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THE 



NEW ZEALAND 

OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOK 



1 9 O '^ . 



ei_e:ve:nth vear of issue. 



PBEPAKBD UHTJEH INBTHUCTION8 FROM THE 

Right Honourable R. J. SED])ON, P.C., 

FREMIDR. 



E. J. VON DADELSZEN, 

BBOISTBAB-OBHBBAL^ 







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■ 1 r. ■■ 



WELLINGTON. N.Z. 

B? AUTHORITY : JOHN MACKAY, (iOVEKNMKNT PKINTKR. 

LONDON: RTBE AND aPOTTIaWOODE, ^LEET BTBKET. K.C. 

1903, 




0000 



384599 

FEB 10 19-/ 



D. of ^- 



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PREFACE. 



The eleventh isBue of the New Zealand Official Year-book is pre- 
sented. 

Part II. has been enlargedrAnd a large amount of information 
taken from the compiled i:esults of^the Census of 1901 is introduced. 
Section I. deals with manufactories and works, including the great 
primary industries of the colony, such as meat-freessing establish- 
ments and dairy factories. 

Short descriptiona of the South Pacific islands lying within the 
boundaries of annexation will be found in Fart III. 

The system of publishing portions of the book in pamphlets as 
■* Advance Sheets " has been continued, for the purpose of supplying 
mformation early, in small quantities at a time. 

. E. J. VON DADELSZEN. 

Begistrar- General's Office, 

Wellington, N.Z., 26th August, 1902. 



CONTENTS. 



PaBT 1. — iNTBODCCTOBY : OFFICIAL. 



Hew Zealand 

Successive Govurootb 

Supreme Court Judges, Put and Ptesenl 

Executive Cooncils, 1813-56 

Parliaments 

Suocesaive Ministries 

PtemierB 

Speakers of the Legislative Oonnoil 

Speakers of the House of Representatives 

Foreign Consuls 

Agent-General for Now i^ealaud in Iioudoi 

The Colonial Office 

Crown Agents for the Cnlouicb 

Honours held by Colonists 

Governor of New Zealand 

Executive Council, May, 1902 

The General Assembly . . 

Official List 

Eoclesiaetical 

Defences, Military and Naval 

Depots for Shipwrecked Mariners 

C4i-aving Docks and Patent Slips . . 

Harbours, Port Charges, Sm. 

Lighthouses 

Annual Pensions 

New Zealand Newspapers 

The Customs TatiS of New Zealand 

Fees payable under Land Transfer Act 



30 
21 

as 
as 

25 
36 

36 
36 
26 
•^ 
38 
28 
29 
■dO 
30 
31 
36 
68 
d6 
58 
50 
63 
72 
74 
76 
83 
99 



Part II.— Statibticai-. 

Section I. Manufactories and Works .. 

II. Imports: Customs and Excise Revenue 

III. Exports, and Total Trade . . 

IV, Population 
V. Religion . . 

VI. Birtoplaoe 

VII. Conjugal Condition of the People 
VIII. Ages: Minors, Adults, and Old People 
IX. Education of the People 
X. Sickness and Infirmity 
XL Meteorology 
XII. The Maoris 
XIII. Law and Grime 
XiV. Local Ooveming Bodies 
XV. Licensee and Licensed Houses, &c. 
XVI. Representation, and the General Eleotion of 1899 
XVII. Ooonpatlon of Land ; and Live Stook 
. XVin. Vital SUtistioa 
XIX. Agriculture 
XX. Mining . ■ 
XXI. Aoenmolation : Prices and Wages .. 



101 

161 
177 
306 
334 

3se 

381 

287 
340 
261 
367 
373 
376 
390 
316 
319 
331 
386 
876 
S8T 



CONTENTS. 



Pabt 1. — Intboductobx : Oj'FICUL. 



New !(j«&lRod 

Sacceaaive Goveraoiti 

Supreme Court Judges, Paot and Preaent 

Executive Counoila, 1843-56 

Parli&metitB 

SuooesBive MiniBtiies 

PiemietB 

Speakers of the Legislative Connoil 

SpeakeiB of the House of RepreaentattveB 

Foreign Consuls 

Agent-General for Now Zvalaud in Liuudoi 

The Colonial Office 

CiowD Agenta for the Cnlouico 

Honours held by ColoniytB 

Governor of New Zealand 

Executive Council, May, 1902 

The General Assembly . . 

Official List 

Ecolesiaetical 

Defences, Military and Navai 

Dapota for Shipntecked Marinerh 

Gloving Docks and Patent Slips . . 

Harbours, Port Charges, &c. 

Lighthouses 

Annual PeusioDH 

New Zealand Nenspapetti 

The Customs TatiS of New Zealand 

Pees payable under Land Transfer Aot 



1 

30 
21 
22 
38 
26 
36 
96 
'26 
36 
■2R 
28 
3H 

ai 

:jO 
30 
31 
36 
58 
56 
58 
59 
68 
72 
74 
76 
BS 
1» 



PaBT II.— STATIBnCAL. 

Section I. Manufactories and Works .. 

II. Imports: Customs and Excise Revenue 
III. Exports, and Total Trade . . 
TV. Population 
V, Religion . . 
VI. Birthplace 

VII. Conjugal Condition of the People 
VIII. Ages : Minors, Adulta, and Old People 
IX, Education of the People . . 
X. SiokneHs and Infirmity 
XL Meteorology 

XII. The Maoris 

XIII. Law and Grime 
.XIV. Ex>oal Oovemicg Bodies 
XV. Lioensee and Licensed HouGes, Ac. . . 
.\'VI. Representation, and the General Election of 
XVII. Occupation of Land ; and Live Stock 
. .KVin. Vital StatlHtioa 
XIX. Agriculture 
XX. Mining . . 
XXT. Aooninnlation : Pnoes and Wages .. 



1699 



101 
ISl 
177 
206 
324 
9S8 
281 
3S7 
340 
261 
267 
372 
276 
290 
316 
319 
321 
385 
876 
887 
-396 



VI 



CONTENTS. 



Seotion XXII. Traneport And Communioation .. ,. 496 

. XXIII. Govetiiment Valuation of Land and iU iiaprovemenu 434 

XXIV. Crown Lands . . . . . . . . . . 44 1 

XXV. Land for Setllements . . . . 447 

. XXVI. Pinanoo— 

Sobseotion A. — fievenue and Ezpenclitnxo of tha 

Qaoeral Oovernment . . 463 

B.— Taxation .. .. 466 

C— Pnblio Debt . . . . 469 

Supplementarr : The Assets Realisation Board . . 488 

MiBcellaneoQB Statistios . . . . . . 484 

Past III.— Abticleb on Spkciai. Suuscts. 

Seottoa T. — 

The Land System of Mew Zealand 490 

Advances to Settlets . . fiOS 

The Land-tax and Inoome-tax . . . , . , six 

The Ooveinment Valuation of Land Aoi 516 

Bating on Unimptovod Value of Land . . . . . . 5X6 

"The Municipal Franchise Reform Act, lUlHj" .. .. 619 

Old-age Feneioos . . . . . . . . 519 

New Zealand Consols . . . . . . 525 

Section II. — 

Agriculture in New Zealand . . . . 538 

Section III.— 

KotoruB District 560 

Te Aroba . - 556 

Hanmer Springe 56B 

The Annexed Paoitic Islands . . . . . . 562 

The Laws of the Cook Islands . . 673 

The Island of Mine . . . . 575 

The Neolithic Maori . . 578 

Part IV. — Descbiption or Land Distbictb. 

Auckland Land Dietcict . . . . . . 68^ 

Taranaki Land District . . . . . . . ■ 590 

Hawke'e Bay Land District . . 598 

Wellington Land District . . . . . . 603 

Marlborough Land District . . ■ ■ . . . . 612 

Nelson Land District .. ■■ ■- -. 617 

Westland Land District.. .. .. 622 

Canterbury Land District . - . . 627 

Otago Land District . . 637 

Southland Land District . . . . . . 647 

APPSNDIX. 

Dates of certain Principal Events in the History of New Zealand . . 651 



Oenerat Index . . > ■ 665 

Syoopels of Statistics, showing Progress of Colony, 1640-1901 (two 

tables) • • • . BroadthMt. 



Map, Diagbaus, aitu Illustbatiohb. 



THE 



NEW ZEALAND 

OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOK 

1902. 



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NEW ZEALAND OFFIClAlv. YEAR-BOOR, 

1902. 



PART I.— INTRODUCTORY: OFFICIAL. 



NEW ZEALAND. 

The Colony of New Zealand consiats of three main islands, with 
several groups of smaller islands lying at some distance from the 
principal group. The main islands, known as the North, the 
Middle, and Stewart Islands, have a coast-line 4,330 miles in 
length— North Island, 2,200 miles; Middle Island, 2,000 miles; 
and Stewart Island, 130 miles. Other islands included within the 
colony are the Chatham, Auckland, Campbell, Antipodes, Bounty, 
and Kermadec Islands. The annexation of the Cook or Hervey 
Group and sundry other islands has recently necessitated an enlarge- 
ment of the bouDdaries of the colony, which will be specially treated 
of further on. 

New Zealand is mountainous in many parts, but has, never- 
theless, large plains in both North and Middle Islands. In the 
North Island, which is highly volcanic, is situated the famous- 
Thermal- Springs District, of which a special account will be given. 
The Middle Island is remarkable for Its lofty mountains, with their 
magnificent glaciers, and for the deep sounds or fiords on the western 
coast. ' 

New Zealand is firstly a pastoral, and secondly an a^icultural 
country. Sown grasses are grown almost everywhere, the extent 
of land laid down being more than eleven miUions of acres. The 
soil is admirably adapted for receiving these grasses, and, after the 
bash has been burnt off, is mostly sown over without previous 
ploughing. In the Middle Island a large area is covered with 
native grasses, all used for grazing purposes. The large extent of 
good grazing-land has made the colony a great wool and meat- 
producing country ; and its agricultural capabilities are, speaking 
generally, fery considerable. The abundance of water and the 
quantity of valuable timber are other natural adTantaf;e8. 
1— Yearbook 



Z »W ZKALMtO OmaAM. TKAK-aOOK. 

Sfw y^adsuA is, l>>«M««, s miniiig coustnr. I^ree •iepoEiis of 
VjhX «f^ r/.<;t with, nii'uAy <»i the w«st eotut <rf the Uiddle r«J»i>^ 
Ool/l, «l)uviiJ ftfid ill iiMnz. is Ecoiyi in both islands, ibe rield 
iMviuii tM:*:u ovtit tliy-niuH coiliioDS iteriiiig in raJae to tbe'pre- 
ii«rit iim*:. Full KtAtiitticaL igfotniation od this sabject is given 
further on, cornptWl up t<&-^. latest (Ut«s. 

'Hi'; fimt ^utHittitie accoaot of the rliscoren- of New Zealand is 
thai f{iv<;;i.by'^U:l Jansen Tasman, the Datch Darigator. He left 
J^atavwi-.f^rj*. the I4th August, 1642, in the yacht " Heemsldrk." 
m-Miij\pi^iii'A hy the "Ztmhtutn" for " Sea-hen "> fly-boat. Afto- 
.hayiug' Viiiit«i'l Mauritius, and discovered Tasmaoia. nanied by 
fiU'n " Van DiHuuin'H Ijand," in honour of Anthony van Diemen, 
(iovitrnor of thu Dutch possessions in the East Indies, he steered 
oasLward, and on the 13th December of the same year sighted the 
went cfjaMt of the Middle Island of New Zealand, described by him 
ftd " a hi({b mountainous country, which is at present marked in 
tho clmrtH as New Zealand," 

Tasrnan, under the belief that the land he saw belonged to a 
groat [>olar continent, and was part of the country discovered some 

Soars bfiforo by Hchouten and Le Maire, to which the name of 
taaton Land had been given, gave the same name of Staaten 
Ijund to New Zealand; but within about three months afterwards 
Bohouteii's " Btaaton Land" was found to be merely an inconsider- 
able island. Upon this discovery being announced, the country 
that Tasriian ha<l called Btaaten Land received again the name 
of " New Zualand," by which it has ever since been known. Tasman 
uailud ivlong the coast to a bay, where he anchored. To this he 
Kavu thi) name of Murderers (now Massacre) Bay, on account of 
an iniprovokud attack on a boat's crew by the natives, and the 
iniiHHiitiru of four white men. Thence he steered along the' west 
coast of tlio North Island, and gave the name of Cape Maria van 
Diiiiiinri lu thn iiorCh-wostern extremity thereof. After sighting 
tlio iHlaiids of tho Three Kings ho finally departed, not having set 
foot in tilt) country. 

'riiorii in no rucord of any visit to New Zealand after Taaman's 
dopuvtiu'ii until tho time of Captain Cook, who, after leafing the 
Ho<Mi<ty Ulands, sailed in search of a southern continent then 
htilinvod to oxist. Ho sighted land on the 6th October, 1769, ai 
YoUMK Nii'k's Hoad, and on the 8th of that month cast anchor in 
I'ovorty Hay. Aftt>r lift ving coasted round the North Island and the 
Middlti and Stownrt Islands — which last he mistook for part of the 
Midillo Ulaiul ~lut ti.K>k his departure from Cape Farewell on the 
J*Ut Maroh. 1770, for Australia. He visited New Zealand again in 
1778. in 1774. and in 1777. 

M. d»* SurvilU', a French officer in command of the vessel "Saint 
i»M\ Mapti»t»\" whilo on a voyage of discovery, sights the north- 
i>a«l o\m8t of New Zealand on the 12th December, 1769, and re* 



COLONISATION. 



uiainod (or a aiiort. lime. A viiiit vraa booh afttsr paid by another 
French officer, M. Marion du Freane, who arrived on the wQBt coast 
of the NorUi Island of Nl>w Ztvaland on ihe 24th Murch. 1772, but 
was, on the 12th June following, treacherously iiiunlered at the Bay 
of Islands by the Natives. 

In 1793 the "Dwdalus," under the command of Lieutenant 
Hanson, was sent by the Government of New South Wales to New 
Zealand, and two chiefs were takt-n thence to Norfolk Island. 
There was after this an occasional iutercourse betweeu the islands 
of New Zealand and the English settlements in New Bouth 
Walfts. 

Id 1614 the hnt missionaries arrived in New Zealand — Messrs. 
Hall and Kendall — who had been sent as foremntiers by Mr. 
Marsden, chaplain to the New South Wales Oovernnient. After 
& short stay they returned to New South Wales, and on the 19t.h 
November of that year again embEu-ked in company with Mr. 
Marsden, who preached his first sennon in New Zealand on Christ- 
mas Day, 1814. He returned to Sydney on the 2drd March, 1816, 
leaving Messrs. Hall and Kendall, who formed the firsi mission 
station at Rangihoua, Bay of Islands, under the auspitiGs of the 
Church Missionary Society. Six years later, in 1H21, th^i work of 
evangelization was put on a more durable hasis ; hut the tirst station 
of the Wesluyan mission, established by Mr. Lei^'h and his wife, at 
the valley of the Kaen, Whani^aroa, was not taken possession of' 
untilthe 10th June, lS-23, 

COLONISATIOH. 

The first attempt at colonisation was rnnde in 1825 by a com- 
pany formed in London. An expedition was sent out onder the 
command of Capiiain Herd, who bought two islands in the Hauraki 
Gulf and a strip of land at Hokianga. The att<?inpt, however, 
was a failure, owing to iho savage character of tha inhabitants. 
In consequence of frequ<?nt visits of whaling- vessels to the Bay 
of Islands, a settlement grew up at Kororareka — now called 
Bussell — and in 1833 Mr, Busby was appointed British Resident 
there. A number of Europeans — generally men of low character — 
gradually settled in different parts of the country, and married 
Native women. 

In 1838 a colonisation company, kuown as llie New Zealand 
Company, was formed to estabUsh settlement ou systematic prin- 
ciples. A preliminary expedition, under the command of Colonel 
William Wakefield, was despatched Iroui England on the 12th May, 
1S39. and arrived in Now Zealand in the following j\uuust. Having 
purchased land from the Natives, Colonel Wakefield selected the 
shore of Port Nicholson, in Cook Strait, aa the site of the first setllo- 
ment'. On the 32nd January, 1840. the first body of immigrants 
arrived, and founded the town of Wellington. About the same time 
— namely, on the 29th January, 1840 — Captain Hobson, R.N., 
■arhvod at the Bay of Islands, empowered, with the consent of thu 



I 

I 



I 



I 
I 



NBW EBALAMD OmOUL TBAB-BOOK. 

Natives, to proclaim the Bovereiguty of Queen Victoria over the 
JBlands of Now ZeaLaud, and to assume the government tliortjof. A 
ooiupa.ct called " The Treaty of Waitaiigi," to which in lose tiiaii six 
moiilliB fivo hundred and twolva names were adixcd, was eniered 
into, whortiby all riyhls and p(jWGra of sovereignty wora ceded to the 
Queen, aXl territorial rights being accurw) to the chiefi and their 
tribes. New Zealand was then constitute^] a dependency of the 
Colony of New South Wales, hut on the fird May, 1841, waa pro- 
ctaiiiicd a separate colony. Th« seax oi Governniont had been 
previously estal'liRhed ftt Wait«ii)ata (Auckland), round which a 
K(!ttk-uibul wa» fanned. 

Thv New Zeaiaml CompAuy hnving decided to form another 
Ketlleinent, to winch the name of " Nelson " wan to be given, de- 
spatclmd a preliminary expedition from Knglaiul in April, 1641, for 
the purpose of selectioi^ a site. The spot chosen was the head of 
Bhnd bay. whore a sottleniCDt was estabhshed. About the sanio 
liiuf' a nuinb'Gr of pioneers arrived in Taranaki, despatched thithc-r 
by the New Pivniouth Company, a colonising society which had 
been fonnod in ^nf^land, and bau bought 20,000 acres of land from 
the Ngw Zealand Company. 

The next ini]ioruitit event in the progress of colonisation was the 
arrival at I'ort ('haltnem. on the 23rd March, 1H4H, of the tir&t of 
two emigrant ship« sent out by the Otago Asuocialion for the 
(ounrlaiiou of a flettlement hy persona belonging to or in sympathy 
with the Free Church of Scotland. 

In 1649 the ■' Ca,nterbury A^ftociatlon for founding a Beltlement 
in Npw Zealand" was incorporated. On the 16th Dticeniber, 1860, 
fche Grttt eitiigraut sliip des[vatcli«d by th« association arrived at Port 
Cooper, and the work of opening up the itdjoininy country was set 
about in a systematic fasliion, the intention of the promoters being 
to establish a settlement complete in itt^elf, and composed entirely 
of members of the then United Cliurcli of England and Ireland. 

The Maoris. 

Prior to tha coloniKfttion of New Zealand by Europeans, the 
eftrliest navigators and explorers found a race of people already 
inhabiting both islands. Papers written in 1B74 by Mr. Rafter- 
wards Sir) WilJiiiui Fox. and Sir Donald McLean, then Native 
Minister, stale that at what time the discovery of the&e islands was 
made by the Maoris, or from what place they came, are matters 
of tradition only, and that much has been lost in the obscurity 
enveloping the history of a people without letters. Nor is there 
anything on record respecting the origin of the Maori people them- 
Helves, beyond tho general tradition of the Polynesian race, which 
seems to show a scrioa of successive migrations from west to east, 

Erobably hy way of Malaysia to tlie Pacific. Little more can now 
B gathered from their traditions than that they were innnigrants, 
and that they probably found inhabitants on the east coast of the 
North Island belonging to the same race as themselves — the deseend- 





ants o( a prior migration, whose history is lost. The tradition niaa 
that, generations a^o, tho Maoris dwelt in a country named Hawaiki, 
and that one of their chiefs, after a long voyage, reitched tho ttorthern 
island of New Zealand. Boturning to his homo with a Qattering 
description of the coantry Ho hod discovortyl, this chief, it is said, 
porsuad<Ni a number of nis kinafolk and friends, who wore much 
harassed by war, to sot out with a fleet of double canoes for the 
nnw land. Tho names of most of the canoes aro et^ill rcmctn- 
l«rcd, and each tribe, agrees in its account of tha doings of the 
people of tho principal otmoes after their arrival in New Zealand ; 
and from these trailitional accounts the descent of the nuinerons 
tribes has been trac«il. Calculations, based on the genealogical 
stares kept by tbn tokti.»gas, or priests, and on the well -authenticated 
traditions of the people, indicate that about twenty-one Renerations 
have pa8«od since ttiu uii^'rutiou, which mav therefore be assumed 
to have lakon placu about live humJred and tweuty-tivu yoars ago. 
The positiuQ of the legendary Hawaiki is uaknowii, but many ptacea 
in the South Seas have been thua tiamed in memory of the muther- 
laud. The Maoris apeak a very pure dialect of the Palynesian 
language, the cominon tongue, with more or less variauon, in all the 
Eastern Foci&c Islands. When Captain Cook first visited New 
Zealani] ho availed himself of tho services of a native from Tahiti, 
whose speech was cosily undorstoofl by the MiLoris. In this way 
much informatiou rempeicting the early history of the country 
and its inhabitants was obtained which coiild not have othcrwiao 
been had. 

For results of recent researcheii as to probable origin and present 
numbarBof the Maoris, see Year-book for 1901. 

BOUNDAIUES AND AhEA. 

The Proclamation of Oaptaiu Hobsou on the 30lh January. 1840, 
gave as the boundaries of the colony the following degrees of lati- 
tude and longitufle: On the north. 34" SO' 8. lat. ; on the »uuth, 
47° 10' S. lat. ; on the east, 179^ 0' K. long. ; on the west, 166" 5' E. 
long. These limits excluded small portions of the extreme north of 
the North Island and of the extreme south of Stewart Island. 

In April, 184'2, by Royal Letters Patent, and again by the 
Lnperial Act 26 and 27 Vict., c. '2S (18G3). the boundaries of the 
colony wtre altered so as to extend from 33° to 63^ of south lati- 
tude and from 163° of ea«t longitude to 173° of west longitude. 
By Proclaination bearing date the 'ilat July, 1887. the Kermadec 
Islands, lying between the 39th and .S'2nd degrees of south lati- 
tude and the Hith and ISOth degrees of wei^t longitude*, were 
declared to be annexed to and to become part of the Colony of New 
Zealand. 

By Proclamation bearing date the 10th June. 1901, the Cook 
Group of islands, and all the other islands and cerritories situate 
withiQ tho bouudory-hues nieutionod in Ihe following Schedule, were 
included in the Colony of New Zealand : — 




A liBO commciieinfC Ki a point »i tha IntarMOlioii of ihc (wsntT-third Stgna 
of MQbb Ift'-ituda uid ibc oneltaDdied-ADdfifcy-Btzih dsgrcfl of loDgituAe v»t at 
Qreennieb, and pK^cA^ding due north lo tha point ol int«nwoiion 1 1 ihe «)ghtb 
de|r>«of noDtb latitude and the one-hundted-and-flftyiixU) dcsroc of longluid* 
weat of Greendlcb ; tb*noa due wait U> the point of intarveoiion of th* •igbtb 
decree of Roatb ]fttliud« And tb« oDc-hundred-utdnlxi)' terctitb d*grM of 
loi'gilude -nest of Grt«ii«icb ; tbmee dud lOutb lo lb« pnlnl of intcrMOtton of 
tba irevrni««n(b dfgre* of Bo^uth lacitude and tbs OD«>hDDdrcd-«nd-aixiv-MveDtlx 
dcgrfc of lorRilude west of GrreDwicb ; thcBCO du« wcgl lo tb« point of inier- 
seciion rf ihe iievcntcetilh Aegne cl «autb tkiltudB and the onF-hiindr^d-aDd- 
aenculieih dtgitt of longitude *e»l of Qre«nwiob : thtDc'e due loulh to Iho point 
of ■nti'riectioD of ttie lwcrtir*thiid d«igr«« of «out)i laotude and ibe one*tiuuorcd- 
uid-8Dvintis<ib drgrep ol ioogituuo wtst of OtocDnich; luid tbeo'co due taeC to 
ebc point of intemcoclon of the twentj tbitd dtgreo of toutb Iktitoda ftnd the 
one-bundted-ard-flfLjr-siitb dcftiee of Icugilude west of Oteeniricb. 

The followiiiK DOW constitute Ihc Colouy o( Now ZoaJaud : — 

1. Tho island coiniiioi)ly known an the North Island, witli its 
adjacent islets, having an a(<grugatQ area of 44,4:68 eijtiare miles, or 
28,459.520 acres. 

2. The island known as the Ddiddle Island, with adjacent islets, 
having an aggregate area of 58,525 square miles, or 37,456.000 acres. 

3. Btcwafb latnnd, and adjacent islets, having an area of 665 
Bqaare niil&s. or 425,390 acres. 

4. The Chathftm Islands, situate 636 miles eastward of Lyttel- 
ton in the Middle Island, with an area of 375 square miles, or 
239.920 acres. 

5. The Auckland Islands, about 200 miles south of Stewart Island, 
extending about 30 miles from north to south, and nearly 15 from 
east to west, the area being 210,650 acres. 

G. The Campbell Islands, in latitude Qi'' 33' south, and loo^tude 
169" 8' west, about 30 miles in circumference, with an area of 45,4iO 
acres. 

7. The Autipodcs Isiaudii, about 458 miles in a south-easterly 
directtou from Fort Chalmers, in t)t(} Middle Island. These aro 
detached rocky islaiulK, and extend over a distance of between i 
and fi miles from north to soutli. Area, 12,960 acres. 

8. The Bounty iKlands, a b>iiiall grnup of islets, thirteen in num- 
ber, lying north of tho Antipodes Islnnds, and aliout 415 miled in 
an east-aouth-eaaterly direction from Port Chalmers. Area, 3,3(X) 
acres. 

9. The Kermadec Islands, a group lying about 614 miles to the 
north-east of Russell, in the Bay of iRlands, ErouI or Sunday 
Island, the largest of these, is about 20 milea in circuit. The next 
in size is Maeaulay Island, about 3 miles round. Area of tho groups 
8,208 acres. 

10. Islands forming the Cook Group: — 

Raroftmfra.— DiHtanoe from Auckliuid, 1,6S9 miloB : oircumfereDOC, 

SOmilee; height, U.'J-iOlt. 
Uangaia. — D sianM irom ItatotongB, IIC mileB; ciroumfartmca, 

80 milei; beighl, 666 il. 
.^flu.— DlHMDca from Ruotonsa, 116 milei : oiroDmfeienoe, SO milui 

boigtit, 374 ft. 





AREA OP COUUOKWBALTH STATER OF AURTRAt.tA. 7 

AUutaki. — DisUnc« tnm IWatoDga, 140 miles; oiroumferan«i), 

I'imllB*: height, .160 (t. 
ilault«. — DmtAUoe tram Rirotorigk, IIU) milm ; alicnmtaroQM, S mflH 

beigfal. R-faoot GO t(. 
JfitMro. — DiHisseo from PKrotonga, X^OnaileB; oircuml«renG«, 5 miles; 

baigbc, ftboDt 50 ft : kIbo, 
TaJcttfM — D'lunt from RaTOtoKgk, 135 milii. 
Tht RtiTteyt (Mantiae And JduImJ.— Diitent from KuolOD^t, 130 mtloi. 

Total area of above f,'roup, IdO square miles. 
11. islands ouUide Cook Group: — 

Hiut — DittAoee from R«totongA. fiSO milea; ciroutn(6Tenee, lOmilea; 

bright, KlOlt. ; nro*, nboiit 100 Mqimrs rnils*. 
Pahitenton.~h\tlwK^ (toin R«iot<;a^ii, 2T:J niilos; bd iktoll, 4 mllM 

by 2 mile*. 
Ptnrhyn. at Ton^artva.—'DMXAQtt 736 milea from lUrotODgft ; Ao kMLI, 

I'J miloa \>y 7 m'loi. 
Hur/ipAr^f/, or -trana'^iArt.— Dietanoc from RAroUDga, 650 milai; aa 

kboll, 6 miteii by A miUe. 
Bitrt^n, or i?aA'iwi>tifa. — DiatuLce from Barolougft, G70 raitea; an atoll, 

SrailM bv 3 milwt. 
Danger, or /'iiAffprilca.— DiitttQCo from Ruolooga, 700 milo*; an atoll, 

3 milea by 'A milea. 
SiitFurrvu).— DiatBDue from Ruotongft, G30 inilei; an atoll. 

Total area of oatside inlands. 130 square mites- 
Total ar<ea of New Zeaiatid extended, ^^0 eqiiare miles. 
The total area of tli*; colouy is tims about 104,751 square iiiilee, 
of which iho agi^re^ate ai-ea of the outlying groups of isltuids ttiak 
ate practically ueoluss for settlGrnent aiiiounls to about 408 a[|tiare 
miles. 



Arta of the Commonwealth States of Auxpralia. 

The areas of the severo.! Australian States, as given by different 
authorities, vary cousiiienibly. The total area of the Australian 
Continent is given as 2,944.026 squaro miles, according to a. com- 
putation uiodo by the late Surveyor-General of Victoria, Mc. J. A. 
Skene, Iroai a map of Continental AustraUa couipilcil and engraved 
under his direction; but lh» following areas are token frotn the 
latest ofQcial recoriU of eacli colony : — 

Square Mllea. 
Q'leetial&Dd .. .. .. .. €68.-197 

Now Soiilh WbJm .. .. .. .. 310.700 



Victotitt 
Soutb Auatralia 
W«ateni Aiutmlia 

Total, Continent of Anatratia 

Tnvmonia 



87,8m 

908.690 
«75.9a0 



a.346,691 
itG.Slfi 



Total, CommoDvtaUh of AuatraliA . . 2,979,906 

The sixe of theee States (with New Zealand) may be better realised 
by companion of their areas with those of European countries. 
The areas of the following countries — Austria-Hungary, Germatiy, 



8 RBW SBAIiAWD OPFIOUJj TBAR-BOOK. 

Prance, Belgium, Hollaod, Denmark, Sweden and Norway, Portu- 
gal, Spain, Italy (including Sardinia and Sicily), Switzerland, Greece, 
Roumania, Bulgaria, Servia, Eastern Roumelia, and Turkey in 
Europe — containing on the whole rather leaa than 1,600,000 square 
miles, amount to little more than half the extent of the Australian 
Continent. If the area of Russia in Europe be added to those of 
the other countries the total would be aoout one-seventh larger 
than the Australian Continent, and about one-twelfth larger than 
the Australian States, with New Zealand. 

Area of the Colony of New Zealand. 

The area of the Colony of New Zealand is about one-seventh 
less than the area of Qreat Britain and Ireland, the Middle Island 
of New Zealand being a little larger than the combined areas of Eng- 
land and Wales. 



Unttad Kingdom. 

England and Wolsi 

Scotland 

Ireland 


Area In 
Square lUlt 
58,811 
30,463 
33,531 


Total .. 

Now Zealand. 

North Island . . 
Middle Island . . 
Stewart Island .. 
Cliatham Islands 
Otiier islands 


121,806 

Area In 
Square Mil 

44,468 

58,525 

666 

375 

718 



Tolal . . . . . . 104,751 

Phtsioal Fbaturbb of thb North Island. 

The North Island extends over a little more than seven degrees 
of latitude — a distance in a direct line from north to south of 430 
geographical or 498 statute miles ; but, as the northern portion of 
the colony, which covers more than three degrees of latitude, 
trends to the westward, the distance in a straight line from the 
North Cape to Cape Palliser, the extreme northerly and southerly 
points of the island, is about 516 statute miles. 

This island is, as a whole, hilly, and, in parts, mountainous in 
character, but there are large areas of plain or comparatively level 
country that are, or by clearing may be made, available for agricul- 
tural purposes. Of these, the principal are the plains in Hawke's 
Bay on the East Coast, the Wairarapa Plain in the Wellington 
District, and a strip of country along the West Coast, about 250 
miles in length, extending from a point about thirty miles from the 
City of Wellington to a little north of New Plymouth. The largest 
plain in the North Island, Kaingaroa, extends from the shore of 
Lake Taupo in a north-north-easterly direction to the sea-coast in 



PBYSlOAIi FSATUaCB CV TAB NORTH IMiAHO. 



th« Bay of plenty ; but ft groal part of it is covered vriih puQii<:a- 
sand, and is unliu«(l for tillage or poiiture. TUere ara iwrerul smaller 
plains and numerous valleys suitable for agriculture. The lerel or 
undulntmf^ country in tbis island fit, or capable of beiuf; made 
fit, for agriculture has been ronglily estimated at 13.(KK),000 
aci-e&. This iDcia>^es lands now covered with standing forest, and 
swamps ihat can be drained : also large areas of clay-marl aud 
pumice -coverod land. The clay-marl in its natural stato is oold 
and uninriting to tho fanner, bat under proper dmina^e and culti- 
vation it can be brouKht to a high state of productivoneds. This 
kind of land is geoenilv ueelecled at the proeent time, as aettlers 
matar soils more rapidly remunerative and less costly to work. 
The larger portion of the North Island was originally covered 
wilb forest. Although xhe aroa of bash-land is still very great, 
yel ^ear by year the amount is being reducnd, chiefly to meet 
the rm^nirements of settlement, the trees being cut down and btrmt, 
and grass-seed sown on the ashes to create pasture, Hilly as the 
country is, yet from the nature of the climate it is especially suited 
for the growth of English grasses, which will flourish wlicrerer 
tiiere is any soil, however steep the land may be ; onc« laid down 
in grus very little of ihe land is too poor to supply food for cattle 
and ihcop. The Area of U.d<1 in the North Island deemed purely 
pastoral or capable of being made so, while too steep for agricat- 
tural purposes, is estimated at 1-1.'200,000 acres. In the centre of 
the island is a lake, about twenty mites across eitbt^r way, called 
Taupo. A large area adjacemt to the lake is at present worthless 
PQimce-country. The Waikato Bivor, tho largest in tho North 
Islaud. Hows out of thu uonh-castvrn coriim- of this lake, and runs 
Umuce north-westward until it enters the ocean a little ilistanco 
south of the Maaukau Harbour. Tliis river is navigable for Bmall 
vteamorii for about a hundred miles from iis moutli. The Maori 
King -country, occupied by Natives who for several yeara isolated 
themselves from Europeans, ties between Lake Taapo and the 
western coast. The EUver Thames, or Waihon, having its sources 
oorth o( Lake Taupo, flows northward into the Firth of Thames. 
It is navigable for about fifty miles, but only for small stoamen. 
The other navigable rivers in this island are uie Wairoa (Koapara), 
the Wanganui, and the Manawatu, the two last of which flow 
towards the &outh-wcftt into Cook Strait. 

The mountains in the North Island are estimaie<1 to occupy 
about one-tenth of the surface, and do not exceed 4,tMX)ft. in 
height, with the exception of a few volcanic mountains that are more 
lofty. Of th«'fi«, the three fotlowmg are the moHt important: — 

1. The Tongariro Mountain, situated to the iwuthward of Lake 
Taupo. It conflicts of a group of distinct volcanic couea, the 
laTa-«t returns Iroiii which have so overlappetl m their descent as 
to (onu ont* euinpact mountain -mass at the base. The highest of 
tiiusu cones U called Ngaurulioe, and attain)* an elevatiou of 
7,5i5f t. The craters of Ngauruhoe, the lied Crater ((>.140it.), and Te 



KSW SKALAND OmOIAL TCAS-BOOI. 



I 



Man (4,990ft.) are the three venla from which the lat«Ht discharges' 
of lAVft have taken place, the most recent haviiift occurred in 1868. 
These craters are still active, steam aud vapour issuing from them 
with considerable force aud noise, tbo vapours, char>{ed with puugent 
gases and acids, making it dangurouu to approach too near the 
ctatcr-lips. 

'2. Kuapoliu. This mountain lies to the south of Ngauruhoe and 
Tongtu-iro. It is a volcanic cone in thu »olfatara stage, aud reaches 
the height of 9,006ft.. being in part considerablv above the liue of 
perpetual unow. The most reinarkftble feature of this mountain is 
tlie crater-Lake on ite summit, which is subject to sHglit and inter- 
loittent eruptions, giving rise to vase quantities of Bteam. RecenUj 
—in March. 1895 — such an eruption look place, forming a few hot 
springB on the inarfjiii of the ln.kc, and increasing tlie heal in the lake 
itself. This take lies at the bottom of a funncl-ahapcd crater, thfr 
steep aides of which are mantled with ice and snow. The water occu- 
pies a circulai- bastn about 600ft. in diameter, some 300ft. below thft 
oncloaiDg peaks, and i<i quite inaccenaible except by the use of ropes. 
This lake, and the three craters previously mentioned on Tonganro, 
are a1) in oneotriught line, which, if produced, would pass through the 
boiling springs at Tokaanu on the soutliern margin of Lake Taiipo, 
the volcanic cotintry noitb-east of tb&t lake, and Whit-e Inland, an 
active volcano in the Bay of Plenty, situated about tweoty-seveo' 
miles from the mainland. 

3. Mount Kginoiit. This ia an extinct volcanic cone, rising 
to a height of H,260rt. The upper part in always covurcd with 
8Q0W. Thitj mountain is situated close to New Plymouth, and is- 
surrouuded by one of the most fertile districts iu New Zealand. 
Bising from the plains in solitary* grandeur, it is an oliject of extreme 
beauty, the cone being one of the most perfect in the world. 

It is estimated that the avea of mountaJn-tops and barren 
country at too high an altitude for sheep, and therefore worthless 
(or pastoral purposes, amounts, in the North Island, to 300,000 acres. 

Without a doubt the hot springs form the most remarkable 
feature of the North Island. Thcv ore found over a large area, ex- 
tending from Tonganro, south of Luke Taupo. to Ohaeawai, in the 
extreme north — a distance of some 300 miles ; but the principal seal 
of hydrothormal action appeara to be in the neighbourhood of Lake 
Rotoruft, about forty miles north -north -east from Lake Taupo. By 
the destruction of the famed Pink and White Terraces and of Lake 
Boiomahana during the eruption of Mount Tarawera on the 10th 
June, 1&86, the neighbourhood has been deprived of attractions- 
unique in character and of nurivallecl beauty ; but the natural 
features of the country — the numerous lakes, geysers, and hoi 
springs, some of which possess remarVable curative properties in 
certain complaints — arc still very attractive to tourists and invalids. 
The world-wide importance of conserving this region as a aanatoriuin- 
for all time has been recoguitied by the Uovcrmucut, and it is now 
dedicated by Act of Farliameob to that purpose. 



I 



4 
4 




PHYSICAL PBATDRKB Or T8B MIDDLE ISLAND. 



11 



* 
» 



NotwitbBtBDdin^ tliu l«ngtli of coast-line, good harWurs in tbo 
North Islaml are uot uumorous. Tliostj ou Iho wygt coast north of 
New I'lytnouth ure bar-ii arbours, unsuitable for lar^v vusxuls. The 
principat harbouni are the Waitemata Hiu'buur. on wbicli Auuklaud 
is situated — this is rather a deep estuary ttian a harbour ; several 
excellent havens iu the northern peninsula ; and Port NicholHon, 
on the borders of which Wellington is situated. Tliis is a land- 
locked hoHraur, about six miles across, having a comparatively 
narrow but deep entrance from the ocean. The water is deep nearly 
throughout. 
^^ The Gape Colviile Peninsula ib rich in gold-bearing quartz. 

H Bixl 
^1 nin 
■ difl 



I 



Cook Stbait. 

' Cook Strait BBparates the North and Middle Islands. It is some 
sixteen miles across at its narrowest part, but in the widest about 
ninety. The strait is invaluable for the purpose of ti-aflic between 
different parts of the colony. 

Physical Fbaturrs ov tke Middle Island. 

The extreme length of the Middlo Island, from Jackson 'a Head, 
in Cook Strait, to Puysegur Point, at the extreme south-west, is about 
525 statute miles ; the greatest distance across at any poin( is in 
Otago (the son them moat) District, about 180 miles. 

The Middle Island is ioterscctod along almost its entire length 
by a range of mouutama knowu as the Souihorn Alps. Soiuo o£ the 
summits roach a height of from lU.OOOft. to 12.000fb., Mount Cook, 
the highest peak, risiu^^ to l^..S49ft. 

lu the south, in the neighbourhood of the sounds and Lake 
Te Anau, there are many magnificent peaks, which, though not of 
great height, are, owing to their latitude, nearly all crowned with 
perpetual ice and snow. Further north the mountains increase ia 
height — Mount Rarnslaw, at Lake Wakaiipu ; and Mount Aspiring, 
which has been aptly termed the New Zealand Matlerhoni. 9,949 ft. 
in height, at Lake Wanaka. Northward of this again are Mount 
Cook (or Aorangi). Mount Scfton, and other magnthcent peaks. 

For beauty and grandeur of scontiry the Southern Alps of Now 
Zealand may worthily compare with, while in point of variety tlicy arc 
said actually to surpass, the Alps of Switzerland. In Nc^w Zealand 
few of the mountains have been scaled ; many of the peaks and moat 
of the glaciers are as yet unnamed ; and there is still, in parts of the 
Middle Island, a fine lield for exploration and discovery — geogra- 
laical, geological, and botanical. The wonders o( the Bouthern Alps 
are only beginning to be known; but the more they are known the 
more they arc appreciated. Tlio snow-lino in New Zealaud being 
so mach lower than in Switzerland, tlie scenery, though the mouu- 
tftins axe not quite so high, is of surpassing grandeur. 

There are extensive glaciers on both sides of the range, tbose 
on the west being of exceptional beauty, as, from the greater abrupt- 



12 



KBVr ZEALAND OFVICIAL YBAH-BOOK. 



nesa of the monD tain-slopes on that side, ehey descend to within 
about 700ft. of the sea-level, and into the midst of the evei^^reen 
forest. The largest glaciers on either side of the range are easily 
accessihle. 

The following gives the sizes of Home of the glaciers on ths 
eastern slope : — 



MAme. 



Arsii 

of OlKcier. 



Langtti 
of Gldcler. 



TaHin&n 
Murchiaon 
God ley 
Mueller 
Hooker 



1 Acreii. 


Mllea ch. 


! 13.GC4 


1» 


, 5,800 


10 70 


i 5,313 


8 


3,200 


B 


2,416 


7 25 



Qiwt«at 


AveraM 


1 WWtli. 


Wldtb. 


MlloM oh. 


HUM flh. 


2 14 


1 Ifi 


1 5 


66 


; 1 65 


1 S 


61 


no 


54 


41 



The Altetsch Glacier in Switzerland, according to Bait, in the 
" Alpine Guide," has an average width of one mile. It is in length 
and width inferior to the Tasman Glacier. 

Numerous sounds or fiords penetrate the south-western coast. 
They are long, narrow, and deep (the depth of water at the apper 
part of Milford Sound is 1,270ft., although at the entrance only 
130ft.), surrounded by giant mountains clothed with foliage- to tm 
snow-line, with waterfalls, glaciers, and snowfields at every turn. 
Some of the mountains rise ahnost precipitously from the water's 
edge to 6,000ft. and 6,000ft. above the «ea. Near Milford, the 
finest of these sounds, is the great Sutherland Waterfall, 1,904ft. 
high. 

The general surface of the northern portion of the Middle Island, 
comprising the Provincial Districts of Nelson and Marlborough, is 
mountainous, but the greater part is suitable for grazing purposes. 
There are some fine valleys and small plains suitable for agriculture, 
of which the Wairau Valley or Plain is the largest. Deep sounds, 
extending for many miles, break the coast-line abutting on Cook 
Strait. The City of Nelson is situated at the head of Bliud Bay, 
wliich has a depth inwards from Cook Strait of about forty statute 
miles. 

The Provincial District of Canterbury lies to the south of the 
Marlborough District, and on the eastern side of the island. To- 
wards the north the land is undulating ; then there is a stretch of 
almost perfectly level country extending towards the south-nest 
ItiO miles, after which, on the south, the country is undulating as 
far as the borders of tlie Otago District. On tlie east a block of 
hill-country rises abruptly from the plain and extends for some miles 
seaward. This is Banks Peninsula, containing several good harbours, 
the principal being Fort Cooper, on the north, on which is situated 
Lyttelton, the chief port of the district : the harbour of Akaroa, 
one of the finest in the colony, is on the southern coast of this 
peninsula. 



8TKWAKT ISLAND. 



i3 



The District of Olago is, on the whol«, iivounUbitiouii, but hsA 
many tine [liaiiiB luid vidluvb eiiiuible for Lill&gu. Tbe mouDtait 
except towanlB tht? wvst cuast, an guuurally liuetilute of tlmberr' 
aod Buitable for gr&zing slitwp. Tli»ra are guMlielJei o( considorable 
extent in the interior of tliis districl. The iiilani) lakes arc also 
very romarliAble features. Lalte Wakatipu extends over fifcy-four 
miles in longth. bat its gi'eatest width is not more than four miles, 
and its area only 114 square miles. It is 1,070ft. above eea-lcval, 
and has a dtqith varying from 1,170ft. to 1,296ft. To Auau Lake is 
Bomewfaat larger, having an area of 132 square miles. Those lakes 
are bonndod on tbo west by broken, mountainous, and winded, 
country, extendiug to the ocean. 

The chief harbours in Otago are Port ('halmers. at the head of 
rhich Dunedin is situated, and the BlutT Uarbour, at the extreme 

jih. 

The District of Westland. extending along the west coast of the 
Sliddle Island, abreast of Canterbury, is more or less auriferous 
(htoughout. The wegiern slopes of the central raoj^e of uiountaius 
are clothed with forest-trees to the anow-hne; but ou the eastern 
side timber is scarce, natural grasses covering the ground. 

Tfat) riven) iu the Middle Island are for the most part mountain 
torrents, fed by (glaciers in the principal utountain ranges. When 
the snow melts tliey rise in Ucud, fermiiitj, whure not contineti by 
rocky wails, beds of considerable width, geuemlly covered by enor- 
mous deposits of shingle. The largest river in the colony as regards 
Tolume of w&ter is the Clutha. It is IM iinles in length, but is 
only navigable for boats or Ruiall river-steamers for about thirty 
miles. The Eivcrs Buller, Grey, and Hokitika, on the West Coast, 
arc navigable for a short distance from their mouths. They form 
the only ports in the Wetstlatid District. In thoir unimproved stat 
they admitted, owing to the b&rs at thoir mouths, none but vessels of 
Bmall dnxught ; hut, in consequence of the importance of the Grey 
and Buller Ktvers as the sole ports available for the coal-export 
trade, targe harbour-works have been undertaken, resulting in the 
deepening of the beds of thet«e rivers, and giving a depth of (roia 
lyft. to 26tt- of water on the bar. 

The area of level or undulating land in the Middle Island avail- 
able for agriculture is estimated al about 15,000,000 acres. About 
13,000.000 are suitably for pastoral purposes only, or may become 
so when cleared of foreut aud eowu witti grass'seed. The area of 
barren laud and moan tain -tops Ik estimated at about 9.000,000 
fibcres. 

Stbwaht Island 

Foveaux Strait seporotes the Middle from Stewart Islaud. This 
last island has an area of only 425,3130 acres. 

Stewart Island is a great tourist resoit during the summer 
months, and is easily reached by steamer from the 131uff, distant 
about 35 miles. 



u 



NBW ZUALAND OFFIUIU. YEAK-BOOK. 



The priooipal peak b Mount Aaglem, S,200H. above sea-Ievel, 
which h&B ao- extinct crater at Us suaimit. Most of the island is 
rugsed and forest-clad ; the cUiuaio is mild, frost boiny seldom ox- 
perionced; and the soil, when cleared of bush, is fertile. 

The chief attractions ore the numorous bays and fiords. Paterson 
Inlet is a magnificent sheet of water, about ten miles by four miles, 
situaced close to Half-moon Bay, the principal port, where over iwo 
hundred people live. Horse-shoe Bay and Port William are within 
easy reach of Ilalf-moon Bay. Port Pegasna. a land-locked slieet 
of water at>out eight miles by a nnle and a half, is a very fioe 
harbour. At " The Neck " (Faterson Inlot) there is a Native settle- 
meiit of over a hunilred Maoris and half-castes. The bush is 
generally very dense, with tliick under^-rowth, Rata, black-pine, 
white-pine, miro, and totara are the principal timber trees. Fish 
are to be had in great abundance and variety; oysteni foiiu an 
important industry. Wild pigeons, ducks, and inuttou-birds aire 
plentiful. 

The OuTr,TiNO Islands. 

The outlying group of the Chatham Islands, 460 statute miles 
L^Mt-south-east from Wellington, and 536 miles eastward of Lyt- 
rteltOD, consists of two principal islands and several iitnmportant 
Ulets. The largest island containa about 22>-2,490 acres, of which ao 
irregular-sbapcd lake or lajijoon absorbs 40|V)tiU acres. About one 
quarter of the surface of the laud is covered with furesl, the rest 
with fern or ^rasa. The hills nowhere rise to a great height. Pitt 
Island is the next in size ; the area is 15,330 acres. Tlie greater 
portion of both islands is used for grazing sheep. 

The Kkkmajjku Guoui' of islands, four in number, is situated 
Ijetween 29^ 10' and 3^ 30' south latitude, and between 177^ 45' 
and 179^ west longitude. They are named Raoul or Sunday Island, 
Macaulay Island, Curtis Islands, and L'fisperance or French Rook. 
The principal island. Sunday, is 600 miles diBlant from Auckland. 
The islands are volcanic, and in two of them signs of activity ore 
still to bo seen. The rainfall is plentiful, but not excessive. The 
climate is mild and equable, ana slightly warmer than the north 
of New Zealand. The following are ihc areas of the islands and 
islets of the group : Sunday Island, T.200 acres; Herald group of 
iilets, 35 acres; Macautay Island, 7E>4 acres; Curtis Islands, 128 
Acrea and 19 acres; L'Ksperance, 12 acres: total, 8,208 acres- 
Sunday Island is twenty miles in circumference, roughly triangular 
in shape, and at the highest point 1,723ft. alx>ve the sea-level. It 
is rugged and broken over a very larye extent of its surlace, and, 
exc«pt in a few places, coverud witli forest. The soil everywhere 
on the islaud is very rich, beiixg formed by the decompoeicion 
of a dark-coloured pumiceous tuti ami a black andesitic lava, with 
which is closely mixed a hue vegetable uioiild. The great luxuriance 
and richness of the vegelatiou bear wiljiess to ihe excellence of 
the soil, which is everywhere— except where destroyed by eruptionSj 



J 




!Gn 



S Sotith IratittAtif 



ff^aJraA anqa.) 
Rierson L 



ra) Danger 1^ 



% Huinphrey ( 

(Jfan ah' kij 



C Penrhyn I. 
10 



Q Suwarrow I. 



20 



im Palmersfon 



fJViUeJ 
(b Savage 



•^ 



^ 



>v AitutakI 



^* 



i-Hsrvwy I. 



-J^TTT 



Nicholson 



.0— w,^^ 



Rarotonga 



S3 South LaUtu.de 



i— — ■ ^ 



Atiu 



i? 






C: 



Mangaia 



^ 



:o 



170 



rflo' 



COOK AND OTHER PACIFIC ISLANDS. 

Annexed to New Zealand in June, I9QI. 



BounderiES slicwn Ifius, 



THB OUTLVINU I&LA»UH. 



19 



and on tho stoep cliffs — the ea-mc rich loam. Want of water is one 
of the drawbacks. Three of ibe four lakes on the island are freah, 
but so difficult of approach as to bo practically useless. 

The Auckland IdLANoa aro about 290 miles south of Bluff Har- 
bour, their position bring given on tho Admiralty chart as latitude 
50' 31' SO' S.. and lonRitude 1G6^ 19' 12" E. they have several 
good harboni'H. Port Hon?, at the north end of the principal iBland, 
waa described by the eminent French commander, D'Urville, as 
one of the best harbours of refuge in the known world. At the 
eoutheru end of tho island there is a through passage extending 
from the east to the west coast. It has been varioualy named 
AdoniB' Strait and Caruley Harbour, aud foriuo a splendid slieet of 
water. The largest of the islands ia about 27 uitlus long by about 
15 miles broad, and is very mountainous, the hi^hust uiirt being 
about 2.000tt, above the sea. The west coast is bold and pre- 
cipitooB. but the oast coast has eeveral inlets. The wood ou the 
ialand is, owing to the strong prevailing wind, scrubby in charac- 
ter. The New Zealand Government maintains at this island a 
diSp&t of provisions and clothing for the use of shipwrecked 
marinera. 

The Cook Islands, withothora rocootly annexed, are asunder: — 

Rauotonoa (Cook Group) ; A maj^nificcnt island, rising to a 
height of 3,000 ft., clothed to the tops of the mountains with splendid 
vegetation. It has abundant streams, considerable tracts of sloping 
land, and rich alluvial valleys. The two harboui-s are poor. 

Mamoaia, the south -easternmost of the Cook Group, in of 
volcanic origin, and about thirty miles in circumference, The 
proiluciions, which are numerous and cheap, are obtained by 
assiduous labour. 

Atiu (Cook Uroup) resembles Mangaia in appearance and extent. 
It is a mere bank of coral, 10 ft. or 12 ft. high, steep and rugged, 
except where there are small sandy beaches and some clefts, where 
th« ascent is gradual. 

AiTUTAKt (Cook Group) presents a most fruitful appearance, its 
shores being bordered by flat land, ou which ace iunuuierable oocoa- 
oat and other trees, the higher ground being beautifully imorspcrsed 
with lawns. It is eighteen mUca in circuit. 

Mau'KB or Parry Island (Cook Group) is a low island; it is about 
two miles in diameter, well wooded, and inhabited. 

MiTiARO (C^ok Group) is a low island, from three to four miles 
long and one mile wide. 

Hbbvby Islands (Cook Group) : This group consists of three 
islands, surrounded by a reef, which may be six leagues in oircum* 
lerence, 

KiDE, or Savage Island, lying east of the Friendly Islands, is a 
coral island, thirty -six miles in circumference, rising to a height of 
300 ft. It bas the usual tropical productions. 

Palubbston' Island, lying about 500 miles east of Niue and 

It 390 from the nearest island of the Cook Group (Aitutaki), is 



16 MBW SBAItAND OrPICIAI. TBAH-BOOX. 

lem&rkable as the " San Pablo " of Magellan, the first island dis- 
covered in the Soath Sea. It has no harboar. The soil is fairlv 
feriite, and there is some good hardwood timber. 

Penrhtn Island (Tongareva) lies about 300 miles north-east of 
Manahiki. It is one of the most famous pearl islands in the Pacific, 
and there is a splendid harbour, a lagoon with two entrances, tit for 
ships of any size. 

Manahiki, lying about 400 mites eastward of Danger Island, is an 
atoll, about thirty miles in circumference, valuable from the extent 
of the cocoanut groves. The interior lagoon contains a vast deposit 
of pearl-shell. 

Bakaanqa is an atoll, three miles in length and of equal 
breadth. 

Danoeb Island (Pukapuka; " San Bernardo" of the Spaniards'). 
Next to the lOth parallel, out rather north of the latitude of 
the Navigators, and east of them are a number of small atolls. 
Of these, the nearest to the Samoan Group — about 500 miles 
— is Danger Island, bearing north-west of Suwarrow about 250 
miles. The productions are cocoanuts, b^ohe-de-nier, and pearl- 
shell. Tomano-trees (a timber resembling mahogany, are plentiful, 
Bpecimenb having been seen 20 ft. in circumference anci 200 ft. in 
height. From the seeds of this tree is distilled the famous 
" Wootidel oil " of the Pacific. There are several other valuable 
hardwoods. 

SuwAHROW Island has one of the best harbours in the Pacific. 
It lies about 500 miles east of Apia, the capital of the Samoan Group. 
It is a coral atoll, of a triangular form, fifty miles in circumference, 
the reef having an average width of half a mile across, enclosing a 
land-locked lagoon twelve miles by eight. The entrance is half a 
mile wide, and there is accommodation for all the ships in the 
Pacific to ride in safety in all weathers, with depths of from three to 
thirty fathoms. It is out of the track of hurricanes, nninhabited, 
but capable by its fertility of supporting a small population. As a 
depot for the collection of trade from the various islands it ought to 
be very valuable. 

Constitution. 

British sovereignty waa proclaimed over New Zealand in January, 
1840, and the country became a dependency of New South Wales 
until the 3rd May, 1841, when it was made a separate colony. The 
seat of Government was at Auckland, and the Executive included 
the Governor, and three gentlemen holding office as Colonial Secre- 
tary, Attorney-General, and Colonial Treasurer. 

The successors of these gentlemen, appointed in August, 1841, 
May, 1842, and January, 1844, respectively, continued in office until 
the establishment of Responsible Government on the 7th May, 1866. 
Only one of them — Mr. Swainson, the Attorney-General — sat as a 
member of the first General Assembly, opened on the 27th May 




GOVBKMIUNT. 



IT 



1854. Duriag the session of that year there were associated with 
the permaneut members ol the Execuiive Couocil oertaia meiuben 
of the Geoeral Asseinbly. These latter held do porttolios. 

The Goveromeot of the colony was at 6rs; rested in tb« 
Governor, ^ho was responsible only lo the Crowu , but iu 1S&3 
an Act ^rautiuj; represfUitative in^titutious to the colony wiw 
passed by the Imperial Legislature. Under it the constitution of 
a Geoeral Assembly for the whole colony was pronded for, to 
consist of a Iiegislative Council, tlie members of which nvere to be 
nominated by the Governor, and of au elective House of Representa- 
tiTea. The first sesfiion of the General Assetiihly waa opened on the 
37th May, 1854, but the members of the Executire were not resp<»i- 
sible to Parliament. The first Ministers junder a system of Respoo- 
sible Government were appointed on the 18th Apnl, 1856. By the 
Act of 1852 the colony was divided into six provinces, each to be 
pnuided over by an elective Superintendent, and to have an elective 
Provincial Council, empowered lo legislate, except on certain specified 
subjects, l^e franchise aniounied practically to household su£&affe. 
In each case the el(--ctiOD was for four years, but a dissolution of the 
Provincial Council by the Governor could take place at any lime, 
uec«s«itatmt! a fresh election both of the Council and of the Superin- 
tendent. The Superintendent was chosen by the whole body of 
electors of the province ; each member of the Provincial Council 
by the electors of a district. The Provincial Govemmouta, after- 
wards increased to nine, remained as intogr&l ports of the Con- 
stitution of the colony until tliu 1st November, 1676, when they 
were abolislied by an Act of the General Assembly, that body having 
been vested with the power of altering the Constitution Act. On 
the same day an Act of the General ^Vssembly which subdivided the 
ootony (exclusive of the areas inoluded within municipalities) into 
eonnueB. and established a system of local county government, came 

rinto force. 
■ GOVUKKMEKT. 

The Governor is appointed by the Kinc;. His salary is £5,000 
a year, with an ounuoi allowance of £l,oOO on account of his eata- 
tabtmhmeut, and of £500 for iravuliiug-exp«u8ee, provided by the 
colony. 
Meml>erB of the Ijegisiative Council hold their seats under writi 
of summons from the Governor. Till the year 1891 the appoint- 
ments were for life; but in September of that year an .\ct was possecl 
making appointments after that time tenable for seven years only, 
^ough Councillors may be reappointed. In either case seats may 
be vacatod by resignation or extended absence. Two members of 
the Council arc aboriginal native chiefs. 

The members of the House of fiepresentativcs are elcctod for 
three years from the time of each general election ; but at any time 
a d]!«solution of Parliament by the Governor may render a general 
election uecessary. Four of the members are representatives of 

3— Tear book 



IS KEW ZXAI.AIIO OFFICIAIJ TEAB-BOOX. 

NativB conBtitnencies. An Act was passed in 1887 which provided 
thai, on the dissolation of the then Genwal Assembly, the nomber 
of metnberB to be thereafter elected to tbe House of Bepre- 
statativea should be seventy-four in all, of whom four were to be 
elected, under the provisions of the Maori Representation Acts, as 
representatives of Maori electors only. For the purposes of Euro- 
pean representation tbe colony is divided into sixty-two electoral 
districts, four of which — tbe Cities of Auckland, Wellington, Christ- 
church, and Dunedin — return each three members, and all the other 
electorates one each.* Members of the House of Representatives 
are chosen by the votes of the inhabitants in every electoral district 
appointed for that purpose. By "The Members of the House of 
RE^resentatives DisquahUcation Act, 1897," no person, who, being a 
bankrupt within the meaning of "Tbe Bankruptcy Act, 1892," has 
not obtained an order of discharge under that Act shall be qualified 
to be nominated as a candidate for election, or to be elected, or to 
talie his seat as a member of the House of Representatives, anything 
in "The Electoral Act, 1893," or any other Act to the contrary not- 
withstanding. 

In 1889 an amendment of the Representation Act was passed, 
which contained a provision prohibiting any elector from giving his 
vote in res(>ect of more than one electorate at any election. " The 
Electoral Act, 1893," extended to women of both races the right 
to register as electors, and to vote at the elections for members of 
the Hoase of Representatives. The qualification for registration is 
tbe same for both sexes. No person is entitled to be registered on 
more than one electoral roll within the colony. Women are not 
qualified to be elected as members of the House of Representatives. 
The electoral laws are the subject of special comment further on 
in this work. Every man registered as an elector, and not coming 
within the meaning of section 8 of " The Electoral Act, 1893," 
(i.e., alien, lunatic, public offender, defaulter, Ac), is quaUfied to 
be elected a member of the House of Representatives for any 
electoral district. For European representation every adult per- 
son, if resident one year in the colony and three months in one 
electoral district, can be registered as an elector. Freehold property 
of the value of £25 held for six months preceding the day of regis- 
tration until 1896 entitled a man or woman to register, if not already 
registered under the residential qualification. But the Amendment 
Act of 1896 abolished the property qualification (except in case of 
existing registrations), and residence alone now entitles a man or 
woman to nave bis or her name placed upon an electoral roll . For 
Maori representation every adult Maori resident in any Maori elec- 
toral district (of which there are four only in the colony) can vote. 
Registration is not required in Native districts. 

*"TIm Bepraieatallon Act, 1900," provides thkt, on the axpiution by 
•ffluxloD of time oc other Boon«r determi nation of the preunt OenerKl A-eembljr, 
the naniber of memben for purpoiei of Europefto repreeentatios to be themaftM 
•Ifloted to the Houn of Represent&UveB ehftll be Mvenly-rix iiii>tead of esTcnty, 
sad that there aie to be liz new dietiicti, ods tor eaoh additional number. 




p 
* 



PDBLIO WORKS. 



TnB Sbat of Government. 



Up to the year 1865 tlie seat of Government of New Zealand 
-was at Auckland. Several attempts were made by members of 
Parliament, by motions in the LeeiMative Council and House of 
Represcntativos, to have it roiiiovaa to some more centra! place; 
but it was not until November, 1863, that Mr. Domett {the then 
ex-Premier] was successful in carrying resolutions in the Hoaso of 
Representatives that steps should be taken for appointiog aomo 
place in Cook Strait &n the pQrmanenC Beat of Ciov^minent in ihe 
colouy. The resoliitiona a<lopted wore : " (1.) That it has become 
necessary that the seat of Government in the colony should be 
transferred to Bonie suitable locality in Cook Strait. (2.) That, in 
order to promote tlie accomplishment of this object, it is desirable 
thftt the selection of the particular site in Cook Strait sliould be left 
to the axbitrameut of an impartial tribunal- (3.) That, with this 
view, a Bill should be introduced to give effect to the above resolu- 
tions." On the 25th November au address was presented to the 
Governor. Sir George Grey, K.C.li., by the Comniuns of Now Zea- 
land, rtHfuesting thai the Governors cf the Colonics of New South 
Wales. Victoria, and Tasumnia, might each be axked to appoint one 
Coniraissioner for the purpose of delenoining the best site in Cook 
Strait. Accordingly, the Hon, Joseph Docker, M.L.C., Nuw South 
Wales; the Hon. Sir Friuicts Murphy, Speaker of the LoianslaLivc 
Council, Victoria; and R. C. Gunu, Esq., Taamania, were appointed 
Commiasionern. 

These gentlemen, having made n pergonal inspection of all suit- 
able places, arrived at the unanimous decision " that Wellington, in 
Port Nicholson, was the site upon the shores of Cook 8trait which 
pre«ented the greatest advantages for the administration of the 
government of the colony." 

The fteat of Government wsa, therefore, ia accordance with tha 
recommendation of the Comraissionera, removed to Wellington in 
February, 1865. 

Public Works. ' 

Nearly all the public works of New Zealand are in the hands of 
the Government of the colony, and in the early days they simply 
kept pace with the spread of settlement. In 1870. however, a great 
impetus was given to the progress of the whole couutry by the 
iuauguration of the " Public Works and [minigration PoUcy," which 
provided for carrying out works in a<lvaucc of settlement. Bailwaya, 
roads, aud water-races were coustructod, and immigration was con- 
ducted on a large scale. As a cousuquence, the population increased 
from 367,000 in 1871 to 001.000 in 1881. and to 787,657 in Decem- 
ber, 1901, exclusive of Maoris. 



90 NBW SBAI.AHD OFFICIAL TKAB-BOOK 

SUCCESSIVE GOVERNORS. 

Sdccbbbion of Govebnobs of New Zealand, akd tbb Dates on 
which they assumed akd retired fuoll the govbrnuent. 

Captain William Hobaoo, R.N., from Jan., 1840, to 10 Sept., 
1842. 

[British sovereignty w&s proclftimed by Captain Hobfton in Januai;, 
1840, and New Zealand became a depeiideney of the Colony of New 
South Wales until 3rd May, 1841, at which date it was proclaimed a 
separate colony. From Januart', 1B40, to May, 1B41, Captain Uobson 
was Lieutenant - Governor of New Zealand under Sir (ieorge Gippa, 
Governor of New South Wales, and from Uay, 1641, Governor of New 
Zealand ; the seat of Government being at Auckland, where he died io 
Suptember, 1842. From the time of Governor Hobson'ti death, in Sep- 
tember, 1B42, until the arrival of Governor Fitzroj, in December, 1843, 
the Government was carried on by the Colonial Secretary, Lieutenant 
Bbortland.] 
Lieutenant Shortland, Administrator, from 10 Sept., 1842, to 2& 

Dec, 1843. 
Captain Robert Fitzroy, R.N., from 26 Dec, 1843, to 17 Nov., 

1845. 
Captain Grey (became Sir George Grey, K.C.B., in 1848), from 18 
Nov., 1845, to 31 Dec, 1853. 

[Captain Grey held the commission aa Lieutenant-Governor of the 
oolnny until the lat January, 1848, when he wan sworn in as Govemor- 
in Chiel over the Islands of New Zealand, and as Governor of the Pro- 
vince of New Ulster and Governor of the Province of New Munster. 
After the passing of the New Zealand Constitution Act, Sir George 
Qrey was, on the 13th September, 1852, appointed Governor of the 
colony, the duties of which office he assumed on the 7th March, 1853. 
In August, 1847, Mr. E. J. Eyre was appointed Lieutenant-Governor of 
New Munster : he was sworn in, 2eth January, 1848. On Srd January, 
1848, Major - General George Dean Pitt was appointed Lieutenant- 
Governor of New Ulster: he was sworn in, 14th February, 1846; died, 
8th Jahuary, 1851 ; and was succeeded as Lieutenant-Governor by 
Lieutenant-Colonel Wynvard, appointed 14th April, I8&1; sworn in, 
26th April, 1851. The duties of the Lieutenant-Governor ceased on the- 
asHumption by Sir George Grey ol the office of Governor, on the 7th 
March, 1853.] 

Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Henry Wynyard, C.B., Administrator^ 

from 3 Jan., 1854, to 6 Sept., 1856. 
Colonel Thomas Gore Browne, C.B., from 6 Sept., 1855, to 2 Oct., 

1861. 
Sir George Grey, K.C.B., Administrator, from 3 Oct., 1861 ; Go- 
vernor, from 4 Dec, 1861, to 6 Feb., 1868. 
Sir George Ferguson Bowen, G.C.M.G., from 5 Feb., 1868, to 19 

Mar., 1873. 
Sir George Alfred Amey, Chief Justice, Administrator, from 21 Mar. 

to 14 June, 1873. a»W 

Sir James Fergusson, Baronet, P.C, from 14 June, 1873, to 3 Dec, 

1874. 
The Marquis of Normanby, P.C, G.C.M.G., Administrator, from 

3 Doc, 1874 ; Governor, from 9 Jan., 1876, to 21 Feb., 1879. 



attPRRUB COUHT- JUDGBB. 



31 



' JTmbmb Pr«nd«rg*st, Esqaire, GUtef Justice. Administrator, from 

31 Fbb. to 37 Mar., IH19. 
Sir Hercnleft Geor^e Robert Bobin«on, G.C-M.G., Administrator, 

from 37 Mar., 1879; Governor, from 17 April. 1879. to 8 Sept.. 

1880. 
James Prendergast, Esquire, Chief Justice, Administrator, from 

9 Sept. to 29 Nov., I»a0. 
The Honourable Sir .\rthur Hamiltoa Gordon. G.C.M.G., from 

39 Nov., 1880, to 23 Jugg. 1882. 
Sir James Preodergast, Chief Justice, Administrator, from 34 June, 

1882, to aO Jan.. 1883. 
Licutaiiaut - General Sir William Francis Drummond Jervois. 

G.C.M.G.. C.B., from 20 JH.n.. 1883, to 22 Mar, 1889. 
Sir JamcK Prendergast, Chief JusLice^ AdministrAtor, from 23 Mar. 

to 2 May. 1889. 
The Earl of Onslow. G.C.M.G., from 2 May, 1889. to 34 Feb., 

1892. 
Sir James Prendergast, Chief Justice. Administrator, from 25 Feb., 

to 6 June. 1892. 
The Earl of Glasgow, G.C.M.G., from 7 June. 1892, to 6 Feb., 1897. 
Sir Jamos Prendergast, Chief Jusiiee, Adrainiscrator, from 8 Feb.. 

1897, to9ch Aukj.. 1897. 
The Earl ot Banfurly, G.CM.G.. from 10th Aug.. 1897. 



8DPBEME COURT JUDGES. 

kSOPDKUR COUKT JtlDQEfi, fAST AND PRESENT, WITH I>ATKB OF 

Appointwest, and of RastoNATioN OB Death. 

Sir W. Martin, H.ppointed Chief Justice, 10 Jan., 1842. Resigned. 

12 June, 1807. 
H. S. Chapman, appointed, 26 Dec.. 1843. Resigned, 30 July, 1850. 

Reappointed. 23 Mar.. 1864. Resigned, 31 Mar., 1875. 
S. Stephen, appointed, 30 July, 1860. .appointed Acting Chief 

Justice, 20 Oct., 1855. Died, 13 Jan., 1858. 
Daniel Wakefield, appointed, Oct., 1855. Died, Oct.. 1857. 
Bon. H. B. Gressoxi, appomted temporarily, 8 Dec, 1857. Poi'- 

manootly, 1 July, 1S&2. Resigned. 31 Mar., 1875. 
Sir 0. A. Arncv, appointed Chief JuHtice. 1 Mar., 1858. Resigned 

31 Mar.. 1875 
\. J. Johnaion, appointed. 2 Nov., 1858. Died, 1 Juno, 1888. 
C. W. Richmond, appointed, 20 Oct., 1869. Died. 3 Aug., 1895. 
J. S. Moore, appointed temporarily, 15 May. 1866. Relieved, 80 

June. 1868. 
C. D. B. Ward, appointed temporarily, 1 Oct., L868. Relieved, 

May, 1870. Appointed temporarily, 21 Sept., 1886, Relieved, 

12 Feb., 1889. 
Sir J. Prendergast, appointed Chief Justice, 1 April, 1875. Re- 
signed, 25 May, 1899. 



Sfi NBW ZIALAMD OFFIOIAL TH&B-BOOK. 

T. B. OillieB, appointed, 3 Mar., 1875. Died, 26 July, 1889. 

J. S. Williams, appoioted, 3 Mar., 1875. 

J. E. DenniBton, appoioted, 11 Feb., 1889. 

B. T. Conollj, appointed, 19 Aug., 1889. 

Hon. Sir P. A. Buckley, K.C.M.G., appointed, 20 Dec., 1895. 

Died, 18 May, 1896. 
W. B. Edwards, appointed, U July, 1896. 
P. W. Pennefatber, appointed temporarily, 26 April, 1898. Be- 

signed, 24 April, 1899. 
Hon. Sir Uobert Stout, K.C.M.G., appointed Chief Jaatioe, 22 Jane, 

1899. 
J. C. Martin, acting Judge, appointed, 12 April, 1900. Beslgned,. 

4 Dec, 1900. 
Theophilns Cooper, appointed, 21 Feb., 1901. 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL, 1843-66. 

Mbhbbbs op ths Executive Counoil op the Colont or New 
Zealand prbvioub to the Ebtablibhubnt op RESPOiTaiBi.E 

GOTBRHUBKT (NOT INOIiUDIMa TRB OpPIGERB CoUUANDINa TBB 

Forceb). 

Willoughby Shortland, Colonial Secretary, from 3 May, 1841, to 

31 Dec, 1843; succeeded by Mr. Sinclair. 
Francis Fisher, Attorney-General, from 3 May to 10 Aug., 1841; 

succeeded by Mr. Swainson. 
George Cooper, Colonial Treasurer, from 3 May, 1841, to 9 May, 

1842 ; succeeded by Mr. Shepherd. 
William Swainson, Attorney-General, from 10 Aug., 1841, to 7 May, 

1866. 
Alexander Shepherd, Colonial Treasurer, from 9 May, 1842, to 7 May, 

1856. 
Andrew Sinclair, Colonial Secretary, from 6 Jan., 1844, to 7 May, 
1856. 

[The three gentlemen last mentioned were nominated by Her late 
Me.je8ty as ez offleio members of the Ezeoutive Oonnoil. Two of them, 
the Colonial Seoretai; and the Colonial Treasurer, were not members oE 
the General Assembly, opened for the flrst time 37th May, 185i, bnt 
all three remained in ofiSoe antll the establishment of Responsible 
Government.] 

James Edward FitzGerald, M.H.B., without portfolio, from 14 June 

to 2 Aug., 1854. 
Henrv Sewell, M.H.B., without portfolio, from 14 June to 2 Aug., 

1854. 
Frederick Aloysius Weld, M.H.B., without portfolio, from 14 June 

to 2 Aug., 1854. 
Francis Dillon Bell, M.L.C., without portfolio, from 80 June to 11 

July, 1854. 
Thomas Houghton Bartley, M.L.C., without portfolio, from 14 Jtily 

to 2 Aug., 1854. 





1 1 




1 _1 


^V Thomas Spencor Forsoilb, M.H.B., without portfolio, from 31 Aug. 

■ to 2 Sept.. Id-M. 

^H Edward Jtiruiii^jiiatti VVaketiuId. M.H.R., without porifolio, from 

^1 HI Aui!. to 2 S«pL., 1H54. 

^H Williairi Thoinas Locke Travers. M.H.R., without portfolio, 31 Aug. 

■ to 2 Sept., inrA. 

^H Jataea Macandrew, M.H.R., withoTit portfolio, from 31 Aug. to S 

^K Sept., ldS4. 


^^P PARLIAMBNl^. ^H 
^B NuMUEB OP Pahliahents hikcr thk Constitution Act pabsku 1 

^H FOR CONPBHKINO RuCABtiltNTATIVe INSTITUTIONS UPON THB 1 

^H Colony op Ni^w Zealakd, with rutt; Datick ov O^kninu and M 

^H ClOSIHO op SbssIOMB and DaTBB op DlSftOLUTION. ^^1 


^^^ l>MllMno»I. 


D*ta or OpMtiug at 
SmsIoim. 


DmM oI pNTogaHon. 1 


^^^^Hj^dfMDlved Idtb S«pt«inb«r, 


iff M»y. 18B4 
HI AogUKt, 1854 .. 
8 AugUKl, 18&S .. 

16 April. IB&C 
(No MRmoTi in 18ft7| 
10 April. 18^ 
(Noua«ioninlSGiJ] 
SOJaly, 16G0 


9 A«saM, 1864. 1 

10 S>pU!mb*r, 1B64. ■ 
16 SepMmbcT. 1866. ^^m 




16 Angurt, 1856. ^^| 

31 AugUHt, I8&S. ^^H 

5 lIov«inb«r. 1860. 1 


^^^Tbitd (dissolved 9Tih J^nuuv, I8&6) ] 


SJum, 1861 

T July. 1862 
1« Oclohor. 1863 . . 
24 Nuvetiiber. 18(34 
96July, ltJ6Q 


TSepkMnUr, 18fit 1 
16B»pUiDl»r, 186S. ■ 
14 DoGomber, I8B.H. ■ 
13 Di»eriiber. 18C4. M 
SOOotober. 16S5. ^^ 


^H Fourth (dtnohriid aOth Doo«mlMir, 
^M 1870) 


SO June, l»€6 

OJulj, 19C7 

UJkily. 1868 

iJucfl. 1860 .. 
14 Juu«, 18T0 


8 October. 1S66. ^^H 
10 Octobei, 1867. ^^M 
20 October. 1868. 1 

S Septetnbur. 1669. ■ 
18 SapWniber, 1H10. ■ 


^H Pifbli IdiMolvad filfa D«Mmbcir, 
^1 1875) 


14 Anguai, 18T1 .. 
16July. 197S 
16 July. 1873 
3 July, 1874 
30 July, 1875 


16 Novnmbor. 1871. J 

S5 October, 1873, ^^M 

a UtitoUer, 1HT3. ^^H 

ai Aiigtikt, 1874. ^^H 

31 Octobor, 1875. ^^M 


^H ^H 



34 



NBW ZBAI.AKD OFFICIAL YBAB-BOOK. 

Parliaments — continued. 



Fu-liAnient. 


Dkto of OpADiUK at 
SeMloui. 


Dftl« of Prorogation. 


Siith (diswWed ISth August. 1879) 


t 
15 June, 1876 
19 July. 1877 
26 July, 1878 
11 July, 1879 


31 October, 1876. 

10 December, 1877. 
2 November, 1878. 

11 August, 1879. 



Sevflntb (dissolved 8th November, 1 
1B81) 1 


' 24 September, 1870 
'28 May. 1880 
' 9 June, 18SI 


19 December. 1879, 

1 September, 1880. 

21 September, 1881. 


Eighth (dissolved 37th June, 1884) ] 


18 Mftv, 1882 . . 15 September, 1882. 
14 June, 1888 . . 1 8 September, 188S. 
5 June, 1884 .. 1 24 June, 1884. 


Ninth (dissolved 15th July, 1887) . . 


7 August. 1884 
11 June, 1885 
IS May, 1886 
26 April, 1887 


10 November, 1884. 
22 September. 1885. 
18 AugiiHt. 1886. 
10 July, 1887. 



Tenth (dissolved 8rd October, 1890) . 



6 October, 1887 
10Mfl.y, 1888 
20 June, 1889 
19 June, 1890 



23 December, 1887. 
31 August. 18S8. 
19 September, 1889. 
18 September, 1890. 



Eleventh (dissolved 8th November, 
1893) 



23 January, 1B91 
U June, 1891 
23 June, 1892 
22 June, W3i 



31 JftDMttf)-, 1891. 

5 September. 1891. 
12 October, 1892. 

7 October. 1893. 



Twelfth (dissolved 14th November, 
1896) 



21 June, 1894 
20 June, 1895 
11 June, 1896 



24 October, 1894. 

2 November, 1895. 
19 October. 1896. 



Thirteenth (dissolved 15th Novem- 
ber, 1699) 



Fourteenth 



7 April, 1897 

23 September, 1897 

24 Jnne, 1898 
23 Juno, 1899 



S2nd June. 1900 
Ist July, 1901. 



12 April, 1897. 
22 December, 1897. 
5 November. ]898. 
24 October, 1899. 



22F.d October. 1900. 
8tli Novimber, 1901. 



PBEJIIRRB. 



26 



SUCCESSIVE MINISTRIES 

SiHOB THE Establishment of Bebfonsible Govehnubnt in New 

Zealand in 1656. 



Kama of UlnUtry. 


AMamed OBoc. 


Betind. 


1. Bell-Sewell .. 


7 May, 1856 


20 May, 1856. 


a. Fox .. 


20 May, 1856 


2 June, 1856. 


3. StRfiurd 


2 June, 1866 


12 July, 1861. 


i. Poi .. 


12 July, 1861 


6 AuKUHt, 1862. 


S. Dnmett 


6 Aiiguflt, 1862 . . 


80 October, 1863. 


6. Whitftkar-Fox.. 


SO October, 1863 . . 


24 November, 1864. 


7. Weld.. 


24 November, 1864 


16 October, 1865. 


8. Siafford 


16 October, 1865 .. 


28 June, 1869. 


9. Fox .. 


28 June, 1869 


10 Sept<>mber, 1872. 


10. Stafford 


10 September, 1873 


11 October, 1872. 


11. W&ierhouse .. 


11 October, 1872 .. 


3 March, 1873. 


12. Pox .. 


3 March, 1873 .. 


8 April, 1873. 


13. Vogel 


8 April, 1873 


6 July, 1875. 


14. Pollen 


6 July, 1875 


15 February, 1876. 


15. Vogel 


15 February, 1876 


1 September, 1876. 


16. Atkinson 


1 September, 1876 


13 September, 1876. 


17. Atkinson (reoonstitDted) 


18 September, 1676 


18 October, 1877. 


18. Orey . . 


15 October. 1877 .. 


8 October, 1879. 


19. Hall 


8 October, 1879 . . 


21 Apni, 1883. 


20. Whttoker 


31 April, 1882 


25 September, 1883. 


21. Atkinson 


25 September, 1883 


16 August, 1884. 


S2. Stout- Vogel 


16 August, 1884 .. 


28 AugUflt, 18B4. 


23. Atkinson 


28 August, 1884 . . 


3 September. 1884. 


a*. Stout. Vogel .. 


3 September, 1684 


8 October, 1887. 


25. Atkinson 


8 October, 1887 . . 


24 Januarv, 1891. 


26. Ballftnce 


24 Januarv, 1891.. 


1 May, 1898.' 


n. Saddon 


1 May, 1893. 





'Owlngto the death of the Premier, the Hon. J. Ballance, on STth April, 18B3. 



PBEMIEBS of SUCCESSIVE MINISTBIES. 



Name of Premier. 


Name of Premier. 


Henry Sewell, 


Sir Julius Vogel, K.O.M.G. 


William Fox. 


Harry Albert Atkinson. 


Edward William Stafford. 


Harry Albert Atkinson (Ministry reoon- 


William Fox. 


stituted). 


Alfred Domett. 


Sir George Grey, K.G.B. 


Frederick Whitaker. 


Hon. John Hall. 


Frederick Aloysiua Weld. 


Frederick Whitaker, M.L.C. 


Edward William Stafford. 


Harrv Albert Atkinson. 


William Fox. 


Robert Stout. 


Hon. Edward William Stafford. 


Harry Albert Atkinson. 


Oeorge Marsden Waterhouae. 


Sir Robert Stout, K. C.M.G. 


Hon. William Fox. 


Sir Harry Albert Atkinson, K.C.M.G 


Hon. Julius Vogel, C.M.G. 


John Ballance. 


Daniel Pollen, M.L.C. 


Rt. Hon. Richard John Seddon, P.O. 



96 



KKW ESAE.AHD OFTlOlAIi TBUt-BOOX. 



SPEAKERS OP THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL. 

WITH DaTBS of THBIB ApPOIMTlUtHT AND DaTKS OF BVTIBRlDntT 

OB Dkath. 



nkmeof Bpokkor. 



DfttAOl 

Appoluttnant. 



Dmt» of RoUrwnflDt 

orDMth. 



Hon. Williun Swftituon 
Hod. Frederick Whiteker 
Hon. Tbomai Hougbton G^rUar 
Hon. Sir John Lftrkini ChMM Bicbard- 

aon, Kl. 
Hod. Sir Willi»ra Fitsherbert, E.G.U.O. 
Hon. Sir HArnr Albert Atkineon, 

K.C.U.Q. 
Bod. Sir Henry John Hitler . . ' 



16 Ha;, ISSi ' 
8 ADguat, 1655 . . 

12 Hay, 1856 . . 
IJul;, 18G8 .. 

14 JuDe, 1879 . . 
33 JaDuary, 1891 

8 July, 1892. 
6 Ootober, 1897. 



6 Aa«u8t, 1S55. 
13 Hay, 1856. 

1 July, 1868. 
11 June, 1679. 

23 JaDuary, 1891. 
28 June, 1892. 



SPEAKERS OP THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 

WITH DaTKS of THBIB ElSCTION AND DaTBS OP RbTISEHENT. 



Name of Bpaakar. 



Sir Charles CliSord, B&it. . . 

Sir David Monro, Kt. Bach. 

Sir Francis Dillon Bofl, K.G.M.Q., C.B. 
Sir William Fitxherbert, K.G.M.O. . . 
Sir Qeorge Maurice 0'Rotke,Et. Baob. 



Hon. Major William Jukes Steward . . 
Hon. SirOeorge Uaurice O'Roike, Kt. 
Bach. 



Date ot Election. 



26 May, 1854 

15 April. 1856 .. 

3 June, 1861 
30 June, 18G6 .. 

14 August, 1871 .. 

15 June, 1876 .. 
11 July, 1879 

24 September, 1879 

16 May, 1882 

7 August, 1SS4 

6 Ootober, 1887 

38 January, 1691 

21 June, 1894 
6 April, 1897. 

22 June, 1900. 



Date ol Retirema 



3 June, 1861. 

ISSepL, 1670. 
21 October. 1875. 
18 June, 1679. 



3 October. 1890. 
8 November, 189S. 



FOREIGN CONSULS. 

Consuls op Fobeion Coontbibs rebidinq in, ob with Jubisdio- 

TiON ovEB, Nkw Zealand, 3bd Apbil, 1901. 



Country 
represenwd. 


Offlee held. 


Name. 


Place of 
Beeideaoe. 


Austria-Hungary 
Belgium 


Oonsal 

Oonsnl - Osnezol 

for Australia 

and Fiii 
Consul 
* 


E. Langguth 
Edouard Pollet . . 

Hon. Charles John Johnston 
Joseph James Kinsey 


Auckland. 
Melbourne. 

Wellinatoa. 
Christonnieh. 



f 


VORBION 0(»(lltn.S. 


1 

S7 


^^^ 


FoBfiTOH COKSUUI — OOKtirUud. 




^^1 Coantry 
^^H Tnpro««utv«l 


Offlca fa eld. 


Nam*. 


Ptatwot 
Kaaldwse, 


^1 BfllgiatB 


OoDin] 


John Barttii 


Auekluid. ^_ 


^^1 


* ■ - 


(Irorce Lyon Dooniaton 
William Uroun 


Duuedtn. ^^^| 


^V Chill . . 


• • - 


Sydney. ^^^| 


1 Denmark 


Coiiint (tor Iftrtth 
iHlandl; Chief 
Conaul&i Oftioer 


PraactR Heary Dillcn Bdl . . 


Wolliogton. V 


H 


Conflul(forSout)i 


Kmi] Chrititimi Skog 


CliriBtcbucch. 1 


^^^^^^^B 


VicoCoiisal 


Prcderiok Eliranltid B«um« 


Auokliuid. ^^M 


^^^^^^^^^k • 


> 


Williani Kdwaid Pnuy 
Poior Jorgon Wtlbolm Holiito^ 


HokiCika, ^^H 




JV ■ » 


Duiiodiji. ^^^1 


^^^^mnoe 


ConsQl (for New 


(^iint Ifiui* AnLnina M^ne 


Wolllnglon, m 


^H 


ZcaUnd) 


Jonuiph Henri De Courte 


■ 


^^^^ft 


Hon. Vicfl Caonal 


PocpiviiilClay NcitI 


Duncdi'n. 1 


^^B 


CouHuUr Abuii t 


ticorge Hutnphroyi 


C4iriBtciiurcli. 1 


^^H 


* ■ ' 


Ucorgn Uuiinot 


Aufklnnd. ^^fl 




Coniul -General 
for Oomman- 
wvftltbol Aua- 

trn-liji, Naw 
Zu'iliuaJ, Mid 

Fiji 


P»ul Von Biiri . . 


Sydnejr. ^^^| 


^^^^^1^^^ 


Causal 


Cn.rl Si^Ggiicr 


Aiickluid. ^^^1 


^^^H 


9 


Ueudii HallvnatelD .• 


Dunedin. V 


^^^^B 


« > • 


Pltili[j Kippeiibarger 


CbriaMhutdb. I 


^^H 


w - ■ 


Friodrich Aug\ist Ktull 


WftiiffaniiL. H 
Wellington. J 


^^M 


Vio«-Ck)niul .. 


ICheth»rd Pocks 


^^M H&iTMiaii latMidn 


Consul • General 
[tor Austmtftsia) 


W.K.Dixon 


Sydney. ^^H 


^H 


Coukul, Acting 


G«orge DanttM .. 


Aticklojid. ^^^1 


^M ItAly .. 


Consul • General 
for C"inuiuu 
weatih □! Aus- 
traliA. N«w 

ZeiilanJ, Mid 
Piji 
OonBuUr Agent 


0. EUrinU 


M^ilhnnrna. ^^^| 


^^^^^^^^^•■ 


Thoma* Wallaco ,. 


ChriaUihurcb. 


^^^^H « • ■ 


, 


OeorRs FiF»lisi- 


WfvllingtMi. 


^^^^H f . . 


■ 


Kidwurd ItnwdS Cafgill 


Dunndtn. 


^^^1 • •• 


■ 


Gor&ldo GiaM<p[)« Parotii . . 


Orvymoutb. 


^^^r • -■ 


^ 


Iticbdrd A. Cktr 


Auckland. 


1 ItibvHk 


Oonsul 


A. S. Aliirirb 


W^llirigtOD, 


• - ■ 


A. M. Mfljera 


AurkliLTid- 


^H NatliErliuidN 


CotiMuI-Oiuiiftral 
lor Coninton 
weaUfa of AuH- 
ualia, New 
Zfttlkod, ftod 
P.jl 

Oonaul 


W. L. HoBBohivrl .. 


Mol bourne. 

• 


^^^^^B !tf 


Hon. OliAdea John Johnabon 


Weilinnton. M 


^^^^^^^B » 


Vive-Coiuul .. 


ndward Bowas Ca^iH 


Dniiodiu. ^^H 


^^^^^^^V V 


* ■ • 


Amtiroii« Millu 


Auckland, ^^H 


^^^^^^^^ 4 


^^ 


IJAtold FnitLhontou Johni«Uin 


WellingUJu. ^^H 



38 



NBW ZKAIiAHD DPFIOIAL YBAB-BOOK. 

FoBEiQN Consuls — contin'Md. 



Coantry 
rapra^utad. 


once beld. 


Name. 


Plaeaot 
Beaidanoa. 


Portugal 


Consul 


John Duncan 


Wellington. 


# 


Vice- Consul 


Henry Rees George 


Auckland. 


• 


* • • 


Xad 0. Duncan 


Wellington. 


* • • 


> 


Cliarles William Rattray .. 


Dnnedin. 


KUMIA 


ConBiil 


Nicolao Pauek 


Melbourne. 


Spain.. 


Vioe-Gonsul . . 


(Vacant) .. 


CbrtBtobarah 


» ■ • • • 


Acting , 


Thomas Jamieson. . 


, 


, .. 


Honorary Vice- 

ConHul 
Consul 


Alexander U. Tumbull 


Wellington. 


Sweden and Nor- 


Arthur Edward Pearce 


Wellington. 


way 










Vice-Consul . . 


Frank Graham 


Chrifltcfaanh 


» 


Acting . 


Fred> rick B. Baume 


Auckland. 


United States . . 


Consul (for New 

Zealand) 


Frank Dillingham 


Auckland. 


« 


Vice-Consul .. 


Leonard A. Bachelder 


Auckland. 


» - ■ 


Consular Agent 


Robert Pitoaitbley 


Christohoroh 


• •• 


^ 


John Duncan 


Wellington.. 


* • « 


- 


Fiederick Oilando Bridgman 


Dunedin, 



AGENT-GENEKAL FOR NEW ZEALAND IN LONDON. 
The Hon. W. P. Reeves, WestminBter Chambers, 13, Victoria 
Street, 8.W. Secretary— Waiter Kennaway, C.M.G. 



THE COLONIAL OFFICE. 

April, 1902. 

(Downing Street, S.W., London), with Datkb of Appointmbnt. 

Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies — The Bight Hon. 
Joseph Chamberlain, M.P.. 28th June, 1895. 

Under-Secretaries : Parliamentary — The Right Hon. the Earl of 
Onslow. G.C.M.G., November, 1900. Permanent— Sir Montagae 
Frederick Ommaney, K.G.B., K.G.M.G., 1900. 

Assistant Under-Secretaries : Frederick Graham, C.B., 1st March, 
1897 ; Charles P. Lucas, C.B. ; H. B. Cox (Legal) ; and Reginald L. 
Antrobus, C.B. 



CROWN AGENTS FOR THE COLONIES. 
Downing Street, S.W. City Office : 1, Tokbnhoubk Buildinob, 

E.G., London. 
Crown Agents— Sir Ernest Edward Blake, K.C.M.G., Major 
Maurice Alexander Cameron, B.E., C.M.G., and William Hepworth 
Mercer. 




» 



p 



HONOURS BBLD BY OOLONISTS, BTC. 

HONOUHS HELD BY COLONISTS, 

Buller. Sir Walter Lawry. F.R.S.. C.M.G., 1875; K.C.M.G.. 1886. 
Gadiwm. Hon. Alfred Jerome, CM G.. 1901. 
Qrace. Hon. Morgan Stanislaus. C.M.G., 1690. 
QreBsoii, Hon. H^.. 1877. 

Gu(igeoii, Ueut.-ColoDol Walter Edward, C.U.G., 1901. 
Hall. Hon. Sir John. K.C.M.G., 1883. 
Hector. Sir James. F.R.S.. C.M.G., 1875 ; K.C.M.G., 1887. 
Kennaway, Walter. Efiq.. C.M.G., 1897. 
Miller, Hon, Sir Henry John, Km. 
Newall, Brevet-Colonel Stuart, C.B. 
O'Rorke, Hon, Sir George Maurice. Knt. Bach., 1880. 
Perceval, Sir Westby Brook. K.C.M.G, 1894. 
Prendcrgttsi, Hon. Sir Jam ■•s. Knl. Bach-, 1881. 
Richardson, Hon. Edward, CMC., 1879. 
Bobertfl, John. Esq.. C.M.G., 1891, 
Bobin, Brcvct-Colonel Alfred William. C.B. 
S«ddon, Right Hon. Richard John. PC, 1897. 
Stout. lion. Sir Robert. K.C.M.G., 1886. 
Walker. Hon. Wilham Campbell, C.M.G., 1901. 
Ward. Hon. Sir Joseph George, K.C.M.G., 1901. 
Whitmora, Hoc. Cotouel Sir George StoddiLrt, C.M.G., 1869; 
K.C.M.G.. 1882. 

PkBSOMS AXXOWED to KETAIfl THE TlTLB OP " HoNOGBABLB " 

WITHIN Hek Majesty's DoumionB. 

By despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies, dated 
Dowmng Street. 15lli June, 1893, His Excellency ihc Governor 
was apprised that the title of " Houourable," appertaining to Mem- 
bers of the Executive and Legislative Councils in colonies poasessing 
Responsible Government, whether confined to duration of office or 
continued for life, wais approved by Her late Majeety for nse and 
recognition ihroagfaout her dominions, either during office or for life, 
as the case may be. 

By further despatch of 10th March, 1894, the Secretar}* of 8tUe 
announced that he was prepared in futurti to submit for the approval 
of the Sovereign the recommendation of the Goveroor of any colony 
hftviDg Responsible Government that the PreeideDC of the iiegislative 
Council or the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly uiay, on quitting 
office afcer three ye4ir«' service in theii respective omces, be pet- 
mittud to rtitaiu the title of "Honourable." TIilb title is now held 
by Sir G. M. O'Rorke aud Major William Jukes Steward. 

Besideti the Members of the Executive and Legislative Councils, 
the (oliowiag ex-MiniBters whose names do not appear in the list 

f'ven above are allowed, as such, to retain the title of "Houourable": 
ryce, John, 18tW ; Cadman, A. J.. 1901 ; Fersius. Thomas, 1891 ; 
aultain. Colonel T. M., 1870; Hislop, Thomas W.. 1891 ; Johnston. 
Waller W., 1684 ; Mi'-ahelsoii. Edwin. 1891 : Oliver, Richard. 1884 . 
Reeves, William P., 1896; Richai-dson, George F., 1891; Rollcston. 
William, 1884 ; Thompson. Thomas, 1900 ; Tola, Joseph A., 1888. 




30 MKW EKAI.AHD OPPlCliXi TB&K-BOOK. 

GOVBBNOR OF NEW ZEALAND. 

RAKrDEi.T, His Excellency The Bight Honourable Sir Uehtnr John 
Mark, fifth Earl of (Ireland, 1831), Viacouot Northland. (1791), Baroo 
Welles (1781), Lord -in -Waiting to Her late Majesty (1895-^, 
Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of »uiit Mi^ftff' 
and Saint George ; Knight of Justice and Member of the Conoeil td 
the Order of St. John of Jerusalem ; son of third earl, brother of 
fourth earl ; born 14th August, 1 856 ; succeeded, 1875 ; married, 1880, 
the Honourable Constance EltKabeth, only child of sarenth ViaoouBt 
Gharlemont, C.6. Linngissue : One son (Viscount Northland), two 
daughters (Ladies Constance and Eileen Knox). Appointed 6th 
April, 1897, and assumed office 10th August, 1897, as Goremor and 
Commander- in-Chief in and over His Majesty's Colony of New Zea- 
land and its Dependencies. Salar>', £d.0OO. Allowance on account 
of estabUshment £1,500, and travelling-expenses £500 per annam. 
The allowance is not payable for any period during which the 
Governor is absent from the colony. Kesidences : Northland 
House, Dungannon, Ireland ; Government House, Wellington ; 
Government House, Auckland. 

Private Secretary and Aide-de-Camp : Dudley Alexander (Cap- 
tain, " The Prince of Wales's Own," West Yorkshire Regiment). 

Assistant Private Secretarv : The Honoui*able Charles Eidward 
Hill-Trevor. 

Administrator of the Government. — The Chief Justice 
appointed under a dormaut commission. 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 

2nd Mat, 1902. 

The annual appropriation for Ministers' salaries is fixed by 
statute at the sum of £8.900, of which £1,600 is for the Prime 
Minister. £1,300 for the Minister for Railways, aud £1,000 for each 
of six other Ministers. All Ministers to whom salaries are appro- 
priated are members of the Executive Council, holding one or more 
of the offices specified by law. Members of the Executive Council 
travelling within the colony on public service are entitled to 
allowance not exceeding £1 10s. per day when so engaged, but 
not during the time a Minister is attending a session of the General 
Assembly. The members of the Executive Council to whom 
salaries are payable, and who are not otherwise provided with 
residences at the seat of Government, are entitled to an allowance 
in lieu thereof at the rate of £200 a year. 

The Executive Council now consists of: — 

His Excellency the Governob presiding. 

Rt. Hon. Richard John Seddon, P.C, Prime Minister, Colonial 
Treasurer, Minister of Defence, and Minister of Labour. 



IJC01BI<ATIVK COUNCII4. 



31 



Hon. Sir Joaepb George Ward, E.C.M.G.. Minister for Railways, 

Colonial Seerecory, PoscmaHxerGonoral and Commissioner of 

KlRctric Tele^rapUs, Minister or Industriita and Comnuirce. aud 

Minister of Publiu HuaUU. 
Hon. Jamea Carroll, Nalivf; Minister and Ootnniissioner of Stamp 

I>utie*. 
Hon, William Cami^ell Walkttr, O.M.Q., Minister of Edncation aod 

Mimttter of Jmriiij^ation- 
Hon. William Hall-Jone«, Minister for Public Works and Minister 

of Marine. 
Hon. JamcH McGowaa, Minister of Justico and Minister of Mines. 

(SSrd January. 1900.) 
Hon. Ilioinas Youii^i; DuncRn, Minister of Lands and Minister for 

Agriculture, (2nd July, JiJOO.) 
HoQ. ChnrloH Houghton Mills, Coniinissioner of Trade and Customs. 

(29th October. 1900.) 
(Vacant) Attorney-General. 

Cterk a( lh« Kx«oati«e Cauuoil — Al^XRHiier JiLtiina Willif. 



» 



THJ3 GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 
Leoiblatcvr CotlNPII.. 
The number of inetnbera at presietit constituting the TieK'slative 
Ootincil is forty-two. The number cannot he less than ten, but is 
otherwise unlimited. Prior to 1891 Conncillora summoned by the 
Governor held Uieir appointmenCs for life; but on the 17th of Sep- 
tember of that year an Act, was passed giving the Council power tg 
elect its own Speaker for a period of five years, and making future ap- 
pointments to the Council tenable for seven years only, lobe reckoned 
from the date of the writ of summons of the Councillor's appoiutiiient, 
though every such Councillor may be reappointed. The qualilicationB 
ate that the person to be appointed be of the full ago of twenty- 
oue years, aud a subject of His Majesty, cither natural-born or 
naturalised by or under any Act of the Lnponal Purliarueul or by or 
under any Act of tbe General Assembly of Now Zealand. All con- 
tractors to the public service to an amount of over £50 and Civil 
servants of the colony ara ineligible as Councillors. Payment of 
Councillors is at the rate of £200 a year, payAt>le monthly. .'Vctaal 
travel ling- expenses to and from Wellington are also allowed. A 
deduction of £1 6s. per sitting day is made in case of an absence, 
except through illness or other unavoidable cause, exceeding fourteen 
sitting-days in any one session. Under "The Legislative Council 
Act, 1891," a seat is vacated by any member of the Council : (1.) If 
he takes any oath or makes any declaration or acknowledgment 
of allegiance, obedience, or adherence to any foreign Prince or 
Power ; or (2). if he does, or concurs in, or adopts any act whereby 
ho may become a subject or citizen of any foreign State or Power, or 
is entitled to the rights, privileges, or immunities of a subject of any 
foraign State or Power ; or (S), if ho is a bankrupt, or compounds 




32 



HEW ZEAL.AND OFFtClAL TKUt-BOOS. 



with his creditors under any Act tor the time being in force ; 
or (4), if he is a, public defaulter, or is attainted of treason, or is cod> 
victed of felony or any infamous crime ; or (S), if he resits his seal 
by writing und&r his hand oddres&ed Eo and accoptttJ by the Gover- 
nor; or (6), if for more thtin one wholo scssioi] of the General 
Assembly he foils, without permission of the Governor notified to the 
CouDcil, to give his attcadaocc in tho Council. By the Staodti^ 
Orders of the Council, the jirf^aence of one-fourth of the member* of 
(he Council, exclusivo of those who have leave of absence, is neceKSonr 
to constitute a nieecinj; for the exercise of its powers. Ttiis rule, hov- 
aver, may be altered from time to time by the Council. 

The oniinary sitting-days are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Tborsdaya, 
and Fridays, from '2.iO p.m. to 6 p.m., resuming again at 7.30 wlieik 
necessary. 



Roll or Meubchs ok 

TBS HONOUIUDLB THK LuGlSLATlVt: CuUNClL OF KkW 

(May, 1902.) 

Speaker— Tbu Hon. Sic il£Mar Jofis Millkr, Kt. 

Obaicman of Comiiutt«e»— The Kou. Wil.u«u Douous H«i.[. Baiu-ib. 




SfttU*. 



Province aI 

DIatrlet. 



D>t« of AppQlntmsot. 



Arltwrighc, tha Uon. Ftftnois 

Bailli«. die Hoii. Williani DuurIm Hall . . 

Baroiooaii, tbe Hon. John W&IIii 

Boll, til e Hon. Wiilmm Mounl .. 

Bowen, llit Uou. CLmrluB OliriKLophtt 

Oa^niATi, the )Inn. Alfrod Jecoms, CM G. 

Feldwick, the Hon. Honry 

PinMt, Cue tloii. FmnoiR Humpttria 

Oourl«v, the Uoa. Hugh 

Onwc. tho tl>-in. MnrgAii StivniilAUB, Q.U.G' 

H*rriii, tli« Hon. itatijiuniu 

Hol'oM. t*i« Hon, Ja-uflH 

JeDkinooa. tho Hon. John Elward 

Jenningfl, tho Hon. Williani Tliomu 

Johnntcin, tho Hon. Chn.fioii John 

JoDOv, tha Hon. Qiacntv 

Kellj, thfi Hon. Thoia&B 

Kollj, th« Uuii. William 

Kenny, iho Hoq. Gourtnvy Willi&m Ayloier 

Tiiouiu* 
IjOiiiMOn, tbe Hon, Cn&rlei 
MoLeftn, tho Hoti. U«Lirg6 
M^nhall, iho Hqh. J«mf8 
Miller, tha Hon. Sir Huary Jobn, Kl. 

(Spi>&kur) 
ilout(jo[infry. Lha Hou. William. . 
Morriti. tho Hon. Gegrg« Bontham 
Ormood, tho Hon. Jolin Daviea 
pMtcock, tha [Ion. John Thomas 
Piiikert'jn, ttiD Hon. Da*id 
Pitt, the H m. Albert, Ll»uc. -Colon el 



Wflllington. 

Marlborough. 

Nelaon. 

OLago. 

Cantoibury. 

Aookiand. 

OtMO 
W«lllogCDIl. 

Diitiedio. 

Wi^^llinglon. 

All{:kUtiiJ. 

Wan tl And. 

Canteibuf}'. 

Auckland. 

Welliiigtoo. 

Oiago. 

Taranaki, 

Auckland. 

MarlbocQugb. 

Caiiterbiir;. 
Otagu. 

WwilaQ<i. 
Omgo. 

GaiitctbuT]'. 

Auckland, 

Hawke'a Bay. 

Canterbury. 

Omgo. 

Nekon. 



13 Daoembar. I89S. 
8 March. 186L.t 

11 May, ieea.t 

13 October, 189a.* 
33 J'anuaiv, Itntlf 
31 D.-ocntbar. IBUO. 

15 0<;Uib«r. 1893.* 
S3 June, 1899. 

33 June. 18^. 
13 Mftv. 1870.t 
3 K-bruary. 1897. 

18 April, 1909. 
6 June. 1898.1 

16 Oolob«r. 1899.* 
2:i January, 1691.1 
13 Duoomber. ISM,. 
16 October. IHUS." 

3 F«bruarv, 189T. 
15 May, 1882.1 

•21 Deoembrr, 1900. 

19 Deoember, ISSl.f 
18 AprU, 1S03. 

8 July. lBSS.t 

15 October, 1893.* 
IS Uay. 18».1 
30 January, 189L.t 

9 0clob(>r. 187 T.t 
3 Ft'bruary, IStfT. 

33 December, 1891^. 



* Ile«p|>olnt«(I, Iflth Octolwr IA99. 4 Lila tnomban. ! Boappolntwd. Gtli Joaa, MO 




U0U88 OP KGPKESEKTATIVBS. 



33 



Boll op Mbubbbs op thk Leoislativb Council — continued. 



»ftlD«. 



Pravtncikl 
DtlMet. 



Dkt* of Ajipolntmuit. 



IImtcr, tlw Bon. lUctiurd Hann&n JaflarM 
Rigg, UtB Hon, John 
Sooduid, lfa» lion. H«iiry 
Shrimilri. tbe Hon. Samuel Edwud 
Sniilli, titr- Hon. Altred Lm 
Bmilh, the Hon. Willinni Cowp^r 
Swveiis, thfi Hon. EilwMd Ccpliu Jahn . . 
SwansoD. the Hon. Wltliam 
T&iaroA,th() Hon. Hori Kerei 
TcimoMia, ttio Hnn. HonAfo 
Twoincy. lb» Hon, Juroiniah Mottliow 
Walker, Iho Hon. Lancelot 
Walker, the Hod. Williani Campbell, 

C.MO. 
Whitmon, the Hon. Sir Goorae Stoddatt, 

K-C.M.a. 
Wiltiams, the Hon. Henr; 



Kolpton. 

Wellington. 

Taranitki 

OtARV. 
OtAftO. 

Knwkp'* Bay. 

Canterbury. 

Auckland. 

Hawks'* IJkjr. 
Cant«>)iury. 
C«nii>rbury. 
Cttflterbury . . 

Hawlce'a Bky 

Auckland 



13 Dcoomber, IMS. 

6 June, 1803.; 

2< Fnbmiin-, 1H68.I| 
IS May, 1885.t 
IS June, HK)». 
13 DeuembiT. IBM. 

7 Maroh. ISSS.f 
15 May, 1380. t 
If) Mar. lKH5,t 
24 June, 1K<J8. 

18 Jnn«. 18116. 

19 May. l&SS.^ 

IS October, 1892." 

91 Auguit, 1669.1 
7 March. ie»2.t 



* B«ap|ialB»»<l. 141b October, I BBB. • Life Uerabar. t Beappalat«d.ftU> Jbu'O. ISOa 

Clerk of Pftrliamenu, Clerk t>t the Legislative Council, and Examiner of 
Standing Ordcm upon Pnvatfi Billa — Leoiinixl Stowe, 

ICIenc-AiuiBtanl — Arthur Thomiu Hotbainloy. 
Soooud Clerk' Avsisttknt — George Moore. 
InBOfpre(«r— Uenry S. Hadtleld. 
EOUSB OP ReI'KBSENTATIVKB. 
The number of members constiLutin^ the Hourq of Kepresen- 
tativsB is seventy -four — seventy Europeans anil four Maoria.§ This 

■ number was fixed hy the Act of 1887. which ciune for the first time 
into practical operation at the general election of 1690. Previously 
(from I8H1) the House consisted of ninety-five members— ninety-one 
EuropeaoB and four Maoris. The North Island at present renirna 
thirtv-four Europtnn mcinberB, and the Middle Island thirty-six. 
The Cities of AucklainH, Wellington, ChriBtchurch, and Dunedin rtitum 
each three members, and all other electoral districts one each. The 
olectioufi aje triennial, except in the case of a di»8ohibion by the 
Governor. Every registered elector, being of the male sex, and free 
from any of the digqualificatioue mentioned in section 8 of "The 
Electoral Act, 1893." in eligible for men,.bership. All contractors to 
the public service of New Zealand to whom any public money above 
H the sum of £60 is payable, directly or indirectly, in any one tinan- 
^^xiftl year, as well as the Civil servants of the colony,, are incapable of 
^Di^g elected as, or of sitting or voting as, members. The payuieui 
^^ntde to members gf the House of Representatives is £25 per month, 
amounting to £300 per annum. £3 for every sitting-day exceeding 
fourteen is deducted on account of absence during session not due 
to sickness or other unavoidable cause. Travel ling-cxpcuses to and 



$— 7«aebook 




I Soo tod^DOt* CD pace IS, iml«. 



34 



NEW zbaXjAso official txar-book. 



from Wellington are also allowed. This scale of payment came 
into force on the 7th November, 1901, under the provisions of "The 
Payment of Members Act, 1901." Twenty members, inclusive 
of the Speaker, constitute a quomm. Unless otherwise ordered, 
the sittiog-davB of the House are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 
and Fridays, from 2.30 p.m. to o.30 p.m., resuming at 7.30 p.ni. Order 
of admission to the Speaker's Gallery is by ticket obtained from 
the Speaker. The Strangers' Gallery is open free to the public. 



Boll op Mexbebs of the House of Repbbsentatitbb. 
(2sD May, 1902). 
Spoftker— The Hon. Sir Gkokge JIacbicb O'Rowce, Kt. Baofa. 
Chairman of Commillees — Artrcb Robsbt GcnmxGS. 



Xkme. 



Electors) Distrlet. 



; Dsta of NottflMtlooot 
B«tiira of Writ. 



For Europtan ElectoraUt. 
All«n. Edmund GibloU .. 
Allen. Jamea 
Arn -Id, Junri Firderick 
Alkinion, Arthnr Richmond 
Barclikf. Alfred Richud .. 
Bentitt, Jftciea .. 
Bollard, John .. 
Buddn, Dftvid 

Cftrnerons. Waller Ch&rlea Frederick 
Carroll, Hon. Jaines 
Collin*. William Whitehouae 
CoUin, Jftmea 

Duncan, Hon. Thomas Yoang 
Ell, H«irv Georga 
Field, Wiilinm Uaghei . . 
Fiaher, GeorRe . . 
Flatman. Frederick Robert 
Fowlds, Geoi^e . . 
Fnuier, AHnd Levavasour Durell.. 
Fraser, William 
Gilfedder, Michael 
Grah&in, John .. 
GuinneiiB, Arthur Robed . . 
Hall. Charleo .. 
Hall-Jones, Hon. William 
H&nan, Joeial) .\Ured 
Hardv, Chnrlei* Albert Creery 
Ha(«ld n. PrediTick Henry 
Herrief), William Herbert 
Hogg, Aletander Wilson 
H rii-by, J'>hn Thomai Marry&t .. 
Houstou, Robert Morrow 
Hutche'<oi), John 
Lang, Frederic William .. 
Lauren-^oii, George 
Lawrr, Frank .. 
LetlibridiiO. Frank Yates 
Uackenzie, Tliomas 



Waikouaiti. 
i Bruce. 

City of Dunedin. 
: City of Wellington. 
; Gi'j of l>anedin. 
' Tiiapeka. 
' Eden. 
'. Kaiapoi. 

Taieri. 
\ Waiapa. 

I Citv of GhriBtchuroh. 
\ Buller. 
^ Oamaru. 

' Citv of Ghristchnrch 
! Otaki. 
; City of Wellington. 

Geraldine. 
, City of Auckland. 

Kapicr. 

Wi^atipa. 
. WalUce. 

Citv of Nelson. 

Grey. 

Waipawa. 

Timaru. 

Invercargill. 
, Selwyn. 

Patea. 
, Bi*y of Plenty. 

Masierton. 

Wairar&pa. 
. Bay of Ifllandd. 

Citv of Wellington. 

Waikato. 

Lvttelton. 

Pamell. 

Rangitikci. 

Waihemo. 



2T Deesmbw, 189ft. 



11 JanuaiT. 1900. 
27 Decembar, 18W. 



11 November, 1901. 
37 D<eember, 189y. 



23 July, 1900. 



HOUBB OP BEPBB8ENTATIVB8. 



8tt 



BoLCi OF Members of the House of Bepresbmta.tivbs — 

continued. 



N&nie. 


B lector ftl Dlitrlot. 


Date of Notlflcatlon of 
Return of Writ. 


For European BleetoraUt —ooati. 






MoOowan, Hon. Junes .. 


Thames. 


27 Deoember, 1899. 


McOuire, Felix , , 


Hftwera. 




MoKenzie, Koderiok 


Motueka. 




MaLaolil&n, John 


Ash burton. 




UoNab, Robert .. 


Mataura. 




MMsey, William Fergueon 


Franklin. 




Meredith, Biobard 


Ashley. 




Millar, John Audrew 


City of Dunedin. 




Mills, Hod. Cliailes Houghton 


Waiiau. 




Monk, Ricliard . . 


Waitemata. 




Hspier, William Joseph .. 


City of Auckland. 




O'Meara, John . . 


Pahiatua. 




O'Horke, Hon. Sir George Maurioe, 


Uanukau. 




St. Baob. 






Palmer, Jackson 


Ohinemuri. 




PitSJii, Frederick 


Palmers ton. 




Bhode^, Bsbert Beaton . . 


EUesmere. 




Ruaiiell, George Warren .. ' 


Bicoarion. 




Russell. William Bunsell 


Uawke's Bay. 




Seddon, Bi. Hon. Riohard John, P.G 


Westland. 




Sidey, Toomas K^y 


Caversham. 


80 Deoemb-r, 1901. 


Smith, Edward Metcalf .. 


Taratiakt. 


27 Deoember, 1899. 


Smith, a or^e John 


City of Ohristohnich . 


22 July, 1901. 


SteTens, John .. 


Manawatu. 


27 December, 1899. 


Steward. Hon. William Jokes 


Waitaki. 




Symos, Walter . . 


Egmont. 




Tanner, William Wilcox.. 


Avon. 




Thompson, Bobert 


Mareden 




Thomson, James Wiltiara 


Clutha. 




Ward, Hon. Sir Joseph Qeorge, 


A warn a. 




KC.M.Q. 






Wilford, Thomas Mason . . 


Suburbs of Well'gton 




Willis, Archibald Dudingston 


Wanganui. 




Witheford, Joseph Howard 


City of Auckland. . ~ 


8 Hay, 1900. 


For Maori Electorates, 




Day of Eleelion. 


Heke, Hone 


Northern Maori. 


9Jatiuaf7. 1901.* 


Eaibau, Henare 


Western Maori. 


19 December, 1899. 


Paiata, Tame . . 


Southern Maori. 




Pare, Wi 


Eastern Maori 


- 



* Writ iDdorsed, Slat Jaonarr, ISOI. 

Clerk of House of BepreAentatives — H. Utterson. 
Clerk- A snis taut — A. J. Butherfurd. 
Second Clerk- Assistant — A. F. Lowe. 
3ergeant-at-Arms — Mnjor T. V. Shepherd, 
Reader and Clerk of Bills and Papers— E. W. Kane. 
Chief Hansard Reporter — Silan Spragi;. 
Interpreters— L. M. Grace, W. E. Gofl. 
Clerk of Writs— H. Pollen. 
Deputy Clerk of Writs- 



Librarian -Charles Wilson. 



86 



mw XEAXtAm omcui* raAB-BOOx. 



OFFICIAL LIST. 
(-26th April, 1902.) 



PRRUIKR'S OFFICE. 
Premin^Rt. Il.m. R. 3. Ssddon, P.C. 
SacRlArT to Cmbiiift — A. J. WiU» 



COLONIAL SECRRTARY'S DE 
PAKTMKM. 

Cribf Owwicm. 
Colonial SMWtarT— Hon. Sir J. O. Wu<1, 

K.C.U.O. 
Cndpr-S*vr>rt«rT — ITug*i Pollen 
Chi*f Cirrk— R. F. Ltucli 
Cltrkt—J. f. Andnwt, A. R. CrnncdT 
OlEifrr in ClisnT >^f GoT^mment Buiid- 

ittft— W. II. Hennkb 



RBOiaTKAH or Rivrai, Dsatbi^ «■» 
Masbiaois. 

Fmr Chief Tkmmm. 
. Auckland — K. H. Ljona 
; Welliitron— F. W.MMaSrid 
' CLri'icliurch— L. C. Williwaa 
[ Dunedin— W. J. Hall 

' PKt5TI56 AKD StATHMSBT DOiAMr- 
HKVT. 
QoTfrnmml Printer, Stalionety OMo* 
Uuiacer. and C<()ntiuiirr of Staay 
Prinlixg— Jolin Umekmj 

Superinltniiinc Overaeer — J. J. QsMbb 
Clii^f Cierk and Ac«ounlaat — B. B. Alk» 
Clrrk *nA Computer— ?(. B. K. Madfj 
Clerkt — F. BArraud. J. W. Hall. B. 
W.tu. A. Slaw, A. WUliam 



ArDiT Offiok. 

ContMller and Audiloi-Oen«r«i-J. K. CW*!t#-A. Pai*rwu 

WarburtoB. HitmtarJ Survrritoi^H- F. MMk> 

AtaifUnt ContToller and Auditor — J. C. Ofrr-wrr*— B. Wilfon, J. P. Rog eia 

^•Tin Orme^r. Jobi-in^-room— Q. TaUlc 

C1)i#rOi«ti — L. C. Ro«kni(:e Sifhi FoTvnan — D. ArcUtald 

0*fk»— W. IXnid. II. S P.in«>. W. Q. B«ui,T,_w Fuller. H S. Hoa 
llM.l«>tM-ili. K. i- A. Si«ren«on. 0. U L<^. W SBtheriand 

U aev-rwr*on. J U.F.»•l«.J.Sk*^ Or*,»**r. U.« «*-r«».-J. PIuffi« 

PMI. R. A drai , . », . - » 



CWWU-C- K. Ka«lon. O. T. Bof> 

OftJeile-K. A.0»»« 

Ku<» Clrrfc*— n 1iin<*. J.S^ift. A 
K BtkIm. J Warxl. r. K. Bn,qp, K K 
STiti:-e, J M-^' IU-n'.i^*n. t. S 

Attdil OAt'yr, AcT'^il A)r»*I«r* OiC<r«. 
lxv,.i..„ ^> |,-. \v ("Suiter 

*«.il l-M'evi.-r* IV r \Vf!+, A H 
Ma." ca-, J Ki!»i. A \V K*-i-.<*, O 

II J Kn»5.'i'., v" V J,-"'.i»«Mi, J. I 

l^^i-vV. M \ l*v>. B A kl»a. 
A A IWtL..-># 

C*-*.* V H M»,-aJW W W O.v'l 
I*si*i O;*^ :^ v\\#»» 



S-b-OTprMvr. UachiBCTooa — John 

0*erfe«r. BiT-.iinp BivkIi — W. TmnUiB 
$uS-.'>*er*Mr. Bindirg BnnHi — O. H. 

B'v\a,-. 
F,-T*«o— .*.■:. Birkiinf Branch — Ifiaa 

;*J4Mt!V P-.-.:*r— n. ni;me 
Foripiva-. l;tSx~*i'^'^' B-«Bck — D. Bav 
Sifwv-.ijvTa-vi K.f<K •vtv per— W.J. Kirk 
K ^,-**r -T K BaT«r' 



i\>IONlAI. TRK^SrRKS'a DB- 
iVkKlMKM. 

v'kiif Oftick. 
v\v.v,, l:y«»..r«<^K]. Uon K J. 8ed- 

v<.- . -» tNix— «»;«T-t.i«-W4«I. and B»- 
tniT.'f Ne« * 'i-i'i'tiiiIi Taniw 



I* ii««< 



«««-ANI 



OFFICIAL E1I8T. 



«T 



I 



AfvoitnUvnt to tit* Ttmmitt— Rabovt J, 

CMliier— C. E. Clihu; 
CorrtejiAndittgClArlc— II. BIuhijaII 
CUrk»— R- B. Vi.iiBia. W. C, Cooper. 
K. I.. MAiThnj, A. O. Qibho*, J. 

If.'lniM, H. N W. (.-liMn!l>, A. J, 

Morgan, T. J. I)«vii., F. II- Turkv- 

U. Ilft«tl9orn. R. Pi*l.er. W. Wilton, 

a. A. FrMor, Q. C. Kaiida. 
Cutivf—W. OilUiidpft. J. Clmrtit, 

H W. Willum* a. S. Mielt*nii«. 

W. L. Crapwn, A- Hnrc 
OadrtiM— L. ML-<tii(i>1), M. RbUioil, 

D. M. Solirftinin, H. ii. llAtliun, 

K. U. 'nijlor, E. S. W»tU. K. A. U, 

B»rrag« 
OSMr for pAvmrntnf [n)pl^ri«l Pennons 

ftt Aucktaii'il — B. J- PsroiiBj 

VailiNDLr Sucistikh' ahd Tk&db 

Umoks' KioisTuy OrncB. 
R«KUlriir — E. MiMCfii 
R«Ti«ini; BurrJuVr— L. O. Reid 
Clerk — V. T. Bviicotii 

OLD'-iOH I'mksiov* OrrioB. 
fUgUtmr— J. iCmnu ^iiiith 
DupuiT RoKitLrart— 

Auiiklkiiil— Juhn King, Rpgislmr of 

blrcton 
Wi-Ui<iKUm-F. W. Manifleld, ReKn- 

tmr at Birtha, ke. 
Cliri*iohuroli— li. C. Willuins, Regit- 

tnr of Kloi-borB 
DuiiiKtiii— Robert Uttt 
(la nil oUirr Pmaion DittricU CJcrke 
of ttiD &I>gUtr*tfl«' CourlH km lite Dir- 
putj Kcgiil.r&r*) 



]>K- 



LAMO AND lNOO«K TAX 

PAKIMKNI'. 
Cocniniuiorier — Jvlin MoOoxan 
Dofiutj OoiiiniiMionor— Cl> F. C. CBmp- 

bell 
Chief Clerk— p. J. H. I). Wtl.iwiwy 
AcouurilKiil— P. i\rjf 
Clorki— A. J. MeO^-iran, H. Nunonrrow, 

J. M. King, \V. MTTer., J. W. Bl»a, 

C, V. KrBofi, a, W. Jiiiiiiih, D. R. 

Puflie. I>. a, Clark. J. aii<>«i»ciii, 

K. lUndrll. K. Hepxorl.h, S. Kudduth. 

J. V«rgUK»i. tl. 8. Uiirroii 
Oad«4«— C. E. J. DowUtid, H. A. Aodcr- 

ton, 0. J. Ld»U, J. M. Park 



DKPARTMKNT OV JUSTICE. 
IliiAti Orrici, 
iliniit«r of Jiutioo — Uon. Jamoi 
UcUowui 



tTn<trr>3ecraUrj — P. Walde^psva 
Chiflf Clfrk— C. B. Jord«n 
Tr<tn*lBi.T— G. U. Ditrie* 
Clrrka— C K. Maetlie<rs, G. V Dixon. 
A. J. TlioM>i>»oi] 

Csovrx L*w Ofiice. 
Altornajr.(}MiLerAl^(vacaitl) 

9i>tiritor-9oiieral — F. Fiuhett, M.A., 

1,L.I). 
AisinUiiit Tinw Ofltcvr^In. Q. Raid 
L»w Drnft^innii — 
Clerk— K- Y. Rcdward 

PATimT OrrioR. 
R(|ti*Lmr ol Patfnl*. Oraif^, uid Trade- 

iiittrk*— F Wiililegnifc 
n»piiiy Rtyivirur— J.O. Lewii 
Clerk— Marj Kjro 

JOfitOIAL. 

Suprrtnt Comri Jvigf. 
Oliiof Jiittii-e — 

WellingtOM— Sir R. Stout, K.C.U.G. 
Jiidee* — - 

W piling toil- W. B. Edwardi, Tbao. 

Coopf-r 
AiukUod— K. T. CofioIIj- 
Cliritti')iiir''li — J. K l>(>niii*tan 
Diinodin — J. S. WillimnB 

VUlrict Ctttrt Jmd^ti. 

Wairarapn, Waiieondi, N«w PlymoBtb, 
llawrrii, nnil ritliii<-r*t.i>ii North — C. 0. 
KvMlv 

NeLon— H. W. Robinwn 

Ailibiir<.on, Tirimni, Oamarii, Qii«ena- 
I0W11. N»»ol'y, l.H.wrcni«, [nrFrwirgilt, 
Holtitika.Oro^matitli. Wr»t|iorl, IWf- 
ton, and Kumani — C. D. B, Ward 

Kiiifulrara of (he Huprtme Court. 
Aui-Llnnil — 11. G Brewvr 
New Plvmoutli— R. U Stanford 
Wamtaniii — U. C. KetLte 
Ndjiier — A. Tyriibull 
Oiitti>rn«— W. A. Barton 
Wellington — D. Q. A. Ocoper 
NpIboii— il. W. Kobiiitiiii 
Blenlipiiii — A. MoArClmr 
CliriBt^-liiircl) — A. K. Bluiiim 
Uukilika-^^'. a Da; 
Duricdin — Q. A. Kiii|> 
InrnriMrgiU — J. R. Culyer 

Sh^rijft. 
Auckland— B. C. Br«w«r 

Taraunki— A. U. HoIitim 
Uawke't Bttjr— A. Turitbnil 





38 



NBW ZBAtiAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOX. 



Parartj Bay— W. A. Barton 

WrlliiiKloti— T). 0. A. Cooper 

WairarH))* — E Riwran 

WaiiKRniii and Rnniiilikei — 0. A. Barton 

NeiMii — W. limp* 

Weitlaiid Nortli— K. C. KtAYing 

Crntral Wf-lland— A. Atkenbeok 

Uarltxi rough — J. IVrrjr 

Canterburj— A. R. Bloxam 

Timaru— C. A. W'nj 

W«tland— V. a. Day 

Oujto— 0-. A. Kinn 

Southland— J- H. Colyer 

Croteit Solieilort. 

Auokland— Hon. J A. Toln 
New FKtnoiilli— A. Standiili 
Qwbonie--J. W. NoUn 
Napier— A. J. Cotterill 
W.-lli.iRt«ii— II. Oiilly 
Wai)|iH»iii— 3. T. Fililierbert 
Nd*»i— C. Y. Fell 
BleiiiK-iin — K McCallum 
Cliri»lL*liurcli — T. W. Stringer 
Timani— J. W. Wliite 
DuitMlin— J. F. M. Fr.i»er 
Incercarfiill — T. M. Maiilonald 
Oauiaru— A. G, Cn'Kcli 

Crote* Proift'uloi-* ( DiAfift ComrltJ. 
New PlyniuiilIi~A. I^lititdiili 
Ilawrm'— K. h. Uarlori 
Waiinatiiii a»d i'alitientoii Nortli— S. T. 

Fiiilirrbfrt 
U«*((TliMi — A. K. lliimiy 
NrUoi.-- 0. Y. Fell 
\l'r»t[Htrt and Hrefluii— 0. K. Ilanlen 
HtfhilikH— J. I'ai-k 
Grevnioiitli - M Ilannan 
Tiniuru- J, \V, Uliiie 
Oaitiani- A. I). rrrH|ili 
QiiM'ii-lowii Wenl.-v Tiiriun 
IiiTercarKill- T. M. MNi'itmiald 

StiyrHiiiii ly Mitj/iili'alrii. 
AuckUiul It \V. Ilnthiiiil ; 

Pokfiio, Wniknto Ai-, II. W. Norllicnifl ' 

OnrIlll|i|!ll. Ai'. '1'. 1tll<i-lii«iMI* 

Rufrfil. A.- K r. |IU«ull.'ld 
Tauniii|:a. A.' .1. M, llolurt** [ 

Tliamw. At-.- U.S. Hu-li» 
Oial'oriie. Ao W. A I'lirlioi 
Krw I'lviiiniitli K. 1,. SiHiifi>ril 
Ilaorni. Ai'. II. Kjri' Kritiiv 
>Vaii);Hiuii, Ai' - 1'. I' Korilr 
Paltiiin>li<ii Nurili. Ai- .\. Ort'eiilleld 
Wellintir.iii. \v W . K. UaH-Men 



Wairarapa, ke.—W. P. Jkoim 

Napier lite. — A, Tunibull 

Nelson- U. W. Robineon* 

Moiufka, CoIUiigwood, Ao. — Vilna 

Heapi* 
Bleiilieiin, ko. — A. MeArthur* 
CliriBl«lnircli, &c. — H. Ueetliam 
Kainpoi, lic. — tl. W. BUliop 
'riinani, Ac. — C. A. Wray 
Qreyiiioutli, Wntport, te. — K. ■. 

HMirkini* 
Hokiiika, Sk.—I>. Macrai4an«' 
Diinedin, &o.— £. U. CaroM* uid O. 0. 

Uraliam 
Oaniarii, Ac— J. Keddell* 
Millun, ius.—Q. Cruickihank* 
Clyde, Ac— F. J. BiirReM* 
Nasfby— J. McEnni** 
Iiivercarfill,&u.— S. B. McCarthy* 
Cliutliani Itlaiidi — K. S. Floraiice 

Official A»»ig»et» i» BanJermpt^. 
AiK'kland— J. Lawion, J.P. 
nVlliiiglon- J. Aslurrort, J.P. 
Cliriili'liiin-ti — O. L. Qreenwood 
Duiiediii— C. C. Graliain, 8.U. 

Cltrki of District and Magiwtrmfm^ 

Comrti. 

New Plymoulh— A. H. Holmoa 
llawera- A. Trimble 
Waii^Biiiti — C. A. Bitrton 
I'Hliiirnioii Norib — W. UatraT«n 
Mitalerton — £. RiwHoti 
NVJiH,,,— C. II. VVebb-Bowen 
ilokiiika-W. A. I). B.mka 
Kiiiii'ita — T. M. [^wlor 
On>.vimiiitU — U. Harfier 
\Vr*iport — E C. KeUiiig 
Keffl<>n — A. A* km beck 
Tiiiinrii— T. Howler 
A>libtirtttii— T. W.'Tayler 
ONinBrii-K P. ■\Vafvt' 
liivori-ardill — J. K. ('iilyer 
l^uei-ii»iii«ii — A. A. Mair 
Ii««i-eiii-e— A, M. Eye* 
Nttseby- F. Hart 

RrtTirrri of GoU Rerr»«e, Mi»imf 
tirfiittriiri. iimii Clrrti of If'ard»ma' 
.r»tii M%ii/i*tralrt' Cunrl*. 

Tliniiit'v — J. Jnrdni) 
iVvi'iiiamli'l — 1). BHiik* 

rilrii>a ' 11. K. Burll 

Wnilii— K. W, C-ve 
laiirHi'iia — \V. A. Tboni 



Ati' aU(i \\ ardtn* k<t i)k>liint<l la. 



OFFICIAL LIST. 



Whangitr«i— Q. M. Robert«hi» 

Unrelock (U>>rlborau([h)— H. MoArdle 

Nelanii— 0. II. W«bb-Uoweli 

Blenbeim — Jolm Terry 

Motueka— H. K. Oilbfrt 

CoUingnrood— W, 8pnle 

Wa-lpurt— B. C. Kelling 

Charleston— T. A. &orf(rey 

Brnfion — A. A-kenbrck 

Aliaiin— J. 0. M«ifro7 

Qreyiiioulh— B. Harper 

Koiiiara— T. M. Lawiiir 

Uokitika— W. A. D. Bank! 

Na»Bbj, 4e.-F. Hart 

Wjndliain— D. Bogue 

Clydp, Black'i, and Alexandra— F. T. D. 

JelTrey 
Oram well — J. Fleming 
Queeiiatowii and Arrombown — A. A. 

Mair 
Lawreiicw — A. M. Ejei 
Qore— M. Folej 
RiTerlon— A. O-. Aihby 

Cltrkt of UagUtratet' Court: 
AuckUnd-II. O. Ralfe 
Oiaborne — O. J. Jiilinatone 
Baniilion— T. Kirk 
Napier— R. B. Matlua* 
Baiting*— P. Skerrett 
Siratford— J. B. Sloney 
Daiiiie*irke- S. Tatmlej 
Marlon, &0.—F. M. Dfighl.on 
Wflllirigion— A. D. Tlioii.ion 
ChriBlcliun.-h— W. Martin 
Ljttellon— W. Sbanaglian 
^iapoi — M. Lynakej 
Waiiiiftte— W. Y. Purchaie 
Dunedin— W. O. P. O'Callaglian 

NiTivi Land Coubt. 
Chief Juilge— O. B. Daw 
Judges- A. MncksT, U. Scannell, H. W. 

Brahniit, W. J. Butler. U. F. Kdjcer, 

W. O. Mair. U. D. Johnton, J. U. 

Bfttliam 
Regi'trart — Auckland, J. W. Browne; 

Giabome, J. Brooking ; Wellingloti, 

B. C. Sim 

Commiuiontrt aflht A'alivf Land Covrt. 
B. S. Buah, A. TurnbiiU, F. U. Blom- 

field, C. 0. KeUle, J. M. Robt-rU, 

W. Sluart, H. W. Biiliop. K. H. 

Cftrew, H. £. Kennir, R. L. Slanfurd, 

T. Hutcbiaon, H. W. Bubinaon, R. S. 

Flomnce : Sub ■ ( onimiBaionera — J. 

Brooking, W. A. Thorn 
flureniment Native Ageot, Otorobanga 

—a. T. Wilkinaon 



TlUDATIOK CODET. 

Chief Judge— Q. B. Dary 

Judgrs— Tb« Judgea of tue Native Land 

Court 
Regiitrar* — The Begiatrara of the Native 

Land Court 

COKOKBM. 

Coronera— Auckland, £. Baker, T. Qr<n- 
hani ; Coromandel, A. B. U. Swindle; i 
Ciillingwood, E. Davidaon ; Foiton, 
H. S. Tbynne; Hamilton, J. S. Bond; 
Hawera, C. £. Major ; Hukitika, R. W. 
Wade; Marton, A. Boaa ; Olia'ana, 
Oliiwa, 8 Batea; Olahnhii, S.Luke; 
Otaki W. H Simcox ; Paeroa, W. Kor- 
reat; Piihi. J. B. Ari<-ll ; Paltnenton 
North. J. Mowlem; Fort Albert, L. P. 
Becroft ; Quefnalown, L. Uotop j 
RHgian, W. H. Walli»i Midhir*t, J. 
Mai-kuy ; I'likaka, A. SincUir ; Thaniea, 
A. bniL'e ; Tauranga. A. C. H. Tore; ; 
Te Awamutu, J. B. Teaadale ; Te 
Kopurn.T. Webb; Waipaw«,S Jolm- 
aoM ; Wrllinglon, J. Ashcrofl; Wha- 
ngiirvi,J. M Killen; Woodville. E. J. 
Ooihard. All Slipendiary Magiatratea 
are tx oj^eio Coronera. 

Nbw Zialakd Police Foboi. 

Head Office, 

Commi-aioner— John Bennett Tuiibridge 

Chief Clerk — Jalin Krana 

Cirrka — .lolm 'Inaker, William John 

Mahone;, Waller Qollan 

Police liepartment. 
Inapei^tora — PelerPender.Williai" Stone 

Parriy, John Cnllen, John Wjbmnt 

£lli<on, Robert Janipi Q'lliea, Terence 

O'Brien, Ewen Mttcdonell 
Snh-Ini>peclnra— NiuboieB Kiely, Edward 

WilKon, Alfn^ Jnmea Mitchell, Patrick 

Black, Henrj Oreen 

Pkisonb Dbpabtment. 

In^peclor — Lieut.-Culunel Arthur Uume, 
N.Z.M. 

Clerk— T. E. Richnrdaon 

Oxolera — Aui-kUnd, Francia Egerton 
Severne, I)iini>dii>, Samuel Cimrlee 
Pliillipi; llokilika, 1'homai Riwion 
Poinlun, Inrer'-argill, John lieiiry 
Brat by ; Lyllelton. Miiltliew Mit-hae) 
CleBrj ; Niipier, Micliarl Flaimery; 
New Plrnionili, Bartholoniew Lltiyd 
O'Brien i Wanganui, Robert T. N. 
BeHsley; Welliiiglon, Patrick Samuel 
Garrey 



NBW ZBALAIfD OPinnTAI, TBAR-BOOK. 



} 



DKPARTMENT OF IxnOSTRIKS 
KSn COUMEHUK- 

Mini^Ur— Hon SirJ O, Ward.K.C.M.O. 
StentMty — ^T. K Dunn* 
(Jliief CWk-G. a. Munro. 



DCfARTMKSr OF TOURIST AND 

HEALTH RKSORIS 
MiiiMr«r-l!oH.SirJ O. Wurd.E-GM.Gh 
a"|fBriiilpiidrtif. — T, E, 3'orni«i 
Clii*f 0(»rk— O- II. V. Kobtfwn 
Iii#pi>Kor — F. Moi'rlioiife 
Ulrrk>— 11. Kirk. U. U. llobinKlll 
.SliorUioiiii sn-il TytiUt— S. iliinB,[it 



DKPARTMKNT Of LABOUR. 
liiitwbT of t.itbour — Rb. UoH- R. J. 

8»<)<loii. I'.O. 
Saentaty !ar Laliour nad Cliiof In- 

■ pci-ior of FiK'loriot— H. Tregpftr 
Clti«r ('li-rk Niiil Dppiit^ Cliift Ins^iitor 

of FncloDc"— JiiiiiiM MftL'kB?' 
Clrrln— t'. Kunloj. F. A. dc In Mm-o 
SliorlUaiid Wntor aiu) Tjjiiit— J. W. 

CollJIIti 
Cadet — \V. Liiikltktt-r 

IjtBVBCl'UltS or yiCTUBU*. 
Nortli lalanil — J. Mliannglifiii, H- 

F«T|tiin:iti, U U. Brpwrll, W. J. 

BlBki-, W. H UHX^rr, M.rgnrvl Haw. 

tl)»r'i(t, mid 71 local lii*|>i'ctor« 
Soiilli UIiiiiJ— J. SliniinKliBii, J. I.Dinui, 

U. MniH-vU, J- B. LitKiixr, W. H. 

He^ifT, Margaret llAirtli.ortie, and 

BS Ilh-'sI Iri»[iri'U)r« 

(T)iFre arv also £00 BMrpuii Ag«iiU 
iti diflVrent part* «1 (lie colonjr.) 



I 



FUUI.1C WORKS 1>K1'ARTMHNT. 

USAU OFriOB. 

Uinirtrr for Public Vfork* — Hon. W. 

Hall -Julio* 
Und«rSi<i.Tr<i>iry— H. J 11. BIno 
KBgiiiPtfr-iiiOhiFf— W. H, Haiw 
SuiMrinlciiriiiig KngiiiDer — I*, ti. liar, 

It-A.. M ln.(.f.K 
1nap»«titis Etigmwr — R. W. Holmei, 

M In«t i:,K, 
Chief 01-rk-W. D. Diimlwll 
AcAuUDtaiit— O. J Oliipliani 
Laiid-ptiriliu* Offiiir— II. 'riiomiMoii 
Awurd Clc^k-U. Vr. U. MilUU 



Clcrlis— P. S. Wflldif, K. McCarthy. A. 

RiitHnll. K. UiAd, A. n. Kimbd). N. 

Jx^ohn, II. F Coiiifl, A S»<iip*t)ii, C- R. 

CrLi!pfoinl. P. J. Gnr*fj. *i. V. Sctiniidt, 

W. MuSninnra, .r .1, Hi-nnnir, *, L 

Ootdlincli. I.. Wliii<<, K. Ki<ld. K. W»bb 
Cliirf l}raiit;l>leiiinil — W G. Uiitb»rf<>rd 
Architrcl — J. Citiiipbell 
I>r«uglil»mi'ii— T. Prrbatn, K. JnckwTn. 

0. A. Unntic-e. W. Widie™, W. G. 

O. 8wnTi,J. II. Pniv. A. K. Kin,;, R. 

O. Apf.t.-a.irl.li, O. W. Phillipf, J. 

Bairii, A. A. NiclioWii, C A. Oir«n, 

J J Kmnor. A V Marmo, V. I- Kilt*, 

S T Siivor. A. T. P.ml 
Hcnd Siori'kcnpiT— .lolin Voiine 
Kiijjinonritiu L'luliits — J. Mi'NBtr.J NorriB 
(.•IrrJMl C«(li-t.— A I>. ["MrV.a.C. Perrj 
Clerical CikdRil«— E. M. U l.juc\> 

DiiTKior Uimciis. 
Diilrict Kiif;i.n«er«— AiH'klai><1, C. S. 
VitkiTMinu; Duiicdiii. K. R. Uaalier. 
-M Insi.CE 
Rrtidciit KngiiiMH — Hiiiiterri)t«, Q, L. 
Uook. M liinL.C E.; NcrrllihUnii Mrtiu 
Triiiik R<iil«>iT, J. A. ^^'il«01l, J. U- 
Loiidlii N.Uoii, W. A. Sfiriiii i Wfrt- 
p"rt., R. A. Vi>iiiif;, Awoi.'.M Intl (J H. : 
Ori>jiiiiiu.lh, J. 'I'liumtiaii, It.K. ; .Spriiie- 
Belli. W. H. QaTit, 
AatistnnI }Iii|;tiiritrt — J. J Ilaj. U.A. ; 
J. S. iju-«ari. S. J. Hiinliiiir. J. Q. 
Dobnor), K. M. 1lr)T*oii, J. llitnnah, 
J, K- Lrwi>. A. Jack, O. 0. Mi'dlita. 
Imn. F. II. Upjiuw, C. K. Arinairunit, 
W. W..iilo«M(i. H. ni«k«<in.,r. W. K. 
McKiiiH., A. Koj., J. V. Hiukell, 
J W. Tliwii^iin, F W. Fiirkon. J. 
Mnetiftn, W. P. UnYnilian. A. iio«ftrt, 
W. A. JelE, \V. SliflVratl. C- J. McKen. 
ti*, F. P. PrhIi?; 
Biiffirx-erins Cikdott — J. J. WiUftn. H. 
Vi{'kvriiiitti, !■'. S. Dv>on, J. Wood, 
L. 13 Cai.^vWlI 
l)ra>ij>)il9»ii'ii — C WqimI, W. A. Onm- 
iitifie, P. V M Biirnm.. W. 11. Iii*lu|., 
T J. MiCoiWer. L, h. Ki.-liard«. J. B. 
Hob^ruon. H. C. W. Wriflt. W. Q. 
[lanlint! 
Grrk*— VV. lunch. <■'. T. Ru>l>hrt)«k. jL 
R.8ci>ii«. A.J B.fcliffu. E. Wiutdfll, 
.I.H IMiloti, J. I) HorUiii.l, t'.tlabut. 
F. E. Blink., II. Gravr, O. T. araoo, 
R. O B^iil*. E. Crouoli. J. A. WhtW, 
W K Fitx^rnlH, U .M Slixin.. II. U. 
O'UotiiifflE, S. A. Hollnud, U. J. C. 
Pairiok 
Mtnntkitppim — T. DoU|{1aa, J. 0. Fulton, 
S. J. Honurictr 



OPPICUL LIST. 



41 



ft&lLWAVS DKPARTUBM. 

Hiiii«t«r tor R«ilwi»jrit~IIon, Sir J. O. 
VV«rd, K C.M.U. 

Omoral Muitiiijcir — T. RoiiKjrne 

raiiefClerk-R. W. MfVillj 

01erh(~l£. J. Aii'lTOix. It. M. Wibcin. 
W. ». RWer. J. L. U*j, W. Johii- 
•trin. J llului|>, C. Q. K<\w»nU. W. 
H. Uiff.trri, A. J. Will, .1. U. ri« l^in- 
b-rt, W. A. \V>lli"f'. i'. J. MfjOoTcm. 
W, II. Warren, A, N Ijobhi-hi. S. S. 
MilltniEton, O. L. 8i->iU--h. W. U. B. 
DooafMi, C. T. Rretia], H. Oenni. 
itudil Iiwpcoion^H. BsxLor, U. Uiinru, 
K. lli>Iu|i.juii. 

KailnaT Arc«u ntMlt^ A . 0. Fifo 

Ulorh.— li IJ.viil»..i, J. II- [>uv)»*. a. 
3. WilxKi, S K Oartu. J. M^-L«>., 
B. l)Ht*. A. UorrU. C. Bmwii, 
T. P*tllV, W. U. |i'i=lirr, J, J'iflli. 
B, J. FlomiMK. II U. U-oi.iir(i, R- J. 
Lo«, W. Bourk*. A. J Btfl».>rlliv, 
F, W. I,iul.. A. U. Hunt. W. E. 
Alurrii. F. K Torlvgu*. T. A. O'Ctin- 
nof, J' W. ])4_viniih, W. H. Siinii.ons, 
J. U- Onuiitlat. J. ITiiilurliill. 

StorA* Audit Iii»jicctor~F. J. Dawe* 
CUrk,— » C. lto-«. G. H. NuHP, C. F. 

F. A. R. latiiTwood, Q. Bcniirit, S. 

ALpp, H. W. Burtxit, K. 1, Mngiii'ii^M, 

R V Br.r. 4 T. U«u, L O Porlor. 

L. B. ArciiilMli). K. J.SfAitUiK^.J. \l. 

DjCr, J. R. RiibrrtKoii, A. I). Llllcolii, 

i. Kvtr, J UriiliiMpr, J. Uil]{<^b, J. 

QinniiDO, B, Ooltlltnch 
Clii>-f Tnlllo Uanaeer— W. II. Qnw 
Olerki— J. E. Arcii«(ror)^. O. A. 0. 

Bobic«oii, J. E. Wi'lilop. Q. Uuniliia, 

K. C Frowr. r. T llalh-fU 
TniRo SuijepitilciidttriU— Woiliiiglon, T. 

Arlliuri DunridLn, A. Omiit 
l)iatri«<l Mi»iii)((<ni — Wtibiiunrri.B. B.Gil- 

Idii 1 Aiirklniid, 11. )tii«l<iii . Wii»g»- 

nut, 8. F. W}iitcuiiibr; Wr.tUii'l. W. 

Cr»iiil»ii>i Olirinichiireli.T. W. Wuile; 
Inrerfftricill, C. A, Pijier 

8laliotil[iUt«rl III rliar|;e— Knatrikawn, 

J. T. l'*noti« I Kailiu, R. I). ?mc g 
Waatporl, T. tlnT-UnalEi?r»i4t ; Nel»iin, 

Chip/ Enquirer for Working Rmlvra^t — 

J. Cmmiii. M hiil.C.H 
lnai>rcliri]{ Unijitirt'f— J. Bunielt, M.IqIiI. 

O.K. 
tiigi-ul Kngiiicor— ll.J.Wjiiiie, A M.hivl. 



IUil«*,T loLnd OSltm—K. Q. II. Mkin- 

a>*rin|{ 
Olii«f Draii^liUmun^O. A. TrDU{i 
DraiiglitiiiiBii — J. Bitaant, W. K. B. 

fiMgit*, 0. T. JoHnjt. Ad. Uo«itt, L. 

Rr^triioIH*. A. 8. liendcrMit, W. W. 

Fry, \V. R nunHipii. A. L Baum* 

giiPt, A- 3. W»'i#bpougli 
Olerk.— W. V Uuk., n T Ford. W. 

A. Mirmii*, If. J«ii<ti|i. T- H. WiUtfn, 

E. S. KelW, it. W. Rowdofl, T. M. 
LucT. li. \l. Qnniner. J. M. B.ibh, 

F. J, Ro«dBii. K. 1>. BLiJinrd.. O. P. 
P»pM1. E J- Guukim, T T.'MWe, H. 
HoAlisUT. Q. a. W.lwn. jim, J. A. 
F. Ciindj. V. W, W. V«iiu.OPe, P. T- 

A. WLlliiinia 

Ristriat Knginwrs^ AiiplUnd, 0. H. 

BitMi WariHtiiiui, D. T. Mi-liil<»li ; 

WelliriKiyii. A. C. Kucli ! Wcitporl 

tind Well^U^d, F. J. Sonet ; Clinat- 

cUurcli. II. MbL-AtiiJrew ; Uunsdiii, F. 

W. UH''l>mn; liirer«irj;i||. A. J. 

Mi'Crvrtio 
ClitefVIvL-liaiiinilKntjiiioer— A.Ij. Bekllie 
CI<tIc*-J. P Kcllj. It. A«kin>. D. D. 

Weir, J Riim^^aj', H. MuKfowrfi, li. 

B. ^Jliii-mi^r, C- L Pellit, A. BoiIqq, 
E. IlAgpriioli, K. J. FlowrrdnT. A. A. 
B. Bo«U, J. H. Ltmjwrd, J P. Mr- 
K«0"en, R. M. Wslker. W. cjgrnor- 
ville 

Cliicf DrnnghtanMn — Q. A. pMiraan 
D-mugliHrwo — R. I'y P-Sniil.il. G. Wil- 

■on. A. SiTiolllfi, J. M. P.'rKnUK 
Boilrr lii»[ip<!tor — J. W. N't-hnU 
t.«LiiHMliv« K)i|iiiieor« — Aui'klmid, A. V. 
M ti-dnniild i ^Vrllingron-Sapier-Ntit 
Pt jriiioiit.il. T. A. Poierkiii; lliirunui- 
BliilT. ir. H. Jm-kioii: Wwiport ii-id 
WeiU»'id. 0. R. 'Rirhunlsun. Rfliiir- 
mg. J. D ilnirif. K. T. Mui'inon. 
BfMk* KiiKiD«ep— <r. U, Pos 
• 

BoaBD oir Arritt. 

.Vvr/A /'/iTHif. 

II. Ej-ra Kciiny. t^tipeiidiarj- Mniiintrmtei 

Cli»iriiiiiii, iip|ioinlu(l b_v the O-i^vrnof- 
11. OnviilKiii, Kmlwiij Ari-uiiutoiit'a l)ni<!i*i 

oleetml. 
T. Wil<on. R<i|^ti«mnii, vlc-'Ud 
M. J. Miirk, U'liird, rlrc'rd 
W. Aiialiii, LcivliMg Ciirpi^for, alei9t«d 
W. Hvrrivun, GaDg'-r. «li-<i(ed 

Ui.UU Ittand. 
0. I>. R. Wnrd, Dirtridi Judite, 01i»U- 

mnii. nppoinlMl bjr llio Uiivrnior. 
T. W. Brvbnar. Siai ionmavtvr, olected. 



43 



MBW ZEALAND OmOIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



F. E. NoUn, Sifinalnuin, eWtrd. 

J. A. MoCullougli, Leading Tiaimilfa, 

T. MilroT, Bxpneman, elected 
K. Duntan, Sub -ganger, «Ieel«d 



POST ANDTKl.HORAFll DEPART- 
HEN I. 
Oensbil Potrt Offioh. 
Pi»lniuler-Oeiier«l and Electric Tele- 
grapli Coriimi»iuner — lion. Sir J. Q. 
Wurc), K.C.H Q. 
SsoreUirr — W. Omr 
SuperititeDdeiit of Electric Line* — J. K. 

LOKHD 

AHiaiaiit SetreUrj and Intpector — T. 

Kote 
Ouiitroller of Honey-ordera and Savinga- 

b>iiki>, and Accoiinlaiit — G. Qra; 
Oilier Clerk— D. Kobertaon 
AaaiKt'tnt Controlter MoiieyOrdera and 

Saving* - Barika, and Artiilant Ao- 

eountiint — W. R. Mun-ia 
Olerka, Secrerarj'i Office— F. V. Waters, 

H. Pliiimier, J. C. WiUiamaon. W. 

Cro<r, B. C. Dean, V. J.BroKHii, P. £. 

Liniifaj, H. D. Grocutt, J, C. Red- 

DiffMcl, A. T. Mnrkmanti, W. J. Oow, 

F. W. FiirhT. J. H. Jordan, S. Mac- 

alifler, J F. P. Cloualon, A. DuiiOTan 
Ifail Axeiil — W. Ishifler 
Clerka, liii^vieclor'a Bni«cli— O. V. Iliid- 

■oii, J. Rrennan, W. A, Tanner, F. S. 

Robiiid, B. M. llarriion, A. S. Harper, 

H. MoUill 
Clerk*, At'Cdiiniaiit'B Brencli — J. L, IT. 

Le<lger, U. A. K. lix^^Eii.., Q. W. 

MuorlioiiRe, W, CiillogliBii, W. Clicg' 

widdfn, K. J. Tliunipvoii, II. Cornwall, 

F. ferrin, J. J. Kkroii. R. E. lla.tei, 
D. A. Jeiikina, E. Fiizaiiiinnit, H. N. 
McLeod, J. I). Arerr, G. B. Ilnrtun 
W. J. Drake, C. i)emi.»eT, J. G 
R<.ft<-lie, J. Covie, F. W. F«h.-r, F. 3 
BrnniiRli. F.j'Kfllelier, A. C. Elliot ■ 

G. H. HHrria, 11. C. Milne. C. W. J 
Panii-.R, H. C. Hi.-k-oii. P. D. ll-x- 
kina, W. R. WukHin, F. Stcw»ri. T. W. 
Writ, O. 0. Rij»e, O. r. Witlipr«, 
U. K Comb., J. K Hull. A. Mar- 
•linll, F. a. A. Knglt-P, C. G Collina, 
T. M. Hi[£liet., K. U. OamMe, J. C. A. 
DiiHl-y. T. II. N. Bea-lej. G. H. 
DnvJB, W. I. Dawaon, W. K. Freiliey, 
J. Suell, W. Gilb.rrt, G. L. Meiseniier, 



I R. W. Penfold, W. A. Smilli. B. H. 
I TwoM>, £. White, C. G&mhle, J. Mad- 
den, J. Alfxiini^er, E. Bermiiigliam, 
8. Brock. E. Uarria. B. U. Krnny, V. 
Jolinaton, H. A. Macl^od, C. Smith, 
M. A. Aaquitb, B. O'Learj, E. E. 
Warren 
' Slectrit^ian and Inapeetor — W. S. Furby 
', Aaaiatant Electrician — T. fiurkley 
MevlianiciniiB— R. Hciniti, F. F«Uin«r 
Storekeeper— J. Black 
Aaaiatant 8torekee{)er — 0. B. Mann 
Clerka in SU)re— C. Ni<-bol)a, T. F«lm«r, 
W. H. Carter, M. McGiltray, J. Q. 
Howard 

ChIBF FOBTHIITIBS. 

Auckland— S. It. Bias 
•Thamea— S. P. Sterena 
*Giaboriie — Q. W. Sampaon 
Napier — D. Cnmmini; 
•New Plymouth- F. D. HoldaworlU 
•Wanganiii— J. F. McBtth 
Wellington — 8. J. .Jiigo 
•Blenlteim— J. Bull 
•Nelson- II. Caldrra 
•Weaiport-T. T.King 
•Greymoulh — C. J. Brrrr 
•Uoi'itika- J. II. Slieath' 
Oiri^lcliiii'ch — R. Kirlon 
•Tinmru — J. A. Iluit^iti 
•Onmaru-W. W. Beawick 
Duiiedin— E. Cook 
•luTercarpIl— J. W. WilkiJ, 

Ikbpbctokb of Tblbgbapbb. 

Auckland— W. Q. Mc<l<lin|;a 
Cliri ate) lurch — J. W. Gunnawaj 
Diinedin — J. Orrhialon 
Net»on~C. C. Robertraii 

ASBISTAKT iNflPBCTORB OF FOBT- 
OFFICIB. 

D. Miller (Northern District), W. St. G. 
I)oUKlaa(Miillan<II>ii<trict),C. J.A.U. 
Tippnig (Suuthrru Diatrict) 

OfPICKHB IK ClIAROR OP TblKSKAPH 

Officbb. 
Auckland — H. F. Seager 
Napit-r— B II. K-ya 
Wtllinftlon — II. W. Ifnrringlon 
CliriaU-hurch- J. W. Miiaon 
Dunedin— J. O. Ballard 



'tCouiblued poab- and telegraph -olBcea. 



OPPlCUt. U8T. 



<3 



I 



I: 



Board or Apfeal. 
J. HcGowan, ConiiiiiMioD«r of Thm, 

Chnlniisn ^hf Act). 
J. K. Loitan, SuporintHiirdMit ot EWLrir 

Line* (bj Aci). 
J. U. 8u<e(M, lUpreMiiting Po*tal 

Bnnoh, elected. 
H. a. Oi-i-nibiiriilk, Ri>pr«»nUng Tol*- 

grapk firancli. «l(vl«d. 



UKPABTUKNT OF TRADK AND 

CUSTOMS. 

OommiwMMvcr of Tniil<t »n<l Outtom*— 

Hon. C. I[. Mill- 
SeereUu7 and tnip«c*orof Oiivtomi ftnil 

Sooremr? of Mnriiift — W. T, QlMgow. 
Cl.i»f Cl»rk— T. Lwnliin 
Clerks, Cuvtoini - V. R. Mcn^itb, 0. H. 

H*n«on 
CkdrU— E W. Tliompaon, W. A. Cune- 

ron 
Audit— II, W. Bnwtir, U. CrvwtVior 

(Wrii«r) 

Colluctow or Cosroiif. 
Auokland— A. Rom 
Pa»»rl» BoT~W. J. Hswle; 
Kew Piy.i.oiilli — U Bedford 
Napirr— H. R. C. Boweu 
W«llin|t«n — D. JolmtloD 
Wwgsnui— A. BUi»U 
Nriaon— W. Ilonpi 
WMtport— Q. R 8|ii)n« 
Octjfmouth— C. Uoiebrook 
Uohilik*— W Rmm 
Lj'itvlMD knH Cdnatfhureb— J. Uillt 
TiiiiBTii — C. S. N'Siin 
OMn*r>i— T SI. CuHen 
Dunedio— C. W. S. Chumburlwn 
Inf^rennr'K »nii BiulT llnrbour — A. 
McDuwrU 



OrviCKBS IK CiiJtiioi or Poktc, ihd 
CoAsrvrAiTKiit. 
— T. C. B«*I<loii. CoMtwaiUr 
RiiM'll — U. 8lcplteiiH>ii, Cuul.wiitMr 
Taurviitfa — E. NorLbcrult, OtBcKi in 

Chmtft 
VFhiwiKnra* — A. Q. BAtdilTA, Coutwatler 
WlMnearci— J. MuTiru. UmiflwaMFr 
UoHKonui — A. J). Cl^itictl, OlGcer in 

Ctiarge 
Bokiaii^a — Q. Martin. CuaatwBtlvr 
CmiMira — J. C. Smilli, OITirwr in Cliar(« 
Wutftfft— J. Oameroii. CoutwttUr 



Foiion— T. t/owia, OOlcrr in Olitrw 
P><U.-n— J. W. Oteniij, O (Goer in Cliarge 
WairiLU — H. A. JuckiiiMti, OHlcvr in 

Cliar|[D 
Picton— T. W. Loxcti. OlVi-«r in Cbarga 
(ntnl.1iBiii Itla>i(l»— K.S.l'l'jrKUM, OOccr 

in Oliarge 



UARINK DRPARTUfiNT. 

MiiiiaUrof Marine— linn. W. Halt-JoKM 

Socretnrj—W.'T. OUago* 

CtiicfCirrk— G. Allport 

Clrrka-J. .1. D. am. O, Hmolur 

Caiirt— B W. Mitii.r 

Marine Kngiiiwr for tli« Colony— W. 

iVaiitLcnl Ad«i*er ami Oliiof RKnmiiiar of 

MaaCcta and Maiea—ll. S. Blackbumo 
Wraltiar RrporCer— It. A. K<Imui,Coid. 

R.N. 
SiiperinliMidant of MercanliU Marina 

and Ctsntinrr of Muter* and Mat«a, 

Ati^kUnd— W. II. K.-<d 
Supririleiid^nt of Mpivintile Marine 

■till Kiaininer af Muatwra »iid Matea 

— WflliniUii, 0-. O. Siii-ih 
Superiiilcudriit of Mcrcanlilr Marine 

and Rxkmiiivr of Matter* anil M*iM, 

L,Ttl«lloii— J. A. U. M«rei«) 
Suprrintciuimt of Men^titile Marina 

and Kxanimfr of Ma«tHra and Mat**, 

Dunedin — C. E. W. Flcmina 
M*el*rof *.i, 'TiitunPkai"— U F. Port 
Uaalof ofaa. "ilinvnioa" — J Hullooa 

IxarvcToiu or SBfrisxxuKi. 

Wellinp^c, Clii«f Inapector — L. P. 
A J "on 

Ruaoll— H. Sipidit-iiioii 
Whantaroi^J. Mnnro 
lIuhiLikik — J. Duncan 
Bluir— P. MoOratL 

H A RBO IT KM ABT KSa. " 

CoUinitwood— K. aullard 

Fultuii — A. BeftliutT 

ItDltiariga— O, Uarlia 
K«ip*m— J. CliMnty SinilU 
Manuknu — J. Nra1>* 
Motiirka— II. L. MolTaLl 
Pioti>n — T. KdFitrda 
Port Robintoii — J. Sinclair 
RitaMill— II. Strplicmon 
Waiupa—tt. FiiUll 



* Tk« »0M iwpMtaai barbourt ar* ««ain>>l*A by lotial Board*, nni t>r ifaa Marin* I>*pa«t«iMil. 




IKSPKCTION OP UACUINEBY 

USPA Br U£NT 

CbM ImpeHorof Muhiriert, Prmci|Nl 

Bnfmf«T8ur*«;or.iind Chitt KtMnnner 

0f KiifriDiirra — K. DuDMkii, U««d OSoe, 

WellinK'oii 
Obier UkrL— R. P. Milnc 
Cl*fk— J. H M>uuU«i»r 
Eiln a«rk« — B. O. Stoiw, W. D. 

AnAnmA. J. O. Macphcnon 
OmI#i — H. Pmto-noti 
tlHp«oU»n c( Uoithiatrf, Engiueer Sur- 
*«;<>ra, BniJ Eiftniitiers of Eii- 
fiKcer*: — 

AuckUitd — H. WHiimIt, ». IM- 

WV'll.,H(i«i.— U. A. MoOwBur. P- J. 
Cnrii.tn, A. C*l<t)rt. W. R. DoukIm 
01ir»l«kurc>li— O- Crull. A. HcVimr 

Duiicdin A. Wnlkor, il. SUrp 

InT«rearcilt— A. W. BvthuiM 
Board vf Kiaininttra ol S^ationarj, Tno 
Uon. LoMxiiuiifr, uid VFiDdinn £iixir<« 

Dnrrra — Kubrtt UuiiunD, CItief In- 
*|>prlijr uf Mactiinorj, U.lnit.Nar A , 
M.hiit.-'^oC'A.Lftod . C)i«iru ati t Jutin 
ll»j--«. F^.13.0, liupoctiDj; Hiinorer 
of Minn 1 P. U. Uay, M.A., 
M.lMt.C.E.1 R. V. MitiM. 8vcT«Mr7 



STAMP UKPAKTUKNT. 
OoiiiiiiiMiuiier of StBiiifi Dutiea — Hou, 

Jm. CftrFoll 
BMrelarfrforSUmiia— C A.Hk O. HtclcMtn 
Obief C'li^rk itiirl A iTouaiaiit — H. O 

Wil)is.>it» 
Cusiuiliuii aiiil Uiuer of Sbtnipa — W. H. 

Shwre 
Kecord tnd K«c«iTing OI«rh — J. P. 

Ct»rk«— V, WillMlm. J. Murraj 
Clii«fSla>")wr— C. Howe 
Oadot— D. Uoiign 
CWene— C. Mol>iio*h 

DllPDTr CUMMlMIOMBU ot STtun. 
Auckland — E. Bamfunl 
Oi*bnrt>e— 0. H W. l>ii<tn 
I'aiVMitki — K. L- SLnurnrci 

Wellingtoti^:. A.. St ri. HickaoH 
WaiiKKiiui J. F. Mcfioth 
Mf^Uoi)— W. W. de CWairo 
UBrlboroiigli— C. E. N<Ud«r 
OanUrbur*— P 0-. WiU.ew 
Tiniiru— J. A. lIuiMD 
OUk»— E*' C' C«rU>a 
SouUiUnd— W. Wtiiiki 
W«Li«nd— T. O. i>«; 



LAND TKANSPFR DHPARTMENT 
AND DKKDi kEOlSTKV. 

Repatrar-Hcnoral of Land and Deeda — 

a. It. n*ty 
St^reUrj. t«Dd and Daada— C. A. 8c O. 

IlickaoD 



litaTKlCr UkVll KROIiTRtH AND 

KKOiaTKAia OP Dm us. 

Aui?kland — E. Bamtord 
XBraiwki— B. I. Slatifurd 
VVelliiiKluii—Win. Stuart 
Ua»ke * B>j— TliDi. UaU 
OUbonif — J. M IlnUiam 
Xrl*o»~-U. W. H.>bii<>oo 
Marltwrou^li— C. E. NaMer 
Conlrrburj — 1>. O. BridgM 
OuKo—U. TurUin 
SouUiland— W. W>ink* 
VfaaibiKd— V. G. Day 

ExAUiUBBs or TlTUM. 
Aui-klaiii) — E. Biiuirord 
Tannaki— R. L. Swiford 
VVellii>gloii— Wr.i. Stu:irl. H. Howortli 
UaKkc'f Ba.T— Tho*. HaJl 
Quburuv — J. M. BalliBiii 
ffelion— II. W. Robintoa 
Marlborutigli — Win. Sttiart 
Caiitfrbur/— O. G. BridgM 
Otajto— H.Turtoii 
3oul-bl«i.d— W. Wrinl.. 
WwilMid— V. O. i>8T 

RioiBTHJLK ur JoritT-iTocx 

COUPASIM. 

0. A.St. Q. Uiokwin 



BiotBTXAiM oy UrcLuiiteSociBTJn, la- 

OffrCKUt AHD PB&VIDRNT ^OCIBTIKt, 
AMU AaaEHTANT KSatBrlU&B OF JOIST. 

rrudt CuMfiKiKB. 

Auckl&iid — E. Bitmfnnl 
Tsmiiitki— H I< ainnford 
HsKlio'i Bb7— Tho*. Hull 
Wollii.Ktoii— H. U- WiUiuBi. 
Nel«.n— W. W. Am C».i.ro 
Marlborough- C. E. NalJer 
OaiiKrbury— P. G. WuliWB 
Ot*BO— P. C. Corlw 
So<ilblai<d-W. Wfink* 
WmiIwiH— V. O. D«r 
Powrty Bay-C. H. W. Piwn 




"» 




OFFIOIAL LIST, 



45 



I 



KDUCATIOtI nEPARTMB^T. 

i^lCini»l«r of Education (•dmiiilBl<>ring aIho 
I K«tiT« lehoolii, itiiluiLnal idmoU. iini] 
r till inittitiit.ioii Inr Hmif-iiiui««] — Hon 
W. C. \V«lk»r. C.M.Q. 

S«oreUrT (ar Eiltintiion knd Inmecbor- 
L Gmenil of Soliooli-^Qvoreo Ifogbcn, 
f MA. 

Auifiunt fli>cr«Ui7— Sir B. O. OibbM. 

U>rt. 
Olflrk»— F. K- Ae Ctro, H. B. Kirk, 

M.A., R. U Poixp. F. L.ScTcrne. E.C. 

^Bank•. r. V. Thomson, U A.. If. J. 
B»rfpir, T Q. Oilbrrt. .1- hrrk. I. 
Itmry. I . RobertMii. C. T. Wild. G-. P. 
Pried ard 
IiMpKt«r of ?^i)lire Salioota— Jfttnei It. 
rbpe. AfMnil.nnt I>ii{>e<<lor — II. B. 
Kirk, M-A Orraiiiiiuir luslrtictor— 
W. W. Bird, MA. 
InipwIurB of TbcIiiiickI Inatruetion— 

K. C. Itue, U. I[. Brufiic 
AMuil«nL lrt*pt«lor*of liiiluBlrtalSoliooU 
— R. H, Pofw.T. A. Wilker 



orcATioif BakUTig. WITH Naku or 

AnekUnd— V. E. Rice 
Tartnaki— P. 8 WliiUwmbo 
l^atigHnui— W. J. Oinoa 
■Wrilinjftnn— A. DorMt 
HAvbA liny— O. T. Founin 
MkrlWrougb — ■!. SmiUi 

Qtr-j — W. HiemrnsrlinBidpr 
WwUnnd-A. J. Mornm. B.A. 
CWnterbiiry Nfltlh— 11 C. L»..e 
Osnt^rburr 9»i<Llli— J. II. litunn-ld 
Ouigw— P. G. Pryd« 
8ouil>Und-J. Keill 



I 



School OoHiiiwioirBBa 



AdmiaiitraloTt of Kdacalion Rtttrvtt, 
wilk yamrt of Seeretari*t), 
AuokUnd— U. N. OnrKnd 
T»r«iMki— F. P. CorkiO 
Walliiif|ton — N. J. Tune 
H««rk«'t D»;— It. P. A. PUlford 
U*riborA<igh — J. STnllli 
Helcim — A. T. JcHtvi 
Wr«*l«iid— A. J, Morton 
C&nlerbiirj— U U. PitinM 
Olago — C &(don(lrei> 



iKDVtTsiAL Scnoou. 
Ooptruwtent &Aoa/j. 

Auckland TndiiHml Scliool^UtM B. K. 

Jiick«ora, Mnnsfcrr 
Wrlliii|[ioi) Ri>i?rivii>|{ IIooio — Mr». E. S. 

Dick, MiitiHKitr 
BiiriiliBin Induatrinl Sclino] (CknUrbur;) 

— T. Areliej, Maiing«r 
T* Orann* Humr (Unnl.rrbur7) — r». 

K. T Umntiriii, Mmnaiivr 
Cliritdiui-cli Rr»iving Homo — UiH A. 

B Cor. MxniKetir 
Oavoraliam liiduatriitl Sflhool fOtago) — 

Q. M. Burliiiwii, MMiafcr 

PriraU Si'iooU. 
St. M»ry'> Tndu*triKl Si^liou). Ponionbj 

— R«T a. H. Oillnn, Unnnwr 
Si. Jutoiili'i Indxflrial SrliooT, WAHing- 

toil — R*r. W J. Lewii, Mati»B*T 
St. Murj'a Inditsiniil Hnlinol. SvUon — 

VtTj Rrr Dfhii Malimirv, Mannptr 
St. Viiiwia dp Pniil'i ImfuXriiU Srhool, 

DuEiodin — Right R«t. M. Vvrnoii, 

Manngor 

IiterrtDTiON roa DKAr-uuru, 

Diraoror— O. *an Aich 
StoNMrd— U. Buttle 



LTJKATJC ASTLDU3. 
Inapcoter — Dunran MacOrogor, U.A.. 

M.B.. CM.* 
A»ai*Unl Iii*pei'lor— Mr«. Oi-nuc Noill 
UediMl fliiperiithrndeiit, AuckUud &»j- 

lu...— R. M. Braliic, M.B, 
lipdicnl StipiritriniuluMil, Clirittcliuroh 

Aijliim — E. O. L«Ttna«, M.B. 
M'edirnil Siiperinttrndtnt, Porirua Aajr- 

liMii— Omj' Uaoell, M.D. 
Uedico) Siincrintruilrnt. WAllin^on 

A»jlum-W. BrtxIcrQow. M 1), 
M«dii'Bl Suprnrxeiidi'iit. Soa^tiff Aajrluin 

— F. Trilby Kina. MB. 
SupariiJirndeiit. Uukilika Asyium-^ H. 

Oriblji^n 1 Medical OlSiser, H. Uaoan 

dr*»«. M.B. 
SupirniilHiiclriil, Ne]>on Acjiiitn— J. M()r> 

ruoii : Medical 0;llcar. W. J. Ma«'ki«>, 

H.D. 
Aalibuni Uall. Wnikar) [privata aajtum) 

— Proprii-u»», Ur. Alfxaxdrr mad 

KsKiUor of Jamca Humoi Uadtcal 

OIBear, Krauk Uay, M.B. 



■ Alao boMa appololm«Bl of Isifwelar «( Boipttala ao<l Ohartlabla InatitMivaa. 



innv EKALAND OmoiAlJ VRAK-BOOK. 



MINES DKPARTMKN'I 

Chirt Opfics. 

Miniatrr of Miitr* — Hon. Jamci Uc- 

Gowan 
Un it«r- Scot oUrj- for Uinet^Q. J. B. 
Klioft 

Clii*f Clrrk— T H, Uma^ 
ri«rk-H. K. [tMi3<']iH'p 
Ai)i.tj>»t — J. S. Miirkuriit, D.Sc.F.O.S 
Oi'ol.igi«l— Al*-»«n.liT MtKuv. F.G.S, 
Aanisiant O»nlo|tiih — \V. A. McKar 

Sliorthaiiid Writer— J. T. Watkina 

IxsriUTOBS OV MlUKS. 

Tbiiii>«« Biiil Aui'fclond Diflrici« - Jamei 
Coutlai AMittniit Irmpi^ctor, Thamiu 
Bjsri : CHiiiprliiir;, l>iiiii>4in, mi\4i 
Southland DiaLricO— E. K. Qroeu •■ 
A>»i>Unr In*]H<clar, Kahcrt Mi-lnl-oali ; 
Cndel.. U. PhIoii : VVo-t Uout Dii- 
tricU— K.. Tnrinanti AHiilant In- 
tpfctor~A, II, Itichnrdii 

UlM50 BUKKAV. 

■SeeretATj— P. OaUin 

■ 

UaKASHIU or WaTBB -KACU. 

Wmmca-Kumara — A. AiLben 
Muiiiil IJ» — R. MurroT 

ScKOOiA or MiNKa 
I«c4urpr« oiu) Iititriii'turi : Tlmtn-r* — 
F. B. AIIpii. M.A., BS'M AMUUnt. 
A IJ. V. MoiT(»n. MA.: R«Dfttm— J. 
W. L*«-. Car«n<a»d»l— D. T. All«n : 
Waibi— P. G MorpHi. M.A. 

BoAmD or Examihiur fxdir "Tri 
CoAL-MiNM Act. IHl^l." 
I^rrrror o( the Geoloipcril Siirrej- of 
f«» Zraland ; the Snrreror-Orneral j 
th« Intpcrting Eitginrrr of MinM; 
ttrn dilrf liiipcrlor of MnclMtirry, 
WnllingUMi; Jamea ]3i>liop, of BrilTi- 

Drrioii : AUrrd B«njftri)ii] Liitdap. 
of Denuutoii ; and (rMaiit) 

BoAAD or BxiuiNsiu dddbii "Tbi 
UiNTKO Act. 1891." 
Same DlflL-ial itiruibara at abora Board, 
«ioep>ing tbe Chief Iriipeelor of 
Maciiincrj, Wellington, with llie fol- 
](»«iii|[ pri'al*' ujfiiibeTt: H. A. "Gor- 
don. F. O. g., Aueklanfii Tlioma* 
Atlkrii Dunlop. ItiBinrs ; Pnlnck 

§uirk Cd|>Im, K^pfUtti ; aiiiJ FraiicU 
odgo, CoronuiDdal 



i'hF DifiTtof (if Hie Oe<a1o|tical Surr*^ 
□F Hrw /«itin-iid it Cliairii an of both 
Board*, and Mr. T. H. Uumer u bba 
SccrcLnry 

OaoLOSiCAL 9uR\'Br, MuBBinf, avd 
OMKKriTOHiBa. 

Milliner in Charge^TIi* Hon. Uioiatof 

of hi ill e* 
Pireotor— Sir J. Hector, E.C.U.O- 

MP. F.HS. 

Clark. Curator, and Mel«r>roIngir»l Ob- 

•*r*tfr fur W.-llineloii — R B, Oore 
AMronoiTiiml Ob^iTpr— T Eiitf 
MeiMiroWifikl OhMtrrrr, Aurkland — T. 

F. CJirotemaii, K.I,-S- 
llt-tvorolo^imJ Obapr*»r, Duncdin — H. 

Sker 
UalooTolngiml Obwr*«r, Naw Pljmoutb 

— O, W, Palmer 
&f4>r«nntlo|en-nl ObterTftr, Hnkilika — A. 

1). Mai'Tarlatie 
Meircrolo^iciil Ohtsr^er, RvUirua — Dr. 

Keri'ttr 
Mi-lrotulujjical Ob>er*cr, T» Arolia — W. 

Hill 

Metforologit^l Ob»err«r. Lincoln — M 

Oiittriri 

Mrtroroloiical ObtrfTer, Har.mer Plains 
—MiatC. Tttjlor 

Nxw 'AxM.Kiro Ihbtitittb. 
Uar>aiier— Sir J [lMtor.E.C.M.a.,H.D., 
FES. 

iloii, Treasurer— W.T. L. Trarera, F.L.S. 
SeoreUrj — R, B Qore 



DEFENCE DEPARTMKHT. 

MiriiaWr of IWpii(.-e — Rl. Hon. R, J. 

Srddon. PC. 
Under Secretjirr — Sir A. P. DouBlaa, 

Baft. ( Kwired Lieutoriant, R.N.)i 

Unjor, N.Z.M. 

Commtmdant of tht N.Z. Forcfi. 

Coltiiiel Jainvt McUillo Babineton, B.H. 

aeii«ml Statr (Local Major- QmerMl) 

Staff" OffiKr of ArtilUiy. 

Mkjnr St. hete-r MoniKotnrrjr Moors, 
NZ-M (Capinin RO.A.) 

Aelitg Staf Officer to tka Camn<tnd»mt 

of tkt S Z. Forctt. 
Major N L. D-A. Sinitb, N.Z.U. 

CUrk— T. F. awy 
Clerical Cadet— A. J. Bak«r 





{Jtnnmnudaitt Mililttrf Srkoot of in- 
rlirtlrtuni, Wrllingloa. 

Li«iiL -Culunel RoScr* Uarlock Owen, 
».Z.M. (CapUin. H.U. 'Soulh Lnn- 
eubm Rrgimetit) 

D^emtit Star* Dtpartment 
SUwekMpcr— J 0'8olli»*ii 
^MMlant .Stuivktwppr — U. Jorrcd 

Maw ZtALlVD PSkUAVIKT MlUTU. 
jV». I Sarriet Campamg, 
LiMt.-ColmT-i W. B. Mvotfngvr 
Ckplkin H. C. Morrieon 
OapUtii J K, Hiitnr 
Li^ui»n>nt It. K Pilkington 
LieaiBriar.C W. P. Wall 
Iiioiilfinkiit M. M. Gjir<l»»r 
Li-ul*»ai.t a. K U. Miokle 
LiriiU'nant R. 0. CJifi-nrjr 
Ueulenaiil H. O. S*>ii]l« 

Inftctorn of Sukmitrih* Minutg 

Okplftin J. FHlooMvr 

tiftpUtn WilliAtn Co/lc, \mU ComI 
Bngwls. K.E. 

OaplMR J. pAl«on«r 

Oapljon Wi'liBin Cojiv, l»t* Ooail 

Liei)l.i?ii*nt P. Svinon 
Liouleikaiit K. B. ^n>jlli« 

3urg*c», Ptrmatt*nl Uilitin 
{H'tllimglt>»). 
Jobn Te«r«, MB. 

5wiy«oit, Ptrmtnenf UilUla 
John A Uing, M.D. 

S«rfi»«a. /VriMitHcii; MitUta 
[LylttUom). 
0. E. CpltBw, M.R.C.S.E. 

Somorijry Sury'Ou, Ptrmammt ililHia. 
Patrick J. 0-:*«i!! OCarroll, L.R.C.8.1. 

ffottorarf CAaptiitH, f.i/UfUott DtlarK- 
w«h/ Prrmanetit Uitilia. 

rh« B«*. K. K. Cl>amb*r* 

Jionnr»rif Ciaplaiii, ll'tUimfffiin Deloei- 

mrnt Prrmonmt Hititia. 
Tho R«T. W. C. Wftl«n, H.A. 



47 

OJtcert Commanding Mililia awd I'olun- 

U%r Itutriet; amd Atljmlant: 
Au>-klitti<l — Affliriit Adjuiaur, Unjor 

JaiiiM R«iel, N Z U. 
W^llmntoti — Brrrel ■Colonel Stitktt 

Ne—U.O.B.. y.ZM. 
Cantwhury — Brerrt - ( oWd William 

HoUlex Webb, NZM., Ui« U/Hl, 

lO^lli Kool 
Nortli Ougo (»ub-iiwini?«— V-l>- I.irut,- 

Culonol Alfrrd H.aiiland, N Z. Vol*. 
Olafo — Hr^Tft-C'lontl Alfred Uilliam 

Bobin. C B . X.ZM. i A<ljulftnt, C&p- 

Uiii L J. JuiM, N.Z.M. 
SouthUnrJ (•ub-diiirirr.) — Major Jobn 

Kawurd Oawkina. >'.Z. V»li. 
Nvlaoii (l«>iii)Njrarj) — MHjur Oeor|[i> CmI 

B«rl«>i|[h Wulfv, N^.li.. law C«ptBii( 

KM LI. 



DKPARTMIENT OF LANDS AND 

SUBVBir. 

HiiiD Orrioi. 

Minuler of L>ti<la — Hon. Tlioinaa Yoiin|[ 

Duncan 
SuriFior'Uvncral and Scvrrlapjr for 

Croon L«n<li--J, W. A. MurdiBnt 
Undfrr-Srcrrtiirj fur Crowu Landa — 

W. C KmHiiKlon 
Oliirf ])raiiBl><'i>>'*'< — ^' W. Plftnann 
CliiffClfrk-F. T O'NcU 
Aitdilnr uf T>>ii»i Rvreniia — W. Q. Runoi» 
ri'UuariMlriKleiiii uf Viliag* S«ltlDiii«nU — 

J. K. Mnrcb 

ACCKUI^P DuTStCT. 

AiiiaUnt Surrpjor-OFUDnl, Cliirf 8ur- 

vtyor, and CommiMioiicr i>( Crown 

T^»d«— U. J. aiiiHIrr 
DiBlri«l SurvrTor*-— L,Cui»n, J. Babei, 

inn.. O, A, M«rLin, 11. 1>. M. Uaamd, 

T. K. *J'lionipM>ii 
AitiiUttt Survr^on-- R. 8. •^albralth, 

n. A. I B<iror>. H. V. Kditi-uuiDbe, 

U. T. M>i< hell 
Oiiff DrauifliUman— 0. R. Pollen 
Roc^irpr of I-wnrI R«Ti<mi« — T. M. 

Taylor 

H«wiB'8 Bit Dijitkici. 

C)ii«f Stttrtfor ami Citinnunaiiniirr of 

C'piDwn IjiiiJla— E. U- Gold ijxiilh 
DiKtricC T.And Ofiloer, OiitKimo, P. 8. 

Stir ill) 

Di*tri4-t SurcrTam — V S. Smith, Jamvi 

Hft?. P. A. i>Kli>»l 
A*aUiftnl 8iirv«ior — T. Drook 
Cliirf l)n>U|thUinni9 — F. SinipMin 
B4WMTW of Land Bvteiiuo— F Bull 



48 



tfKW XBAI.AICII OFVIGUL TEAB-BOOK. 



TtlAHiKI DinKICT. 
ChM Surrr^or and CammtMiom^r of 

Cm«li L«tid*'— J. M>rkpiiji* 

Dutrirt SurTvion— U. M, Bktvt, 0. H. 

Ballard 
AMiplB'it-Surtftor*— J. p. Frith. W. T 

M<^rprlh. R. W. Wat^^n 
Cliiff Dmuirlilm'Bn — J. lAn|[iiiatr 
KM>»ii«rorLsiid Rririitic — O. F. Dofl* 

WKi-u»0TO)i Dirniior. 

OtiioC SartejOT and CoviiniMnravr of 

Cr<>«)i Lni'di — J. 9trau(.4.>in 
Dirtriti SuriMor.— J. I;. Climi^. F. A. 

Tl«>inj>»on, H. J. Lowe, W. J. Wlipdw, 

J. UiKty 
AwMtnni Surffjor— J. R. Binehan 
Cllirf I>riiii|[liliiitai) — L. 8uiith 
RweiT^r of Land R«i>»iiu«— T. Q. Wailt 

Nmoa Dimicz. 

Cliief Sur»eTor misd Commiiaiotivr Of 

Croon Irfind*—W O. Mfrrai 
Dialrirt SurvFji>r>— J, A. Monlgomsrir, 

J. SnodgrKM, R. T. dadd 
AMitUtit HuTTfjttf — J. i>. ThomMD. 

E. C. R.>binioD, A. O. Muir, W. C. 

Mi-Ali*i«r 
Cbicf llrauglittman and RM^«it*t of Land 

B«T(riu»— U. Trent 

UAKLBOVOPOR DiRTKlCT. 

Oliief Stirrcjor and CttmmiMMtner of 
Crown I.ai>Ha — C. W. Aditnx 

I>i.inrt 8ur»rtnr-D, W. Odl-M 

Ai»i»t*nl Siirrcjor — K. W. liuchrndgt, 
II. M-itUiid 

Chief Itniuglitfman afid Rrcai*«r of Land 
Rerenna — W, Amwtrcmg 

Wmtlakd DiaTKicT. 

Oliiaf SiiFTi'Vor *niJ OontmiaiioDer of 

Croon I^iids — G. J R<>ti*rt« 
Aatiriani Surveyor— W- Wil»on 
Cliirf DrnnKlilaiiiBn — T M Ginnt 
Rrrifjfrr »f Land Rerriiuc — A. D. A. 
Uacfnrlanc 

ClKTKHBITKT DlrTRItrT. 

Ohirf Siirr^for and CiminiiMioner ot 
Cn'Vrf L«iida — T. IIuiii|>)iriri 

Ditlrtrl SiirT*ior»— T. N. Brodi'mk. 0. 
]1. M. M.n'orr. L. O Matlnaa 

Cliipf I>r»iialil>r.iJiii — V. U. Stiaiiki 

Racoiver of LadiI Revenue — A. A. UeMab 



Otioo DirrsrcT. 
0>ie( 8ur*r;or and Cotnmiwiooer of 

Ora«n Dinda— na«id IWrron 
Dirfnd Surrerora— K. H. Wilmot, D. 

M. Calder, *. T. Neill 
C)ii«f Drau(lil*inai> — S, l*lionip»on 
RtMUer of L«i>d Re<«aM— O. A. Read* 

SorrnianD Dwmicr. 
Cititf Surveyor and Ca>nniijMion»r tt 

Urovn I.aiiHt — Jolm Bay 
Aaairtnnt Swrreyor—A. I1<'<ipkinAon 
Obirf l}mU|t>>liii>an — O Rohmton 
Rwatiar ol Land R#rrtlUl^^H. L. Wabb 

UBwaifi* or Lakd Boasda. 
Auckland— O. J. UnrlW, R. Thompaoa. 

D- Lundan, J. Rrii*tiB«' 
Haoke'* Bay — E. C. Gold Smith, 0. 

Hall. T. Hyde. R. R. Oroon. Q, 

Malhewaon 
Taniiiaki — J. Markrnsia, J. Ilealop, 

Jamra Rallrnl^iir^, J. U CtMinelt 
Wellington— J. Slnuvhon, A. W. Hogg, 

A. Hte*t '- 

Nrlion — W. O, Miirray, John OntlMn, 

]) B»I-. J-M.raUll.O. Ljncb 
Kfarlborougti— C W. Adan>», J. Red- 
wood. A. I*. St^jmour. J. Duimn, P. 

Parroni mt4 

Wwlland— O, J. Roberte, A. Uallieaon, 

J. Clirmnr/, J 8- I atip, A. Cumoiing 
Cai'terbin"? — T. Iliiniplirtee, A, 0> 

Pringle, J. Mel^rhlai). J. Sraly 
Ota^o— I). Barron, i] . B. K.rkpatmk. 

}l- Clark. J. Duncan. W. Dallaa 
SoiitKlaud— J. Ha;, A, Kinroaa, J. Ms* 

Inljrre, A. Ualdey, D. King 



DEPARTMENT OF ROARS. 

Ukad Officv- 
MiTiidor in Cttargr — lion. T. Y. Puncan 
CliiorEnitiimror Roada— C. W. lIuM- 

houfn 
Cliitf Clerk — W. 8. ShorL 
CliirF Acconnlanl — H. J. Knowlaa 

Dulricl (tffSem. 
Road Simrj-or* — Auckland, A. B. 
Wrivlil i T* Kuiti, '1'. Burd : Roioma, 
A. C. Turner i llaaks'i. Bar. D. N. 
McMillan-, Tarnni>ki. 0. T. ^urnyt 
Ua»i)ia>iui, R. II. Bjwneji Wiling. 
ton,0. F. RobliiBon : Marlborough, C. 
H. Wilhnm*; CHi-tprbiif;. F.Wilfarri 
Oiago. W. ]), K. McCurdiei Soulb- 
land. H. L. Falkincr 




OrPICIAL LIST. 



49 



"THE LANX> FOB SETTLEMENI-S 

ACT, 189*," 

BojkRO Of LtHD Puscuiai OoHHia- 

CkairmMi of Bo«rd and Iaei J PuroliMi 

Insp«c1or — AldAnder Borrtn. 

Tbv B^ard oomuU of llio Load Pur- 
«hAM' laitpcwlor %» Ch«iriii*ii, the Sur- 
n^jtiT • Qitiwr*i, tkie Commi<Monpr of 
Tbiw — th«M (or the "bol« (.■olonj — with 
the CominiMonAn df Crown Iaii(1« and 
> mtiinlwr of thr I^Miid Board in ««cl> 
land dJ»triot, «ho are nitmbcr* only for 
the bB«n«*i> arising wiChin their r<- 
•p«eti*a dUtricU. 



DEPARXHENT OF AGRIOUL- 

TCRE. 
Ifinuterin Oliar^t— Hon. T. Y. Dunran 

Hkau OrpiOK. 
Stntttry of AgrioulUm and Chief In- 
•pfctorof Slock— Jiihii 11. Hitchiv 

• 01it*f Clcrfc— Richnrd Kp«tt 
CampUfir of Suttitic« — R. B. Burdpkin 
CIotW — Oori*»pi.indencr bmiioh : F. fS, 
Pope. J. I^niicioi), K, W. Alkimon. D. 

IStneUir. A. McTnggart, T. II. U. UaII. 
T. Kanntnij. Ai'VODiiUini'a Br>iii-)i — 
J. R. D Stneer, A. Caltwti. F. C. 
Iljorrine. T. R. Wtlton, A.S, RowdoD. 
U. Fits|tibtN>i) 



Lonioif OrrioB. 



Produi?* CoinniiiMou«r, Londun — EC. C 
Cuueron 

\ VmiuitAaT DiTuioK. 

OhierVrlerrinanrSiirsnoo—J. A. Gilrutli' 

M-R.C.V.8. 
A«iuUtii Chief TcierinnrUn^C. J, 

IU*kri. M K-C:.V..S. 
L«boriilor5 Ai*i*tBiit — G H. BnrlLtP 
TfUriiianiM (U.,R,C.V,S.) — II. C. 

Wilki*- [F.RC.V.^.). A- R, Youfig. T, 

it. Bdnr, J. Ljrunt, J. llouglaa, J. 

Brtnd (F-RC-TS.), 8. Burton 
UMt Inifiecliin and VerfirinariiLni 

<M»R,C.V.St— J. O. Clftjuin, A. 

Cnbb, n H. Bait, C. R. Nralc. J. 

R Cb»p)ton. T- O. LiUco, .1 A, U. 

Tower*. A. McL Patcr«wn, D, Mni;- 

)i«ttio, H. A. R«id, J. Kerrigan, V. A. 

BaoltM, J. NuUnll, f. C. llobrrtioti, 

W. H. Hawthorn. W. G. ToTlor, W. 

4 — Yew. book 




D. Snowball. A. W. BamM. J. UcEie, 
T. Cuniiimghinn 
MmI Ii,i|jrclof. — H, 8. 8, Kjl«, H. 
MarvBck, F. fioattie, W. A. S. Suttou 

D*iBT Dn-ieiOK. 

Dairy Ccin]nii*iioner — J. A. k'iiinnUa 
Hairy InMriicton^ P. J. M^-Qunui, D. 

Ouddie, W. M. Singleton 
Dairy Prmlmv Grader* — A, A. Thorn- 

ton, J. JoliDtton. E. Towu»tinnd, I). 

Tho'iit. A. O. Shirley, S. A. UumbLc- 

too. T. C, Broih 

BlOLOOICAL AND HOKTIOULTITBAI. 
DiVIBIOK, 

Biolopi.i-T. W. Kirk. F.L.S. 

Ar«i*r«iit KTitnmolri^i*! - Auckliidd, Cap- 
tain T. lirouii, F K.S 

PomologiiU — North Inland. W. J. 
Painter, &. 1. Fildi. W. A UoucIjot. 
South Island, J. O. Ulackmorci 

Fruit [DipeotorE—AuckUtid, CaptAinT. 
Broun, F.E.S. ; \\VIIiitgtoii, 11. Palo- 
IborpB) Cbristoliurcb, A. 0. Smala j 
Suuirdiu. A. F. C&rgilL 

CnHUICtL DWtUOM'. 
Cli«iiii»t— B. C A«lori, F.CS. 
Ltbontiory AiaiiUnt — G. WiUimmi 



PorLTsr DlTiaioir. 
Poultry KxporL— D. D. Hjdo 
Poult^ GrudoM — AutfMaiid, 



R. W. 



Pouniford 1 Wrllinglon, W, Blowora; 

"" " " S. N« 

T. F. Lcihy 



ChriatHi.urcl), H. Ncirlui] ; Dunedin, 



Poullryntutinn AltendaDl« — Ruakura. 
C. Ciiu«ii , MotiiuliiLki, a. O. Collelt i 
BuTiiliaui, W. S. Mcliao | Milloa, J. 
W. ace wart 



Hemp Oradfri— Auckland. W. H. O. 

JiiUtistoii ; Wrtliu(;larii. G. J. Fulton 
Dairy luipeiaor* — AMckland, Q. M. 

\S iliiainfOH i Pnoroa, F. Bonltin ; 

Tliairjci, W. A P. Siittou , WetliiiK* 

ton, P. Tlionnon ; Chri«tvburch, A. 

M<iL<phcrH)ii i Dutiodiii, J. Q. Parker 
Orernrert uf KliprriiiLOTilal Farn» — Wai- 

niuiji, N. K*ii*iiii[tiiii 1 Kiinkiuu. U. 

Miik-nliy ; Moiiiolinici, F. Gillandera; 

WemroB, 0. licw* 
Caretakere, Quarantinr-itatiooi— Auck> 

land, A. Oiekton : WeUmgLon, J. P. 

Rom I Lvtbotlon, W. J. TboKna« 



50 



NEW KEAIIUID OFFICIAL YSAR-BOOK. 



InpwnoBa of St»ck. 



I Also R^iUnn of Bnnilt and In- 

■pectori anrlar the Slttaehifrinf atid 

Iiitptvtiuii. Dairy Induitry, ami 
Noiioui W«nl> Ai-u) 

Aitu1ilau(^ DistrtM— Aiij!>kliiurf, B, Clirian 
dn ckiftr)t*>, F. H. BrUlniii i OliAes. 
•r*i. D. A, Grfthani; WliaiiKnroi., J. 
T. SLoDt; lla.rnilrcrK, 11. Kot^i K.il)i- 
kibi, J. Kerr; Titurauga, U. K. Col- 
lett, 

|[iiwk«*»B»yDi»triol— Nupirr.W. UilWr 
(in chniyot ; OUWne. O. Ttiomton 
kixl D. PInaHEnK } Wairoa, W. R- 
Rulhxrriinl : Iliiitins*, F. O. Wnjriio ; 
WoodtilU. J. Hiir;*j. 

Wftinmp* nitlriot — MuiorLon, d. H. 

Jritkiii*i>n (in charge) -. CarlerLoa, T. 
C Wi.b!» 

WeMiriiion Di>tri«t — Wnlliiii^ton, J. 
DrDmiBiond (alli'^and [lorl), IXMunro 

Manniralu Ditcriet— Palmentoii North, 
J. Diinnn (in diai^) 

Weil Cmui (Xfttth M»nd) Duirieb— 
Watinariui, A K. BIiltji)«1I (iti diNr^lv); 
HuQl«rTilt«. V A. [|uddlpii-ii>ii lla- 
wem, J. W. Deoni I Strmtfard, J. 
Bii(l){p J Neo Plfiiiouili, R RuitBU 

Marlborough Dirtrict — Ulenhcim, J. 
Hooro 

CftnterhurjDi»lriflt— ChrialohMrflli, R, P. 
HutdpmnH (in i^hnrgp), and K. A. 
Di>"d«n lalSie) ; Rolbi'rliani. J, C. 
BuddlriUni ; KanEiurn. C. A. Cun- 
niiiKliaui i ABtjburbiii, B- Fullurl^n : 
Tiuiaru. K. A, Fwld 

Suiithcrti BistrioL ^ Diiiiedin, T. A. 
Fmiip"-, A»iiitlaiit. C'liii-f ln'pwtor (in 
cliarge) Aiid J. E. Tlioriiion (offleo and 
port) ; FwiHip, W. Blucl r Kurtiw, W. 
Willit Ouwaru, J- C Millvi Falmen- 
Mil South. H. II ill 1 UoAgiel, A. Iron- 
nd*i NaiAbf, K. t. Ouainyc; Cl;<la. 
Q. itaLmod ; Lowrcni-e, A, Mill* : 
Uilton, R- Wright i Balt^lullm. J. L. 
Brurif ; Oor*. W. I)n]);li('«li : lincruar- 

eiii, K. iv a. rur...T, Jiiutr, .1. w. 

Raymond (port) ; RiTcrlor, T. Oil- 
mour; tJiiiBcnilowti, 

Wuttaud DiairicL— UukiUka, 0. C. Emp- 
■on {ill charge) 

HftlMii Uiiiricb— Nslxon, El. UeX. 

Campbell (in oliarge) ) Tticlimoud, O. 
S.C00IM 



VAL0ATION DKPARTMHNT. 

Valuer GfiDcral— John McQiinan 

Deftiiljr Vahirr-Cleiifral— G P. C. Owup 
boll 

Chiff C'ltrk— V. J. M. 1). Walm*1«T 

CIrrh*— A. K. Fowlrr. U L. Wi'i^iii*, 
J. Atkiiiaoii. <3. Hallidar 

Driiiigbt>niait — If, fl. Seta 

Sii|»>rTi«in)f Vnliien — W. Dunowi, Aoak- 
land ; A.' P. O'Cdllafbati. CtinU- 
diiirch 1 A. McKprroir. Duoedta i 
M. Curowoli. Ininri-nrgdl 

Dittrifi Valuwri' — Ja<ti«« I. Wilwn, jna. 
Wluiiigarri; W. Uorroll, J. J. Br|- 
iiuLln. Ai>rkUi.d 1 W. H. WallU, 
Uai»illati: Inn S. Sim»un. Ot»boro*; 
W. IC. Orlffln. Nniiim H. J. C, Coult^ 
Hawenii S. lEiil. N«<r Pljrtuowtb i 
A. Burn*, Waiijcaiiui ; R. OArdaarf 
Palm^rilon Norlli; J. Tnmsr, Mft«lM- 
Uiu ; J Am™, Wrlliimlon ; T. W 
Ca«»rbLll. Pctunir : E. Eftiny. Piolon: 
J.Qtfn.Nflenii ; .I.Wisb«li>r. llokitika; 
A, IX B»yllrlri. Wc.tpjrl.; ». Dick, 
AiliUy ; II. \[urrAv, ChriiU-hurch ) 
A. Ft«einAii. ChriBiuburol) i A. Aliko, 
TinmrLx; K A. Albiiiaoii, Oauuru; W. 
L. Cm.i|i, Palint<r*<"ii^oiith; W. Dallas, 
Bak'lullia; J. Wni^ht, ])ui»din ; J. 
QpijrgL*, IjiiomiMoHn ; John Siiiaill. 
Oom Clmrlri Rohi. A. P.Tper. Invrt- 
caricill 

Cl-rk«— AiiokUnii. E VV Wal«'.ti. T. C. 
Somfrsi Chrmmhuri'li, J. M. WbMlir. 
A. MillttT; Diiuddiii. A. Clothier, J. 
T. Bull ! IiivervaPHill, T Osarlii, C. 
ds R. Aiidr^iTi 

Cadeiii— A>ick]>Mid. K. Pfknting; WeU- 
in|{k»i, K. .1. f(. C?iiiiiiiiiii|( ant) F, C. 
Doi>|;lUi InTPrc«.r)(ill. P. Coreomi 



OOrKRNMKNT LN8URAN0K 

DKt'ARTMENT. 

CoinniiMiaiipr — J. H. Riplianlwn, F.J?.A., 

F.I.A.V. 
AMJitaitt CoriiiiiitaioirT— D. M. I^iekis 
Arlll»ry — Morri* Vot 
8<»c«t«rf — W. B. IIiidoQTi 
Uliii-f ModiriiL Ofi\.-or~T. t^^aliill, M.H. 
Arcainilant — tl. W. Burttroji 
Chief Clerk— R. C. Xiri'ti 
A«*i*lar>L .Ai-tiiarv — & li-alie 
Srcoiiil Ai'iaiaiit Ai-liinry — P. Mut«r 
Ortic* Kmminsr— ti. A, Ki-timertT 
Clorki— J. W. bioiiiburgb, W.S, Smitii, 

A. H. Uamerton. 0. J. UcS. Uc- 




OPPIOIAL LIST. 



fil 



Eeniie, A. Ajtry, V. B. Bolt, T. L. 
B&rter, A. L. B. Jordan, H. S. Mann- 
inK> C- E- aKlwv;, O. Wrbb. P. K. 
Kellii<K, J. B. Yoii'iK, (i- C. Kiiplie. 
J. A. Thom*oii. H. Ro»e, A, ds Cwtro, 
R. P. Uood, O. A. N. Ciinipbrll. A 
T. TrBTBni, C. J. AIoiaiidiT. K. T. 
Smitl). F U. Leckin. EI. !• L.rT«itkni, 
W. H. Wool.. S. 1". U-mliornc, J. 
■a. K»id, A. E Jaekion, C. B. £. 
9lic>it>ui7, J. R. Snnnson, H H. litn- 
dWMOll, R. F"llHttiiu, A. H. Jnlin«l()n» 
O. S. NicoU. R. a. Laita, T. FduIij. O. 
K. Bfldd. J. T. ti-unn, J, It. Krwor, W. 
Biinii'^i J- J. K«wtirr, T. M. Diinmil., 
W. J. E-mri. H. W.Tlii., M. I.. Wilwti. 
B. Trrvithick 
lChi*f UwwiiKer — W. Aroliwr 

ACCKLAMD AavHcj. 
Diilricl Maii<i)((-r— W. J. S^oiglit 
Chi«rCt«rk-J. IL Dloiikhorn 
Clorka— C. B. Ralph 

N^rmii AoBucT. 
fi4Mid«riL Agrni — J. H. Dn^ti 

yVkVO^iVVl AOBKOT. 

Rwjdvnt AB«nt— A. E. Allltoo 

W BLLIXOTOK AURIHTT. 

Dialnrt UaiMMr and Supertuor of Kew 

Btuincu^O. Ri>bFrt«iin 
CUM Cl*rk— H J. K. Herotwd 
ClMki — W. C. MarcUni, A. M. Mo- 

• Donalil 
^KUOK AQXXCI. 

RMid«nl Agi*'il — A. P. Burn^* 

OKXTHovtH Aaxscr. 
BMidmL Agant— A. W. Q. Burnea 

CHBOTODDUca AOKMJK. 

District Uanasor — J. C. Prudlig« 
Chwf Clerk— J. W. U. Woori 
Clarl— 0- J- RotwrUon 

H TlUtRC AflBMCT. 

Hs«>id«>iit Af.mi — S. T. Wirkileed 

H Oakako AaKMCT. 

VxMideiiL Aicoiit— O. II- I'lnnl 

^ Di'HMUiK Aoiiscr, 

I>i*tm'l Manogfr— R. 8. MpQowdn 
.Oliiaf CUrk— O, Cnol.Mn 
Inkt—JL Uariyatt 

iKTKiiDAiraiLt. AasNcr. 
euLAgeul — J. KiiidUf 



I 




PUBLIC TRUST OFFICE. 

Public Trustee— J. W. Poynton 

Soliuilof— F. J. Wileon 

Chief Clrrk — A. A. K. Duncan 

AMifiaiit CUief Clark— T. S. Ronaldaon 

Clerkt— T. 3tepli«iu. P. Fair, C. Zacha- 

riAli, P. HMTej. K. C. Hactm, W. A. 

Konlliani, A. Piirtlio, Q. A. Sin|tti, 

A J. OroM, E. A. SiriTllie, J. B. Jack. 

V,'. Bnrr. K. O, Hnlr.. C. Morri».8, W. 

iltir.il.li, C. A. Gi'lLJtniK.li, II M>iiit.ur«, 

R. Prio0, y. M. Cbesncy. H. Turner, 

C. M. Culders. A. Pctt^rwK, O. B<».-k, 

M. K. Knali, l<'. J>i)*iie«. J M'Uiiea, 

H. P. Hny, R. MaoGibbon, O. Pumvll 

t)i4>lrict Aiiciit, Cliriolclninih — M. C. 

HnruHit : Clprk". T. R Sujwftl, J. 

All*n, i*. A Dftirnui., A. K. Hii<igWd 

Diilrit^l As«"l. Am-kUnd — K, F, Warreti t 

Cl«rk, K. N. H. Browiii*. V. Adams, 

0. Ho bi It von 

Diairii'l AKeiii, Ouiiiylin— F. H. Uorioa; 

OWk., W. a. Mc'Go»Bn. T. Young 
DuLrict Agnnl, OrffVinniith— T [). KcD- 

d»n 

Diitm-t Agent, Nelaon— K. P. WatJda 
W»l CoBftt SetLlomom RearrTtPt Agxttil 
and District AitPiit, Nt-w I'Ifinoiitli — 
Tboriiu \V. Fiaber; Clerk, K. Oawin 



ADVANCES TO SETTLERS 
OFFICE. 

Supprititeiicient— Jobii HtrOo^ran 
Depiii; Superinieuderii— O. F. C. Camp- 

b«ll 
Chief Clerk- F. J. M. D. WfllmsleT 
Ipapfoting Acooimtant — P. HeveB 
Clorka-W, Waddel. H. E. 'williama, 

W. S. Miiirlinliffr, J K. Tliomp*on, 

A. W. Knowlr., W. Aiild. M. J.Croin. 

bie, T. W. Foolc. C. T. Pow^r, J. B. 

Walli*, A. A. Pricrlmrd, H O'Kmirke, 

C.WiUon, 0. li.Collii... R. 0. MoUn- 

nan, A. Tudln>pe. J. F. O'Unry, T. 

W. Vi.kfry 
Cliiief Tnliior* — W. Diinean, Auckland ; 

A. P. 0'C»tlHj|l.iiii. Cliri»U'hiircli ; A. 

McEerrow, Dtinedini H. Carai>«ll. 

InrerL-arKill 
Olcrk al Auckland— F. B. Rgbtirlton 





DEPARTMENT OF 
HEALTH. 

Miin«t«>r of llf«lth — Hon. Sir J- Q. 

W«rd. K.O.M.Q. 
Chief Hiwttti Offli-Dr— J. Ua.lci>1m Hmod, 

M.I>.,F.C.S.,D.P.H-, Cl»nihnd(te 
DLnlrict HoBlth OlBoer— T. H. A. T«len- 

lino. M. R.C.S.E., L.Mid D.P.1I..R.C.P. 

Lond. 
NftllT* Hoallh OQIur—Miiai Poid*r, 

M.n. 

SccnUr; — E, Horoemmi 

Clerks— Ufrbcrt B. M«|cratl>, P. Willi*. 

H. Ka*tp»t*. T. P. ButloT. J. W. 

1'ii*l<.r. 'l>piat*. Ethol Etuu, Q. 

Cmig 
Port H«klth Offioflw.— 

Whaiisurf-i— O. U. SumC, M.S. ft 
Cli M . Sjdiiif-y 

AucIUmuI^ B<i<nrd Win. SiinrDiKii, 
L K.CJ.P. rt R.C.S. Edin,. L.F.P.S, 

K«ipar> tlmda— Captain J. 0. SidUIl 
Ooelniiim— W. <5, 8coii. L S.A. Lond , 

M.RC.S. Kng.. M.I>. Durh. 
aUhornr— .1. W. WiUunt, U.B. et 

Ch.U., M.D- Ellin. 

Muier -T. 0. Moore. K.B. rt B.8.. 

U.l>. UriiT. Dubl. 
Nflnin— E. J. RoborU. MB. H B^, 

Uiiir. ot S.Z. 

t^WMgKnui — B. C. BlLri^. M.R.C.8. 

Bui!.. I.S.A. Lond. 
W*llin(tloH— H. Pollen, U.D., M.S. 
Pir4an— H. A. U. CUndge, M.B. H 

BS., Uiii*. Ouruani 
LjlUlton— C. U. Uptitm, H.R.0.8. 

Bug., L. .C.P. Lond. 



Port Chalmen — 0. HodgM M.B. rf 
H S. Kdiu. 

BlufT— Jm. TorPMic*. M.B. »( BjS. 
UniT. of N.Z. 
"Wwlport— M- nlaok^nii*. L R.C^P., 
L. R.C.3- Etliti, L.P.P.3. GIm., M.B. 
et B.8. Cniv. Urlb. 

GrfTmoiilb — C, I.. Horicn, M.R.O.S 
Sng,, L.KCa. En|>.. US.A. Lond. 

Va(xin« Dialributor— J. Q. F. Wilfonl 
M.R.C.S. Zag., L.S.A. Lond. 

BwUriologut— J. A. Otlruth, M.B.C.T.8. ' 

AaautanL in L*bontoi7 — O. H. Barker 

Diilrif^t Krnllh Ofllcen — 

AuckUnd-R. H. Mak«ill. M B.. M.S. 

Dun«ili>i— r. Ogilon. M.D. M.S. 
Aolina Dialrirl lloBltb Oftc*r» — 

CbriaccliQTch— W. II. Sxmt*. M.H 
M B., M.8.,B.8c. 

ricl»On— K J. RobcrU. M.B.. B.S. 

Bl«nhrim -W. Andcnon, U.B.. US. 

Xapirr— 11. B. Finch, M.B,, Cb.B.. 
DP.H. 

Sanitari In»pK-Uira — 
Dun<jdin— J. E. Qiuin 
Wellirtgion — A. H- E«ndaU. C. A- 

Seliaurr 
Auckland — C. C. Winrtanley 
Napinr — M. Kerihaw 
Nplwin — E. Middleton 
Cliri*l«]inroh — D. Munro 
laTrruargiU — E. Cam Bran 



I 



Cadxtb nr Ootbehickxt Skrvici to bb ToiimBSRa. 
OadeU in the Civil SerrJM are required, of Mr arriring at lh« age of eig)it«ei> 
/«■», to WMP for llir«« yrtn in a Yotuntecr corp*. Hrad* of d«par1ni«nU ar» 
required to ■«« that («d«u who eoine within the r«|i"'*^''^'^' j^'<^ *'>* Valanl«ep 
Faraa^ and •erve for Llie prriod ciamod, and alao lo notif; lb(> L'nder-S«or«(arj for 
I>ef«Diw of Iha BppoiiitmiinL of all oatleU eomtng iriliiiit this regulation- 




BOOLBSUBTtOAL. 



53 



ECCLESIASTICAL. 

Tbere i» uo State Church in tbe colony, nor is State aid given 
to amy form of religion. GoTemment in the early days set aside 
certtkin lands a.3 endowments for rarious religious bodies, but DOCbing 
of the kind has been done for many yoars post. 

Chuboh of thb Pbovinoe op New Zeaiund, ooumoni:.t callsd 
THB "CHoncn OP Exqland." 

Bishops. 

The Most Rov. William Garden Cowie, D.D., Auckland; conse- 
crated 1869 (Primato). 

Tho Right R&v. WUliatn Leonard Williams, D.D., Waiapu ; 
consecrated 189fi. 

The Right Bar. Frederic Wallis, D-D., WeHiogtOD ; coosecrabed 
1895. 

The Bight fiev. Charles Oliver Mules, M.A., Nelaoo ; consecrated 
1892. 

The Right Rev. ChurchillJulius, D.D., Chrietcburch ; contiecrated 
1890. 

The Right Rev. Samael Tarratt Kevill, D.D., Danedin ; codso- 
crated 1871. 

The Bight Bov. Cecil WiLBon, M.A., Melanesia; consocrated 
1894. 

Roman Catboug CavRoa. 

Archbishop. 

The Moat Rev. Francis Redwood, S.M., 0.D., Archbishop and 
Metropolitao, WelliDgtoa; consecrated 1874. 

' Bithops. 

The Right Rev. George Michael Lenihan, D.D., Auckland ; oon* 
eecrated 1896. 

The Right Rev. John Joseph Grimes, S.M., D.D., Chrisbctmroh ; 
coneecratea 1887. 

The Right Rev. Michael Vcrdon, D.D., Duaodin: consecrated 
1896. 

Aknual Meetings and OPFioans. 

The principal present heads or officers of the various ciiurchea, 
and the places and times of holding the annual or periodical asHoui- 
blies or meetings, are as follow : — 

Church of Btt^Uind. — For Church purposes, the colony is divided 
into six dioccaes, viz, : Auckland, Waiapu, Welingtoii, Ndlson, 
Chriatchurch, and Dunedin. The Geiioral Synod meets every third 
year in one or other of the dioceses. Representatives attend from 
each diocese, and also from the diocese of Melanesia. — President, 



the Bishop of Auckland, Prirna.te. The Diocesan Synods 
once a year, under the presidency of the Bishop of the 
The next General Synod will be held in Auckland, on the SSiI 
Jannary, 1901. 

Roman Catholic Church. — The diocese of WelUngton . e«tablished 
io 1B48, was in 1887 created an Archilioceae and the metropoUtaa 
see. There are three suffragan diocese» — Auckland, Christcharch, 
and Dunedin. A Betreal is held annually in each of the foor 
dioce»es, at the end- of which a Synod is held, presided over by tbs 
Bishop, and at which all his clergy attend. 

In January, 1899, the first Provincial Council of New Zealand 
was held in WeUini^ou, under the presidency of the Metropolitao* 
and attended by all the So&agan Bishops, and a number of priesta 
fllocted spetiiolly in each dioeoso as representatives of the whole 
Catholic clergy in the colony. The decrees of this Council were 
approved by Home in April, 1900, were published on 1st January, 
1901. and are now binding in every diocese in New Zealand. 

Presbyterian Church of New S^ealand. — The union of the Otago 
and Southland Presbyterian ChTirch and (he Presbyterian Choroh of 
northern New Zealand was effected in Dunedin on the SIst October, 
1901. The unii«d Church bears the name " The Presbyterian 
Church of New Zealand." The General Assembly will meek 
on the second Tuesday of November, 1902, in St. John's Church, 
Wellington ; and thereafter, on ordinary oocaBions, alternately in 
Dnucdin and Wellington. Moderator, the Bev. James Gibb, Dun- 
edin; Clerk and Treasurer, Rev. David Sidey, D.D., Napier. 

Methoiiist Church of Avstraiasia. — The annuai New Zealand 
Conference meets on or about the last Tuesday in February, tb* 
exact date being determined by the President, who holds oflicQ 
for one year. Each Conference determioes where the next one 
shall assemble. President (1902-3), Bev. D. J. Murray, Mastcrton ; 
Secretory, Bev. S, Lawry, Polmorslon North. The next Con- 
ference is to meet iu Durham Street Church, Cbristchurch. 

Primitive liethodist Church. — A Conference takes place every 
January*. The uuxt is to be held at Ashburlon, cununencing 8th 
January, 1903. Tlie Conf^^rence otficials for the present yeeir are ; 
President, C. M. Luke, Esq.. Wcliinj-ton; Vice-President, Rev. G. 
Clement. Weatport : Secretary', Rev. R. Hall, Bluff; Secretary of 
Executive Committee, Mr. D. Goldie, Pitt Street, Auckland ; 
Treaanrer of Mission Funds, Mr. Joseph Watkinson, Mangere, 
Auckland. 

Baptiit Union of New Zealand. — President, Rev. F. W. Borebam, 
Mosgiel: Twasurer, Mr. A. Chidgcy. Cbristchurch ; Secretory, Rev. 
J. J. North, Sprcydon. The Union comprises 34 churches, 3,679 
members, 4,67H scholars in the Sunday schools, with 690 teachers. 
There are also 110 local preachers, and 2G preaching-stations. This 
religious body has a newspaper of its own, the i^ew Zealand 
Baptttt. published in Cbristchurch: Editor, Rev. F. W. Borebiuu, 
Uosgiel. 



I 






DBFBNCKS. 



Congretfationat Union of New Zealand, — The annual meetings 
are held daring the nionbh ol February, at such place as may be 
decicied ou by vote of ihe Coancil. ChairiiiaD for 1902-1903, Ilev, 
I. SiiripnsoD, Chriscchurch ; Chairuiaii-elect, Kev. W. A. Evans. 
Wellington; Secretary, Rev. W. Day, Aucklaml ; Treasurer, Mr. 
W. H. Lyon, Aucklaud; Bcgialrar. Mr. F. Moiidowcrolt, Welling- 
tou ; Head Office. Auckland. In 1903 the meeting o( the Council 
will be held at nunuditi. The Coiniiiittee of the Union meets at 
Auckland on the sef^oiid 'iViHsday of each month. 

Heiirewa. — Minl^iters: Rev. S. A. Goldstein, Auckland; Rev. 
H. van Staveren, Wellington; Rev. I, Zaohariah, Chrialchurch ; 
Rev. k. T. Chodowski, Donedin ; Mr. Alexander Singer, Tlokitika. 
.-VDnual rneetinga of the general Congregations are usually held at 
these places during the month o( Elul (about the end of August). 



DEFENCES. MILITARY AND NAVAL.* 
The defence forces cooBist of the Koyal N.il. Artillery and Royal 
N.Z. Enifineers, and the auxiliary forces of Voluiibeere (Mounted 
HiQea, Naval, Ourrisou, and Field Artillery, Submariuo Miners, 
Engiiieers, Kille, Cycle, Bearer companies, and Defence Kiflo 
Clubs). There is a Oommaodcr of the Forces, who is an Imperial 
officer. A Royal .^nilltry oflicer is Staff Officer for Anillery. To 
the Under-Secretary for Defence all questions of expenditure are 
referred. 

MiLITAIlT InSTHUCTIOS. 

A School of Military Instruction has been established at Welling- 
tOD, with an officer of the Imperial forctfu us Comniaiidunt. 

MlLlTU AND VOLUKTSBB DISTRICTS. 

The two islands (North and Middle) are divided into five dis- 
tricts and two sub- districts, cAch commauded by a Field Ollicer of 
Militia or Volnnteors, with a staff of drill-ser^jeants, 

BovAL N.2. Abtillebt. 
Thifi Force is divided into four detachnienls, which are stationed 
at Aut'kland, Wellington fhead-<inarters), Iiyttelton, and Dnnedin ; 
their principal duties are to look after and take charge of all guna, 
stores, amumiiition. and munitions of war at these four centres. 
The Force conaista of one heut. -colonel, three captains, (our subal- 
lerns, with an eatabliahmcnt of 240 rank and file. 

Royal N.Z. Enoikbers. 

This branch, Uke the Artillery, is divided amongst the four 
centres for submarine mining and torpedo work, and consists of two 
captains, two subalterns, and one probationary cadet, with-* total 

* For IcforoMtloii t*Ui iDiUUrf canUiiK*DU Mut foriknleeln BodUi Afrkoa, •ealSutll. 



HBW EBJICAHD OPFtOlAI^ TB&K-BOOS. 

establishment of 96 of all ranks. They have charge of two torpedo 
boats and three steam launches, two Hubmarine mining steAmeiBot 
the "Sir F. Chapman" class, and of all submarine mining and 
torpedo stores. 

VoitUNTBEBS. — MOUJITBD KiPLES. 

There axe forty-two corps of Mounted BidcB in the North Island 
and tliirty-oiie in the Middle Island, with a total stxengtb ol 
5,464 of all raiikg. These corps go into camp for an aonoal 
training of six days. 

VoLcinxRBS. — Natal akd Garrison Artillkry. 
There are Ave Naval Artillerj" Corps and one Garrison Artillery 
Corps in the North Island, and three Naval and two Garrison 
Artillery Corps in the >riddle Island, comprising in all a total of SO 
officers and 917 rank and file. They go into camp annually for 
sixteen days. 

VOLCNTBBHS. — SUBUARISB MlKBRS. 
There are two corps of Submarine Miners in the North Island, of 
a total strength of 19U. These corps also have cutlera. &q., provided, 
and are inHtruuted in rowing, knotting, splicing, signoUing. and other 
duties pertaining to thiK branch of tlie aervioe. Attendance at an 
anncial camp is also compulsory. 

V01.UHTEBBS. — FiE/.D .Artillery. 
There are five batteries of Field Artillery (two in the North 
leland and three in the Middle Island), with a total of 430 of all 
ranks. They are armed witl) 15-pounder B.L., 9-pouiider Arm- 
Btrong RB.L. guns, and B-pouudfr Nurdeufeldtfi, on hold- carriages, 
and go into camp annually for sixteen days. 

VOLVNTEEBB.^ — EsOt^EERS. 

This branch consists of four corps, with a total of 349 of all 
ranks, two in the North and two in the Middle Island. Besides 
GSxrying nfl»>s they are provided witLi entrenching tools and all 
appliances for making and blowing up bridges or lajdng land-mines. 

VOLONTKEKS. — BiPI.E C0RP8. 
In this braneh of the service there are a hundred and sixteen 
corps, fifty-five being in the North Island and sixty-one in the 
Middle Island, with a total strength of 7,763 of all ranks, including 
garrison bands. 

Volunteers. — Ctclk Corps. 

There are Volunteer cycle corps at Auckland, Wellington, Christ- 
ohorcb, and Dunedin, of a maximum strength of two officers and 
twen(V-6ve non-commissioned othcers, rank and 6le : ibey are at- 
laohed to the infantry battalions at those centres. 



VoluQteer bearer corps at Auckland, Wellington, Ohriatchurch, 
a.nd Dunedin are of a triAxinium strength of three officers and fiftjr 
uoD-commissioDixl officers, r&nk and Qle. There is &Uo a bearer 
corps al Nelson of a auutimum strougch of two officers and twenty- 
live uon-ooujaiisBiouod ofQcers, rank and file. 

^1 Defence BifLe Clubb. 

■ Tbesc have lately bcuu uetablielied by the QovemmoDt. Ueui- 
^Lbers can purchase riAes at cost price from Govornmenl. An aoiiuaL 
^■gBADt of ammunition is inatie lo thoss members who fuliil coudi- 
^^^ns as to quarterly drills. There are seventy-four rille clubs, 
comprising about l.-'iOO men. 



VOLOKTEBBS. — CaPET CoRPS. 

There is a force of fifty-eight cadet corps — viz., twenty-two in 
ttbe North Island and thirty-six in the Middle Island. 



I 

^M The whole of the adult portion of the Force have carbines or 
™ lifles ; Cadets being armed with Martini-Entield and Snider carbines. 
Defence rifle clubs are tu-fhcd with Martiui-H^nSeld riHes. 

IESUOLMENT. ETC. 
Membara of the Permanent Force;) are enrolled to serve for a 
period of eiplit yts&x» from enrohnetit, the Itist three years of such 
iHeiin^ in tho Reserve; adult Volunteers for three ytiars, aiitl cailote 
two years. The Permanent Forces are principally racruitod from 
men who have one year's etficient service in the Volunteers. After 
passing the guunery and other courses and serving three years 
iu the Permanent Forces the men ar« eligible for transfer to police 
^ and prison services. 

H iNSTRUCTORfi. 

The Instrnclors for artillery and engineor and submarine mining 
carps are obtained from the School of Gunnery at Shocburyness, 
and fi'om the Royal Engineora, under a throo years" engagement, on 

> completion of which they return to their regiments. 
Capitation. 
An annual capitation of £3 lOs. is granted to each efficient Voluu* 
teer.and a sum not exceeding £30 to each eflicieut cadet corps, One 
hundred and fifty ixiunds of ball-cartridge are issued each year free 
to erery ailult Volunteer, and tweucy-five rounds to each cadet over 
Lhirteaa years of age. 

B AnUlNIBTiLlTIOH. 

"^ The defence forces of New Zealand are administered under "The 
Defence Act, 1886," and ■' The Defence Act Amendment Act, 1890." 





HBW ZBALAHD OViriOtAT. VBAH-BOOR. 
EXPENDrrCRR ON TRE ESTABMRHMEST ASD MaIXTP.NANCB OP 

Dbfkncbs rHOM 18b4-b5 to lyoO-iyOl. 



rau. 


HUMktr 
XspMidltor*. 


Uwbour 


TtttaL 




S 


t 


« 


188A-6S 


90,810 


9,G01 


100,417 


1SB6-86 


91,Sl2 


187,167 


218, 40» 


1886-87 


m.921 


130,428 


aS9,366 


1887-88 .. 


V2'2,mi 


73.468 


196,519 


188S-89 ., 


53.fi91 


so,om 


108,684^1 


1&69 90 


63.611 


16,732 


79.3^^H 


1990-91 .. 


80,891 


10,798 


91,6^^H 


1B91-92 ,. 


75,343 


7,(U4 


B3,98^^| 


19fi2-9S .. 


50.809 


11,205 


Tl.Olfl^l 


ISSS-M .. 


66,670 


3,ft76 


60,546^1 


1894-96 . . 


G2,L81 


3,495 


64.67ftM 


1895-96 .. 


84 .9K1 


s.au 


88,2M^H 


16M-97 


83.4-13 


4.690 


87.138'^| 


1897-98 .. 


83,004 


2.536 


6fi.a2» 


1898-99 


114,780 


10,168 


1S4.947 


1899-1900.. 


184,970 


6^338 


190,298 


190O-IWI.. 


156,318 


S.MO 


160. L7B 



DfcPOTS FOR SHIPWRECKED M.VRINERS. 
Elbven of the crew of the barque " Spirit of the Diiwn," whioh 
was wrecked on Antipocles I»lfind OTi the 4th September, 1893, 
remained on the island for cij^hty-eight days without becoming 
aware of the exisLenco of tho dfcpiH of provisions And clothing fa*- 
castaways which i» oatabhsht^d there. Attention is now drawn 
to the fact that such depots uro inaiiitained by the New Zealand 
Government on that island, and on the Auckland, Campbell, 
Bounty, Kermadec, and Snares Islands. 

The following are the poBitions of the depots : — 

Attckland Islands. — A depot is placed on the ttouth side of Qre> 
bas Cove, Port Ross, and another la Camp Cove, Carnley Harbour, 
and a tliitd at the bead of Nonniin Inlet. One boat is placed on 
the uorth-west end of Adams Island, another on liliiderby Island, 
and another on Rose Island. 

Campbell Island. — A d6pdt is erected in Tucker Cove, Pei-severaoce 
Harbour, and a boat has been placed at the hea<l of that harbour. 

Antipodes lalatuis. — \ depot is placed abreast the anchorage oq 
the north-east side of the principal island. 

Bounty Islands. — There is a depiQt on the principal islaad. 

Snares Islartd. — A d^pAt has been established on cbia island in 
Boat Harbour. 

KerttKidec lilands. — A dcpit is established on Mftcaulay Island, 
near Ijava Cascade, on the north-east end of the island, and another 
on Curtis Island, at the head of Maudonald Cove, on the north* 
western end of the island. 



I 
I 



I 





QBAVINQ DOOBB A»D FATKNT SDtPB. 



s& 



Finger-posts to indicate the direction of the ddpAts ha.v& also 
(been put up. 

The Government steamer visits the Auckland, Campbell, Anti- 
Ipodes, Bonnly, and Snares IsUnds twice a year, and the Kcrmadec 
: Islands oDce a year. 



GBA\1NG DOCKS AND PATENT SLIPS. 
Vk»sbl9 visiting New Zealanil, and re^jtiiriiig ilocking or rspaim, will 
find ample accointnodation at the principal ports of the colony. 

There are in New Zealand four graving-docks ; two of these are 
JBituated in Auckland, one at Lyttelton, ami one al Port Chalmers. 

Auckland Doukr. 

The Aucklatid Docks are ihe property of the Auckland Harbour 
Board, and cost, witli machinery, appliancnti, Ac, £247,000. The 
dimensions of the docks at Auckland arc as follow : — 

Longtb oTcr all .. 
Ijfingih on floor .. 
BrMidLli ov«rr &U .. 
Bre»dih on floor . . 
Breftdth acsutrbnco 

Uepbii of wfttoi on Kill &t lii^h vtftler 
ordioary aptitig tides) 

The followinjj is the scale of charges for the use of the Auckland 
and Calliope Graving Docks and appliances : — 



Calliopa Dock- 


AncklBcd Dock. 


Mb feot. 


an feat. 


500 . 


son . 


110 . 


65 , 


« , 


a . 


do . 


48 , 



33 



134. 



AvcKiAKD Obavisq Doce. £ ■. d. 

Eotxanco fM . . ..110 

For every vmicI of 100 tonii (grangi n^ntor), or undor, per 

Avf ..400 

For BVMy »o««l over 100 Ion* (grou register), for fi»t 

100 Ion*, uor dnv ,. ..400 

For erery Biddlliotift] ton (^roM r<>giKtcrK pRf day .. 2 

For two or caore «eaiie1* docking at the Hainn time, the ton- 

na^pi □( which together does ciot exceed 100 tons (kvobb 

rvgivtcr), per day each . . . . 3 10 

For atiorea out in docking or hdngiug the v<'tisal, there maat b« paid, 

aceorditig to Injury done, auch amuuiiL ki luay be lixed by Che Doclc- 

m«sl«r. 
Foriuo of ttoam kilo, lOn. per day. 
For UR« of piicb furikivac. Hi*, pnr day. 

Oaujofb Ouvma [Jock. 
£ntran<» fee . . 
For all V«MoU up tn 300 totis {groas register) 

For all veMeln »U] to 4(»l lanit 

mi to .500 lo(i« 

601 to GUO tout 
, 601 lo 700 innn 

, 701 lo auO tous 

eOl to flOO trni 

901 to 1,000 tons 



i^ n. 


A. 


5 & 





SO 





S2 10 





96 





37 10 





30 





89 10 





85 





87 10 







60 



HBW eBAI.ANn OPFIOIAI. 



After iht Ifaird iimy In docik 

Id. per ton per dfam. 

.. 66. 



k OimM 



CALtJoi'K Gn4vi5» V>ock— continued, 
For^l vcuelf 1,001 to 1.100 lom {giou regiitet) 
1. 101 to 1,200 tona 
. 1,201 to l.aOUsona 

1.801 to l.60(J tons 
1,501 lo 2,000 con» 
9,001 lo 3.000 totin . 

3,001 tol.lloO <.at>» 
4,001 to Ji. 000 tons 
The (ongoing oh&rges &re far thr«c Aa,js or less, 
tbe following rat«8 are chaig»d:— 

For frll va«>eU up to 900 tons {sToes ntRiGter^ 

For alt vesMls ol 501 tniiji to 1 .000 ton* 

For ftll vesMls over 1.001 toni up to S,000 tout 

For nil vMseU ovtt 2.001 tons and upwaidt 

Twenty p«roant. r«duccion on Cklliope Dock tktea is allowed when two 
three veueta oaq &rraufie to dock on ib« tune tide, sad ttnuia is dock I 
same number of houn : btil Riieh rediKiion it not allowed If anr of Um Aoot 
land Harbour Boiird'a vnniiplt Ape douked ul tlia Mime Limn u itootner menol 

For eharct* out in dooking or linnging the veHBel, tbcra U to be paid, •»• 
oordiag lo iujur; done, sucb amount as may be flxad by tbe Doobmaitor. 

During the year 1901. 94 vessels of various deacriptions, with] 
a toial of 31,438 tonn, miuie nse of the Auckland Graving Dock, 
oocopying it in all 22.3 days 10 hoars, for repairs or painting. 

In Calliope Dock 16 vessels were docked, with an aggregs 
tODDOge of 23.494, and occupying Che dock for ^8 days 5 hours. 

Dock dues for the y^ar amounted to JE2,354 58. 4d. 

Under arrangement with the Admiralty, a complete plant of t _ 
most efficient and modern machinery ha« been provideti at Calliope 
Dock-yard. The workshops are now erected, and all the machinery 
in placed in position, with the exception of the shear-legs. This 
plant i]icludes i30-ton shear-legti complete, trolly to carry SO tODS 
and railt%, 10-ton steam crane at side of dock, engines, boilers, 
overhead travellers ; planiug, shaping, and slotting machines ; radial 
drilltt, vertical drills, band-saws for iron, punching and shearing 
machines, plate-bending rolls ; 24 in. -centre gautry lathe, TO ft. bed ; 
9iQ. and i2m. gautry latlies, uiilUug- machines, emery - grmders, 
screwing ■ machines, ditto lor pipes, hurizontal boring • DiacluDea, 
Root's Ljlower, smiths' forges (kix), coppersmith's forgo, leralUng- 
slabs, 8t(>aiii- hammers, lead-riirnace, wall-cranoa, zinc-bath, plate- 
furnace, jib-crane for foundry, circular->taw bench, band-saw for 
wood, lathe for wood, general joiner, carpenters' benchps (four), kilo 
for steaming l>oard5, Fox's trimmer, cupola to melt 5 tons of metal, 
countersinking machine, pipe-benrling machine, tools of variooB 
descriptions, moulders' bins, force-pumps for testing pipes, vica- 
benehes, electric-light engines, dynamos, i^c. (two) ; and all other 
appliances and machinery required to render the plant adequate u> 
repair any of His Majesty'^ ships npon the station, or any merchant 
vessel visiting the port. The dock and machinery will be available 
for Qse, when not required for His Majesty's vessels, in eiTecting 
repairs to any merchant vessel requiring same. Electric lights have 




A 



ORAVINQ DOCKS AND lUTBNT SLIPS. 



61 



beet: provided for workshops, dock, and dockyard. The dockyard 
is now coimecbed hy teioptume with the couLral oxchango. Ad 
abundant supply of the purest freHh water is available ai Calliope 
Dock and Calliope Wharf ; and a most completu estabUslunant of 
up-to*date machinery and appliances has been provided. 

tWBLLINGTON PATRNT SLIP. 
The Port ot Welliu^toii han no dock ; but there is a well- 
equipped patent alip at Evans Bay, on which vesseU of 2,000 tons 
can be wifely hauled up. This slip is the property o( a private com- 
pany, and is in do way connected with the ZLaibour Board. lb 
ie l,(yiOit. loDg, with a cradle 260ft. iu length. There is a depth of 
32ft. at high water at the outer end of the slip. A dolphin aod 
buoys are laid down for swinging ships in Evans Bay. 

The company has eouvenieiit workshops, which contain machinery 
□ecessary for effecting all ordinary repairs to vgbbqIb using the slip. 

Daring the year ending 81&t March, 1901, ninety-six vessels of 
various aizea, of an aggrcgatu of 45, 121 tons, were taken up on the 
slip for repairs, cleaning, painting, Ac. The cliarges for taking 
veMels on the slip and launching them are Is, per ton on the gross 
tonnage for the first full twenty-four hours, and 6d. per ton per day 

i afterwards, unless by special agreement. 



Otaoo Gkavinu Dock. 



The dock at Port Chalmers is vested iu the Otago Dock Trust. 
S body entirely distinct fruin the Otagu Harbour Board. Vessels of 
large size can be taken in the Otago Dock, as the following mea^ure- 
,eDts will show: — 

Ltngth D<p«r all 

Ltn^ih on tbo floor . . 

Breftdlh overall 

Brwddth OD Boot 

Br«&<jch wbeia ship's bilg« would be . . .> 

HrcAiith Rt Hix-kgatM.. .. .. .. 

Dsptli of water on ■ill ftt higli-wuCer (ordin&iy Rpr!df( tlda«) 17^ . 

Connected with the Otago Dock are a large machine* shop, 
steam-hammer, and forge, with all the appliances necessary lor 
performiog auy work that may be required by vessoU visitiug 
the port. An 80-lou bhear-lege has also been erected fur lieavv 

• lifts. 
There is also a patent shp, used for taking up small vessels. 
All vcBsek using th? Otago Graving Dock are hable to dock dues 
according to the following scale (unless under special contract), re- 
Tised since the begiuniug of 1B96 :~ 

£ >. d. 

V«>b«Ib undei 200 tODK, for the first tbree tlftyi, or part ol 

tbtea daym .. .,3S00 

VtBMlBofaoOtoos. &nd under 800 toDa .. .. SA 

800 tonx nnd upwards .. . . 00 




62 



NKW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



And for every day, or part of a day, after the firat thres dayi : — 



VeBBelB under 300 tons 

300 . and under 400 tons 

400 , . 600 , 

500 , , 600 , 

600 . . 700 . 

700 . . 800 , 

800 , . 900 . 

900 . . 1,000 , 

1,000 toDB sad upwards 



8d. per rwiiter ton per day. 

6|d. 
Ojd. 



During the twelve months ended 31st December, 1901, the 
dock was in use 205 working-days. The number of vessels docked 
was fifty-eight, having a total registered tonnage of 48,058. 

Ltttelton Dock and Patent Slip. 

The Graving-dock at Lytteltoo, which is the property of the 
Harbour Board, is capable of docking men-9f-war, or almost all of 
the large ocean steamers now running to the colony. Its general 
dimensions are : Length over all, 503ft. ; length on floor, 450fc. ; 
breadth over all, 82ft. ; breadth on floor, 46ft. ^ breadth at entrance, 
€2ft. ; breadth where ship's bilge would be, on 6ft. blocks, 55ft. ; 
depth of water on sill at high-water springs, 23ft. 

The scale of charges for the use of the dock and pumping 
machinery are as follow : — 



For all veeselB up to 300 tons, for four days or leas 

301 to 400 tons, 

401 to 500 tons, 

501 to 600 tons, 

601 to 700 tons, 

701 to 800 tons, 

801 to 900 tons. 

901 to 1,000 tons, 
1,001 to 1,100 tons, 
1,101 to 1,200 tons, 
1,201 tons and upwards. 



£ B. 
20 
22 10 
25 
27 10 
30 
32 10 
35 
37 10 
40 
45 
50 



After the fourth day in dock, the folloning rates are charged : — 
For all veasels up to 500 tons . . . . Id. per ton per day. 

For all vessels of 501 tons to 1 ,000 tons 

For all vesBeUover 1,001 tons up to 2,000 tons 

2,001 tons up to 3,000 tons 

3,001 tons up to 4,000 tons 

4,001 tons up to 5,000 tons 



3d. 

2}d. 

2id. 

i. 



Twenty per cent, reduction on the above ratoa is allowed when two or three 
veBEtls can arrange to dock on the same tide and remain in dock the same 
number of hours. Two vessels of 1,000 tons each can he docked at the same 
time. The 20-percent, rehato is not allowed if any of the Lyttelton Harhour 
Boud's vesBelB are docked at the same time as another vessel. The twenty- 
four hours constituting the first day of docking commences from the time of tne 
dock heing pumped out. _ 

Any vessel belonging to H.M. Navy or any colonial Government, or any 
commissioned ship belonging to any foreign nation, is admittod into the graving 
dock without payment of the usual dock dues, hut is charged only such sum as 
is necessary for the reimbunement of actual expenditure of stores, wages, and 
matetialB. 




BAUOOCBe. 



63 



» 



There are electric lights, one on sftch side of the graving-dock ; 
ftTid there is a workshop alongside the dock, atid several other en- 
einoering works within a short distance of it, where repair;) and 
heavy foundry-work can be done. 

The gravmg dock and machinery cost £106.000- The interest 
and Hinking fund on that stum, at 6| per cent., amounts to 
£6,825 per annum. Sioce its const ruction, the dock dues for 
the nineteen years, endud Slst OocLMiibwr, 1901, amounted to 
£19.161 5s. 7d., and tbo working expuusett to £11,626 14s. lid., 
leaving a credit balance for ain«t«eQ yearb, ended Slfit Dec«iuL)er, 
1901. uf £7.634 lOs. 8d. 

During the year 1901 twenty-six vessels were docked, and the 
'dock dues amounted to £1,864 3s. 5d. For the nineteen years 
ending 1901, 379 vessels were docked. 



Patbnt Sup, Lvttei.tos. 

.Alongside ibe graving; dock in a patent slip, with a cradle 
150ft. in length, suitable for vessels of 300 tons. It belongs to 
the Harbour Board. 

The following is the scale of charges : — 

Dp lo 75 tooa grots regiiter, £4 for five dayn, and lOn. per day &tter the fliih, day. 
0««r 7A ton* sad up lo 150 toui gross regiM«r. £C for fiia dnya. uid 15s. per day 

ikiUit drib (lay. 
Over 150 toni and up to S&O tons grotw rogiitcc, £8 for Ata dayii, Kud SUd. per d«y 
, ftftrr Alih day. 
[Over 250 loni grosH register, £10 for five daya, and SOs. per d&y after fltlh day. 

A day to ujcad Wct^ecD BODriie add cunstt. 

The ftbote nvlPK r-.ovcr tho co«b ol kll lataoar oonneotcd with hAnling up and 
lauDClilog (thu cTcw uf the ve«iiel to Kite limit uaittanoo am tn»T be required), 
uid tlia cost of blooking e vessel Knd sliifting ttie blocks after hauling up. 

TiMAKU Slip. 
The Timaru slip is capable of taking up a vessel of 300 tons. 

Kelson Chadlji. 

The Aachor Steamship Company's cradle can take up a vessel of 
1160 tons. 



HAKBOUaS. 

PiLOTAQB, Pout Charoes, etc. 

fPiLOTAUK, port charges, berthage charges, Ac., at fourteen o( the 
>rincipal harbours in New Zealand, as on the 1st January, 1902 
Toonipiled by Mr. C. Hood Williams, Secretary to the Lyttelton 
Harbour Board) ;— 

AUCKLA^tO. 

PUot««« (Dot oompuliory) : BalUag-vcwele, mwaids and outwards, 3d. per ton 
eaoh way. 



«BW 2VALAND OP7I0U.L TEAR-BOOK. 

SMuaftTR, Inwurd* ud ontwftrdi, 2J. par ton «kob v%y wbtD Hrviow at pilot ftn 

l»lt«fi. 
Port afaargae : 3J. pai toa faKll-yearly {qn ftll vusa]! orer 15 tons) in od« par- 

mest. 

Hftibourmaatcr'o fee* ; Id. tot ton. 

BfltbbR^* : Kvarj- pataoci who «bii.ll a«e a.ay wharf with njiy veasel aball pij tor 
ihe OM tborool— Farry ttoamcra, £1 to £1 lo*. par m^mih ; otli#r *«a««b 
under 20 lona, 1*. per d.%j, not exoa'SclLiig lOa.. For every veMvl not iaolatUd 
in tbe ftbove, ^d. p«i too pec day. OuUidu beitbs, (d. par ton par day. 

Gusoh:ib. 

Pitotaga (notcoinpnlaary) : Sniling-wisslii over 100 toni, flret 100 loae. 6d. ] 
ton; evary I-jd over 100 torn, 3J, psi too. Into and out of Tarknga __ 
llivar: SalUng-ve&aals, .Id. per ton: cnilingvtMQla towed, 2d. gar ton; 
xloamer*, 'id. per ton. 

Port obkCKuit: Ste&mera, Nnilmg-vet^sel*, or boati plyius within tho barbour or 
engagtid in coMilDfi only, 8 J. pot toa quarterly; ateamort onillng-vaueli, 
OC boats plying wlihJn tho harbour and not «iiga(Fd In ookstin^, only on 
arrival (not lo exoeed lUd. pat ton in ^ny half-ysar). td. p)t tan , Dtaamon 
or ulling-veBBvla from bayona ibe Au«tialjaa Coloniea, on arnra). id. per ton. 

Harbonrniaiiiiw's [aes : Free. 

BacUiafia aloogaido the mburvc^: Far day or part, under M tona, 5*.; otm 50 
tons and np to 75 lonit, 7«. l>d. ; ovsr 7^ tona up CO 100 wat, 10«. ; (or evtry 
addittoiml SO Uinii or traouou tboroof, "it. (id. Taieela disct^argiBg outside 
of bMH lo pay ball foregoing duea. ^teainera to pay double rata* •■ par 
lonnage : and in all caeos aailing-veaMls lo make way for ateaman. 

t^ilotage {qoI ootnpuliory) : Into Innar Harbour — 8ailing.*e«aelB, 4d. par ton; 
Btaamora, 3d. par ton. To rondatoad— Firat 100 I'-aa, sailing- veaul a, 6d. 
per ton : atoatnars, '^i. pt^r ton. Every ton over 100 torn — Sailing vesseta 
vd. p«r ton; ulcamun, Id. par ton. Into llriraknatat Barbour— Pi rat ino 
tone, aalliiift «ei>>ela, Od. par ton ; ateamora, 'id. per ton. Every ton over 100- 
ton a- -Sailing- vQgaela, 'id. per ton : aleainora. Id. per ton. Outward pilolago, 
ball ratee. 

Pt»t ahargna ; 6d. par ton cjnartarly in advance, vaiiel* plying within port oc 
engagvd in ooaiting only ; 2d. pir ton on ariivaJ ot reai«lK not plyinR witfaia 

f>3rt or not solely employed in coantmg, but not to exceed la. per ton in any 
lalf-year. Oce&n-jjomg vaaaale |noi being " colonial trading " or ooaating, 
veaanli) returning to pnrt vithin one momh from date of tirat arrival i ' 
gzfmpt Iroui |ior; oliaitfai (or icoond or aubaequout arrlvaU nitbin on* 
<;(ilcn'[lAr in on til. 

Harbounuaaier'ti fe«e: 6a. per reaeel o( leas than GO tons. Steamera nndar GO 
tons and licensed aa lighters aro axempl. Id. pur too taitingveatala 60 (on* 
and upwards ; lOa. prr voiiaul steamer* ot 60 torn* and under 130 (ana; Id. 
par ton RbnamerA nl liO Ions and npvrarda Veaaals paying for pilotage sar. 
vice iDwurilii du not pay Hurbuuimaater'i fees. 

BWTtbage : Bc«akwaier Harbour wharves— 3d. per ton on cargo landed, abipped, 
or iraii>ihipp«d: Is. easb borta or lat^o cattle abipped ot tranabipped; id. 
caob iboop or amall animal iblpped or tri^nahippen. Otber wbarvea—lOa. 
par veani of GO tona ; £1 per veaael over tiU loim to 120 tons ; 3d. per ion 
VMKia om I'JO tons, Half ratoa only charged wbera veaaela eoteriDg Ui« 
Inner Harbour pay fur pilotage aaivicaa. Vciaela licenied aa ligbtart or tow- 
boala ithall. whlloc aoiually employed at Ilghterago work, pay one- third ol 
thp foroigoirtR c-liargeH upon each aiid et-ery trip. 

Hawfor* and mooringit : Vessijls at wbarl in Breakwater Harbour — ^d. per ton 
per day, or part u( a day, on rogisterod bonn&go. Veaiela moored to buoys 
within Bfeakwatvr ilaibitur, Jd. tier Uon put day or part of a day. 

Fenden: VeaeeU at wharroa in BieaKwaUr Harbour— 5a. par day, veaaels usdve 
flOOIOiw; 7e. par day, veaaela of aOO toaa and under 1,000 tona; 10e.perdaj 




HARBOURS. 



6S 



v^ivIk oI X.O0O bOB* Hd uad«t 1,500 Ivqi : 15«- p^r dky, vwsoli o{ 1.500 toaa 
uid undorfiiOOO toiu; £l per dn^. vesiela ol IJ.OOO lou ; and lo od. to pro- 
portion. 

Nkw I'l.YMOtrrit, 

Pilotage room put Bory ) : Ch&rged bo^b ionar^a and outwards, iDterooloaJal or 
toaatlng — B&iliijg-vessc:l<, 3il. per tin; stoamau, Ijd. por ton; fof«iga nail- 
ing-veK«fll or Ktramor, jtl. put Ijo. 

Pott otiarg-a: lu-eraolouial, Id. poi ton, pAyablo faalf-jrektly ; Iot«igD, jd. poc 
ton on arrival in roadstead. 

Bartbage rais: 3fi. per ton on all oargo landed, shipped, or traoaliipped out- 
ward* : 00 r'gisiorad tonnneo aim jd. p«r ton. 

Warpi: Id. por ion regintor (or firm K)0 Km; Jd. pur ton (o( exMM. 

Henders : li. per day or part of day. 

Waiat immunum St.) : fii. per 1,000 gatloDt. 

VIasqjlsvi. 

F'Uotage: All Ttielii wben plated bj eigaals from the stall only, Id. p-r ton 
regiBt«r. River pilotag*, to bo cbargi'd lt>r any aaaislauoe rcn4«r«d by the 
pilot or any cf bis crew iusjde tbe bar, 31. pir coa, Wneti a pilot boardt and 
conduelaa vessel ouUlda ihs bar. 3d. pur ton. Steamars anftaged in tan- 
dcnng ooean iteatners at anobor in tbe roadstead obarged half pUolaga 
ra'ex. 

Port ohargea : Nil. 

Harbourmaster's lees: Pre*. 

liertheg*: Por ev^ry si«aTn«r ufdng any wharf, bting berlh«d alongside, and 
whetbat di'otiarging or lualfng cargo or not, 9d. per ton oo ktus' rogiotcr (or 
ArBt day ol elgbi workioK boLira, and Id. for evury sunecoHinii day of eigbt 
working hours. Par every Btiling.reMel tfae charge to be 2d. (or fiiat dav o( 
•ighl working honrK, and fd. fnr every aunoeediog day of eight working 
boor*, not eivoediMK livo days. For evptv v«*se] occupying a berth ouuida 
another veiu«l, and loading or aisobarging cargo, )d, per ton on gro« teglB. 
let per dnv of eigbt w^irking hours whilst loaJing or disobafglng. Shlpa' 
dues on v^smIh detained in port by stress ol weather will noi be charged 
alter tbe third day. 

Wki-liicotom, 

Pilotage {optional): SallJng-Testolii inwards, 4d. par too; aalliDg-Teseela ont- 
wardn, Hd. p«T Ion : stoimers iawards, 8d. per toe ; steamer* outnards, 2d. 
par ton, Pilutage inoludes ibe removal tee to or from tbe berth at Id. pel 
tOD. 

Port cbargca; 'ii. per ton on arrival ; not cxoeeding Gd. in any hslf-yoar. Hall- 
ycatly days, l<t Jitnuary and July. 8t«amrrit arriving lor coal, stoics, 
water, or ('r reotiving or landing mails or pisieugert aud tbair lui;ye£e, 
wbiafa do cot oome to any wbaif gr tccaive or diEcbargi cargo witbin bbo 
pott, are oxrmpl Irom port obargrs. 

ElarboLirm aster's or brrtbing lee on vrsjels of ISO tons and upwards, Id. per ton ; 
uuder 1'2I) Ions. 10&. VesHJe paying pilotage are exerut^t. Exempkiou berili- 
age ceititicatcg are giran ts ootnpeieat masters in tbe coastal and tnttr- 
colonial tradr«, but not to thosn in foreign trade. 

Bntbage : None, uulesa vcssvls delay diaobergiug or loading tor an undue time. 



Pilotage (oompnlsory) : Steaoteri, inwards and outwards. Id. p«r regiaterad ion. 

Suliiig-ios8clA, inwaids and ouiwitcds, 3S. por tjn. MmimuRi pilottgs oaoti 

nay (Id ail case*}. £1. 
Port ubarKUK : Pur vetiaels not euiplayLog the pilot, lo pay tba following, up^u 

first airival, ball-yearly : Ve^^els over 100 tons rtgister, la. por too ; vesGals 

nndwr IOC Uta» regisMr. 6d. pet ton. 

fi — Yeu-ltook 



HoclMiirltRbU; VaHala not sniplaylDg the pil&t, over 100 toai ragUin, Id. p*r 

ton ; aiuler IW tonx rogisur, ^d. per ton. on (kirivftl. 
Hftrboarmnstcr's fees : 120 tons nnd upward", lii, p«t too ; less bban IW 1od>, 

I0!^. for en-oh rrmovnl of «nv KtaiiTTiei or HtLiling vassal wtilim ibo harbour. 
Bttlbftge, tenders, ikDd v/wpu : Kil. 

Westtort. 
I'llotftge : Fre» (oignitl-stBtion}. Pour piLota aiithoriH'd. 
PortomrfiM: Kocsivlng &□<) dlBohitrf(lng «liips' bkllMt, ts- psr ton; mtaJmiim 

ohikrg;c, 'iOii. ; Id. par ton for on ol abooi. 
HarbourraadUt'A (o«9; Preo. 
n«nhiige : Um of wbkrf, ^ct, per ton p«r dajr ; oiinimom obarg*, 5i. ; mnidaiiua 

cbitcgo, £5 lOr. 

OllNTWOVTH. 

I'i1olii^« Rrre {aignAl-ilKtian). 

Poit L-biL>f{Cit : DiticibairginK xbipii' b^lR»t. 6i. per Ion. 

HarboucmuCtc'a (ooa : Fres. 

B«rlh«ga : Uh of wba'f, Gd. pti tun not register per Uip. Vea*tU in l<a]lMt ' 

i;o»l or dmbor, Id. par ton net rtgUtar (or cba first toat ditja; tnKximuoit 

£d iOii. i minimiUD, An. 

Lyitbltom. 

Pilotima (oompulaorv) : Pilotage, inwaidii and outwardt), sKillDg-T««s«ls 3)4. per 
ton : stGftRiers, 2Jd. per t-^n. Tree on asoond call on a&m* voT&g«. 

Port cbargatt : ^. per tnn. qumrtorly in advknoA, Tor vcMols of 1(10 Mtil Uid Op- 
wftrda pUiDR wtthln iha port or atnployr-d in coiiat]iif|[ only, not to exccad Qa. 
per ton lu itny bKlt-yeitr : 2d. per tcm for v«ati«]s of 100 tona and upwiirds 
ttoi plyir>(t wltbin (be port or not Eoleiy employed in coasting, not to exoe«d 
6d. per too in unv hftlf-jreftr. For exemptions from ptIo'Aiia ftnd bkrboiu 
laes. ICO Bcoiions 192, US, mod 184 of " Tbs Huboura Act, 18TS." 

HArbDurmMt«r'H leca : Vnt. 

Bftrtbing ohargea: Nont. 

W*Tpa I'il in. coir haw««ra) : t'i p«r w>rp lor ma during & vesMl'a sbty Id port, 
not aioecdiDg fIi monilit. 

Fender* (nott wood): £l (or Unt dky, and lOi. psr dity After. IDs. foe qw of 
each hardwood feeder. 

TlKABU. 

PlIotftgA (onn]pnl«oT| ) : Sailtng-veMeln, 3d. per ton Snwkrdi knd ontvrarda ; wfaan 

tug uiod, Ud. per t"n ; ateiamerK, 2i. pvr ton iuwurd*. 
Port ohuTgea: Couter^, l^d. par ton eaob trip; eailingvcsiiela, not ooaatem, Ad. 

per ton each trip; stcikin-vostol*. not consterti. Cd. pot ton in c&rgo worked; 

in All isaaea not to nxonnd la. ijd par ton in B.nT hftlt-yo&r. 
HarbourmBtitor'e tcea : Id. per ton eftob serviue. Tbia fee ia ofaargcd to all TemUs 

nr (iteAmera noi pikvlng pilolKge. 
BerthAga: 3d. per ton on itll cargo landed or ihipped. 
Hawsers and ntooringn: VcttianU .^t wbarvoo, jd. pnr ton reglctar tor firat aevaa 

diiya ; aubaequcnt dava. Jd. per ton. VeioeU Ut buoya, uodur 6()0 tonx rcgia- 

ter, ^d. per ton ; over HlHt trmi, ^6. per loo. 
Fendara : Sailing>vesMl» under MO tuna register, '24. par day; under 1,000 tetn, 

Sa. per day : ov<.>r \,{K0 ton", 4<i. per day. Stenmera iinditr 1,000 toDl raglB- 

t«r, 4s. prr day , under 1 .500 tona, 10a. par day ; undvr 2,DO0 imt, Ifii. p« 

day ; ovor 2,111)1) tons, £1 per day. 

Oaka&et. 
Tonnage rat«: On cargo, inward* or oatwarda — (^oal, merobandiap, aton*, pn^ 
duco, and timber, 8d. per ton : woi:^!, 'i». per ton : troxoo abeep. Id. per «ac- 
froson lamb, Id. per carcaee ; rabbita and barea, 3s. per Coo, (kh- 



I 




4 



I 




WHAUFAOn HATES. 



67 



walsht: all oitux froz«a gooda Sa. pot Iod, gcoH dMd walght; liva.iilo«lt, 
Ld. 8d. p«r ton. Noh.— Coll«otod in (ho Mra« mftnott m ben)hKg« dues havt 
h*an collected. 
Wariw: ^i. par ton pw d»j foe Mvm imft i ^. pec toa pai d»y (bw««tbcr. 



Otaoo. 

Ilaba^ (compuUer;) ; Tnwftrdfl and outwKida, Bailing -vesasla with&ut tag, 6d. 
par ton ; nith lug. 4d, par ton : »t«ftBi«», 4d. per ton. ForaiEo Btcaman 
Oftlling twioa on ono «oy«go unlj ohft(ga<] odq*. All vawtolf halding oxem^ 
(ioD o«riilii!ikia«, one annua] pUotags. For every v«aael imderitwam oarrylD^ 
an exAinpi pilot and employing a Soard'B pilot the obarge shall be jd. per ' 
tou tur liiA Uppur Harbour. 

Pott obargM ; 6^ par ton balf-ytarlp, all vauelt, 

KarboaimaiHr'a t»»: V«aieU less than 120 loos, lOa. ; ov«r liiO toai. Id. pet ton. 

B«f Ibage : Vesieli trading withio tho port—lO toai. As. per quartet: ^5 tons, 
10a. p«r qaarter: 60 tonit. 15*. per qaarttr; 100 tons, £l per quarter. 
VewaU trading beyond tho part — S*i1ing-ve«MU }d. per ton (maxiniutD, 
■ighMoQ day*. £10) : sieam-veisela. ^d. pot ton put day. VomeU laid up lor 
lana than a month, onehaK the above rates : over a month, ^. per (on pet 
montb. 

Towage: Wh«D aasiiiCanca in Riren to HteAm.vaniBlii tindvr ttteaiQ, ODS'Ioutth' 
oiual towage, not exoeediug £5 lor Upper Harbour, and £7 (or LoHor Bm-J 
boor. 

Bi,urF. 

PHoim (eoapolsory) : Stekmoie, iawardH and outwards, ^jd, per regFei«red tan ; 
•ullag*YeMo1a, 5^. iownrdB and cnlwards It enf not employed; 8j|d. per 
iwlatered ton inward* and outward* if tug empLojrad. 8Mling-v***al* la 
baUut, S)d. per ragUtered tan Inward* and outward*. Steamer* tn and out, 
Td. p«r rcgUtcred tan, paTable yearly ; Bailing- vcaacb, in and out, lid. par 
rogiHtured too, payable yearly. 

Port obarg«s : On all voassln, pur Crip, 2d. per registered ton, or in ana nun), hall* 
yearly from date of eolry, «jd. per regl*ter«d too. 

KarboitnnaMter'i fees : Free. 

Bahartge: Sceamera, '2(1. per ton net r»gist*r for the first day, and Id, per tea j 
per waek or part of a woak themafter. 8ailiag>ve«*e)* and hnlka ot ovar SO^ 
totiH njgUur, Id. per ton utt regiatot per week (or tb« Brat (oui weelu. and 
^6. per ton per week thetoa(t«t. 

Wharfage Bates. 

Wharfage rates at fourtcoD of tho priucipal hai'bours iu New 
Zealand, as ou IsC January, 1902 (compiled by Mr. C. Hood 
Williams, Secretary to tba Lyttottoa Harbour Board] ; — 

ACCKUHtt. 

Oaiural Utrchandite. — Z*. pat boa impartE ; 1*. pot too exports. 

Transhipmente: Halt-ratea wbau dO'dared. or '2s. 6d. per Ion, incladiog 
labont and *even day*' itorage. 
Orain and A^cuilural I'rodue*. — 1*. lid. per too landed ; la. per ton ahipp<d.J] 
Tranabipmcnta : Half nt«> when deolar«d, ot 3*. Gd. p«r ton, inoludi 
labour and aaTan days' atoraito. 
FrouH iltat. ItuUtr, itc. -Is. Gd. pet ton landed \ Is. jper ton shipped. 

Tranabipment* : Half-rates wtiea dcolatod, or 'Ja. Sd. per ton, including 
ueven days' itoraga and labour. 
tPbffl.— tid, par bal*. shipped or landed. 

TfanAiipjnanU : If landed, dunapedt and T«-ahipped, 3d. per bale. 
Coof. — I*. 3cl. par ton landed ; fid. pet ton ihippod. 

TraashiptneaU : Shipped or dUohatgad over aid* (or staaaiar'a us«, tree. 



68 



>FnOIU^ TVAB-BOOK. 



Tnnb^r.— Sawn. 3i. p«r IjDOOtu Ikoded; It. par 1.000 (c. shlppvd. BmK or 
round (leu l^i V*' ce&t.), U. per 1.000 ft. ImdMl. 6d. per 1,000(1. 

Trm,nshipmnntt : UM litndina oh»rKea when declar«d, 0( St. SL p«f bos, 
indudlDg labour ftud acvaii aa)-a' storftga. 

Hots.— WhufkAa on Mrienllurftl nnylneo. froMo mokt, «o«l. A£.. wu ruaad fld. pv 
ton, knd on woot ad. |>gr btia, Kad tltobor id. por 1<» It., on lac Attcuai, tSBS. 

Gl8B0E»K. 

0«n«rai Uerckandiu.—lm^ortM, Sr. to 61 : rsporU, aa. 6d. to 6d. By mcacnn- 
mcnl, from 40 «ub>c («el to i cubio leet ; >ame loc weight. Al«. beer. 
w>d poiWr, par galloo — Import, l^d., «xporc, J3.; apirita uid arttMiptt 
lOD imuuroiDtnt, 7a. 6d- No export ctacxgea oo gooda ttiK bft*« pwd 

TranahifiineiiU: Free. 
Grain and Agricttltitral Produc*. — Gnin— Import*, 9i. ; axporta. Is. OnM»- 
■cad — Import*, 5a. ; «xp3iU, 3*. PoUtoas— Impgita, 5s.; «xport*, 
28. 6d. (liuekB). 
Tnumhipmenttt: Frre. 
Proien Meal. Bvttfr. Jc.—Sbotf, ad. p*r e&roMt; lamba. Id. par ouuMt; 
bftuncbes. l«gM, Ae., 2t. 6d. per too. 
TAnabipmenU: Fno. 
Wooi.— 1«. 9d. per b»l«, export. 

Truiatiiprntnta : 3d. p«i b»1« if lnodwd aad reabippod. Ffm if tnnaliippvd 
into ri<M<). 
Coat.— 2*. per ton. 

Trtuieliipnioniii : Coftl for engtnta »nd (i«exing.*)iip*, tree. 
Timber.~&mwii, **. per 1.000 ft.: baulk, la. pei L. 000 ft., tmporta; la., mai 
Gd., per l.UOU (t., axporia. 
Tnualiipnieiita: Free. 

(jeneral MtrehaudiM.—iK 6d. per too imporU, 1«. 3d. pel toa MtportA, kcfiording 
to in««aurement oi weight. B«llut, inwarda. la. pur ton '. outwerda. 
la. per ton. Emptits, ball iMec. 
TrutabipmeDM : Qukrui Import rate^, Ontet Harbour; bAlf import ntea. 
iDoer Harbour. 
Oram and A^icHUuntl Proditca.^Sa. 6d. importa; la. 3d. exporta, wooidlng U> 
meftauietDeci or weigat. 
TtAiMbipmf'nu : V^'tar import rates, Outer Harbodr; bftll import rUes 
Innor Harbour. 
Froien Jitat, Butl€'; ^c— Imporu fr«e ; expotu 2s. 61. per loa. T«Uow kod 
polta, iiuporifi free : expsru i*. fid. 
Traiuliiprnruia : Quarter import rAtFfl, Oiit«r Harbour; half Import rata* 
Inner Ilnrbcur. 
Woot.— It. per bale, exports only. Imports, free. 

Trail •)) ipm en ti : 3d. over side : 61. per bale if landed far traQ&bipment. 
Coal. - 3«. iiDforts ; la. expotte. 

Tninahipnient* QuiLr;«r latea, Outer Harbour; bait rates, Inner Harbour. 
Coal (or entiuiea mid (reczmg sbip', Outer Barbour, free, it declared so. 
Tinker.— Hi. 4d. per 1,000 It., tmporu; U. 3d. par 1.000 ft. ciporti. 

Traiubipinenu : Half ratea, Inner Harbour; quarter ratoe. Outer Hatboar 

HOTC— Ooodii otfaor than wool and Oax laii<l«d nn a wharf tor trambipiDMit to a renel 
Irtncalanothor birUi.oliarfaduiward wbartace onl]r wben declateil at Qmeof aotty 

Nkw Pltmovtu. 
Otndral ifirchaudut.—ii. per too. 

TranahipmenU : U. 6d. p^r ton. 
Oram and AgricuUfrat Proiiuee. — Sa. pet too; gra^t-seed, 2a. (!W sacka). 

Tranahipaieola : la.6d. per ua. 



4 

I 

4 





WHARFAOB BATES. 



69 



FroterK Utat, Butter, tte.—i». p«r ttm. 

TrftDftbipOMDls: U. 6d. pec bcut. 
tVoot.— 6d. pvr bmU ; tn bales ol A owt., i*. fn ton ; thr«o bklos al ovet 4 OHt. 
2*. per UD, 

TrftaahlpmcDla: ThHo-quiirUr fum 
Coai,—^ per too ; brovo co*l. la. "M . with labour. 

TrAOshipmenta: Turee-quivrtnc tAtao, witli Uh^iir. 
Ttmbtr. — 480 ft, per tan, 3«. ; 320 ft. pec ton (rough or mwn], with labour. 

TrknihipniontB: Thrae-qn^rter nbtva. 

WiJtaAXUi. 

OKural ifirehandUe. — trnporU, 3«. pec ton ; axpocla, 2i. per ton. 

Tnuiahipmnnta : IlAK-Cfttes. 
Otain and AgriculluTcil Produce.— Importa, 3a. per (on; expoite, 3>. per ton, 
Potatooa, export, I«. per boo. 
TrsDibipments: Utll r &t ». 
Fntttn Mtal. Butter, <fc.— Sbeep, J'J. per carcaae ; lamb*, ^. per carcMe ; leg*, 
•bould«r<. and lotna oaliODtatsi! u 6d anny to a ofttcMe, aooording io 
freiRht. 
irool.—6d. pet tale. 

Trftnahipmeuta : Halt rates. 
Coal.— la. per tnn. Co«1 for ebip's usa, ouiwud, 6d. per too. 

TrBoebipmenM: HaK-riLCCf. 
Tivtbw.~-6d. per 100 ft. : for ehipnirnt, 2d. ; while pine, Id, 
Tnoihipmonla: HikU totot. 



Wklumotok. 

Oentral JUmAandue.— 2« par ton tn<w»rd>, InaladJnK labour and one nlRht'i 
storage. Inward OArgo landed alt-r noon on Friday i> stored frM UU 
noon on follnwiVg UontlaT : landed nltur noon on Saturday ia Btor«d 
Ineo till 5 p.m. on the followinK Tuo«tl»y, Is, err ton outwards, 
including labour. Railway whatfnge - 1*. inwitrds: Cd. outMardt. 
mtbciut Iftbour. 
Tran'hipmnntM: 3'. On. pnr ton, mi^liiding labour and one week's atorage. 
Ovec »t<ia at vokmI lying at wbnti, Cd. per tou. 
Grain arut Ayrv^lural Produce .—'in, pvc ton mwacdii, including labour and 
on* night'a etoragw ; 1m. per ton outwardu, inotuding labour. Railway 
wharfage— Is. inwarda; 6d. ounvaidii, without labour. 
Trasahipmcnui: 3n. pnr tnn. inr^ludtng labour and fcvon daj-s' Ktoraga. 
Over Htdc al veiLwl at wbnri, hA. per ton. 
Frum iltat. BntUr. <fc. — 1^. inwards; la. outwardH, witboul labour. Railway 
nhaifA«e^li. Innardn: Gd. outwatda. without labour. 
Tran»hipm«nU: M<'nt, 1». -Id. pnr ton, withouL labonr; butter, Sn. 63. per 
ton, iucliidi'>(t labour and i<torugei. Meat, butter, fto., ov« side o( veaeel 
at wharf, (id. per t^n. 
troof.~4d. p«t bn.lo rC Railway Whart, without labour; 6d. p«t bat« at other 
wbarrm, including labour. 
TntBihlpmentft : 6d. per balo. tnalnding labour, and 3d. additional it stored. 
Over Bide of veasel to veaeel al wharf, 3d par bale. 
Coot. — la. per ton imports; Cd. per ton nporiB, without labour. Railway 
wharfage— Jk. per tnn inwarilrt : i»l pqr ton outward*, without laboor. 
Tranabipmenta: Aoro<« wharf for Blaamec ■ uae, free. E'rooi veM«l or balk 
to veaael al wharf, free. 
Timber.— 3d. p«r 100ft. Inwarda; l^d. pat 100ft. outwarda. withoaB labftoc 
If labour >nppli»d, 3d. per lOOtf. aHded inwarda, and l^d. oul*rarda. 
Railway wbarlage— ad. iuwardi; Ijjd. outwatds. wltlioui labour 
Tiftnahiitments : &. 6d. per tnn, inclading BBten daya' itotaga and labour ; 
and Gd. orer veaaera aide into another. 



70 



HBW £BALA»D 099tClAlt TRAB-BOOK. 



Gtrural Mfnhandiu.—^. p«r Iod. imporU aai mporU, «IUi Iftbew . 

TnntbipmenU : Vnt, wbon not liijtd«d on wbftrf ; 9l M. it luidvd. 
Oram and Agricultural Prodact.-U. Gd. pec koo, impotU nod eiporU, wltfa 
■kb^ar. 

Trftaablpm«tita : Free, whan not UoiIm] od wkutf ; te. 6d. H lutdai. 
Frotrn Mrai, BuUfr, <fc.— Non* Khippwl. 

TnnsbipniVRU : Fno, wb«ii aoi lftod«d oo wbuf . %mH mt«> i( l»itd*4. 
ITooL — Expoiu, la. per bftJe : impotU ft««. 

Tr&naliipiBoats : Ffe«. wbea not lka<lcd on vhftlf 1 b&tl nws If Iftudad. 
Ocai.^1^ p« ton importa ; 2n. with Ub->ur. Ft*6 exporU. 

TmuBbipinoDU: 2<. 6d. p*t too, with labour. FrM, wbMi doI luodad on 

TSmbtr.—id. por lOO ft mptir. import : Id. per 100 It. caper., Mpoct ; 8*. par 

ton by tii«ft9iir«taettt, witb Ikboar. 
Tru»hipQi«nu: Fi«e, wb«u uoi lundcd oq wbarf; hait tmtaa if luid»d co 
«har(. Re-shipmaoU, 2*. 6d. per ton. 



Westport, 
Geiumi Mt*chandit*. — 2t. pertoa. 

TnnaliipineiiU : 'is. Gd. per ton, iactuding labour Mid ooe waek* ftlongc; 
1b. mr TOD it tTftnBhipp«d to *evs«l or Iigh»t. 
Grain and A^aiUural Prodiut.—i*. p«r too. 

Trftnsbipmeniii: Ja. t>4. pet ton, tnoludlng l^anr ftod on« wekk'ft Uoms* • 
la. pet Ion if tt»D*liipp«d to ««t*el Of Uglitu. 
fVoMR Mtat. BvUtr, dc— 3>. per ton. 

Tnnshipmonta : 2s. 6d. par ton, foeludiBc li^ui and on« trt«k'« ttongf . 
IFooJ-— Cd. (Mr bftl«. 

Trmnsbipmeiili : Sa. Gd. per too, iocludiiig labour kud oim wcak'a 
Is. per too it Uftii»bipp«d to nesel or ligbler. 
Coot— Cd. poi ton. k 

'JHmbtr.^-iA. par 100 ft. If for aipoct and curied bj rail, fr«*. 



«lMraJ Jtfrrchandwf.— 3«. par ton, Tbts ob«rga InoIudM 1>. ft Ion for rVMivlos 

iLlid de)iT«rin^. 
Tnuiiibiptncnt*: S«. Cd. p«r too, including labour ftnd one weak'a atorag*; 
la. per Ion if tranahipiicd to *«moI or lif;bter. 
Orain atd Affrutattuwal Prodaet —3a. pur ton. Tbia charge iooludoa Is. » ton 
for rocfiving aad dclivBrin^. 
Trannbiptneoti : Ss. Gd. per ton, inoluiinf latwut ftnd one vteck's Bton^; 
la. per ton if tnniihipprd to vaMvl or llgbtei. 
Frotn Meal. Butter. ,ic.—&3. per ton. Tbia obaiga in«Iudea la. ft too lot 
roceiving and delivering. 
Tiaoabipmenls : 24. Gd. per too, including labour and one we«k*s storsga. 
Wool.—IJd per bale. 

TraD«hipiii?nt«: Sa. 6d. per too, moladlag labour and one woek'i atongc; 
li. par i<ia If traaabipp'd to vbbsoI or lighter 
Ooal.— 6d. per ton inward* ; 3d. outwards. 
Timber.~3i. per 100 ft. If for export and carried by rail, tras. 



Ottural IferchanilJM.— la. fi^per ton. 

Wauahipinents : Fraa, wlietb*r landed on wbarf or otben>iaa. 
9f*»N on<f AgrietiituTal PrvdTttt-~66. per ton. 

Tranahipnieota ; Frae. 
JFraa*n Mral, DutUr. dt. — Gd. per ton. 

Tranabipmente : Free, whetltar landed on wharf or otbaiwlBa. 




WHABrAOB R.iTBB. 



71 



Wool.— 43d. p» bale. 

TniDifalpmniti : Fno. 
Coal.-Ql. mr tan- 

TranxhlpEnfiDtt : Free, whether l&ndei on wIutI or otberirlt*. 
Ttmftw.-aa. per 100 U. 
TT»nahipin«ata: Fra«. 

K.B.— All T« sbipments of gooi* from Lj'ttellon aiKl«r deolantion, free. 

TiKAKQ, 

9«n«rai Merchandist.^is. ptr Ion. 

TraashlpmenU : Hktf rttoj. 
Qrain and A^icuUural Prodnct.^m. 6d. par Con. 

Trail ftbipman It ; Uklfrfttcfl. 
Froun iteat. — )<1. p«r oarc&w. 

TrKuBtiipmantk: H&1( rat«e. 
WaoL^U. per bile, 

Tr^nshipniuiU: Half mtcB. 
Ooai.—ii. per tan. 

TrADshipQiants: lltUf r»t««. For baokarlag purpOM*, tno 
Timber. — Id. p«r 100 ft. 

IluiBbipmetiti: H&K ratw. 

Oamabu. 
General tdfehatdita. — St. p»rt9a, 

Trftuahipiaftnlii: Ftc*. 
Oraiti and AyricnUural Product. -•^. ftx too. 

TtBiushlpmontfi: FrM. 
fVo»M itftit. liutUr, d*;.— Jd. per rbeop. Butter, m mwohAodtH, Sk p«r tao. 

Tr«aitbipmetila ; Fr«e. 
Wool.^GA. per bale. 

TtMtBbipmoDla: Free. 
Coal. — &. per ton. 

Truubipnwau: Ff««. 
7\niter.--54. and 7d. par 100 tt. F^oomg poeU aod lallB, 4i. pei 100. PiUiaei. 
7d. per lOO. 

TranabfpmeaU : Free. 

DOSBDIH. 

Oentral Jfercliarufue.— St.. 4a., aod 5c. per too, Unpoiti; 9i., 'Ji., and 3b. p«r 
ton, txporw. (Claeriflad.) 
Tmiuihipineiita : 23. pet ton. 
Orain and AfricuUurai Pradtite.~ln. per loo, Imporle: If. 9d. pof ton bjr 
wtigbi. exporta ; 9d. par ton on bran and pollard, exporla. 
Trantbipntenu : la. par ton. 
JVcum iUat, BtdUr, J^c. — Si. per ton. rxport§ : bntier. import*, in. par ton; 
frozDD meal, impottc, 5«. par ton ; ihaop and Iambi, Id. per carcata, 
TranshipmaDU: 2«. par ton. 
tfool.— Biporta, 3a. p«r ton by measomaent ; -Is. pet ion. Imports {tbnee balaa 
to ton). 
Tranabipmcnta : 3«. per ton bjr ntcatnremant. 
CeaL—'M. par Ion, imports ; 9d. per ton, aspofla. 

Tnuufaipinrats: 2t prr loo. 
Timb*T.—Cd. and 3d. par 100 aaperfioJal fee*, imporU : Od. per ton b; meaaure- 
ment, eipQrw. 
Ttansbipmanu: 2s. par ton b]r meaaiireiDent. Nottoa of ttanihlpmeot 
mult be giren wtUiin turenly-lour boura after abip'a arrival. 



72 



MKW XBXLAKD OTFlCtAL TRAR-HOOK- 



BmiT. 
Cicneml Utrthandut. — I*. lOd. prr ton, imporU and rtportn. 

TrsBili>pm»nu: Fim, wh«u not lacdcd ou wh^rl; DkI{ r»ica it luid»d. 
OniH aid JfrieuUurat Producf..~Hd. psT u>n, LmpcTte and esporis. 

TiMKhtpmaDUi: Pr*e, wheo not l&ndcd on wh&rf; balf r««8 if landed. 
Froaen tteal, Btutsr. iCc.^lld. per too, «i(>o(t«; oheeiw. Is. per tan. 

TkmnahipnMOU: Fre«, wiien oot luided on vikaFf ; balf nU«i if landod. 
Vdol.— E>|Mrt*, 9d. p«T bal« : iniportti frot. 

Tranahipmcaw ; Fi«e, i»tL«ii not iauded ou wbaci ; ball ratM if laadtd. 
CoaL— la. 6c). p«r tAti, importa; free exporU. 

TraRahipmanu : U. 6d. p«c (on whao landed «x hulk ; ftte wbao oot landed 
on wb&r(. 
tber.—l». per 1,000 !i. auper,, import: 1». per 1,000 tc. iiiper.. export. 
TraniibipmeDts: Frep, wbon noi landed on vhai(; balf ralM il landed on 
■hari. 



I 



I 



I 

I 



k 



LIGHTHOUSES. 

The coasts of New Zealand are, considftring their extent, fairly well 
lighted, bat there are many places where lights are atill reqnired. 
.Additions to the existing lights are mode from time to time oa funds 
are available. 

There are twenty-nine coastal lights— eight of the first order, 
fifteen of the second, tfareo of the third, and three of smaller orders, 
and a second order light is about to ho erected on Kahuraugi Poini, 
on the west coast of the Sonth Tsland. 

There has been no specJEil difficulty in the erection of lighthouses 
in New Zealand, apurt from th& trouble caused by indifferent land- 
ings. There arc no lighthouses built in the sea, such as the well- 
known Eddystono or BcU Rock. That on The Brothers is the only 
one which it is considered necessary to keep as a rock-station: that 
is, the keepers are relieved from time to time, three being alwaj-a at 
the station and one on shore. 

Tlie cost of the erection of the lighthouses is given fay Ifae 
Marine Departraent as about £181.600 (the Ponut Passage Light- 
house, having been built by the Provincial Government of .\uok- 
land, the cost is not given). The annaal consunipiion of oil is 
abont 20,000 gallons ; and the cost of maintenance, irrespective 
of the cost of maintaining the lighthouse steamer, is about £13,500 
a year. 

Besides the coastal lighthouses, there are harbour- lights at 
most of the porta of the colony for the guidance of vessels into 
and out of the ports. 

The followiag table shows the names of the lighthoases, iudi* 
eating also their situation, the onler of apparatus, deecnption, 
period (in seconds) and colour of the lights, and of what material 
khe respective towers are built ;— 



I 

I 




mi^Qii^i 


1 


■ 




LIOBTaOUBES. 


73 


V 




I P»rtod 






^B ll9Ufe. 


Order oT 
Appsratu*. 


DeeHlp- 

tlOD. 


or H»- 
LUht. 


Colour of Ligbt 


Tnwer 
bulUot. 


w 


Dioplrte. 




Soeonile. 






H Di«men 


iBt oH»r . . 


BevolvJng 


00 


Wljite 




•• 


Fixed .. 


■• 


Kfd, Eo ahoir over 
Columbia Rmf 


Timber. 


McJcn Hjnoii . , 


l.t . .. 


PI lulling 


10 


Wliit* .. 


Stone. 


Titi-Tirl (AacW. 


2nd . .. 


Fixed .. 


, . 


Wl)lt«,<witliiedarc 


Iron. 


l&nd] 








over riAt EoqIc 




Covipt Islsmd .. 


5th . .. 


• 


, , 


While ftnd red .. 


Timber 


Ut . . . 


Revolnng 


» 


Whilo .. 


Iron. 


B£ut Cnpa 


3nd . .. 
2nd , .. 


■ 


10 

so 


- 


# 


PtffbUnJ I*Iuid| 


-- 


Vix^ .. 


■ • 


Red, to flhow over 
-Bull Rook 


Timber. 


wOftpo PAllissr .. 


Snd , .. 


FlMbiog 


TrriM 


Wliito .. 


Iron. 






«9tryhA 


ir-mmiite.nilh three Acc-ondii 1 






Itttarrali 


1 between fltubea | 


P«noarTow H««d 


2nd . .. 


Fixed .. 


, , 


White .. 


Iron. 


Ckpe Egmont .. 


Stid „ .. 


« * ■ 


, , 


r ' * ■ ■ 


» 


M*niik*ii Head 


3rd . .. 


^ ■ • 


. , 


« • t 


Timber 


K»i[Mim Head . . 


2nd . .. 


Flashing 


10 


, 


« 


DroChan (in 1 
Oooir Strait) ] 


2nd . 


Fixed .. 


10 


Red, toehow over 
Cook Rook 


- 


Cape Campbell 


2nd . .. 


Revolving 


60 


WliiW .. 


« 


OodtoT ilAikd 


3nd . .. 


Fixed .. 


_, 


. 


Stone. 


(L>tt«ltan 1 
AkaroK Head .. 


3Tid . .. 


Ftaahing 


10 




Timber. 


3Ja«r&ki 


8rd , .. 


Fixed .. 


, , 


■ 1 • 1 • 


# 


Tatar AA Koad . . 


8rd . .. 


. 


.. • 


Rod 


Stone. 


Oa|)a Situridani . . 


2nd . .. 


RflToWtng 


60 


WhiM .. 


Timber. 


I^t)fjg«t Point .. 
Wupapapa Point 


l«t . . . 


Fixwd .. 


, , 


, 


Stone. 


2nd . .. 


Flashing 


10 


■ a * 4 a 


Timber. 


^k 


Catadioptric. 










^H>ci8 Iidiuid 


IH 0Tdr.r .. 


Revolving 80 


■ • • ■ a 


Stone. 


^B 


DioptHe. 










^HMtra leland . . 


Ifttordot .. 


Fixed .. 




Wtiito. with red 
aros over inalioni 
darigen 


Timber. 


^HAMtor Point 


Int . . . 


Flashing 


10 


Wbits .. 


* 


^Hlpl Foul wind 


2nd , 


Revolving 


80 


■ ■ • 1 ■ 


# 


Panwall Spit .. 


2nd . .. 


^ 


60 


White, with rod arc 


• 










over 3pit end 


Nelson 


^th . .. 


Pixfld .. 




Wliite, with red arr 
to mark limit of 
anc^hnrnge 


Iron* 


Fnoeli Fa»* 


etti . . . 


M 


' ■ 


Ri'd ami white, 
with white light 
on hoacon 


" 


^^Upheuldand 


l»l . 


Group 
AubiDg 


^ 90 


Wliito .. 


- 





74 



NBW ZBAXiAND OFFIGIAIi YBAB-BOOK. 



ANNUAL PENSIONS 
Paid bt the Govebnhent of New Zealand, as on 81bt Mabcb, 190S 



Nub*. 



DftM 
from wlitcli 

PoualoD 
eoDamenced. 



il 



Amonnt. 



Name. 



Dkto 
from which 

PeiuIoQ 
commsncad. 



AmouiL 



Cndtr ■■ Tht Ciril Sereic4 Act, 18S6." 

£ 
I U»v, 1896 
1 Au^., 1881 
1 Oct., 1887 
: 6 3tLQ.. 1896 
; 1 Not., 1901 
112 Jan., 1888 
' 1 Nov., 1880 
^16 Fab., 189G 
i 1 April,1890i533 
.17 Feb., 1895|l35 



Aiurewi, A. 
Azr-.-. M. 
AlUUC, A. D. . . 
A£:«fK-c, J. G... 
Bac^d. T. 
3ic«:eT.H. C... 
2iM4r. £. 
Hvz^t*. G. H. . . 
S»xk:c.C. T. .. 
iMnrud. J. B. .. 

a.'-*=*;:. F. 
h-.sidjtl-i. J. 

brv*E. W. R, E. 

SiZTt^M. A. 

•!.-,.•«. J. 

i-.iii. E. D. 



B. 

141 12 
26 
■247 10 
261 18 
% 4 
225 
214 17 
100 
6 




IPeb., 18821 96 13 
;21 M&r,ie89{101 15 
1 1 Aug., lt<'JS'l46 8 
1 Aug., 1892 '265 16 
1 June,18PG.116 13 
IJuIv, 1699; 89 
I 1 April,1893 256 6 



CL^iM... F.E... ! 1 Mur., 1890 466 13 



'.*-. *T. ;. T. 


.. ' 1 Oct.. 1898 223 6 


'.i*w=iw:. '.V. 


F. 1 April,18y0.154 15 


':*«*. H. T. 


.. iJan., 1879 400 


Omm H. 


. . 1 Oct., 1879, 98 13 


Vr,* h c 


.. 1 5ept..l8U5 IGO 14 


V.wu... 1. 


.. 10 July, 1892 131 3 


',iviM.%. 'f: . 


.. 1 Apri],1891 52 15 


'.T-.wt. A 


-. 31 Dec. 1S85 68 12 


',-..»i. v.-. 


., 1 Dec. l.StS 62 10 


' -.' • T-fc— J 


... 1 Ftb.. 1SS8 175 


-V.'.r .-. .' 


.. : Feb., 1^93 2r>0 


.V.-.«*i A .'. 


.. 1 Nov.,lS75 .-'l 


iw-t," 


.. V-i Nov.. IS.-^ 104 10 


*'. . '.:•. '-. 


.. : Jiiv. isyi 110 11 


.' *. '.a r 


.. 1 M»r..iyj3 125 13 


?...*■- '■■" ',-, 


-. '.': Apri;.!^>C 140 16 


?r«-.-. -■ ,■ 


.. ; :-:ir..]-:-i no 13 




.. : s«f...i--'; 22-* 11 


'>r*i *.■::. ',- I: 


.. - i-p:..:-Vl 52 10 


'>-.** ; 


.. ; F-:i,. ir'ji i.'iS (". 


,-fk. :c*-. '. 


.. ;: A.a. ]"C >i Vi 


Hfc.--. .i-;.-. ^: 


.. '.: i ^ y. V-->(j J'/J 


K»r: .• T 


. , 12 2' '.v.. 1- "'j I'.*;i 7 


Jlii.-*. >.'. '. ,• 


A . :-..- . ;-.•-, :t>: 13 


H«-.*. .^ 


.. :: '.-.-. . :-■; '-> o 


H«Lr. I 


.. J Arr. .:-■; -■^ 3 


• H- t.:. A-. 


:.-..-:': .-. :--. •.--- :-rr.-:o[. 


C.r.'. ■>7r.._»: :-.- 


..'•J.-,*: K--\ t*.-. ; ov! . ti.e L 


ihii tk-. ;« 





d. 



I 

01 
l{ 
0| 
0. 
0; 
4' 

7( 

8; 

.!! 

8 

'^ 

1 


3., 
10 
8 
3 







4 
4 

S 
4 
-5 


4 



1 



4 



'Undtr "The 
' continued. 
iHill, C.J. 
. Holdao, T. 
Jtuitcman, S. J. .. 
Johnson, J. W... 
'Johngton, S. 
' Judd, A. 
: KMtley. B. 
Kineling, T. 
Laing, E. B. 
Lung, W. 
Lang, A. 

Lincoto, R. 6. .. 
Lodge. W.F. .. 
Lubecki, A. D. .. 
Lushat, R. A. . . 
Mftitland, J. P. .. 
Millar, Q. 
Uiller. F. 
Mitford, G. M. .. 
Moiison. J. R. .. 
Monro, H. A. H. 
Morpeth, W. J. . . 
Morrow, H. 
McCulloch, H. .. 
Mac Donne II, R. T. 
McKellar, D. .. 
McKellar, H. S... 
NeUon, J. 
Norris. E. F. . . 
NutCall, J. 
O'Connor, R. .. 
Parris. K. 
PiiBlev, E. W. .. 
Pearson. \V. H. . . 
Phillips. W. M. .. ; 
Pickett. B. 
Pinwill. A. 
PiM, H. 
Powell,!). 
Hawsnn. C. E. .. 
Keid, \V. S. 
Renrell, W. 
Rilwrison, J. . . 
RodRerson, W". J. 



Civil Servia Act, J966'"- 



£ 
72 
SI 
149 

78 
178 
173 



g Feb.. 1895 

13 Oct.. 1878 
1 Ma;, 189S 
1 Hay. 1898 
8 Juna.igoo 
1 April,] 887 
1 July, 1884 
1 Jan., 1894 
I April,1687 
1 Fab., 1896 
1 Feb., 189S 
1 Mar., 1889 
1 Oat., 1881 
1 April, 1896 

31 Aug., 1880 

15 Jan., 1901 
1 Feb., 1890 
1 AprU,189g 
1 Feb., 1SE9 
1 Dot., 1882 
1 Not., 1880 
4 Aug., 1894 
1 Juoe,ie90 
1 Aug., 1890 

23 July, 1890 
1 Nov., 1901 
1 Aug., 1892 
1 Oct., 1901 
1 Oct., 1S95 
1 July. J897 
1 Sept.,1892ll47 
I Jan.. 1877 314 



18 12 10 
317 5 3 
112 10 
212 10 

76 15 

68 17 
185 
SOO 

76 16 
411 18 

80 7 
141 13 
196 15 
271 16 
842 17 
195 4 
190 16 
233 
150 
347 13 
433 6 

90 

88 17 

74 IB 

5 



' I Not., 1901 1215 16 

SO Sept..l884 8«) 9 

; 1 Dec, 1894 ! 68 4 

1 Aug.. 1866 '209 10 

' 1 July. 1891 iiaO 17 

1 Mar. 1881 .100 

1 July, 1693; 44 1 

1 Dec., 1895 244 

1 Nov., 1900 '500 

1 Dec, 18051167 18 

6 Oct, 18921165 

1 July, 18921248 6 





3 



8 
4 

4 



s 

9 
8 


9 
8 

9 
4 
6 
B 
8 
6 
5 
6 


8 
11 

4 

8 



•■v-item wa« alH-ilislusl in New Zealand. In ms the 




AHHUAL PBKaiOa&. 



AHHUAIi PUHSI0K8— OMIJMWI. 



75 



r 


Dki« 


g 


Date 




H Skm*. 


tnMD whl«b 

Fanaloo 
wnintBoad. 


AnoSBt. 1 Nmh*. 


trgynrtlch 

Faoaion 
aooiflMBvad. 


AnwtiaL 


OMi«r " Tht Civil Ssnie* Jet, iSfifi "— R [7iiJ«r *' TIU MOttmrf Pnuiona Act. 1866." 


continoed. [ £ «. d. 


£ a. d. 1 A»p«rft M Rao 


1 JBlf, 1870 


90 


Ro««. C. 


1 Oct.. imt Id IC Bnna. U. R. .. 


,, 


Tfi 


SeukDoke. W. N. 


1 Pab., I8T-J 240 0' Uuiings. L. .. 


,. 


56 


Bbnnptoo, J. . . 


L6 July, 1889 UO U 0\ Iriton*. Huite 


8 KoT., 1868 


13 


SilvioK, H. 


ITJui., I»0O 7 it 10 OIIMann, Nadioft 


a Dm.. I860' 36 


Sioolftir. A. 


1 June.lSTS IK 


UcDontUd. £. 


, , 


86 


SIftUr. J. 


1 April. l^OeiSa 16 i 


UorrifAo, Add.. 


ae Oet.. 1865 


86 


fimith, J. 


I June.IKM! 49 S 6 


Ruuall, C 


. 


96 


SmiUi. B- p. . . 


1 Nov. 19l)0 5O0 


AdwaaoD, T. .. 


CI 


3 S" 


Smith. T. B. . . 


1 July, 1676 371 S 7 


BMiButa. J. G. 


' 


16- 


Sieienf. P. 


1 Dm . ludSiiea o o 


OorbMt. Omwe 


M 


8 0' 


SUBftTt. J. T. .. 


IMkj. 1889WX) OlOnwfotd, C. P. 




a 0" 


Snin^kod, P. . . 
Tiwfiu. P. .. 


1 Not.. 1899 96 


Oibbotta. U. C. . . 


12 Oct., 1869 


OSS* 


7 Oct., 1899 t Id 16 8 


UaisblyD, J. .. 


1 Oil., 18T8 


OSS* 


Toanuit, J. 


1 Jut.. 1901 SU3 6 8 


Hoot, R. L. .. 
Kdly. T. 


Apriuerro 


16" 


Thomaa. 0. W. .. 


1 Nor ,1S7S| 88 15 


s a* 


ThanMoo, R. . . 
Tiurd, E.F. .. 


I AUr.,18»!330 


Ketabxr. P. .. 


» Anr. I860 


16- 


1 Jal;, ibSa ISO 19 


Lftc«y, OMntt.. 


, , 


OSS" 


TraMdor. P. 


13 Oct.. 1897 IM 3 4 


Lak*.T. 


J , 


one* 


Tocker. W. 


81 D«o.. 1880 IM 13 4 


Lloyd, T. 


(1 


S 0* 


VmI. J. 


1 S«pt.,188A 49 15 a 


McDonnall, W. 




UO 


Vwla, J-S. 


1 3«pl.,188T fifi 3 10 
1 July. IS95 388 1 11 


Hcl>>agkU, T. B. 


1 Apiii,lA9f) 


40 


Von Stumi»r.S. .. 


MoXm.O. 
Mo^IaIido. T. .. 


, , 


1 ©• 


WudeU. H.S. .. 


1 July. 1888 366 13 


(^ 


S 0* 


WbiU.W. 


1 July. 1881 ' OC 5 


Boca. EdwMd 0. 


17 Not.. 1866 


Ta 


White. W. B. . . 


1 Ju»y. lB7a 875 4 9 


ShftDkgbM], J... 


, , 


1 6» 


Wiltt«ii»,E.U... 


1 April. 1880 185 


ghRpherd. R. . . 
Timmii. W. 
Tuflin. Q. 


n 


8 B" 


Wood. 3.O. 


1 July, 18M sod 10 6 


1 6' 


Vliigg. H. C. W. 


1 Atig.,1689<I&7 8 10 




2 2" 


"Vajjc*. n. 


8 April, 1870 


S S' 


J Wklab. W. 
Dndw - Tin HaMtrtom PaMUH da, i Wk-lay. Edw. 0. 


15 2^0*.. 1866 


16' 





8 r 


1S9J." SWillUmMiB. P. 


I June. 1869 


S 0- 


Hunenoo. R. a .11 B^t..l891>3H) 


Apark L« K*ung> 
Kftiwift Ruuahi- 

Wbft 

UMiu Whitiki. . 

UkiipuoK 


14 %Uy. 1904 
1 July. 1870 


8 6" 
10" 


Ciubr " Tlkf ittndith and 0(A«n 
/Viubmj Jd. 2870." 


1 ApriU885 
1 July, 1867 
i AuR., 1865 


6* 
1 0" 
9* 


tUaOaJtiiod^B: — S66A U 


jPtnT^tini) .. 


13 Oct.. 18S9 


10" 



•Per diem. 
(*11* «<1.tMni9RhOcioUr.iaB: inenaMd tnlkU..nb Daeatnbar.lflO. 
l>) I*, rron ITUi Dii aw bac. HW. to ITUi DManbar, 18M: la. fld. Mm iTth DMambn. V*». ^ 
ITUiDeomstiM'. laru; sd. tnna ITtb D>M«iibar. ISHV to SBOt Baplaoibar. ISH : laeraaacd to 1>. 6d. 
lal Oetobar. UM. 

11)^ rtwDMli Josc^ UBT. teHfaJuc. tast;&. fraw Rb Jiuaa. ISK. to SUt JiiBawlMB: P«r- 
ii»B««i tnn Wb XoT«aii>aT. MP- 

('•ila.Cd.tectWBlntMatba.troaailBUi AprU. tt»: n mimti for Wratw inoctUia, ISPB: aaoawM 
for tw«)*« OMOiba. t«n : pafatanaat tron tW) Hmj. ii«% 

(*1 tod Octobtf. un: cMa^ M Mb April, vm. raaiwr»A.«fcd ApfU. I0H. 
"(U « from — . i(«l : Intt w Hrf to » (rmn i«b Foi^hmit. tW. 
.t Ik Ti'T !««)*• uoBWMi. tmtu Mit \fm\. irffD; V nd-, ^nn*naiiL fncDlrt Ma^. mt- 
k|U.Mto«t«at«a«M«(b*,Ir<wi iMb OcLobat, iMi; U.Od. (arM«lraa«Mta^tra«iOM«bav, 
; mnuMMal, Inai Mb Xorontbca, )8ri. 

Ila- M forallbt notiUia. Am«b toah Sarpa««b*r, MMft; ^ M. (ov tvalv* moalfaa^ troM lUh 

UID: fla- ad. 1« twclm BMwttM, mai Utb Jano. WTI i k. ad. frota Utb Joaa. URi par- 

I ttooa )Slb Jana^ wn. 



ANNUAL PBNSIOMS-<»»ti»tMrf. 



Kun*. 



Data 
from vliiob 

dominea«ed. 



Amotinl. 



Nrnma. 



from which 



Oni«r " Th* MilUary Pe'isiotis Exttmhn 
to Conti-n^mU Act. iOOO." 

£ B. a. 



74 



100 



26 





50 





66 






Berr»,Mra. Char-in June, l!)00 

lolt*. aod dhiU | 

dr«u 
Colhtu. Liitnt. 16 Adk., 1901 

Bobl. W. G. 
Oonnel.Mrs.H.A 17 J»n., lUOl 
B[UV«f,MrF.U.P. IC Aug., 190u 
LoTB, Mr*. S.. 35 Aug., IWl 

and ofaildien I 



Vn^ " Ths Walsh and Ottmr Ptntimi 
Act, Jflfiff." 

Hewett, Etlen A.llOFeb., I86SI SO 

Under " T}u Sfipreme Cmirl Jtulges .Act 
I86H Amendrntnt Act. ]S7-t," a'ui " Tkt 
Supienia Court Aci, 18H3." 

Pi«iidarg«>l,SirJ.,% Msj, 1899.1138 6 fl 



UneUr " IVu AftUlia Au AmtndmttU Act. 



2658.' 



B«f>diFig, W. . . 
Bilton. F. 
Cftdy. W. 
Itunn, A.J.N... 
King, B. U. .. 
Leftl. R. 
Bkinnor. W. H. 
Viok>ry. W. .. 
Woolto.T. 



(*) 



A 


«. 


i. 





9 


0* 





s 


0" 





1 


0* 





s 


V 


ao 














V 





3 


8* 





9 


(r 





S 


0* 



Oi^erj Pensions Act, i«?*." 
McOuire. E. .. (39 SapL.lSTlj 10* 
Russall, W. . . I 1 Julf, ]871 1 1 0* 



* P«r dliiD. 
(fellB. rroui lOtli Mfty, IMS: leaaweil for tnotve uioathB. April, 1806; uptin renflwod fortwvln 
"Baonilu; ad. tor cw«lv« nnxtcbii, Itobi JWh to lotli Mn]-. lixHi; 6(1. tor t««lv« monibs, from H^. 
' ISM; permaneQl from lllb ISmj, ISIO. 



Kstv ZtKL^Kv Caon QuTumis (£10 per Annuin). 



AflunBOD, TboLtit.*. Tlh M&y, 11:60. 
Ailitln. Smniial. tOth Mtrcb. INS?. 
Mn?h, Bolo'ii'^n, tOlb Uar«h. IS^iJ. 
BIcIHls. Iloiijaiiiiii. lAEh Hkrcb. lAOD. 
mil. UU'irKO, lOtti April. IW>. 
LiOfpiril, WinUiii, 1Mb Mnrnh. tncg. 
lisw, Kraiit^a JoMpb, lOtb M*r<!li. IWD. 



Maltng. Ohri*im>b(T, loth M»rob. IWB. 

M«if,01llMtt.7i.h t'lihruary, IBTO. 

IV*MO. Qoorso, lOtli Mnrvb. IMO. 
Ribsrt*. John Uurkitilnili. lOUt U>rrb. IRBB. 
Bo^lriaDM. ADioDi'), toih mm-^i. Imql 
Sbcphtrd. RIcbnrd. Ueli U&rph. 1800: 
Sraltta. Juigua. 7eb Jua*, lUO. 



I df IktaPntlBeift] (lovnraitinni. NcUon— Mrs. Roblnmn'a tbraa ilbuitbten, £iaa. 

to Hr*. &|li<itwU) t'uT-l, .CIO; iMtnitun of IkIa P. I>. ItAwion cnnlioiuiit to liia widow. 

HI: iMBfllnnlo Ai>er«lM>i)aT&biiiiilittEigi lor irountU reoaited wbeo In the venrioa o( tbe H<« 
K««U]MiaoT«rnm«ii(,iiiI . 



NEW ZEALAND NEWSPAPERS, 
are (JftTiuary, 1902) 211 publications on the register oi 



H Trrrr 

^M Qewspag>*!rs for Kew Zealand. 

H The names ot liie Tiewspapers, with the postal districts and towns 

H in which they are pnnte<1, are ^iven in the following list, the seoonflj 

H column showing the d&y or period of publication. 




HEW KBA.LAND NBW8PAPKU6. 
M. 8igiiifie& morrung paper; E. evening paper: — 



77 



Auokluid— 

IAooklimd Rvanin; StB.r (K.) .. .. .. Daily. 

Anelllftsd Weekly Kewa e,ud Town ftiid Cotmtrjr Jouruftl {K) SnturdOiy 
Dibl« Stttndard (M.) .. .. .. .. Munlbly. 

C&tnoiie Onroniclo (M.) .. .. ,. .. , 

ChrifliUn Worker . . . . . , , 

Churoh OuteUcf (M.) .. 
D*n>«h (M.) . . . . . . Tiirioe montblv Uet. lOtb.aOth). 

Ifaw Zealand ABC Guida .. .. .. UoBlhty. 

Now Zriilruid Fftnncr, Boft utd I'oultrr Joiimal (M ( 
Kew Zeiilruid timpliic, Ladivii' Jourual, tuid VouLtu' Cuiu- 
pftoioii . , , . . . . . . . Wednesday. 

Mow Ztoland Henid (U.) .. .. .. Daily. 

Novi Zr.klond illu«lra'.cd Mngfuino .. .. Monlhly. 

New Z^aliiitd lUuMtralrd ^purling Raviaw nnd Lloeimed 



! 

r 



VicLunilet'a Gosoue (BI.) 

Haw Zraland lIlaAtrfitf^d l'n-Dita(M.} 

Now Zcftlftiid Jo)'ful Nome ■ . . ,. 

Ob««rv*r(M.) 

Produce Circulftx uid Monthly Repott (M.) 

BburUnd'i Trade Journal 
Oonomandcl— 

CaramundoL Oo-iinty Nowi (K). 
Dftrgikvillc — 

WwroB Bell tnd Norbharn AdverLiaer (K ) 
Baniilioji— 

Wkik&to ArgDB (E.) 

WkikatoTimos&Qd ThkcaM V&ll«y QuMtto (U.) 
KitwnkAWtt — 

NortliCEU Luminary (E.) 
Kftwbift— 

K>t*bi» Settler and Ka^I&d Advertiier (M.) . . 
Ooafaungii — 

MftDukau luid Privnklln MkU Knd Auok1tui3 Courier (B.) .. Frldny. 

Manak&u Countj Chronicle (U.) .. .. .. SftLuidAy 

Bodu«y aa'l Obfkin&ira Timet, Wattcmava ft&d K&ipam 

(iM«iti«|M.| .. .. Friday, 

Woakly Onebui)({& ludep^udotit tad District AdverUiar (M.) SMUcdRy. 
Itotorua— 

Hot Lakes GliruDicIo (U.) 
Wbkngarei — 

^orttivni Advtitiota (E.) .. .. Frid*y. 

, , Thahkx. 

aT«ng&lliU«— 

0>jIdt)eMs Ad*ocat« and Ohio«inari County Chronicle (M.) TuM.,Tbur.,&tt. 

um— 

ifwt CoMt Ouudtftn fR.) .. .. W«d., 8atnrd«j. 

Opotiki Herald, WliakaUuo County aud East OomI Gaacttc 

(E.) .. .. .. .. Tuiwday, Kridny. 



Thursday. 

Satufd&y. 
Moiitlily. 
Snturday. 
Monthly. 
Saturday. 

Tuesday, Friday. 



DaUy. 

Friday. 
Saturday. 




OliinocnuH naxAtU) |K.) 
Tautwiga — 

Bay of Pleuty Times and Thatniu Valley Wardait (E.) 
Ta Aroba— 

Te Aroha and Ohin«inQri Hews and Upper Tluuaes Advo- 
eale (M.) 
riMinea— 

Tbamoa Advartiur and Minvrfi' Netrs (IS.) 

Tliamei SUr (K.) 



, . Mon.? Wed., Fri. 

.. Moo., Wad.. Pri. 



Tuai.,Tliur.,6al. 
I>aUy. 



78 



NEW ZBATiAND OFFIOt&lt TBAB-BOOK. 



Waihi— 

Wftibi Chroniola (M.) .. 

Waihi Daily Telegraph (E.) 
Waitekauri — 

Golden Age (E.) 
Oiabome — 

Oiabome Times (M.) 

Poverty Bay Herald (E.) 



QlSBOBHB. 



Wed., Saturday. 
Daily. 

W«d., Satoriay. 

Daily. 



Kbw Pltkodtb. 



tnglenood — 

Record and Waitara Age (M.) .. .. Wad., Satofday. 

Weekly Reootd (M.) . . . . Sattuday. 
New Plymouth — 

Budget and Taranaki Weekly Herald (U.) . . . . , 

Daily News {U.) . . Daily. 

Taranaki Herald (E.) . . . . . . • 

Taranaki Newi (M.) . . . . Satnrday. 
Opunake — 

Opanake Times (E.) . . Toetday, Friday. 

Stratford — , 

Egmont Poat (E.) .. .. Taes.,Thiu.,Sat. 

Egmont Settler (£.) . . . . Hon., Wed., Fri. 
Waitara— 

Waitara Evening Mail and Olitton County Chronicle {E.) , . . 

Dancevirke- NiPiBH. 

Dannevirke Advocate (E.) . . Daily. 

Dannevirke Daily Press (E.) . . ... 
Hastings — 

Hastings Standard (E.) .. .. .. •• « 

Kapier — 

Daily Telegraph {E.) . . . . . . . . - 

Hawke's Bay Herald (M.) . . . . ... 

New Zealand Pire and Ambulance Record . . Monthly. 
Waipawa — 

Waipawa Mail (E.) . . . . . . . . TnaB.,Thui., Bat. 

Wairoa — 

Wairoa Ouardtaa and County Advocate (M.) . . . . Tuesday, Friday. 

Eltham- Wahoandi. 

Eltham Argus and Daily Adveriiiier (E.) . . , . Dally. 

Eltham Guardian; Kaponga, Ngaire, Te Roti, Hawera, 

Stratford, and Cardiff Advorliser (M.) .. .. TueB.,Thur.,BaL 

Hawera — , 

Egmont Star (M.) . . . . . . Saturday. 

Hawera and Normanby Star, Patea County Chronicle, and . 

Waimate Plains Gazette (E.) . . . . Daily, 

Hunterville— 

Huntervilie Express, Hunterville, Ohingaiti, Moawhango, 

and Rata Advertiser (E.) .. Tues.,Thur.,Sat. 

Manaia — 

Waimate Witness (E.) .. . . Mon., Wed., Fri. 

Mangaweka-r 

Settlflr(E.) .. .. Tues.,Thur., Sat. 

Marlon — 

Rangitikei Advocate and Manawatu Argus (E.) .. .. Daily. 

Patea— 

Patea County Press (E.) . . . . Mon., Wod., Fri. 

ftaetihi — 

Waimarino Argus and Raetihi, Ohakune, Karioi, Pipiriki, 

and Upper Wanganui Advocate (M.) .. .. Tuesday. 




NSW ZBALUiD KBW8PAPEB8. 



79 



riaffutui — 



Ne« Z«ftlMKl Good Templu Wfttohmird (U.). . 
(M.l 



PtUM-Rugitikei AdvertlMr 



N»w ZmUwI Til BiU (VI.) 
Wwigftnul Cliroaicle uid 
{M.» .. 

YwuDUi (M.) 

C»rUrloo— WKxrmn»». 

I Wurv«pftl>ader(£,) .. 

I Wur&npft ObMrrer. P««xhcrston Cbronkla. Eut OoMt 
r AdvftrtiMr. ftnd South Count; (lAxetta (£.) 

Ekftlkbaok — 

Ekai«huti« Expr«M ftod J^ottii Wftimntp*. Courier (S.) .. 

Pftnnan Fnaod (U.) 
Peildjng — 

P«ild.ng SUr (E.) 
Poxton— 

UuAv&tu HenUd^E.) .. 
Onftowo North — 

T* Pok* ki Hilnimngi (K ) 

Walmntpft StuidMil Mid Feftlhentoa AdTcaalv (E.) 
Lcfin— 

)t>uft«ftlu P*cm«r utd Horoirhenua Countj Ohnmtcls (B.) 
UMAUrton— 
w WainuMpaDftily Times (B.J 
I WunramSUr (K.) 

r ytvAly Star u»d WolluigtoD Dbtriot AdvutUrar (V.) 
OtakL— 

Otski Uktl &nd Hotonfaenaft Count; ftod West Cooal Advsr- 
tiut (U.) 
PfthiAtuk— 

PkUatiw BaimU (E.) . . 
Pftlnunton Sotth — 

UkBAWfttu DftilT Stftndiutd, Raagitikei Advartiaor. And Woct 
CoMtGwAt* (B.| 

Uwr>«w*ta D&ilj Tim« (C.) 
PetODe — 

HnU lod PetaD« Chromele (B.) 
Wallington— 

AdvoMU (U.) 

Chtneb OinMicle (M.> .. 

BTVButg Pom (G.) .. 

U«n«ntil>KM:ord (M).. 

N«w ZcKluid Crsfuni&D (U.) 

Kew Ze&Iuid CjrciUu' TontlnK Glob Gueite (M.) 

New Z««iftod Dairyman uid Dtttry UcsMogu (B.) .^ 

Naw Z«aluid Field (U.) 

Now Zrftluid Froo Lanea (Ikl 



Taoadftj. 
Uonth);. 

Satord&j. 

Dail;. 

S*taida.y. 
Ftiday. 



Mod,. W«d.. Pd. 
Tuc*.,Thur.,Sfrt. 



.. Uoatblr(ln). 
-. Daitj. 

. . TaH..Tfaar.,6*t. 

..ToM-^ttnighilv. 
.. Mo*., Wed., Fri. 



* 

Tkuxtd%y. 

TQM.,TbDr.,Sat. 
Hod.. W»d., Pri. 

Duly. 

ToMda-y, Pr1d»;. 

Ta«Bd*j. 
Uoatbt;. 
XMIy. 

8&UHdftT. 
M0DU1I7. 



Frid«iT. 

8«taid»7, 



N«« Kc&lknd IniLinincc. t'lnane^, uid HintDg Joum&l (H.) Uonthljr. 



Vvm XmalMoA Uul, Tdwu Ksd CooaUjr AdTarliMi (Hj 

New ZealMd MinM Ke«onl |H.) .. 

Now Z«alMidTiinu(M.} 

Hcgi*t«rutd Pmpertj laraston' Gaid« |M). .. 

W«UioKtoD Prica Currant Mid New Z«ft1&Dd Tnde H»- 

roodvOt*— 

WMdTill* Exuain»r (B.) 



Ftidi^. 

MoDLUy. 

I>ftUr. 

HontUy. 



Moa.. W*d.. Pri. 



80 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAB-BOOE. 



Blenheim- Blehhkik. 

Mar] borough Daily Times and Town and Coonti; Adver- 

tiBer(M.) .. Daily. 

Marlborough Express (E.) . . . . . . * 

Havelook — 

Pelorus Ouardian and Miners' Advocate (M.) . . . . Tuesday, Friday. 

PiotoQ — 

Marlborough Presa, County of Sounds Oazette (U.) ... 

Brightwater- J^i^i^s. 

Brightwater Independent Chronicle (M.) .. ,. Thursday. 

Colling wood — 

Golden Bay Argus (E.) . . . . . . . . , 

Motuelca — 

Motueka Star (G) . . . . Tuesday, Friday. 

Nelson — 

Colonist (M.) . . . . . . . . Daily. 

Nelson Evening Mail (E.) . . , , ■ ■ . 

Takakn.— 

Takaka News and GoUiogwood Advertiser (E.) . , Thursday. 

Charleston- Westpobt. 

Charleston Herald, Brighton Times, and GroDinville Be- 

porter(M.] .. .. Wed., Saturday, 
Murohlson — 

Buller Post (E.) .. ..Tuesday. 
Westport — 

Buller Miner (M.) . . Friday. 

Westport News {M.) .. .. Daily. 

Westport Times and Evening Star (B.) .. ■• . 

Greymouth- Gbevmooth. 

Evening Star and Brunnerton Advocate (E.) . . . . Daily. 

Grev River Argus (M.) . , . . . , ... 

Weekly Argus (U.) . . Weekly. 

ReeftoD— . 

Inangahua Herald and New Zealand Miner (M.) - . . Daily. 

Inangahua Times and Reefton Guardian (E.), . . . . 

Hokitika- HOKITIKA. 

Hokiiilca Guardian and Evening Star (E.) . . . . Daily. 

Leader (M.) .. .. .. Saturday. 

West Coast Times (M.) .. .. .. Daily. 

Kuruara — 

Kutnara Timos and Dillman's and Qoldsborough Adver- 
tiser (M.) .. ., Daily. 

Ross- 
Ross and Okarito Advocate and Westland Advertiser (M.) Wed., Saturday. 

Akaroa— Chbistchukcb. 

Akaroa Slail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser f M.) . . Tuesday, Friday. 
Asbburton — 

Afihburton Guardian (E.) .. .. .. Daily. 

Asbburton Mail, Rakaia, Mount Somers, and Alford Forest 

Advertiser (M.) .. .. .. . . Tues., Thur., Sal. 

Anhbutton Standard and Farmers' Advocate (M.) . . Uon., Wed., Fri. 
Cheviot — 

Cheviot News (M.) . . Taeaday, Friday. 



NBW Z&il^AJXD HBWBPAPERB. 



81 



Ohristoh nrcb — 

Canterbury Times (M.) . . . . . . Wsdn«Bd&y. 

LylteltoD Timen {M.) .. .. .. .. JiaJly. 

Mercantile and Buikniptoy Oaxette of New Zealuid (E.) Wednesday. 

New Zealand Baptist . . . . . . , . Monthly. 

New Zealand Church News (If.) . . . . . . , 

Nen Zealand Fanciers' Obronicle (M.) 

Hew Zealand Railway Review 

New Zealand Schoolmaster (E.) 

New Zealand War Cry and Official Oazette of the SalTatJon 

Army (M.) .. .. .. ,. Saturday. 

New Zealand Wheelnuui (ii.) .. .. . . Wednesday. 

Press (M.) . . . . . . . . , . Daily. 

Prohibitionist .. .. .. .. Fri,, fortnightly. 

Spectator (U.) . . . . . . . . Tuesday. 

Sportsman and New ZeEiland Cyoliet (M.) . , . . Wednesday. 

Star(E.) .. .. Daily. 

Truth (E.) .. .. .. .. ... 

Weekly Press (inoorpocating " The Referee ") (U.) . . Wednesday. 
East Oxford- 
Oxford Observer (M.) . . . . . . . . Saturday. 

Kaikoura — 

Kaikoura Star and North Canterbury and South Mad- 

horongh News (E.) .. .. .. .. Daily. 

Rang i era — 

Itangiora Standard and North Oaatetbury Guardian (M.) Wed., Saturday. 
South bridge — 

Ellesmere Onatdian {M.) . . . . ■ • . • 



Temuka — 

Qeraldine Guardian (M.) 
Temuka Leader (M.) 

Timaru— 

Timaru Herald (M.) 
Timaru Post (E.) 

W aim ate — 

Waimate Advertiser (M.) 
Waimate Times (M.) . . 

0am am — 

North Ota«o Times (U.) 
Oamarn Mail (E.) 



TlMABD. 



.. Tues., Thar., Sat. 
. . Daily. 



. . Saturday. 

.. TueB., Thur., Sat. 



Oauarq. 



DCMBDIM. 



.. Daily. 



Alexandra South — 

Alexandra Herald and Central Otago Gazette (M.) . . Thursday. 

Balolutha— 

Clutba Leader (M.) . . . . Tuesday, Friday. 

Free Press (M.) .. .. ■. . 

Clyde— 

Dunstan Times, Vinoant County Gazette, and General 

Goldfields Advertiser (M.) . . . . Friday. 

Cromwell — 

Cromwell Argus and Northern Goldflelds OsEette (M.) . . Tuesday. 
Dunedin — 

Evening Star (E.) .. .. .. .. Daily. 

Farmers' Circular (M.) .. .. .. Thur., fortn'ly 

Katipo .. .. .. Monthly. 

New Zealand Guardian (M.) 

Kew Zealand Journal oi Education 

New Zealand Mining and Engineering Journal {M.) . . Thursday. 

6— Year- hook 



82 



NEW ZBAI.AND OFFIOIAL TKAR-BOOE. 



Du ned i n — continued. 

New Zealand Tablet (M.) 

Olago Daily Times (M.) 

OtB«o Witness (M.) 

OlagoLili'ral and Workman (M) 

Outlook (M.) 

Schoolmates.. 

Temperance Standard . . 

Trade Review aod Farmars' Qazette (H.) 

Triad tM.) .. 

Weekly Budget (M.) 
Iiftwrence — 

Tuapcka Times (M.) 
Milton- 
Bruce Herald (M.) 
MoBgicl — 

Taieri Advocate (SI.) 
Naaeby — 

Mount Ida Chronicle (E.) 
Pa 1 me re ton— ■ 

Palmcrston and Waikouaiti Times (M.) 
Roxburgh — 

Mount Benger Mail (M.) 
Tapanui— 

Tapanui Courier and Central Districts Gazette (M.) 

Arrowtown— Invebcabqili,. 

Lake County Press (E.) 
Gore — 

Mataura Ensign (E.) 

Southern Standard (M.) 
Invert^arfiill — 

Soutliecn Cross (M.) 

Southlander (M.) 

Southland Daily News (E.) 

Southland Times (M.) .. 

Weekly Times (M.) 
Queenstown— 

I.,ake Wnkatipu Mail (E.) 
Biverton — 

Western Star and Wallace County Gazette (E.) 
Wintou — 

Wiiiton Record and Hokonui Advocate (M.) . . 
Wyodhaui — 

Wyndham Farmer (M.) 

Wyndham Herald (M.) 

The foregoing towns are arranged according to the postal dis- 
trict in which they are situated. 

Taking the provincial districts, AucHand has 43 publications 
registered as uewspapei-s, Taranaki 16, Hawke's Bay 9, Wellington 
43, Marlborongii 4, Nelson 14, Westland 8, Canterbury 31, and 
Otago 43. 



.. Friday. 
.. Daily. 
.. Thursday. 
. . Saturday 

. . Monthly. 

. . Thursday. 
. . Monthly. 
. . Saturday, 

.. Wed., Saturday. 

.. Tuesday, Friday. 

.. Wed., Saturday. 

. . Friday (twice). 

.. Friday. 

.. Saturday. 

. . Wednesday. 

.. Thursday. 

., TueB.,Thur.,S*t. 
. . Tuesday, Friday. 

. . Saturday. 
.. Friday. 
.. Daily. 

' • ■ 

.. Friday, 



Tne6.,ThuE.,SaL 

Friday. 

Mon., Wed., Fri. 
Tuesday, Friday. 




TB8 CDRTOUS TARIVr. 



S3 



THE GDST0M8 TARIFF OF NEW ZEAL.\ND, 



Ondgr the Ciuftmu and Excita DtU\M AcU, iS88 and IhVS, " Th* Tobacco 
H Bweut Dutiet Act, 1806." and " Tha Cu*Umu Dutie* Atlundmsnt Act, 

V^ 1 

W Exam 



Table op Duties. 

PTm bsftdinga of Iho r<"ip»clira cUshs in Ihii Table and in tli* Tablo of 
Examption* »r« unei) Kolel^ tor 0(iti«antano« at olawifioUion, nnd nhKll not m 
tny M«7 sflcot tb« arttoles specified iheraic, or be eoascrued to iadlaau tb« 
BiAMriAl ol which iay suoh attiale is m&d«. 

. The word " iron " tnolude* sbtcl, or sImI aod iron oombini>d. 

I Neitbitr ateam-Btiglnes, nor pkru ol «t«ain-«nginaa, nar ntxtm-batlcn (land 

«r marine) an InoJuded ia the expreittion '* ma«hiueit " or "DMcUlaety" In 
eitber this Table or the Table of Esempiions. 

The abbrctiaboQ "n.o.«." meaoa uob oiherwiu enumoratod. 

In computing "ad valo ram " dull « th« invoict value ol tbagoodx ix inoreawd 

|ky lOpDT eeDl, 

CliASS I. — FqODS and ArTICLBS for Hl'XAN CONBUHPTION. 
Nanus of ArtteUa and Ratta 0/ Duiy. 
1. Almonds, in •hell, 3J. tb« lb. 
3. Almoade, Hhelled, Q.a.e,, 3d. ifae lb. 

3. Bacon and hami, ^. Lbe lb. 

4. BisotiiU, iblpA* plain &nd uiiaweeleDtd, 3a the ont. 
A. BiwuiU, other kmd^. '2d. Iho lb. 

6. Boiled auears, comfics, loEeiiges. ScoUih mlxtuMii, and Hngat-oandy, 'ii. tti« 

lb., iDeiiiding iaUmal packagea. 

7. Candied poet and drained peel, 3(1. the lb. 

8. Caper*, oarairaj aeede, cauup, oayaooe peppiir, obilUaa, cbutaey, ourcy- powder 

and •paete. fish-paate, galAtioe, iainglaaa, llqaorloa. oUvee, 1!0 per coot. 
ad vaioTtvt. 

9. Cbuooioie oooteetionery, and all preparationa of obooolaCe Ot cocoa — 

In plain trade paokagea, 3d. the lb. 

Id lancy paokages, ot in small paokagoe for retail aale, ao p«r cent, ad 
valprtm. 

10. Confeotiuiiery n.o.e., 3d. the lb., inolgdlog iuteroal packagea. 

11. Curianta. Id. the lb. 

12. Plab. dried, pickled, or saltccl, n.o.e.. 10c. the owt, 

13. Fi«b, potied and praMtvod, Sd. the lb. or paokage of that roputai! weight, 
and ao in propoitioa lot packagea of greater or tesa reputed weigLc. 

Flrult, Iraah. viz. : — 

Apples, p«arB, plams. cberrfaMf peaohaa, nectarines, median, apricota, 
quinoea, lomatooF, Id. tbs lb, 

(No duty excucdiog Jd. the lb. to be levied on apples and pears bom 
I4th July CO aiat Deoambei.) 
Cutraala, taapk«rtjes, gooaebftrriM, blaokbetriea, and atrawberriea, ^d. 

ibolb. 
Lamona , Id. tbe lb. 
' 15. Pmiu, dned. 2d. the lb. 

16. Fruila. piesarvcd in juJc« or syiup, 25 per cent, ad valorem. 

17. FruU-putp, and parlially proswrrnd Iruit n.o.e., IJd. th« lb. 

18. Frcita preMired by aalpbuioiu acid. Id. tlte lb, 

19. Gliiuoan, Id. tb« lb. 
90. Honey, 2d. tbe lb. 

il. Jams, jelliea, marmalado, and pieaerves, 'id. the lb. or package o! lliat 
xepntod weight, and ito iu proportion for pookagea ot greater or lest 
reputed w«ight. 




I 



98. 

as. 

27. 
SS. 

». 
30. 
31. 
88. 
S3. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
88. 
39. 
40. 
«1. 
42. 



JalliH oaac«Dtnilt)i] lu tnlileU or powder, 4d. tbo lb. 

UuzetiftUid CM>rulli»Lr, ^, the lb. 

MmiU. potl*(t or preMfved. 'iO per oeut, ad valorem. 

Milk. pi«4(!iva(l, 30 p*r cent, ad valorfm. 

Uoawrd. jtd. iba lb. 

Nuu o( all binria, exc<pc coooit-nutii, 'Ji. Cha lb. 

O^aWrs, praMnod, 'id. tlm lb. or [j«ok«|{e of Ibat reputed weight, tknd bo in 

proportion (or packngea ot greater or i«B» reputed weight. 
Pe*rl doiIai^, U. the cwt. 
Pew. •pile, 2*. bheowk. 
Picklet), Ss. tlio imperial galloa. 
Provltloni, n.a.e., 'JO per oent. ad vaioftm, 
K*l>ins. Id- Che lb. 
Rio«-flour. G«. tha cwt. 
S*rdiiin, inclutlinK tt>e oil, 2d. tbw lb. 
Banntr. 4a. the imperial gallon. 

SpK>ee, inelndiDg pvppor nnd pimento. dDgrMiiid. Sd. the lb. 
Spioea, iaolodinn pappar and piiuonto, ground, 4d. cha I b. 
fioear, )d. (te lb. 
Treacle end molaaus, jd. the lb. 

Va^lkbie*. (r*sh, dried, or prrscrved, 30 per etmi. ad valorem. 
Vinegar, t»blo, not axoaodinFt CA par cent, ot aoidlty,* 6i. the galloD. 



Class II. — Tobacco. 



An<t 



41). (3gar«li«a. not exueding in w«igbe UJ lb. per 1,000. I7a. 6d. Lhe 1,000. 

for all weight iu exc«M ol 2} lb. per L.OOO. Cd. the os- 
44. Cicu*. ^• M'o lb. 
4fi. Snafl. 7i. tbe lb. 
4ft. IVibaceo, 8*. Ed. the lb, 
47. Tobm^eeo, ODmanufMMurod. entered to be manafactunid iu t^ coitmjr in aiiv 

Ueenwd tobacco uiauuloctory, for manufaulnnng purpoaea onl]^, inM 

tohMMo. eifarv, eisareiten. or Mnufl, 8*. Ib« lb. 



Class III. — .Vlcohouo Bbtei{agf.i4. akd Matbruls for Makiko 

Ramk. 

48. Ale. be«r of all lorU, porter, uider, ntid porrr, the gallon, or for six reputed 

qoarl bottica, or H repuied pint boiLliSji, 2». tUf. gallon. 

49. Oordtala. Utieia, and llgQeaia, 16*. the liijnid gallon. 
Mil Hope, 6d. the lb. 

51. Malt. it. the bushel. 
£9. Bkem^t, Id. the lb. 
S3. Scdid wort. 6d. the lb. 

M. SpifiU and atrong wnten, the itroDgih of whiob oao be accertained by 
SjrknV fa7t)TDinet«T, 16*. the proof gAllon, 

(No aliowanee beyond Uih nniler proof nbnll be made for aplrita or 
ativng watera ol a lets hydrometer ittrengtb than 16 5 under proof.) 
S6. Spirita and strong wat«ra, aweeteoed or mixed, when not esoeedipg tfae 

. stnngth ot proof. I6«. the liqnid gdloo. 
56. SpinU and strong water* in oaaea ihall be charged as lollowa, namelj':'- 

Two K*ll*»>* ^nd under, aa two gallons ; over iwo )<alloDa and not exceed- 
ing threr, as three satldna; over three Rations iLnd not exoerding tour, 
w four gaU<nis: ana ao on for nay greater quaotitj eoot^nad in ftoy 
eaae. 
37. Spirita or alroog water*, miied with ingredienta in any proportion exoeeding 
33 per conc. of procf ipirii, and aliiinuKh thereby contiug under aav other 
deaignation, cxcepiUig paunt or propneiary medioineB. ot ttii«Mirea and 
mfdictnal Bpirita othemiae omnnp rated, 16n. the Hqiild gallan. 

* ViBc<ar »x*Miiag CS par eeol. trt acidity te be Iraeted m aeeiio aeld. 




COOTtnu fuuw. 



* 
* 



of HMlMfcU 



«MiAa4 I7 9]toa^ hy^MaaMr. Mm Milan, or lor MX npolad 
or twtw i^pB f J ptoi bonks. 9*. im fftlhw. 

50. WlD^ Mkv than apwlitfaic Mid ABffmtut, eaBMlolnt \9m Ami M per esaU 

ol pnXkf iplHt T«rifi«d bv Sjrkea** tivdnHnvlev. tbe f*.ltaB, oc f or tis 
w p ul i ii qturt bolt)**, or t<r*l«* npatad pto; bouta*. H*. tha gttUo*- 
tiO. WiiM, apukliag, ft. iba g&llon. 

CtMiSA TV, — K01f*AU»B0LIC BBTCaA.aK3. AND Uatirui<8 fok 

Maeino Same 

51. Avuad ftnd ratnwfti «uan moA aAanwakif haTWgM, tt far eaoi. ai 

vsiamn. 
«t. Ohiaarr, 9i tba lb. 
«S. OboMlMa, 84. tho lb. 
-M. Caoo*. sa. iba lb. 

65. CoSm, aw ra w of. 90 p«c cent, ad vaionmt. 
«. CoOm. roaatad. 8d. tba lb. 
•7. SijmifM : hmt- or l«iitoi)-Jaio« awMtanad : nupbcff^ vlaagw. 35 par ««et. •< 

8S. Tea, 9d. tb« lb. 

Class V. — DftOOft, Mkdicikbs. Chemicals, asd DscoatsTs' 

Slndkies. 

69. Aeid. aeatio, B.o.a.. oootaining not ntof* thaa 80 par eant. et aeiditf, l^A. 

tbalb. 
FtK avert- 10 par oaiil. ol aetdit; at IraoUoa iheraoF adJitional, J4. 
tb« lb. 

70. A«id. tacMric, la. tba lb. 

Tt. Bakfanf-powdar. y«a«t praparationa. and oihar tMnanta, V> par aaat. «i 

MJor«fli. 
TS. Chunicala n-o.a., including pbota{tc»phi(? abamica!*, And glacuU aoatie aoid 

(B.P. •taBdaird), \i pareaui. ad vtthrwm. 
IS. Craaot of tanar, Id. tbe lb. 
74. Dnip and dro^giata' aimdrlaii and apoCbaearic«' waraa, a.o.«., l& pat eank 

ad vdJortfa. 
TS. EaacDocs. flaToarJitg, apiriluou* : 13 per oant. ad valonm until lat Pubruarp, 

1896. and theraaftw 16a. the liquUi gKllon. 
TS. Eaaaacaa. flavouring. n.o.a.. IS p^r o«b». 
77. BuoaljpluB oil. m bulk or bolUo, •JO pur cant, ad vaioram. 
TS OlyeeriB«. r«tlnad. 30 par cent- ad vahnn. 
T9. Oi'iiim. 40<i. tha lb. 

80. Patant tnwlicinea. IS par Mnt. ad vatomn. 

81, Piofiriotaiy medicmea, or rordioamantii, (1) beacinit tho nama ol tb« pro- 

iniaaor 00 label or package ; f J) b««iiDg a preflxad nama In tba poa- 
■esaive oaaa ; (S) n.o.«., prtpaxea oj any dmuU awtnt or an, lA par ctnU 
ad valortm. 

SS. SacebaritiB, animpl in lb« farm of tabloid* or eablabt, la. Qd. tbe oune*. 

ft3. Saraaparilla, 15 |>ei ecot. att vi'tortm. 

84. Soda, carbonate and bicarbonaia, Is. the ewi. 
88. &kIk. crvittKlR. it. thd ctti, 

80. Tinctum and modtcinal ■pirilttof any reoofiniiad pharniaoopcziia, contaimug 

more than 50 mr cent, ut pcoaf epiiit. la, tb« lb. 
ST. Tinoiurea and meaicioal apirite d( any reeo|nia«dphKrmaoopatia, oeoiainlng 

SO par oeot. proof apint or l«aa, 15 per cane, ad tatanm. 

Class VI.— Clothino and Textile Cocms. 

85. Appaial and read; made ototbinft, and all artiolat n.o.a. made up vrholly or 

in pan from tesUla or otber pieoe-goooa, ii per Miil. ad valortm. 



86 



NRW ZBUtlim OFnCUT. TEAR-BOOK. 



89. Appa-rol maOo by BritiEh or (oreictn ttUloit, dnu-, mantle-, or jackat-maken 

to tb« ard«r ot rcfcldrnU in the colonj. utd tflta»d«d lor the iadividn*! 
U8U of «uob reiideiiu, wkctiicr iaipurt«d by tbe tckideoU themaelTac m 
through Ml iin))orting Rim, 40 per oeai. aaooJorVM. 

90. Bla.Dkotit. iO per cent, ad valorem. 

91. Collfkra and culli, of pkpcr or nlher in&tArtft), 96 per cent, att vatortm, 
93. Cotton oouruvr[iKii««, 20 pec vout. ad i^otorafii. 

08. Cotioii piece-goods, to include lutkey twills, drtn printe (hftrd-apun utS 

pl&in.wov«n|, where the invoice vftlaa does not exceed 4d. tho jerd : Aed 

oottoii piece-good* n.o.r., 10 p«r «ent. ad valortm. 
9i. Cotton pteoe-goude — nuooly, t&peetry ; cretcnnei; chiat* ut ciipe. tai 

eorges : vehetcena. relveU. uid |iluihca. all kinds: damuks; mcqacin; 

BiktccDa: linenettea: crepons; crimpo ; nopliyr*: gin^hkniK: ttirkey twills; 

piinta ; printed cotlonK; piijiicM, vcitingi; quiluiigt, And mkreellM; 

mud ins of lUl kindv ; u«t»; nindow-oets; hollkuda.eiutelni, and blloda; 

diftpata; ticks, locluding coloured BelgiEUi; towellings; Iftoea. 30 pweaai. 

ad valorem. 
Dntperjr n.o.»., 20 per oent. ad valomn. 
Fentbern, oruuQeiit&l finoludinK oatticli), and srtifloial flowsrs. 35 per ceol. 

ad valorem. 
Forfar, donlo*. and flax *iieeliug. n.o.o.. 30 per cent, ad valonm. 
Purs, '2i per c«nt. ad ralormt. 
Habeidatilier; u.o.e.t SO per oent. ad valortm. 
Hats of iJl kinds, inctading atraw hau, also caps, 25 per cent, at 

valurm. 
Honiory n.o.e., 20 p«r oent ad ratortvt. 
Lace, and )ac«a, u.o.c., £5 per cent, ad valortm. 
MilVm^ty of all kmdfi, inetudlng tnmTned haU. caps, and boBDets. 3ft {ler 

oent. ad ralotein. 
, 104. Kibbonii nnd cmpo, all kiiidt, 25 per cent- ad vaUrrtm. 

Bu^s, wmjlien, cotton, opowum, or other, 30 per cent, ad iwlorem. 

BhawU, ilO per cent, ad valortm. 

Silk*, aatcna, Telrets, pluth», n.o.i!., oompoaed of Bilk mixed will) any oiber 

material, ia the piocr. SS per cent, ad valoretK. 
Tcxtila piece-goods othf-r than <!otton or xilk, 20 per cent, ad valortm. 
Umbrellas, paraaola, and ■umbadea, SU per cent, ad vahrem. 
Yarns l),0.e., SO per oent. ad vaMrttn. 



Cu88 VII. — Lkathbb and Man-upactubrs op Leatheb. 

111. Boots, rboee, and alippcra. n.o.e. ; golo&hea, clogs, pattens, vampa, oppefa- 

and laoee. 22^ per cent, ad vaiortn. 

112. Heel.platee, and toentiffeneia and pUtea. 22^ per oent. ad tuiorent. 
219. Leather— 

Leatbrr belting, and bait-leather, bamesa. bridle, legging, bag, kip (atbar 

than Kaat India), id the lb. 
Bull KD(1 uplit, int^Iuding iwtiii bidoa and tweeds, 3d. the IbL 
Cordovan, levanted leatjiier, roans, aliecpaklns, morocoo n.o.e., basils, 3d. 

the lb. 
Sole leather. 2d. tbc lb 
East India kip, PerKians. latnfankini and KuatfJcinii (dromed other than 

morocco), kangaroo and wallabi skins (ditsaad), tan and oolouied call, 

2d. tbc ll>, 
Ijcather n.o.e., Id. tho lb. 
114. Leather board ot oomoo, dd. the Ifa. 
116. Leather bags and Uatker cloth bags, n.o.e., 20 per eent. ad ml^rem. 

116. Leatber, chamois. 20 per cent, ad mhrtm. 

117. LeaLber cut into ahapen. 2Sf per ceiit ad raloreM. 
lis. Leather leggiuga. 22 j par cent, ad roJorrm. 

119. Leather manufactures n.o.«., HO per oont. ad vatcrtm. 



THB OUBTOUS TARIFF. 



87 



laa. Portmute&ux; ininks; tmvttlllnftbKgiiikna brief-bags of Iva'.har or iMthvr* 
oloLb, IDIn. In tcngCh KnA upnikrdE. and c&rpat-baipc, 25 pm o^nb. ad 
valoriM. 

131. Saddltry, and batneea, nbipn and whtp-lbonBii, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

Class Vni. — Fursituue and Household FuuNrsHiNo. 

123. liukat- and wiakor-WAro n,o,o.. not being lurnilare. SO per cent, ad valiftm. 
ISS. OarpeM. and druggeU; fluorcl&tb ; mat*, and malting, SO ptr cont. ad 

valor fm. 

124. T)t»kfl, 30 per coat, ad valortm. 

12.5. Fumituro and oabinctwAra, n.o.e^ and oUiAr than Iron, SS p«r sent, m) 

valorttn. 
ISR. Futnitufe-, knife-, and pi ate. powder and polJili, 20 per c«iit. ad valorrm. 
Iii7. Mantelpiecti, olbor tbaa Btonc, £0 per cunt, ad valurem, 
128, UpholKtrry d.o.«., 26 par ocni. ad valorevt. 



130. 

lao. 

131. 
132. 
18S. 
IM. 

la-v 

13C- 
1»7. 

18K. 



140. 
UI. 

142. 

ua. 

Hi. 
14A. 

lie. 

147. 

Hft. 
14U 
IftO. 
161, 

152. 

IM. 
IM. 



ISfl 
Ififi 
157 



CimLsh IX. — China. Glaks, and Earthen Goods. 

Bricka. known ke (irebrirk-E, SO por pent, ad vatortm. 

China, porrciain, and pani>nn-riri>, 20 par cont. ad faiorem. 

rirainagin piprit and lilen, 2(1 per cont, oii valortnt. 

Knrili*n rfooiing and gar(ipn-litt!«, "JO per nt-nt. aii vaiureiit. 

Eartlienwai«, Et«neware, and brownware, 30 per cent, ad valorem. 

Pilurs, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

V^neiAy. gnyimii, n.n'i fiicc-lik^ ffoadi, 30 pftr cant, ad t^alM-em. 

GEa«a, orowr. uticot, and izomtnon wlntlow, £*, iba 100 euptrflcial f««t. 

Glassnare; alio plaWKluitfi, and glase polidhcd, coloured, and other kin^R. 

n.o.«. : Riobes and ctiimneyii for lampB, '20 per cent, ad valorem. 
Immp*. Iftntfmii. and lampwick, 20 por cent, ad t'liJor/ni. 
Plaie-itlai>r, bov«lleO oi vitvreil ; mirrors and looking glaneCK, IraiUQd or uu- 

framcd, 'J5 per cent, ad talanim. 

Or^sR X. — Fancy Goons, MudicAt Instrumests, bto. 

Acti6cia) flies. 2fi per cent, ad valorejii. 

OardK, placing, Sd. per pack. 

Clock*, 20 pvr ceut. ad |:ul(;rff<(i. 

DreMing-eutea, SO per cent, mi valorem. 

Fancy goodfi. and toys. '20 per cenl. ad vaiorein. 

Kikhing lackl«, inclnding aitihcially.baiwd liooks otber Ibau (lien, 20 per 

per neoit. ad KalvrttH. 
JenelUry ; plala, gold or silver ; gnrnaiono, 6at nr pol»h«d, £0 per cent. 

ad fjiiortni. 
UouldinRK in iha piaoa for pioture rr&mes, oomioea, or oeillnga, Ifi per cent. 

ad talortm^ 
Uuaical Inntraments of aI) kindft n.o.e., SO per caet. ad valorem. 
Oil, pertuiD'ed, 2^'< per c«ui. ad valutem. 
PapicT-macbii «aie. 30 per oeni. ad ^^alortm, 
Prrluuiery n.c.e., SS per cent, ad taicrein. 
Partiinicd iiplrits and Cologne-water : HI le. the liquid gallon until tlio lab 

Pebruaiy, It*UfI. and lliermfter il lt)s. tins liquid Rallon. 
Photrgrapbio goodn n.o.e,. 20 por oeni. ad talor&tn. 
PiotuicE, paintings, drawinga, ongravmRB, and pbotograpbe, framed or tut- 

Iramtd; picture- or pliotogtapli fminea and -mounu, 20 pet cent, ad 

valartm. 
Platedvrare. 20 per cent, ad tolormc. 

Statues, etaeoetifcs, caeU. and bronitoe. 20 per cent, ad valoretn. 
Tobacco. pJpM and -cmpr. cigar- and oiRnnette.holdeia and -oafees, cigarette- 

papor* and oaspn. 20 pgr cont. ad vaiorm. 
ToiUt preparatioss n.n.e.. 25 p«r eent. ad vaiortm. 




88 



NBW Z8At.AtTD OVPteiAI. TBAR-BOOK. 



169. Wfttctice, 20 ptt eont. ad valorem. 
150. Walktng'atick*, 20 per cant, ad vatortm. 

Class XI.— Paprb Maxopactdbes Atn? Stationebt. 

161. Caled^Ara kod abow-nnn1«, ■.11 kinds, 25 pnr coot, ad ttilm-tm. 

IGl Catdboaid boxes ooinploto. or ourdboard cue aad Bhapud for boxes (iiifl)udiiif 

mKteh-boxeo), 2!i par oent. ad valaram. 
163' I>iTocU)rlM cjf N«H Zrklaad. or of anjr pktl llier«of ; klto aov«ni (or dirw 

toriL'H, SS per cpnt. oii lalttreiii. 
16<. Hftiidbills, prc^rammoB aod ciioulats, plkybills and printed poiMn, 90 pw 

omt. a>i valorfiTi. 

165. Ink, writing, 20 pet 06nl. oii tirforfrn. 

166. Pftpn- baga, oomm (iuciuding siigi).T' bag*). 7a. 6d. the owb 

167. Papec bsga n.o.v., 35 pvr c«ai. a4 valorttn. 

168. Pnprr-hntiginCK, \fi per Cfint. iM coiortm, 

1G9, I'ltpur vrrupi'iri'i; — vir., blue cMulle, glnxed oiip, f[l»x>d cKvmga, naall hand, 
lumber hAiid. and tieiue, ox. the cwl. 

170. Prtpor, n-rappiiig, other kindn. indading bravn, cartridge, And Riigw pspian, 

S", tho owt. 

171. Prlbliiig m*tbar relftting bn paUnt or propriBtary mnilioinoa; trad« Mtt*- 

loguet. ptioelieu, aaoi fMbiiui-plikleM o( ue good* of flrmt or poraoot tax 
Che colony, £5 p«r oenk. a^ vafurvm. 

173. Stationary and wdLin^pnni^r n,ii.«'., 30 pvr i?cnb. o/i i^ciJorfiq. 

173, St)mUon«ry, tunnufk^cureu — viz., ncoouiit'book*; in&nuiaript book*; bill- 
bebd, Itivoic«, ftud HiKtoiueut fonua; piiuied or ruloJ p<i[>er; counMr- 
bcohs; cbf-qiiiv and draft lorma ; tagi: Ikbela; blotung p^dii : akoub- 
bookiiL bnok-oovem; copying Ivttcr-bonks : mADJIold wiicrrti: Album 

IoUinr tb«n tnr phcitunrnphu) ; Jittiins: bi rth <!»}'■ book* ; plain nr faiot- 
incd ruled boulu ; iirinud wiudow tivkoU; printed, litbo^rafiheJ, or um- 
boaaod atabiouBry: uid CtiriAtniAJ. Mew Yo&r, btrihdAjr, &nd t^t«r cards 
Riicl bEiokli>.t«, 25 peir cvnt, ati viiUirtit. 
Hi. Stereotypes and inatricu. 25 poc oonc. ad vnlamn. 



o- 



GlAS;^ XII. — M.\NLtFA(JTUllES OK MkTAI.. 

175. Bieyalea, triBvclef, and the Use vehlclits; alaa flntaUed or parllj flnlBbel w 

mnchined part* of ftame, n.o.o.. inoludiug wildlMS Meet btltriog OOl lo 
Khnrt Inngtha, 20 par cent, an twiiofVin. 

176. Boilers, land and marine, 20 per oeni. ad valortm. 

177. Braaa cocka. ralvec. union b, liibnaaiorB, and wtalatlea, 3tO par MnL «d ftUarwm. 
174. Br&s.<t main>rr&ctiir»<i. n o.«.. '20 per oeni. a4 tatanm. 
119. OiLrchi!H«o (ilmt), 1C- io 2«.bar«, la. 66. itn.v 100. 

180, Carthduv va«i-i>, M. ibe 100. 
18t. OartriiiRra ii.o.e.,SOpetoeat advahrem. 

182. GaBli.rogi uteri ng aiacbinea, 10 par P«til. ait vntcrt-i. 

183. CofBn.famlluie, 30 pet a»nU ad valorwia. 

181. Compoflition pipiog, 3*. 6d. Ihe owl. 
L5. Onppnr mn.iiiifAiitiirei n.o.*., SO p»r e«nt. ad valorem. 
'5. C^ipviiii; prtrmev, 'iO per caul, ad iMlortm. 
17. Cra>>-wincbe«, oraoee n-o-o,, oapttana, and wiudlanatt 30 per oenL ad 

valorem. 
A. Outlcry. ^0 per oent, ad valorem. 
19. Pireaimt, all kind«, ^ per c*nl. ad v^lortm. 
>J. 0«lTaaiMd iron mamitaaturea n.oe,, 3& par otnt. ad vakmm. 
II. Qaaomatttm. and othor apprntmi [qt producing ga« ; also gM iB«t«r9, 10 par 

cent, ad vnhrmK. 
H. Gaaplpe«, iron, & pvr cent, ail vttl«rt'>t 

13. Hardware. iroBOKnigar]-, and tiollowsm, 30 per esnc. ad vahrevi, 
H. Iron bridges, and iron mat«rial n.o.o. Far the canntraotwn ol bridge*, 

wbarvvH, jectioa, at pal«at alipa, SO par oanl. ad niionaK. 




TBB 0D8T01K TAHIPP. 



m 




I 
I 



195. Iran oolumnt for buildiiigs. uid other atruotaral innmnk, SO per oaat. ad 

valortm. 

196. Iron doors tor asfea &tid Tftulti. 'iO per cent, ad valorem. 

197. Iran, galvantssci corrvgatvd slmeta, «ate<*«. ftn'l tvkIU, 2*. par awt. 
liQU galvsnitod tilo*. rldgiuR, gultoring, mid spouting, '20 por c«nt. oit 

Kotovm. 
Iron gftUa ftnd gube-ponti. MtaploK, aUndftnU, stiwinitijf po*lit ujd ii^^iuktu*. 

Iron DiUli, 2s. per owt. 

Iron pipeii. kill) AUinf!* [ors&me, lnoliidingDiftin-cookii,Gp*roenl. otf ooIimVm. 

Itoa. iiUin g&lvkiiiaed abei!! Bn<) boup. In. IkL tbii c«tt. 

Iron l*DkH, esceedtD^ 300 galloQB a.a<i not exoeedtiig 100 ga-llouB, JO*, eacb. 

Iron Uknks of uiid itnd« ^0 ^Uona, As. e&oh. 

Iron work uiid nirR work, 20 per ofrnt, ad raUnfm. 

JftpbnD«d And lixcquersd mat»l w»n, 35 par oadI. wf uolorMK. 

Lawn-moKors, 20 p«r oeDt. ad vatormn. 

Lokd, in stasoM, Ln. 6d. ths owt. 

Lfiftd piping, 3a. 6d. Ui« cwt. 

Maclifnury n.u.e,, 20 per cetiL ad valorem. 

MiiobiDcry. eluotfic, and uppliKnoes. 10 per cent, ad ralorgnt. 

Maohioory (or tlour millE. woollon mitis, papGr-tnills, ropu- and twiiu- 

maklng, drerigtng, *ikw-milb»g, planing, oil refining, boring: and »l*o 

niKcbiuery (or ri^lngeratiuK or prenarving innal, Irntbat-npUUing uu^ 

obinan Ksd baod-knives fur eame, 5 per cent, ad oatimm, 
MonufaoturQ*. n.o.e., of mcial, or ot metal in oombination wUb way otbat 

matvrlal, 20 [>ar cent, ad vuloTcm. 
NaiU n.o.o.. 3e. Iho cwt. 

Printlog maebinAii and pr«M4'<i, a per oont, ad valortm. 
PuDiDS *nd Otbec apparatus lot raiding waIoc n.o.e., 20 pM «ent. ad 

valcrmn. 
, jBi^vi^y f^^^ tramway plant and matorials o-o.*,. 90 p«r o«nt. ad wolonm. 
Qaifl-lionii, 20 per cent, ad iMUortm. 
Sbol, 10«. the cwt. 
Soda watnr maobin««-, al»o, macbinea for aerating liqntda, S per oent. ad 

valwtm. 
Steam englnoi and pnrt* of atcam-onginta n.o.e., 20 nor c«nt, ad vaiortm. 
Bieam-CDginw, and pnrU tborcof, including the boll»r or Imilera iberefor. 

imnorisd ip'Oially for mining or gold-«avlng purpose* and ptooeBS*!, or (or 

doiryiog purpoeosi 6 per oene. an vaiortm. 
Tinwikro, and tlnKmiths' fiirnitiiro n.o.o.. ti5 per ocnt. ad valorem. 
Waterworks pipes, iron, 6 pet cMit. ad valorem. 
Weighbridges and woiglimK-msi^hincH, 3<) per cent, ml vaiortm, 
Wir« mattros»«B and webbing. 20 per roal. ad valorem. 
Zino tdes. ridgtng, (pttterinK. piping, 30 pec cent, ad vaiortm. 
Zinc mauu(n«lur«a n.o.e., S^ per cent, ad valaitm. 

Class KIU.— Timhkh, Amy Ahticchh uai>k fbom Timbbh. 

Bellow*, other tban forge, 20 per cent, ad vah>rtm. 

HIoclH, woodt^n taokl«, 20 pe.r n«nt ad vfilirtm. 

BuL-keta and Lubii, of wood, 20 por cttut. ad vaiortm. • 

Oarria^es, eaits, dray», wagouB, Bod perambulMon, and whMli for Iha 

sama, 20 par oonl. ad vaurwm. 
Carriage ahivlt*, spokct. and lolloee, drcMed; beol earriace limber, n,o.<M 

20 petL'eiu. ad oaUirtm. 
Doors, glased with ornamental glass, 4s. ciLch. 
Doora, plutn, 2a. SAch. 

Baslie«, gtAKcd, with omikniontal gloss, 4a. the pair. 
8a*b«s, plain, '2d. the pair. 
Timb«r, palings, 3e. the 100. 
Timl>«r, posU. 8s. tbs 100. 




321. 
833. 



2iO. 
S27. 
828. 



Wl. 

Sd2. 

S3S. 

Sli. 

•£K. 
S37. 
386. 

aw. 



raw BBALAIfD OmOlAI* TBAH-HOOK. 



S<0. Timbar. raiU. *•- fha 100. 

311. Titnlier, sann, dr««sed, 4s. thn 100ft- Ba|>«rfioi»l, 

242. Ttmbflr, sawn, nuRh, S<. the 100 h. HtipetfiolKl. 

SIS. Timber. thiDglM and lulhs. 3ri. Lhe 1,0<K). 

Hi. Woodeotir&re »tid turnery u.o.«, tuid veneers, 'Mi p«i oeot. ad vatcrtnt. 

Class XIV. — Oils, Paikts. etc. 

S4ii, Axle>greAM>. nnd other solid lubricant*, 21) per cent, ad valortnt. 
, 846. Harness oil snd oompositlDit, nnd leather dressing, SO per oeut. ad va]ortm 

IT. K&phtba, 6d. the gallon. 
''S48. Oil, lineoAd, Gd. tlio gAllort. 

349. Oil, raincral, ineludinfji shsls'Wwito or unreftned iniDcrkl-oil n.o.e,, 6d. tbe 
g&llon. 
3. Oil D.n.e.. Gd. the gullon. 
H. Oil. olive, in biilh. Gi). th« gallon. 
' S53. Oil vagrtubte, iii bulk, n.o.e., Gd. the giillon. 
253. Oil vsKalAblo or uUit'r, iu butilu. \T, per cent, ad vatortm. 
Am. Punts aud ooLoun) ground ici oil or turpenlin*. So. &d. the owt. 
' ~b6. Psints KDd colours mixed TCa.dy for use, 6s. the cwt. 
Putty, 2*. tho cwt. 
E7. Slearire, l^d. tbs lb. 
FS&B. Stfarine for RiAtob-malcing, )d. ths lb. 
^3&9. Vftrninh : ensmel painU ; gold size. 2s. the gftlloo. 
200. Whiting and olmlk, Is. tb« cwt. 

Class XV. — Aohioultukaij and Fakm pRODUtm* «tg. 

261. Aninis-U, load for, of a!l kinds, n.o.o-, 90 per oarit. ad rolgn n w. 

aea. CsHle (bomol). lOi.eacb. 

AGS. Ohail. £1 the ton. 

264. Orftin— nftmely. bftr]ey. 2^. the 100 tb. 

8GS. Grftio uid pulse of evurj kiud ti.o.a., 9d, the 1001b. 

3B6. GrAin and pulsp. of etivry kind, whitn ground or in tay wftj niiuiiifKotiu«d> 

n.o.«., U. Iha 100 lb. 
SS7. UorMes. £\ each. 
368. Liniatd, CI tb* ton. 
360. Uftlse.^ thfllOOIb. 
270. Ouions, £1 the con. 
871. PiQpftred oait meAl, £t Si. the ton. 

Gl.ASB XVI. — MlBCP.LDAHBOUB. 

Bn^B. £aat, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

Bogs, oiJino, forfnr. hositiikr, and linon, 20 p«r c«at. ad val«r«M. 

Bogging kiiil ba(;s ii.o.e., Iii per cent, ad vauirtm. 

Blaekiug and bool-uluss. 20 pur uoui. o^ A'aiortm. 

Blaoklead. 20 per cant. Ad vahrem. 

277. Hltifl. 2fi, Iho lb, 

278. Brttuni*. brii»h»iii, aiul brushwara, n.;>.o., 25 per cenl. ad valortm. 

279. Bmsbes, faair, aud combs ; ioil«i clotbvs- and hat biusbee, ^ per o«dL ad 

valorem. 
SBO. Cicndlos, Id. the lb. or packtbae of thnt ropiibrd vrcfgta, and so In prop&rtla 

(or pftckttges of grniktir or la*K reputed wstHht. 
181. Cement, in. the barrel. 

S8S. Cordogfi and rupe, n.o.e., 20 per cent, ad valitrfm. 
288. Cork, cut, inoliiding bungn, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
384. Firework* n.o.o., SO p«r aeal. ad vaiortm. 
SS5. Flock, 10 per cent, ad valorem, 
28b. Glue and siso. Ijd. the lb. 
S8T. Granite, sawn on not more than two lidts. and nob drtSMd or polisb«d. 

^ par Qont. ad vahiem. 





SI 

8. M&rble. granite, i^nt] other nUin*, dnwMd or potUbsd, *nd uitelM mad* 
tberefroni. inoludiag mnolalmcccs, 3S p«c oent. ad vutorgm. 

389. UfttchM— 
WoodAO, lo bo»B eoBUtning nni mare th&ti fiO iiiAt«hM. li. tbs gfosi o( 

boxea. 
In boxes ooDUioinft pt«i 60 ftnd not mora Chim 100 mfttcliM, 3(. tb« 

gtOM of boXM. 

Id boXM containing mtjta th^n lOlJ mAtcliM, lor avery 100 mkUibea 
or frAcbioii tbnrool cootUDed io one box, H*. th« grow of box««. 
Wu, " piftid veitu " ID cardboard box«i oontainiog and«f 100 moMben, 
la. the crou of boxes. 
" PockvlTektAo " ill tin or otberboxodcontftining under 100 matcbes. 

It. 4d. th« grosa of boxM. 
" SportimanV," " Ondf," uid " Xo. 4 tin TtRlM," in boxvi contaio- 
o^ Dol mare tbui 300 matchM, la. 6d. the poM of boxat. 
Wax. other kinds, for «vetjr 100 maKbes or ItacUoio tbaceol oonUuned 
ill on* box, 2a. Sd. tfae grow of boxM, 

390. Nets and netting, 30 pot oont. od valortm. 
aai. Paraffin wax, Jd. tbe lb. 

392. Powder. Dportiog, 6d. tbe lb. 

9&3. Sackm, uthtir Lhan cornsaoka and jata taoln, IS p«r a*st. ad valortm. 

2H. Sauta^-ekiiiK and easinui (incUiditi^ brina or salt), 3d. par lb. 

S8&. &>«p, common yellav, and hint mottlnd, h*. thociit. 

3B6. Soap, n.o.e., 26 per cent, ad vaiorim. 

997. Soap.pawder, axtract of roap, dry soap, and Bo(t-*oap, 30 per oant. ad 

valorem. 

998. SpitiU, methrlatfd, la tha liquid gatlon. 

S9S. Spirits. cle«r«d Irom warDhousv. m«tb;latod. uodar pNGoribod ooDilitiooii. 

0d. tbe liquid gallon. 
900. SMrob. 2d. tbe lb. 

301. Tarpaullna, t«nta, rick- and wa^Eon -covers. 30 per ovnt. ad valorem- 

302. Twine n o.o., 20 per cent, ad i>oforon. 

303. Wn?bing- powder. SO per oent. ad valortm. 

304. Viax, mm oral, vegetable, and Japanese, Ifd. lb« lb. 
la addition to any dul} cbargvabk by law on any goods impoitcd into thn 

colony, a fortbnr duty of 30 p«r ceuC. ad valortm stiall be ehaiguii 
when ili« goods arc prieou-oiaao. 



TABLE OF EXEMITIONS FKOM DUTIES OP CUSTOMS. 

Class I. — Foods, etc. 

tfamts of ArtieUs, 

305. Almonds, Barbary, Sicily, and Ft«Dcb, us4d in coDfaclionars* tnaiiufactures. 
30tl. Ancliovics, salted, in caaka. 

307. Arrowroot, sago, lapioca, maoaroni, *etinK!«Ui, luid prepared groats 

306. SalU 

aOO. R;c«, dressed or undressed. 

310. Kica manufActurcd Into siarcb In bond. 

Class IV. — Non-alcoholic Beteraoes, btc. 
3tl. Cocoa- beans. 
813. OoAm, rav. 

Class V. — V&vas, bto. 

318. Aoida — tit.: boracic; catlmlic.in bulk , fluoric: mtttiatJo ; nitric; OXklioi 
olaio; picric: pjrcgalliD: salioylio; sulphuric. 

311. CoDCCBtrated cxiraeu or essbnceii id liquid (orm or preserved io fat for pet- 

tiiBae-inaniila£tuT)ng pticposea in nuuiufaatuiing narebcuses, in bottlai of 
not less than 1 lb. In weight. 



KBW KBALAMD OPnOIftL TRAKBOOK. 

319. IMttlnfeotantB. 

316. Drugs »□<! eh«mick1s — vis.: Ktuin ; sDlphftU of ftlamininm ; anlpluue ol 

Ammoni*-. uihydroua AtntnoEiift; aniline riyc*; Kruonie; UMstoo*. ar 
Hu1pb&t« of copp«r; borax; oUeabu ; cbloririA ol cAloiuni ; nilrM* of 
«f|vet: ooobia«al: cceo8Di«, crude or oomiuorQial : glyoerine, crnda. 
sum. ftrabJD Rnd imgftc&nth ; gnoi btnsoiD ; KTlifioiftI gum Arabia; gain 
aokmnr; {>hiisphori.iR ; potoah, cAUttio potiwh, mnd nhloraw of potMh: 
M«rU«b; [)ruM)*t«of poiMh : er«tiiil«o[pAtA«iitum ; 0y«tiid« of ■odium: 
liquid olilorino; BkiRinmonliio; mtUpelre: wtetat« o( Mda, erode ; wd^ 
MD; cAUfltlD loil*: mtr&M of aodA; aillcAtu of ftodA ; sulphate of toda; 
siilpbiiU cif (indium ', hTpoiiilpriitfl ol luiilhiin ; olryAhniiM ; aulpbot; 
obloriJaof xinui Jron-«ulvl)M«>; RHlUnul*; turrauno ; t^JTroii ; mcmm*- 
oxidflgui; Iree-waabos: in^eobioi'liM; maltine: cblotod^ne. 

317. BassnUfti oils, exo«pt 6uofljyptuA ; ood.llTn oil: oil of rhodiam. 

318. Homo di*notaM. 

819. Mftdioinikl bnrk*, Ivitvo*. horh«, flow<r>, roots and guoii. 

^0. Herub «xt«tmlnator. 

S21. 8b«6pdlp. xbeftp-iireiiolioB: slisep-licks. 

932. Sorgiritl Aod detital iootfumaaits n.nd applianoss. 

323. Soionlifio utod a.Bti%y b&lancoN, ratoru, disks, Mid olber applisDoes lai 

ohumlesi anftWnlii nnd aoMoy mark. 

324. WAtet-b«rdenitig cb«mickh for brawers^ use. 

Clahb VI. — Clotriho and Twtasa. 

33fi. Aocontromonte tor military purpoiAs, fixoaptiiig uniform ololblog.* 

i'JB. IlrSoe-nlAHLio and hrooE^-iU'iiiinllng*. 

327. BuiiUuK. in Ibu piece. 

3^8. BuiMr- s.nd cbeese-olotfa. 

S'2Q. Buccons, tkpos, wadding, piDs.iiMdlsc. 

XK). CAliro, w)iii« snd gT«y, also cotton shostingB, in the plftcs. 

3^)1. Ounlutuy. ijio1«rI(]i) , aud pkln bcavet sklii, of ootlou. in the pi«c«. 

H-t^. Ciilourcd QDCtoo shirtingii ; ilsBiieleCte fibirting^.f 

333. Foifar, dowlas, and fLax sbepting. wlion cut up under lUpoTTisioD to siaM 

Dot exc««ding 47 in. x Sflin. for Tiiakiug tloiii-bags, and nob exosediog 

Mi'i. tor lining wool nrnlK. 
834. Fur->ktns, gre«n or Hun driAd. 
-83S. Gold or silver laoo or brnid lor miiltar; cbtliing. 
896. tlatmaksm' matannln— vir., : ailk pluab ; Cak hood a ; iihnllao; galloons: 

«alioovsi spiUc-boanli) fur liatboxon; lealbvis and Hnings ; blooks; 

mould R ; frarnea; ventilatom; atid lasBSlB. 
837. Hessiaos, plain or aliip«d, and scrim. 
336. Lealhar-oloth- 
aSO. MitiornrunloM (raquirod in tho making up of apparel, boots, sboes, hats, 

eii\nn, MLi\i\\oTy. umbrellas, pa.rafioU, and sunfthadeii), ottamvraled tn tay 

order of lbs GommiuiuiDpr, and publiHbod in iho Ontettt. 
340. Sftilolotb. canvoA. and unbt«>sch«d douiiln warped duck, in Inn pircs. 
311- Sewing ootions, Hilks, and tbmadii : oruobet, daruiuK. ajid koiuiug cotMBBC 

angola mc ndingH not cxcoeding 45 ^ards, on e&rde. 
343. Silk (or nuui-dretning. 

343, !?i1k IvUi [uhoeiDakarv* and eacidlun')- 

344. Staymakors' biodiug, eyrlvt*, contet-fastenors, ivnn, ticks, luting, SAtew, 

and ootell. 



•ftubieot toliboproTUJortofMClloiiWof TlioDefocPoApt, 1000." u tallows:— 

^quif-FN'irtj to b* aiimltled frr* Of Cit-tamt Dtttp, 
W. All tDlliMr; (Tli)tliinij, Miilclli^rv, aiii3 MiiitpiucuU ImiioTlvd Into \h« oo^'Otiy tor the 
6»Md ;t>t« UB« of n Vuliinir>r oar|ia niisll. on Uw cartvllcaio In nrlliii« of Uie Huiislaref 
Dol«ac« Ibsl tua uuiio nro or lia.vo beso IDiporlod for suoli iitirpoaa, us adiuliud lato ibe 
4>olouy (rea .il Cuntu'iiw Uuty, 
( Sea noU ou |Kga 93. 



■nu coanMB tarifp 



•tt. TkBocs* kitomiDga— Tit : plun-«olour«d iwilallw hsir-olotfa; cmnrttn 

dolta M BAf Im kpptttTvd of by to* CommiHutMr ol CiMloma : lulifts 
eJaib ol eMton oc waol : bnekraoi; wadding Mulpiddiaft ; ailk, womwd. 
■■d MMMn Uadiag* Mid bmkU : Mtij-biDdtnK*: RusMfaamidi: aboutdu 
fAdi: boaklM; «I«SMa: dimb, d*u. uid brown jikm: pockctiop: 
alkia. blAok. mod brown djad utiioDs and iiii«o«. 

3U. Umbnll&iDAkvn' mkUriftli— Ti>. : nv*nibl« uid iBTuitiiM ailk miKtnne. 
f Ion*, uiii Mtia do obAaa ol not 1«m Uimi 41 m. Id width : alpb«s ololta, 
wiih bocd«c: luMllb eloth, vich budtf ; tiao ottabr pteoft-iooda oa nah 
aaoditMM k« tba OominlnioiiAr nukj «pproT« : *tickft, nwitwt, BOtohvi, 
o«P«, bmiU*, cap*, nba, •tnteborn, tipi, and rinfii, 

HI. Union >binfnei the m*Dioa valu« ol wbieti ilo«a not exee«d ImI. the yacd.* 

848. W«lerproo( iBM«ri&l in tiM pieee. 

Class VII. — Lrathbb. akd Abticlsb oskd in Lbathbk 
Hamvfactdbbs. 

949. Boot»tw4ie. 

JlAO. BooCtnaken* Uniofl, ouivu. pldo or oolound, twg uid portcnuitcAa 

liDinga, of mefa mu«rift)9, qoalitlu. mai pfttt«nu m m&j be epprotea bi 

lb« Cemnuaiofter. 
391. BooU, aboOT, wid eiippcn— tu., chUdnn's, Ho. to 9. 
ftsa. Cork •olc», iknd •ook solee. 

%9. Kast Ibdia kip. oniBt or roDgh-Uiined, bot nndraaiad. 
3U. OoAtakio*. criitl or rough-UoDod. but niiilriiianii 
3&5. Otindorj-, axc«pt b«eU and to«-pIaU». 
866. Hogakins. 

337. Kangaroo-, waJlafat-akina, undrewed. 
SOB. Loath*!. lapaiiiinl or eiiamelled ; goaUkliut, drtand M notocoo, eplound 

iDiheribu black). 
SU3. 6addla-tr*««. 
3G0. Saddlen' irmunongerj (except bite and atirrup-irona), baniM, and monntii 

for faariMM: atraining, aiitcingle, btace, glrcti, aiid roller web* ; eollar 

oheek, aod iht aam« artialc plain, of auoh ijualit; u maj bs approved bv 

itieComminionor : lagging- bucklM. 
901. Taiinitig tnat«tial«, oruda. 

CuLSe VI] I. — FUBKITVHB, ETC. 
863. Blind>webUn( and tape. 

368. Upbolaurerv' "ebbioK, hair leatiDK, imitation lialr->«atlDg; curled bair; 
pnp and ooid of wool, coitoo, or ailk ; Mfu, and atada. 

Clash IX.— CniNA, Glass, etc. 

34i. Boltlta. empty, plain I'ua, not hvlui out oi giound ; alao, jua ap to 3 in. 

in dtamswr al tbo inoutb. 
3Afi. Olam platoi (cngiavf-ili lot pbalo-litltographio woik- 
866. Jata or other dutiablr vtcwln, ooatatning (re* gooda ot gooda aabjeoC to a 

fixed rata ol duty, and b«itig ordinary Uadu paokagaa (or tho goods coa- 

UUaed in lb«in. 

Class S. — Fancy Goods, btc. 

3£T. ActioD-work and keys, in framoB or otlierwiae, foi mac ufa«ttir« of organ t. 

harmoniQDia, and piano* ; organ-pipaa aad iiop-kaobi. 
368. Axlt*44' eanva». ooloura, bra*b««, and palette knli-ea. 

* Wbenavvr aoy di«|»iiia arlaea aa M Iba npnUaation ot tbe osaaapUM in favour of 
OOlonred ootton, naiiBclvit*. or union >)ilrtiii|(f . In tb* tm»a «t labrk* allagad lo ba auoU 
•blrtiDC*. tlix C'liiiiiiiruiuiir.r liaa power to ilMide «iiQh lUtputa; aod Ui Omw of doalii oh 
blap*rt. be m»y rc<)iiti<- iii» tabile in tlUpuM lo b» out ap for tlUit-nialung.ua4er inoti 
«oadlU»iM aa be pr«ar«lbM. 



9i 



MUW i&KALANU OVVIQIAS. yBAH-UOOK. 



309- Magii: litnUmi, tnniieH, Mtd ■tidai. 

870. Mloro«oopea aatd lieito no miaul celcftaape«, aud looMOg lar tame. 

3TI. MuBioal iDatrumoaie, apeoially Lm[>ort«d ht VolunteeT b&nde. 

S72. Painting*, nlAiuary, huil works of an, prab»ut«d lo ur imported by taj 

Siiblic iivKtiLudoii or urt KMociation r*giil«cad A« a body oorpontw, fot 
i#|>1uy 111 liie bullilini;* of ituob lailicutloa or MiDOiatioD. aoa not to ba 
KoUl or oUietwike diapoiicd o!. 
3T3. Phucogrnphio canavraa and Ivima. 
874. PhoLograplia of picsoaiJ ttienda in lotlere ot DAokatB. 
37fl. Prccinna etonea, cut or unonl and iinmoanud. 
S7& SauaiUxad aurfaoea for pliulu'grapliio puEpoaea. 



«T7. 



878. 
379. 

sso. 

[981. 

^992. 

3S3. 

384. 
SS5. 



391. 



Class XI. — Papek, etc. 

Bookbiadora' mate rial a— vii.. cloth, Ic&bher. thread, heodli&ndii wt>l>bing, 

eiid-papeiK, tanlcrung-gut. mar blicK- colour*, niarbt«>pap«t, blua pa*ta for 

ruU"g lolc, atapts pre>aui, wiru-«caplo«, etapIa-atiQ)[B. 
BntMr paner, biiowa aa parobm«iit paper or naxad pAper. 
Cardboard aud paalebo&rd.of aiH«a uul loaa tliau thai kauvrn aa " roj»l." 
Cacdboikrd boxea. maUiniLl for— vix.. guld and eUver paper, plain And bo- 

bosaod. galatino and ooburud papora, knowQ aa " bax papers." 
Cartridg»-papHr lot drawing liuoli!! 
Ololh-lined boarijs, not teas thau " royal." 
CLobh Uuod sapers, QOftmeUcd pap«ti ivoriu and gelfttiaa ; meialUo papaPt 

not Icf a Ihan " datuy." 
Oopy-bootcaanii dnvwiug-boolia. 
Copying- paper, mHdiuiu and duubl«- foolscap, \a original mill wrappen luid 

Hand naado ehequft-papor. 
Ink, printing. 
Mascicatcd para. 

Millboard, and bookbindsrs' leather- board, 
f'upci, h&ud-mada or machine-maiio book or writfng, of bIsm not leas than 
tlie WW known a« " dfliny," wlion in ari)tinU wr^ppara. 

PiiQliuiI'pi*Pi-'i- 

Prlttted bookit, patiara, ojid inuajc, a.o.e. 

School alaiea, aad educational apparatas. 



-89i. 



395. 

39&. 



399. 



4nu. 

Ml. 
403. 
403. 



40t. 

4D.5. 
406. 



Class XII.— Metals. 

AU maobioery (or agrioulcural purpoaea, iaoludiug ohni! onttom, corn- 
criiabera: corn. ahetlor«, also ardolos UMd in inaDafaotuclag the same.— 
viz., chftff ■ cnltiing knivcK, tllt-ruJceB, AUirign lot tbreabjng ■ niillt 
fotgiuga fur pluugha. 

All ogrioultuTal impleinenla. 

All bolu and Dut», blank or screwed outs, black ot fioiahad auU. 

ADObors. 

AttiflcciH' tools. 

Axes and hatcheta; apadea. ahoveU, and forks : picks ; maGtacks ; qu 
and kDnppiiig-h&mmrrs : acython. aheep-alioara, reaping- hooka ; soldorir 
iroQa; EiapGrlnangHirii' acissnca : butcbnirN'Ruwa and ol«tbven. 

Axleo, axle-arcaa. uud boxea. 

B»ud-aavTa and foldingaaws, ineludlng frames. 

linllaws-aaila. 

Biuyctea aiid tricycle*, fittingR far— vis., rabtxtr-tiraa, pneuiDatic-tir«a, OQt- 
sido cov«r», and innur tubes; rubbat and cork liuidlas. and pods' 
rubbnn; aUo drop-forgin({i and stampini^i, ball-bnaringa, waldlvss b| 
tubu ill full lengtlia, rmia, (ork«, and apokea, in the cougb. 

BliLckimiths' navUii, forgos, and (ana. 

Blowota. 

Brass vti copper, in pig*, bara, tnbea, or abeata. 



411. 



iia. cofftf I 
us. 



,nd.hateM 



f,wmakm.\ aui all aatel- uwl «««d- 



419. 






niliiiMi^lilhi ililil 
Qa» Willi II ■»* hiMMi. wrt < 



•ili» win wvttHif . 



Ifo«- «a< W — i WQ— wiwd wir* y* ; i 

Iran botlarpUiM sad oftflftafid laf plMM far botkn : baiiw-tubM h« •x- 
Mc4io( 6 ID. la diuBMer, wkd BBtUngBd; BaaliBf'i axpMWwa ilifi ; 

Iran, pUia Macfc tbcM, tod, bolt, bw, pUto, Ikoop. and pig. 

Xroa nikd gtodsa. 

Iran pittUs, Mi«w*. Kttd QMtinf* for thip*. 

iron wttm o.o.*., indnding (•ncis{-inra, pt*in ftad b&rfced. 

Ijtmi. m pigs ftod but. 

LooauionT— . 

ICMhUi* wwi. 

UacUsmj cRcluutelyfortbepiuiKiaaol Iba muiuiACtimol b««t-nwl aug^r. 

Uaoblavrv fvt dftii^los porposn. 

U>^iiici7 at vKfj dcBcnpUoa for miainc purpOMs, itmhidiiig taacliio* 
pampft. bat not i&cliiding nuk0tiia«r7 tor wcdginf. 

Ukchtnarv tor gi>ld-«k*iog parponM and praoaaMa. 

Mei«] fltunga lot trunks, pomiuuiu«ux. tnvalliag-bact. kggings bags, and 
aucbaU. 

Uetal stMavaa for blocks. 

Matallic eapaulaa. 

[*»mDbulM(irs aud tfac liln Tahieles. fltUngs tor n.o.*. 

ParfOitmtad or oaUulat abaal nac or ir>ii. 

Poctabla •Bgioea on ioat oc an; grcaMr nombac of ifbMlSt wllb boiler ol 
loeecnoUra typa; al*o traction angina*. 

Printing typ* ud materiali d.o e. 

Ralls far railways and tramwars. 

Kaapcni and bin^vra, and rvapiiiA and mowipg maohinM, aoil aztra iMtts 
for Sana : inatvilals for tnanuJacCuriog agricultar^ nMbinarr, namaljri 
raapacknifa uotioni. flngsra, brass and rt*«l ipriDgs, nallaabla ouUngs, 
dJRoi for bairo*s, mould-boajds and ptoiigb.sbatas, uoald-board platas, 
and Ktasl-abaia plsloa oul lo paLlarn, nfeeith-plataa ; plougbs and harrows 
combiued thresbars. 

Riddlaa and aiavas. 

ilivats and srasliera. 

Saparatois and ooolan for dair)'iDS purposas. 

Sat Hcawa, aDginsars' studu, and aplit-piua. 



96 NEW SBAJUUID OFTlOlAb VSAS-BOOS. 

453. S««uie-, kniuing', uid Ultiag-mkchiaM. 

Abi- Spiral apiings fexwpi aofa- »nd mat(re*»-BpriDgi|. 

455. SwMn and hydnalic prcHDn mnd TBcaom 8M19M. 

456. Steel nmi, black or finished, for hydnaUa ummb oe iicfu*. 

457. SomTtss' tiMl bftodi and maMBriBg-ap— ■ 
456. Swords. 

459. Tkcka of «11 kinds. 

460. TcA-packiog l«ad. 

461. Tin. in pig», bttn, or iheeU. 

4G2. Tiiuniitbs' fitungt, including sumped or blocked tin. plMii»heil or u- 
plknbbed. 

463. Tina. (op> of, onuoented. 

464. Welded uid flanged boiler-tonucca, pluo or comglLtad. 

465. Wire, of bran, copper, or lead. 

466. ZiDC, pUio ahe«t. 

467. Zinc plkiea and copper platea for photo-lithographic work. 

Class XIII. — Tisibeb, etc. 

468. Aeh, hiekoiy, and ianeewood timber, nnwionftht. 

469. B.ackamiths' bellowa. 
4iO. Brash woodware. 

471. Cftrriage- uid c*rt-shafu. spokes and felloes is the rongh ; faofaa. at all kinds; 

pole« if unbent and unpluied, o( all kinds; bent wbeel-rinia. 
473. Carriage- and carvmakers' materiaU— tiz. : springs, mon n t h igs. tr fanntin ff, 

hra^s hinges, tire-bolts, shackle -hoi <J en, step treads, and other ma 

fittii-gs (except steps, lamp-irons, dash-irons, seat-rails, and fifth wheels), 

mboer- cloth. 

473. Cbunis. 

474. Lignam-Tit«. 

475. Sieves, hair. 

475. WoodcQ bandies for tools. 

Class XIY. — Oils, etc. 

477. Benzine in bnlk. 

476. Oiis — via. : candlennt. fish, kercaene. penguin, palm, seal, whala. 
47^. P*inu and colours n-o.e. 

4S0- Shaie oii. once ran, snii^le for gas-making. 

4SI. Spirit* c! tar. 

481. Turpecune, driers, and tecabane. 

Class SY. — Miscellaseovs. 

4S3. .^ppantus arsd appliances solely fur teaching parposes, ai ms^ be mipptowmi 

by the CommisMoncr. 
4^^4. Bag* maoe c£ New Zealand tow or flax. 
4^5- Belling tx machinery, other than leather. 
-(Sc. Bii^der-twin*. 
iS7. Bri-;k», cti;*r than fii«-bricks. 
4?^, B'.:ild:i:g aiaienais D.o.e. 

4c$. Brusiie* ioT c r earn -«e para tors and ccmbioed screens. 
i'M. C«Ldi'nnt« uaj candiennt kcroela. 
-i^l. CaDJ;e-wick. 

iifi. Cac^as ar r.^ns acd eievatois tor teapws and binders. 
fif3. CarfieD;#n' ba^et«. 
i'^. Cnartsani map:. 
i9o. C: rfeouc^ner*' mocldiD^-sIsrcb. 
*95. Cotton •a*te. 

4:^7. I>ye-$;u?« and djeicc maierials, crude. 
4ds- Felt sbeaihicg. 




499. 
900. 
601. 
S09. 

SUB. 

«H. 
906. 

606. 

soe. 

609. 
910. 



I 



an. 

912. 
618. 
514. 
915. 



616. 
517. 

518. 

619. 
930, 
531. 
533. 
&2.<j. 
934. 



9SS. 



THE OUSTOMS TABIFF. 97 



Food preHnratiTo n.o e. 

Oum Dooti. 

HftwMn of 13 in. and ov^v. 

Hoi]«7 and brown Wlndaor soap oomponltlon. 

Itoa Mid ald«l Qordage. 

Jut* baggiDg, bAgs, and iftcks. 

Muiurae. 

Muble, nnd other •tone, hewn ax roagh tAwn. not dress.ed of polished. 

MatWKkarii' cotton tttitie. 

OMqiaJ auppliei (or oonauliu offioora o( countriet wh«n a slisLtikc oxemptioa 
esifllB m lavoar o! BiiEish Ooueula. 

Pftpcrmftkers' folta. 

PkMODgvrs' boggago anil «f!iK!ta, including only «(9ii,rins- apparel uni othor 
pentonkl elltoiR that huvo bcoa vfota or ara in uso by pnreonK arriving in 
th« colony; aliio iniplemcjiM, infttriiraentA, and tooln of triwle, oooupb- 
lion, or empluyment of audi peraouti ; and hounehold or othar att^etn not 
exo«fldiDg iitOO in v&lue, whioh have beeu in uae for iwelvu monthB prior 
lo <mbikrkBtion by tha persaas or tuniliea brineiag thou to the eolony, 
Hid not iiiiondoci for tttiy other penraa or portoD* or (or lala ; also cskbiEi- 
lurniablngii bfilonging to iuoh porsoai. 

PImui of Paris. 

Powder, blftKEing iind meal. 

Sbip-chft[\illefy n o.o. 

Sblpi* roclcoLs, blua-liffhba, und (taaRnr.aiKanl*. 

SpirlUformthnufiksiuTiug perfumcdl spirit, tl^voufioKeKnence^, and culinary 
esMitoeB In manLif^ciuring w&rehousoH. This exemption to eeuia on itis 
litd&y of February. 189G. 

Stones, mill- grind- oil- and wbet-. 

Tobaoco for sboepwaeb or for insecbicids, Aft«r being rendered ua&t for 
hnman ootnumptior to the Rabinfa^tion of the GommiBtioner. 

TroAclu or inolmiitiit, mixoi! witb bonc-blAok la proportiont lo the uatis- 
fftotlon of iho ComDiitialoner. 

Tubular woven ooblou-oloth in the piece, for meat wr&ps. 

Type, writers. 

Wax. boltlinfi. 

Woolpackn and woolpoeketi. 

Yarn—oif . : oolr, flax. hemp. 

Arlioles a.ud mfttecials (at may from time to tima be specified by the Com> 
miseioa^r) which nre §uitod only (or, and uro to be uaed solely in. 
tbo fabrication of j;ondii within the colony. All docisions of the Gom- 
miaiioner in r«ferenuo lio artioles lo admitted frea bo bo piibli«bed from 
Un]« to lime In the OatetU. 

And all ariioloa not otberwise anumerated. 



TaBIX op ExCISS DOTtBS. 

sac. Tobaeoo. le. tha lb.* 

fiST. OigaiB, oigaretMi, andinuH, li. &i. tbo lb.* 

9S8. Bwr, 8d. tbe gallon. 



* 'Tb« TobaoQO Rxola* DutiM Act, ISM." •action 9, ana«t>:— 

"On anil ttlcr Ititi tlilrtV'nrnt Amj of OeoaculMr, one thotiiKiu] nkElit linnitrod kod 
illn«cy Kii. nocHoo Ihrt-u ol -Ttie Cimoum anil Kxoiau OuUok .\<rt. ItVl, vball Iw daeuod 
to bo rDtmalwl nii-l In 11u>i t>f tlic duun* llupuBod by tb*l Hoctioti llici v aliitll be lorleil, w>1- 
lected, and pnMl. on ukI a(i«r tliftt ilay, upou tobaovo utaiiulaoiiirvd ju ttio coluuy. at (lie 
time of niakinu llji! Hntry (or lioma coaaampllon ttisronf. tlm iiav«nk.l dutliM of Rtdna 
lallDWinit. that la to »ay — 



"On lahacoa ... 

" On aii[ar« aud eDUIT ... 
" Va oi^kraltaB— 

If roaDDfaotand by msdilnDTir 

If mad* b]r baad ... 



ODOBbillluii the pmi[iil. 

Oil* •bullae lum mxponco the pound. 

Two •biUiniiii and ■tspvae-it tbo potiii''1 
One abUtiim tliv 4^011 oii." 



7— Ttar-book 



w 



mw ZHALAHS OFTIOIAXi TlAIt-BCWK. 



699. Artielea In wlttali Rplrit is a, neoeiiiiary iuRrBJi«nt, mftnntftelare^ in ft Wktv- 
bouse appointed under aeotloti 2G of "Tlio CustouiH LawaOonBolldfttlMi 
Aot, l&8'i." nuinaly— 

Pharmncopwia tinctun», om«doo*, oxtnotn, and mudioiiiftl ■pujia 

oontaini&g more tliAn 50 pur nnnt. of proof apfrit, 9d. the lb. 
PbacmivaDpoilA tlD'OturoH, esaeoceii, octracta. and medicinal iptriM 

contftinlug lew than fiU pur oenL. of proof apirit, 3d. thti lb. 
OuUnary and flavoaiinj; vaaenoas, 12i. th« Liquid gallon, from lat F8l>* 

ruary. 1806. 
Pertamed spirit, 204. the liquid gallon, from Tit Febrnary, 1B9S. 
Toilet prep&rcbtio&s nhicta are subject to 16h. Lbo llquic) gallon oa im- 
portation. 13a, tlie 1i']uid gall^^n. 
Toilfll prap&ratiani; nhicb are subjeot to 25 par cent, duty OD import*- 
tioD. 6s. the liquid gallon. 



DutMt imposed by His Exceltencu the Oovernw lender Section 17 
0/ " T}ui Customs ami Exoisa Duties Act, 2888." 

S30. Olive itoooH, Brouad [icu Ntw Zeala^id Gaatttii. IQtb May, 1990). id. tbc lb, 
fiSI. BcewAra' earn.mel {ate Neu> ^faUtnd (laif.tu. 21*1 Augimt, IHW), 3d. tha lb. 
CS2. Liquid liQpA (Be« New Ztalarnl GnretU, -jut DHceuibor, IdQS), tia. tbe lb. 
&98. Tbe United AelipstOB Pntent Saliunander DaooratioDs (see Ifiu Zsaland 

GoMtltf, Ittb May. LS06), \6 per cent, ad valorem, 
634. Matches of any materinl other than vooi) or wax, a duty tan&tpanding to 

tbe duly payable on wooilt-n m&tobaa (aee .^kui Zealand Qaulte. '.ilTtb 

April, 1899). 
S9S. Fibre condiiii pipoa nnd fittingi tor same [mb Ntto Ztaland Gaa$u», 4tb 

Mav, 1B99), 5 per cmnt. Aii tmUmm. 
53B. Cjiraniel cereal foae Ntio Ztalanti Gattlle, Hth Miirclj, 10001, \A. tbe lb. 
637. Com po board {»e Kiin ZtaUiml GaxctU. I'ith r>ooGmbar, li)00)i ia. tiu 
100 £t. super. 



The " Opium Prohibition Act, 1901," makes it anlawful far any 
person to importi opium into the colony in any fonu Huitable for 
smoking. Permita may be isaued by tho CominiBeioner of Trade 
and Customs for the importation of the drug Id the following 

forCDB ; — opium, crude. 

Opium, in powdor. 
Opium, extract o(, aftlld- 

No permit shall be isBue'd to auy purHon of the Chinese race. 
Heavy p euaities are prescribed for breaoheu ol the above law, 



" The Timber Export Act, 1901," authorised tho coUoction, by 
Order in Council, of the following duties : — 



TjOge, round . . 

Loga, aquaced with axeoiaaw.. 

Haldoga 

PUtehet ol any partloular kind, 
& or pleoea of auob tixe aa tbe 
I Ooveroor by Order in Oounoil 
V from time to time determuiea 



3*. per 

100 aupetfioial 
leet. 

Si. per 

100 fluperfloial 
feet 



Or rach leaaer dnty m th« 
Governor by Ordai in 
Ooasoil determineB. 

Or nch leeBor duty as tbo 
Qovtmor by Order In 
CouDoil delerminoa. 




VSta PATABLB imOBK LAMD TBAKsrCIt *CT, 



99 



I 



An Order id Council dated tite 37tfa Much. 1903, directs that there 
shall be levied, collected, aad paid prenous to exporutiou from 
New Zetland, duties apon white pue and kabikatea timber as 
under : — 

Lo^, KKuid . . . . St. per 100 iQiwtflcIftt fMt. 

Loc*, ant la hftlt 

liogi, •qoftced wiib rxo or akw, 10 in. bj 10 bi. or [ 

in eqainJeat, or over > * * 

FtitehM, any width, Mid aot oXModing 10 in. thiek. Ss. p«r 100 npaifieikl hat. 

A further Order in Council, dated 10th April, 1903, direcLs that 
dutieB on kauri timber shall be charged as under : — 

Logft. roaad . . . . . . . . Sa. p«r 100 nipctrSoi&l Imi. 

Logs, cot m hAlf 

Loctt WiaMvd with ax* or mw. . . 



PRBS PAYABLE DNDEB LAND TBANSFEB ACT. 

Fsaa VAXkBut to Dteratcr Luid Regiszsass oxata " Tbm Luid Taunpsa 

Act. 1886." 
Foe Ute bringiilg land andar tlw prortdoM o( tbli Aot (over Ukd above 

the east of adTerlueoiMta)— S *. d. 

Wh«D tbs ihia ooiLriata of » Grown gnmt, and oona ol the land 

iooladcd th«»iDbaab«aadaaltwhb ..030 

Wbon the title is of anjr otber doaotipUoo and tho vataaaxMada 

£300 .. ..100 

Wb«D the title lb of any other deeciiptioQ and the «a1u« axo««da 

filOO and does not osoeed £900 . . 10 

When tho tftie i« of any oth»r dasoription and tha ralaa exeeedi 

£100 uid doM DOl exceed £!>(XI . . 10 

WbeD the title it of any other deeeriptlon and when the ralsa 

don not exceed £100 ..050 

Coattibutioo to tho Annraoee Pand apoo first bringing Laod ander 

tbi Aot,— 
Id Iba poand Bterliag .. .. ..0001 

Otharlaaa- 

Por every apptte«t<oo to bring land ander the Aot ..050 

For every oertifloata of titla on ttMiBter nbere the aoaiider*tioo 

doaa not «xo«»i £100 . . 10 

For aveiT oihar oartifloata ol title ..100 

Bagntenng oMmormndum of ttanifei, mortgage, Inoumbranee, or 

laaM .. 10 

Baftataring transfer or diaeh&rga of mortgage or ol ioeombranM, 

ox Iba traoafec or enrronder of a IcMo .,050 

Baglatadng proprietor of any etitata or interact darivad by eettla. 

ment or traaimiwioD . . . . 10 

For ev«ry power of actcmey dapotJud .. .. .. 10 

For every regirtration abstr&ot .. ..1 0^0 

For o&Doelliog lagiitration ab«tnMt . . ..05(0 

Fot fivaiy raToeatioa ordat . . . . . . 10 

NotiDg oavtat .. 10 

OanoelliDg or withdnwal of oa**at, and (or every notioa talatiDg 

to aay eave«t ..000 

For avacy aaareh .. -.090 

For every guicrftl aeueb .. .. .. ■• ..050 



100 



M8W KKAI^ND OFnCUL TBAR-QOOK. 



Olhor Itm—eontiHutd. £ a. d. 

Foe every tniip or plan depoeitod . . . . . . ..050 

Foe over^ inKtioment declivratory o( truaU, ftud for evecf will Ot 

oth»r tDBtrumenl depodtod .. .. .. .. . . 10 

For rog)8t«[li]g teogvery hy prococdinft to Uw ot equity or rc-cntrjr 

by lauee . , . . 10 

For reglsIeriuR vesting ot \ease in inortg&gee, oausequoat on lefoiftl 

of TiU8tG« in Baskruptoy to ococpl the siuna .. .. 10 

For nnlcring Dotioe of mnrringo or death .. .. 10 

For •DUrino notice of writ or atd«<r ol Suprame Cooit . . . . 10 

Tftking affidavit or ncalmury declaratiou , . ..Oft 

For the exbibiljon of any depoiiled itiiitniinaiit, or toi azhibltlsg 

deeda sarrendored by applicant proprietor .. ..0 

For certiHsd copy, not fixcsMding nve finlioB .. >. 

For overy folio ur part folio alter flnt five .. ,. ..0 

For every notice to produosdoedi or instiumcntn .. ..0 

For ev«ry outaUnding intemt noted on cortlfiaale of title . . 

Wbem any inatniment purports to deal with land included in mora 

Oian one grant or oorlifioata. Cor each registration mamorlft] 

ft[t«r th« flint ..OSO 



All foM sndar the Aot shall be due and pay&blo In odvanoe. 

WbVMMveral prcpcrtLL-a arc inoluded in one form ol applioation, tber* ■halt 
ke efaused in reapect of each property an applioation Ice. and a tAO for bringing 
Iha luid undct toe Act, Land iocltid»d wichiu ona outer boundary shall be 
«leemed on* property tor the pnrpnsa of this regulation. 

In all eases a Im ol one pound (£1) is h«r«by proacribod ax the Dhbrge to 
be made for advcrtinng noticA of appllcAbion : provided that, ^vbonovi-r it ia 
Bcoeoacy thai uuuiual publicity nball be RiTeu to any aupliuation, tbo Diclriot 
Land Kegmcrat mivy require paytnrnt of Kiinh adiitlonal mm at Khali, tn his 
jndgment, be auffictcnt t>} dtiltuy tlie coat of xueli ad Tertian me a la. 

Id all cSMii wliero app1ii:ation is made lo bring land uuder the Aot, and 
the ocTtiricatD ol title la directed to tanua and is iMued in the name of the anpti. 
cant, bhu fee* for bringing luoh land under the Act. with the exocption ol the 
"application fee," i:nay. at th« request ol tha applioant, remain aapaid nottl 
•Qob land is doitlt »ftli by liim ai leglatoiad proprietor. The IMotriot Land 
K4>gistrar thall retain any tmch certificAte of title until the fdos due upon the 
namo have been paid, and, until audi piLvmeat. aball not register any dealing 
with the land included in auch oariiHcale ol title. 

Printod foTuia supplied by the Rogifilrar for use uudor the Aot shall ba 
ohaigT'd for At the rate of one shilling each. Sollaitoni, land- broker*, and olb«n 
having forma printed for their own una, and at thitit own exMOiie, aball, on 
approval ot uuoh iotmn by the Registrar, be entitled to have tbe same aealed 
trea of obarge. 



H 




PAK'l II,— STATISTtCAI.. 



SECTION I.— MANUFACTORIES AND WORKS. 

The results of the compilation of the special returns relating to thtr 
various manufactories, works, &c., in the colony are compared with 
those shown for previous censuses in certain of the tabulated Btate- 
nients given with these remarks. 

it mast be observed, however, that whereas up till the time 
of last census the term "factory" was rather held to mean an 
establishment where manufacture was carried on wholesale, where 
machinery was employed, and where several hands worked together; 
in the returns for 1901 a " factory " has been interpreted to mean 
any concern where two or more persons work together at making 
articles for disposal, wholesale or retail, and without reference to 
machinery being used or not. Thus the return seeuis to be rather 
one showing industrial workers (and their production) where two or 
more are found together, than one of manufactories to supply the 
wholesale trader:', or making for export. But the attempt has been 
made to approximate the census results to those of the Labour 
Department, according to special direction. Tu make tlitj com- 
parison with previous census figures as true as possible, rhe results 
for all the dressmaking, tailoring, shirt-making, millinery, and other 
establishments which were not included until 1901, have been de- 
ducted from the totals at foot of the summary table. Any roughness 
in the comparison caused by small concerns employing two persons 
only, and doing a retail business in making or repairing, having been 
included at the last census, but not before, cannot be avoided. And 
indeed it will become clear to any one reading the following remarks 
that the large increase in money value of manufactures is obtained 
mostly on items in respect of which moving down to a limit of two 
persons engaged would not materially alter the comparison. 

The totals for the industries do not include mining and quarrying, 
which are dealt with separately. 

Deducting, as above mentioned, from the total value of manu- 
factures for the year 1900 the results for such industries as were 
8— Year-book. 



102 NEW ZEALAND OPPICIAI. YEAR-BOOK. 

not included in 1895, a most satisfactory increase is found on 
analysis of items, which has been mainly brought about by develop- 
ments on a large scale in the following iodustEieS: — 

Value of Output for Year 1895 -compabed with 1900. 

Inoreaae in 5 yeajs. 

--'■-'■■ * 

Meat freezing, preserving, Ac. ■ ' ... ... 2,182,616 

Butter and cheese factoii'is ■ ... ... 1,033,876 

Tanning, fellmobgering, and wool-scouring ... 650,855 

Foundries, boiler-making, range-making, and 

engineering • ... ... ... ... 621,356 

S^fWjiillft, 'with sash and door making ... 369,832 

._ '.Printing establishments (not Government) ... 315,161 

■'Clothing (with boot and shoe) factories ... 242,12ii 

Breweries and malt-houses ... ... 240,468 

Flaxmills ... ... ... ... 170,946 

Gasworks ... ... ... ... 91,542 

Chaff-cutting works ... ... ... 90,816 

Biscuit factories ... ... ... ... 79,010 

Bacon-curing establishments ... ... 73,542 

Coach-building and painting ... ... 67 , 108 

Woollen-mills ... ... ... ... 66 , 959 

Brick, tile, and pottery works ... ... 56,090 

Aerated- water factories ... ... ... 53,202 

Cycle factories ... ... ... 46,230 

Lime and cement works ... ... ,,, 29,261 

If to these be added the value of the grass-seed after dressing, 
£241,239 for the yeai- 1900, the greater part of the increase in the 
total for all raiinufactured articles (£7,591,789) is accounted for. 
There are a large number of smaller amounts of increase than those 
abovu stated, but the main lines of development are sufficiently in- 
dicated. 

The addition of the figures in the column for total value of manu- 
factures is not absolutely justified to the fullest extent of the amount 
shown (seventeen million pounds sterling) ; but in the present state 
of New Zealand industries it appears that the degree of repetition 
of value is not so great as to prevent the total given being of great 
help in judging of development. No doubt seventeen million pounds 
is over the fact, because, for instance, butter frozen for export is 
included in reiurns for meat freezing establishments, and also in 
the butter factory returns ; timber cut is valued under saw-milling, 
and sonic again in the furniture-making line. Also, leather is 
valued in the tanning returns, and some part of it again in the boot 
and saddlery items. But, of the material operated upon, a great 
deal is imported. 

The great primary industries of meat-freezing, butter and cheese 
raaknig, with some others, do not mainly provide materials for 
making other wares. 



HAHUFAOTOREES AND WORKS, 1896 AND 1901. 



103 



The iron which is used at the foundries and engineering works 
id imported to New Zaaland. 

But it must be admitted that, as the colony advaace» in primary 
induBtries, dedactioos will have to be mode wit-h grea,t discriiuinatbn 
from the figures in the column "Value of all ifianufactures," in 
respect of the ainouots given in the returns. 

As yet it is held that the addition is not so ouich affected hy 
repontions aa to render the result other than useful ; although, as 
before remarked, the total figures are admittedly in excess of the 
actual fact. The eompariaon with previous census reaulta is still 
considered valuable. 

The special tables which follow tHa aummaries will show dearly 
that quaiitit'itis have risen, a.& Well as thi> value of manufactures, SO 
that the davelopuiant is not merely a qnestioa oE market prices but 
oE actual output. 

Ill 1896 the actual increase in live yoara of the annual outpuii waS' 
found to be only £775,523. But it was noticed that there were 
special causes for this amount being so small ; and also that quanti- 
ties showed Lhen in many cases a certain degree of dev^lopoiaut ol 
industries, though values had not been maintained throughout. 

Tlie year 189-0 was admittedly a time when great reaulta could 
not be looked for, Severe financial troubles bad happened shortly 
before. The phormium and rope industries, iroii-workSng (imple- 
menca and other) were not thriving, and in other lines matters were 
not altotjeiher what could have been wished. The inquiry for the 
year 1900 hus been made after a period of groat prosperity. 

Mj-HUPACTOniE^ A!4D WOHKS, 180O ASH 1901, 



Ifumber of «9MbtiVhment;s' 

Hftnds emploied — 
Malen 
Ffemalta 

ToUls-l 



^AgF4 pai i — 

Tu Males 
. Femftlifs 



To Lai at 





.\|iri[. 

IKW- 
So. 


iQtiiJ 
3,1C3 


No. 
701 


" 


1,403 




I.&S5 
U,337 


■■ 


J, 776,076 
lSl,.5lfi 


2,8!l.'i,l!70 
203.28'2 


1,11^.203 
71,766 


-■ 


l,!)07,6n-.i 


3.00^1.501 


IJ1(0,'J69 











' 04alll>08 GovGrniueat ini^nn'kiy Wrirkiilli.opi imil Uorpiaicienb I'HntiDi; CHlra, 

I BiclndEuBaresiwnhiiic, tallDdng, BhitVlUaliillK, mUtini3ty,dc<:.:,ti)t wbk-ti tit>retiirai 



Id IHH 



104 HRW ZSALAND OFFICIAL VBAB-BCMh. 

Uakukactoriks ahd Wobks, 1896 aho 1901 — coiUinufif. 



Horae-power ... 


April. 

lase. 

H..p. 

28,096 


March. 

H..p. 
39,052 


lucrSMe. 
I896-I90I 

H.-p. 
10,956- 


Total approximate value of — 
Land 
Buildings 
Haohinery and plant .. 


£ 

1,063,989 
1,743.078 
2,988,955 

5,796,017 


£ 

1,713,254 
2,419,803 
3,82G,5T4 


£ 

649,265 
676,730 
837,619 


Totals 


7,959,631 


2,163,614 



Uoder the heading " Hands employed." the males increased 
from 22,986 in 1896 to 35,438, or at the rate of nearly 5417 per 
cent, in five years. The females employed increased at the rate of 
42-81 per cent. 

The wages paid iu the factoiies or large industrial works dealt 
with in the census returns were returned for 1895 at £1,907,592, 
and for 1900 £3,098,561. 

The average annual amount of wages paid to male hands was 
£77-2 in 1895 and £81-7 in 1900. For females, £29-8 iu 1895 
against £323 at the last census. The wages of both would seem to 
have been more than maintained. 

The increase for the year 1901 over J 896 in the horse-power 
stated in the returns was 10,956, against 6,400 for 1896. 

The approximate value of the land used for purposes of the 
factories and industries increased from £1,063,989 in 1896 to 
£1,713,1254 in 1901. The value of the lands used for mining is not 
included in the above figures, and the value of Grown lands has 
been omitted throughout. 

A very satisfactory development will be found in the value of 
the machinery and plant, from £2,988,955 in 1896 to £3,826,574 
in 1901, being at the rate of 2802 per cent, for the perioil. The 
value of the buildings also increased greatly. 



InduSTKIES in PkOVINCIAL DlSTltlCTS. 

All the various industries for which returns were received in 1901 
are given in the statement below, which thus enumerates completely 
the manufactories and works in operation in the colony, specifying 
tile provincial districts in which they are situated : — 



INDUBTHIBS [N PROVlNOIAIi DISTBIOTH. 



105 



Ikdcstbisb in Pbovincial Districts. 



Number of iDdntMea in ProTineial Dlstrleta. ' v 



MuiurkctorieB, Works, Ac. 



^' 3 



AnimaJ food — 

Heat (reeEingJ and praserving 
works 

Ham- and baoon-ooring ea- 
tablishmenta 

PJsb oQiing and preurruig 
works 

Batter and oheese faotories.. 

Babbit-packing 

Condensed milk faotor; 
Ve^t&ble food — 

OraiD-mills 

Biscuit-factoriea . . 

F rait - preserving and jam- 
making works 

Saga r- boiling and confec- 
tioner}' works 

Sagar-refining works 

Fruit- canning works 

Baking-powder factories 
Drinks, narcotics, and stimu 
lants — 

Breweries 

Maltbouaes 

Colonial -wine making 

Aerated -water factories 

Coffee and ppice works 

Tobacco man D factories 

Cigarette man n factories 

Sauce and pickle faotorles 

ViDSgar works 

Ic« factories 
Animal matters (not otherwise 
classed) — 

Bone-milia 

Soap and candle works 

Olue factory 

Saassge skin factory 

Boiliog-down works 

Mannre-works 

O leomarg « ri n e - wo r ks 

Fat-refining works . . 
Working in wood — 

Cooperages 

Baw-mills, sash and door fac- 
tories 

Barrow and ladder factory . . 

Wood ware and tamery fac- 
tories 



27. 102 e 



4 
4 
22 
4 
2 
1 
9 
3 
2 



1 
10 



U 



s ' « 



a, 2. Sj i 
4; 2 3I .. 



10 
3 
1 

24 
4 



10 
4. 
2 



4^24 

IM 23 26 66 



4; 


IS 


■ 
10 


12 


.. 


13 


17 


42 
7 



23 27 

2 7 



40 2!! IH 



1 1 



51 

O"- 

H 



34 
39 

28 

•247 
7 

1 

78 
20 
13 

26 

1 

1 

11 



4 16. 15; 74 



10 8 

2' 

27, 17 

3 5 



33 

14 

125 

18 

2 

3 

23 

4 

2 



4 24 

1 

1 10 

.■> 14 

1 5 

1 

1 

4 23 
7U 334 



1 



106 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAB-BOOK. 
Industbirs IK Peovikcial DisTfiiCTS— cont^niwd. 



JIoatitaclorlpH, Works, 3tc. 



KuaiberoMndaatrleilnPravlnDUJ DiblricU. j a 



I 



s * 



VegAbbble produce for ioiiei — 

Cb&B^cutCicg GBGabURhnietits 
Grews Besd-dresBing eB(abliah- 
mati tB 
Papei-maDuInoture — 

F&per bag and box faotorles . . 
Gu-works . . 
!El6(iLtic-ltgtiiii3j> works 
ProoefiBea TelatingtoBtone, clay, 
glass, &o. — 

Lime and flement works 

Btick, tilo, »tid f cttAr; works 

TabM'CQ-pipe fftotor^ 

Monamantal masonry 

GlasBworks 

Olaes-bevellJiig works 

Electro- plating works 

Fum joe-works 
Metals, other than gold and 
silver — 

Tiunare-factories . . 

IroQ and broas foandries, 
boiUr-mftking, maohiniste, 
&o. 

Heel- and toe-plate factories 

Engineering- mo rki . . 

Rauge-makiDg vorke 

Spouting and ridging factories 

L«H.3-headed-naiJ woike 

Iron-pipe and fuming works. . 
Books and publ i cation b — 

Printing offices 
Muswal inatrumentB — 

Mii^ic^al- instrument factories 
OrnaiTienltj, miDonkft products, 
nndstijal] warea — 

Pifture-irarae makera 

Bosket and perambulator fac- 
tories 

Cork-outting 

Lapidaries 
Equipment for sports and 
games — 

Bl'liard-table factories 
DeeJgDB, medals, type, and dien — 

Bubber-stamp making 
Arms and explosives — 

Ammunition factory 



is: 



.i 



12 
13 



2 

lo; 

51 
6' 



35 12 



40 



12 



25( 

9 

I 



20 






1 1 1- 



1| 5& 

ill 2& 



2| » 

1 81 7 

4) 5i SO 

1 i. & 



5 16 

251 108- 

1, 1 

7 2T 

S 

.. I s 

3 

1. 



Ill 60 
14: 65- 



a 37 

3 9 

9 35 

1 

2 2 



85; 49 186 
..'23 



3 & 

5 21 

. I 1 

3 3 



1N0U8TH1ES IN PltOVINCtAIi DISTHICTS. 107 

Inddbtrirs IK Pbovikciai. Districts —continued. 



HiinufMboriH*. Works, &• . 



Number ot Ludustrles In L'tuvlDcif.1 lHhiHcta. 



1 



K&ohines, tooli, and imple- 
menta — 

AgrioulttinJ - implement (ac- 
tor les 

Braah &nd broom factortea . . 

Cmlery factor; 

Bellowa factory 
CArriagee And vehloles — 

Coach building and painting 
works 

Cyole faotoriaa 
Haroesa, aaddler;, and leather- 
ware — 

Saddlery and haraeaa faotorlea 

Whip-thong (ao^riea 

Portmanteau factories 

Tanning, fellmongeriag, and 
wool - Ecouring eatabliah- 
ments 
Sfaipa, boata, and their eqoip- 
ment — 

Ship- and boat-bailding yarda 

Oraving-dockg and patent alipa 

Blook and pamp factory 

Sail and oilskin faotoriaa 
Fomiture — 

Furniture and cabinatmaking 

Venetian -blind worka 

Hattresa factorlea . . 

Wool, tug, and mat making. . 
Gbemicols and by-products — 

Perfumery manutactories 

Varoiah manufaotoiiea 

Ink manufactories . . 

Starob manufactories 

Chemical works 

HEcmatite-paint factories .. ' 

Sheep-dip factories. - 

Hatch facLoried . . . . | 

Herbal-remedieH factocies .. i 

Blacking factories . . 

CoocaDut-oil mill .. ..I 

Textile fabrics — 

Woollen-mills 

Flock-milis 

Cleaning and dyeing works . . | 
Dress— ' 

Tailoring establishments 

Dressmaking and milllDery | 
eatablishmentB 



33 11 









14 



.^ 




^ 


s 

"o 


□ 

s 


f 








s 




U 


d 


•L 


4 


C 


s 


IS 



19 



15 



44 

10 



39, 

i 

14 



3C 
5 
3 



12 



12; 



I' 
1 

a 

78 



10, 
9! 



10{ 

3 

2& 



12 



SO 
21 



24 W 

I 

.. ' S 

■M. as 



13 
I 

1 

100 
71 



115 

1111 



3a 

7 

1 

30 



21 1 .;i 144 
y 3j 18 

•2 i] 12 



•2^ -JH 175 



11) 

5 

11 



lOB NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAK-HOOK. 

iMDUH'rniKs IN Pbovinciat. Districts. -conttiiiKiJ. 



MtmiilHcloriHB. Works, Ac. 



Niiiuber at lD<lui'trice In 1 


'rovlDnial 


DixtrlPts. 


^ 


A 




. 1 


' 1 ' 


,^ V 




jL ! 


« - » 


1:1 

^ , a 


-d 


^1 


, -a , ■ 

» ^ S 


B 

c 1 ^ 


^ 1 . 

■ o 

1 1 



DresB — continued. 

Shirt- making eBtablishmetits 

Ooreet and h-Ar, xnanufoctoiiea 

GlotbiDg laotorieo .. 

Waterproof factoriea 

Boot and shoe faoiorics 

Hat and oap faotorieB 

Eoaierj factories 
Fibrous maieriale — 

Rope and twine works 

Bag and eauk factories 

Fiax-raills 
Returns not included in above 



Total>(, CenauB, 1901 .. 
Deduct tailoring, dreH" making. 
shirt. m^king.and monumental 
maBonx' establishraentR, not 
inolude.i in aooounta taken 
for 1896 and 1891 

Totala. Consua, 1901 
(leas deductions 
hiliown above) 
Totals. CensuB, 1896 . . 



4. 

;v 

7 
] 
811 
5' 
II 



3i 

24: 

3 



23 
40 



-2h\ 
4 



H 



7."i2', 2G7 100, 707 
85 21 If. 155' 



HI iU8 

,V 'J 3 



ToialM, Cinsus, IBUl 



(Hi" -ilfi 1-14' 552' m 



578 laa. U7I 390' 5^ 
577' 08 fid 333' 77 



176 



10-1 



143 



4 

1 

a7 

•1 

s 



.15 

T 



y. "S 






■in 

f, 

21 

G 

ISfi 

18 

17 



17 

1 

la 101 

3 74 



Si 618| KOulsGBO 
.0' 101 lO-il S17 



CiSi 547 



47 448 



70713163 



fil6l-24Sy 



iil! 880 S4l!2254 



The provincial districts, arranged accordins; to the number of 

industries i)eloiiging to each, specified in the last census returns, 
stand as iiiider: — 



Nuniliei' of IniluwtrifM, excliidiiifi 



Omgo 

Auckland 

Wellington 

CaDti;rbuiy 

'I'aninaki 

Ni;lsi)o 

HiLwWe's Bay 

West land 

M^irlboi'ough 



lOiil. 

707 
liG7 
o52 
.:47 
24 1> 
170 
144 
Ort 



riio 

.■)7;i 
wm 

448 

128 

154 

147 

47 

"lO 



IM91. 

Ml 
o77 

:ym 

380 

68 

142 

8:1 
51 
11 



1>I;TA1LK UK THK Pkincii'.al InUL'STKIKS. 
The priticipal industries returned at the census of 1901, and 
particuliLiri relatinj; thereto, are fjiveu in detail in the followiuf^ table. 
These industries are arranged in classes according lo tlieir nature : — 



UKTAILS .OF THK i'ltlNUIPAL INDU8TK1IS8. 



109 



■< 

i 



B 

o 






. 



.11' It! 
wa^ "11 ■"'3 l-.inid 



s s 



'0D6E ^ni'np DOtlD 






>0 ^ 31 

V- a; i- 

■p 1^ r^ 



;o c» u; ■« 
O S <:• u3 



■>n CJ (N 
00 cc ci 
■x n o 



!M t- OD 



T-« Ifl 



5 






1 


-N W ->■ 
1 IC O 
lO 35 -!• 




03 

93 


^7i 


in 


L- 




U- L— -N 
■41 —1 -fl- 


■* 


■ ■ St 



X 



1— 


1 




C^ 






t- 




■0 



■[")o.l, 



•T n ■ 



-t> ^ ■.■; 






C 15 CC 
-H -1. o 
r-J '.O L- 



1" — ■K 



■9.i[«H 



s 



— 3 

o_2' I 'Hoi-ttiia.^f 









■re i^ -^ 

■U IN OT 


t- 


o 


13 ■ 


D •!■ lO 




1 


■N M 

O X 


O I- t- 

— -« ffl 
ire £ ^ 


Ti 


Ti 


W 


-< 35 11 

~ 05 



E " I 



:■! S 



a? ^ OT — 



■»n|»n ! U i: ;:, ;s 



i -tar 'i-<ii|'M] 

I JO jei[itiuv iuio,L 



I ■? 



S S" 

9 

■V o 

1 -2 2 ■* S 

I-.5S3 

^- ts- 
■ A « a B 

Is "5' 



•S. S 



K S 



B » O 



3* 

&4 n 



E'= I 
■3 S 13 -t- 



o Ei: 



■^ < o u S 



g -o » K-s o . 

C _^ P *^ ^ 

h M en En (0 "c 

a 



en I 2"* 



■23 
o g 






II 



l^ j"*' 






1 








s 




<« 


la 










p 




A 


K 

s 




Ei; 



ss 



= 4 d 

lis 

aj3 < 



no 



MRW ZK&LAHD OlfFIOlAL YBAK-BOOK. 



■< 
C 

u 

n 
a. 

EC 
H 

o 






■smUd 



•'(Ml 



■ !ii!j»WlElHi'>eni'»A 



'(JB«ntl 



■WOX 



O >H ■-< lO t- ■* 



srtmoo 



=« 



«3 CO «J C- ■ ■ t3 ■ 

I- rH O ^ 55 



F-" Q 1^ CD ^ -^ 

t- ro ^^ G^ u5 M 

CO CC (U to CI 00 



01 o -«o o> 

U5 to CD ■W t- 



r-< 01 in >-" 

■H ^ rt o> 
^ O 00 o 

™ 'N CC o^ Ol 
t- SO 33 



«g -gss 



■« CT "5 
I CO ooto CO 






m — o ci 
Si ■* o ■-• 



??5 



03 09 0) O fN 
VOi CO Oi rti 



m oo 

Sao 
CO 



■B9HH 



1V10J. 






'flSl'ianpui 
JO laqiuns r^ioj. 



« tT O O (E 

C5 CO « to 111 



■^ p — CI 00 Ci 

A S I- 1ft TJ t- 

Oi CO 1-- C5 to tH 

^ ■•rc^-^ -I"' • ■ ■* " ■ 

iswwaoQoscomw 
« ^ --1 

o « o o 1— -• o 



•a Q 
■« o 

oi" 


8,689 
5,910 
1,872 




IB (N 
SO tO 

-3 




O 00 -- O 0) 

S: to OT 


4* 


S2 



2 " 

9 

-S 



Is 

* 3 



^■s 



<a 
-•- s 

nn ■-* _ 

iS'SS 



















nil" 



'■=-3-S2^5 






a 



*.5 = 



o S-2 ^ o ■« 






H * § a 
1 "= * s ™ s 

Ob outn 



DETAILS OF THE PRINCIPAL IKDUSTRIBB. 



Ill 



Ci 0> to CO t- <-! 

OS lii is « to 3V 

. _H -. ■*" CD -*' ■ t-" 

r^ t- O m —I .-1 



2 t 



•-■ to m 



-• !N 05 



1-- 04 



--" 00 

■5-"' 

is .-1 



It 

it 

!i 



to 01 

-* to 



ftxn 

01 



►5 



S 



05 !D 



2S 



0? a6 



OS 05 <N 

■ -^' o'to' 



93 
— H 

=■.1 







113 



NBW ZKAEiAKU OFFIOIAL YBAB-BOOK. 



■»<™ui 

fnat 'filial 1(3 «K. 
■BUiKPirnH'vtiii-f w 






1-- OS t- 



lot- i^- 

•o so 

3* StO 



&3 



OOSI itniJiipnodn 1 



CO r- m 
3 -n «( 

le n o 






a 

h 
O 

s 

< 
H 



'•SJUH} p*i(oiiltiia 
aaMoj JO lunaniv 



■1«1U,L 



J 'BJ[truii9,4 1 



2S 



l"1"X 



'Hd|1lll«.-I 



■f»l'IV 






lO t- ■* 

mOH CO 

t-'OO 

■?! -I C-l 



-f t- ■»> 

fr- oa OB 

as oi o 



c* m !-■ 

f 7^ '-3 

-r —I -?) 



3 
■S 

3 
s ■ 






S3 



•M OO COOD 



=11- S5 00 



1^ 



4 Ml ■■ 



^ 1 
4J k- 



-S .4 



S 1 -C 2 



eo 



ii 



" = _ - 

00= 5 o 



5-0 

S P * 



e> 41 O 

0.°-. 

T3 OCC, 






S 

£ (O 5 



« 2 



■■o 

* a 



a- 






£ as 

- V o 

I -• a! 13 

: a 



1 ^-c 



a S S-" 



.i a- 

OhCQ 



& 

o Ss a s * s •■« 
H a 



i>i:i' \ij,s (IF iin. i'i,iM MMi. iMiis'i'uir 



I i:; 



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w^ 


C- 


t- 


s 


eo 


s 


3 














(0 


S 


-4 




CJ 




M 


»> 


?> 


-* 


s 




9) 


00 




114 



MBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAR-BOOE. 



. 'tfHnipttna 'ill"! )■" 
o"I«'a 'oi»cni«uiiLr]v 



.-LftJl 
, Ji<*.\ net) JO] t'lTViI 



u 

E 
E- 

O 






iinfii fInuBpBOtIn 



'(jam Oil 

■SHJOH) pllioilllllS 

j:ouo,i fo iLiQLiinv 



IWO.J. 



s 



CH 



03 03 
t~ OS 



;3 



CO 9 oo a> t~ 



s 






■* 00 

OS o 






EO U SI 

gS i- 
V CD 



CO 

s 



§5 S 



s 






s 



1-1 CI « 

ai Ji ■« 

O ■* rt 



S^ 



— •- M 

SI- ■IS 



uS ll5 GO 

8 



•B3l»mJ;I 



s — 



1 tT 

*= s 






'H.llVJf I 



FT'J. 



•Bn,Tiin,\4 



■*'>l«1\ 



n.ii iisti|irit 
loa.iniiiii_v imoj. 



53" CO W 






■* CT tc> 10 to -- m 

10 1.5 —• 0> CO — ■ 
T o CC CO -1 OS 



-*ciL-r3srt<NC-«K'ci5o mo— -tx —' la c» 



cc r< — o o -H 



•B-^O? ^O CO -» -- 

: g =^ ^S g «^ S 



—I'rcrscoaOTiiwiNcCMGfl 



t: T " " 2 

-" = = CJ 3 O 



■3 = 5^1 
u 3 n C u E 






33^ iS 



c ° " ^ ^ 5 

'5 

c _ 

2 ^^3 



13 



CJ — 

:^9. 






^5- 3 






S = ;j ¥ 



= j« a 

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o O u 5 



Z -1 

0,. " *j -- 

ID :: S C 



■a 



s 



5,5 



o "; la .s 






a^ 



CA 



DETAILS OF THE PBINCIPAL INDUSTRIES. 



115 



t- O W Ci >5 ■ -qi 03 

t- ..J -- iS 'O ■» 



ti) ij> ■-■ u; 
e- 115 Tti ai 

00 OJ 10 "-< 
iH c« ei m 



*0 10 CO ^ 

CO CJ to m 
e« 03 -w o 






o « 



?S -." 



s .s . 



C5 OT 01 O 
•M ■* CC S 



35 -^ -,0 



■U (3 CD 53 
(N ^ ■W O 
<D IN t- l- 



r- p- .-1 CO 

o ^ ■* "M 

D C* O OT 

•-< '15 ^ fH 






I tp t- -« « O TO 

1 Ci — I =Ci CI C) 
1 CO — ot ■-■ o 







„ 


[- 


fl 


CJ 











L-5 


t- 





t- 


l~ 






•-< 


.— f 



s- ■5.. 

Co -« 

ill H 



I - o 
" a 

- ^ 



is 






op" 

Is 



■2 a §2 



.2 a « 



= ■= ?! S i 



■3 tf-s " a 



a O 



Q 






fl a 



-B.S 



to 



U fl 
-3 — .■;; 



(Zl 
tH 

w 

•a 

B 



o 



■— ffl CI 

3 «°° 

..a 3 *i 



O " 

E-> 



ED 



3-a 



n 



3o 









.= S'' 



a 3 



03 >J 
1 = 



= — 



■- o 



S2 



d U J 



"3 oS 



50. 

. a a 



^ n - — 



oS ^ 



116 NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAK-BOOK. 

The succeeding statement shows the most imporEaut iDdostries 
in operation in 1901, ranged in order of' the values ot their output 
for 1900, and compared with the results obtained for tiie years 1895, 
1890, and 1885 :— 



Total Valne of *U Muiafactarei or Produce. 
iDcIiiaiag Bepain. 



Meat-freezing aad preserving and 
boiling down works . . 

TanniDR, fellmongering, aud noot- 
scouriiig 

Baiter and cheese factories 

Sawmillfi, laBh and door factories 

Iron and brass fouDdrien, bailer- 
makmg, roaohinista, &c. (not 
inctudiDg Government Kail- 
way Workshopfi) 

Clotbing and boot and- shoe fac- 
tories 

Printing egtablishmenta (not in- 
cluding Government Printing 
Office) 

Grain milla .. 

Breweries and malthouses 

Woollen mills 

Gasworks 

Graea - seed dresNng establish- 
ments 

Furniture and cabinetmaking .. 

Coach - building and painling 
works 

Flax-mills 

Bi-'cuiE factories 

Gbaff-cuttiog works 

Bacon-ciiring est ablixliments . . 

S^ap aud candle works 

Aerated-water factories 

Saddlery and harness factories . . 

Agricultural implement factories 

Brick, tile, and pottery works .. 

Spouting and ridging works 

Tinware factories 

Sugar-boiling and coufectionet; 
works 

Kope and twine works 

Cycle tactorie,* 

Chemical works 

Friiit- preserving and jam-making 
works 

Ship and boat-b'jilding works . . 

C-ofiee and fpice works 

Limo and Crmi'nt nrrks 

Sail, tent, and oiiskin factories.. 

Bone - miiU acd other manure 
wi^iks 

WoodKATe and turnery facLories 

Cofiperages 

Hcsi^ry fa^toiief 

Sft'jce acd pickle works 

Sa,:ssc£ sk:c factories.. 



lOOO. 


iwa. 


ItSu. 


ma. 


£ 


£ 


£ 


£ 


3,834,891 


1,652,275 


1.464.659 


543. 8T» 


l,8n8,107 


1,237,252 


1,026,349 


634.913 


1.5-35,1.50 


501,274 


150,957 


43.094 


1,268.(189 


898.807 


832.959 


1,177,713 


924.171 


302,815 


40:^.636 


36S,919 


85t<,280 


61(>,158 


570.315 


514.506 


7u4,2ao 


389.124 


354.559 


273.886 


632. S84 


874.0-56 


991,812 


754,830 


«oit.2oa 


418.830 


330,849 


431,197 


•dr>[K3vi 


302.423 


279,175 


194.311 


■2JO,5f>7 


199.025 


178,947 


lii4,653 


24I.2:i9 








■ill. 0-^1 


a5,327 


131,314 


ici,375 


-•11!, 077 


148.969 


139,660 


128,346 


■J((a,492 


32,546 


234.266 


-20,059 


197. ■-'89 


118.979 


127,147 


47.784 


169,313 


76,497 


63.236 


54,440 


159.564 


rt6.0:i2 


83,435 


58,799 


i-'ift.tug 


152. -298 


155.714 


130,745 


151.811 


9t*,609 


91.091 


^.098 


147, (we 


r.3.735 


37.347 




138,fJ01 


10-2,1)54 


114.472 


111.823 


122,230 


06.140 


.W.830 


91,797 


112,691 


•i3.76i! 


33.140 


15.478 


93,587 


63.723 


14.297 


S.500 


tW,590 


33.235 


17.248 


17.130 


t>7,bG3 


.52.400 


76,711 


55.413 


6.:>.047 


18,817 


5.655 


1.301 


64.834 


75.320 


41. .W3 


34.2S3 


5S.092 


36.108 


27.255 


32,292 


45.S11 


ii.233 


35,&47 


.56,132 


45,623 


74,3;W 


&4.024 


9S,234 


45,142 


15, SSI 


39.416 


16.928 


44.S54 


3(\166 


31 .<.■s;^ 


25.574 


40, -2 J* 


12.246 


i.t;-i3 


&.337 


37,552 


lS,i76 


9.100 




37.531 


19.233 


11.540 


11.862 


31.265 


9,357 


5,650 


6.200 


31,25S 


13,417 


6.407 


:<.!** 


3t1,674 


13.472 


10,583 


.. 



KUMBKB OF HANDS: PKIKCIPAL INDU&TRIKS. 



117 



Totel T«la« of mU HunhrtiuM or Pradoc*. 
tftrlnrting Bftfoiri 



Hu ajid otp beu>rie« . . 
FiBb-«iirinK Mid pnsarriiig worlu 
Eleetnc-ligbting worlu 
Bnia^ ftnd broom factories 
Herbftl- remedies f»aioriM 
BftkiDg- pander fkoloms 
Baikct aod p«nunbalfttor fac- 

toiies 
UftUreaa fsctories 
Paper -bag aad cardboard box 

factoriM 
Waterproof factorioa . . 
Vanetian blind faetoriee 
Colon iai-wioe aorks .. 
Othat induatriea in mpect of 

wbicb tbo valae of the mana- 

faotures was leas ttaan £8,000, 

and fiondrj 



taaa. 


iag& 


iwa. 


UK. 


t 


< 


t 


t 


35Mi 


10,902 


31,638 


13,6i» 


25.173 


10,292 


19.537 


13,183 


23,234 








21.131 


33, »» 


13,340 


7.78t> 


18,396 




, ^ 




18,163 


10,153 


5.637 


4.190 


I7,»l:i 


11,930 


7.381 


4.375 


16,296 


•- 


■- 


•- 


11.217 


7.696 


4,497 




13,378 


33,354 




, , 


13,233 


9,878 


4.7T6 


8,470 


10.330 


8,963 


3,456 


3,636 



805,606 473,037 380,156 335.148 



Kumbor n( HandK. 
1901. leec 1801. 


6,812 


4,059 


3,96S 


5,308 


4,407 


3,233 



3,590 1,642 1,787 

3,134 3,351 2,569 
2,383 3,037 1,568 



The order of the principal iDciufiiries, ranged according to the 
namber of hands employed, is as follows : — 



Sawmills, sasb and door laotories 

Olotbing and boot and shoe faotories 

Iron and braes foundries, boiler- making, moebinists 
*o. .. 

Printing establishments (exoloding Government Print- 
ing Office) 

Heat freezing, preserving, and boiliog-down works 

Tanning, fetlmongering, and wool-soouring establish 
ments . . 

Flax-mills 

Woollen mills 

Fonilture and cabinet-making faotonea 

Batter ana cheeae (aotories 

Ooach- building and painting works 

Brick, tile, and pottery works 

Breweries and maltbouses 

Biscait factories . . 

Saddlery and harness faotories 

Agricoltural implement factories 

Oasworka 

Grain-mills 

Aerated-water faotories 

Cycle factories 

Tinware factories . . 

Sogar-builing and confeotionery worka 

Hoeiery factories . . 

Ctaatl-culting works 

Spouting and ridging works 
9— Year-book 



1,963 

1,698 

1,693 

1,310 

1,138 

1,185 

838 

827 

667 

653 

586 

573 

515 

452 

395 

387 

305 

282 

266 

261 



1,629 
647 

1,416 
496 
376 
807 
455 
560 
425 
26G 
581 
295 
419 
347 
135 
289 
R9 
133 
212 
90 



1,196 

3,304 

1,174 

585 

269 

678 

494 

563 

331 

184 

528 

249 

499 

261 

31 

93 

53 

51 

205 

100 



118 



NEW '/KALAND OPFICIAI!. YEAR-BOOK. 



Number of RAude. 

IS 

Sugar TpRning works 

Soap aod candle worka 

Sa:l, tent, and oiUkiii f&ctoriee 

Ship- and boBt-buildiog yards 

Baoon-curing eatabliahmenti 

Kope and twine works 

Lime and cement works .. 

Uatcb facloriea 

Fruit-preserviDg and jam-making works 

Woudware and turner; factorica 

Cooperages 

Fisti-ouring and -preserving works . . 

Brush and broom factories. . 

Sauce and plcklo works 

Basket and perambulator factotiea . . 

Hat and cap factories 

Waterproof factories 

AaimunJtion factories 

Siunage skin factories 

I'&per mills 

Ciemical works . . 

Paper-bag and cardboard-box factories 

CoSee aud spice works 

Babbit preserving and packing works 

Orass-aeed dressine establisljments 

Colonial-wine works 

MattresB (actorlea 

Electric- lighting works 

Venetian- blind factories 

Cleaning and dyeing works 

BoQC-milla and other manure works 

Good on Bed -mi Ik factory 

Oraving docks and patent slips 

Starch and soda works 

Bakii g-powdpr factories 

Pumice works 

Coraet and belt manufactories 

K'irhalremedios factories .. 

Vinegar works 

Portmanteau faotoriea 

Picture-frame mak* rs 

Tobacco manufactories 

Sheep-dip factories 

IndiiBtriea employing under '20 hands 

Meat Freezing and Preservinu, with Boiling-down. 

The establishments iucreaaed from 43 in 1896 to 48 in 1901, and 

the hands employed from 2,037 to 2,282. The value of output for 

1900 is returned as more than double that for 1895, the figures being 

i3,834,8yi against £1,652,275, a rise ot £2,182,616. From 1890 to 



1901, 


1)06. 


IBSI. 


2o6 


160 


110 


232 


190 


209 


231 


143 


124 


211 


106 


145 


196 


128 


84 


192 


150 


232 


184 


79 


98 


183 


121 


. . 


167 


198 


117 


156 


81 


51 


138 


76 


53 


137 


76 


140 


128 


92 


81 


128 


68 


41 


118 


76 


63 


117 


72 


112 


114 


93 




105 


90 


80 


98 


56 


73 


98 


84 


is 


95 


lU 


55 


81 


86 


35 


78 


119 


81 


62 


32 




60 




, , 


59 


53 


34 


5.1 


, , 


, , 


52 






51 


45 


29 


51 


58 


*6 


47 


46 


35 


33 




, , 


32 


29 


64 


32 


27 


13 


29 


, , 


, , 


28 


20 




25 






23 


. , 


. , 


23 




, , 


22 


, , 


, , 


22 






20 


. . 


, , 


7 


29 




532 


268 


36 



MBAT FREEZING AND PBESBHVINO. 



119 



1895 the increase was only £187,616. Of the total value for 1900 
(£3,834,891), sheep and lambs frozen were valued at £2,103,166, and 
legs of mutton at £85,361. The beef frozen, preserved meats, 
tallow, bonedusc, &c., also show largely increased business in the 
quinquennium, 1895-1900; frozen butler and rabbits tnost markedly 

SO- 

The table given below shows quantities as well as values in the 
comparisons, whicli speak for themselves as to the great development 
that has been proceeding of late. 



Ceniiua YuKr. 



!^' 



Hands 
orii- 

1.1 -yeil. 



SI. P. 



WBguH )iaiil 



M. 



F. 



MMbiiie- 
powei- 
used. 



■ i 
12 



Oatpnt, 1000 and 180S. 

Bhoep ftnd Lftiobs 
ttotea. 



i 5 . 

■ if S 



■/: 



g Z, ! CArcaHBi. Value. 



1901 
189S 

Incretue . . 



48 2. 2.^3 j'j'2<)4.2;6 
431,985 52ilS0,4Tl 



248' 



23,7451,116 



£ 

i.4id 

304 



No. £ 

7.450.''3,318,123,*2.U)3.166 
7, 492 '2. 362,535;'!. 213, 559 



42 



985,5681 889,607 



Oatput tor tbe Years 1900 nod 1H96— conNnunl. 



Omna . Beef ttnioa and 
Yeaj*. I ch.lled. 

' Quautity. Value. 



froEBD Rabbits. 



Quantity. Value. 



PreselTed Ueats. 



Tallow. 



Quantity. Value. , Quan. i Value. 



11N31 

189G 



InoT. 



Lb. I £ ■ No. £ Lb. 

34, 28.5, .323381, 210 6, 040, 047'l44, 616 7,867, 440 
1,954,495! 21,425; | .. 4,999,640 



32, 930, '^33,359,7a5;6. 040, 047 144.616 2,867,800 

II i I 



£ 

171.151 

74,369 



96,782 



Tons. £ 

14,707 298,621 
10,958172,310 

3,809126,611 



CensuB Tear. 



Output tor tbe Years 1900 and i895~cantinued. 
ItoneduKt. Oilier Manures. 



Neatsfoot Hud 
TTOlter oil. 



Quan. 



Bones. HnrnB, 
Hoots. &v. 



1901 
1890 



Tonn. 

G,514 
3.246 



Iiiorease.. 3,2GC 



Value. 


Quan. 

Tonn. 
5,721 
2.206 


Value. 

£ 
25,824 

9.424 


1 
Quan. Valup. 

Galls, i £ 
30.174 3,450 
15.067 2,097 


Quan. 

Tons. 
530 
113 


Value. 


£ 

31,037 
11,865 


£ 
3.f)85 
188 


19.172 


3,515 


16.400 


15.107 1,353 


417 


2,897 



■ AUo 2;,9!H cut. of I^RN ot mutton frozati in IHSS, valued at CIG.-IT.'i, and G4,-Jli:< cwt. of 
frozen legs of mutton in ltx<0, valui^d at £t<5,361. 



JiiO 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YKAB-BOOK. 



Output. 1900 and 18i»~con Nit tint. 



1000 and 



V&lue. 



oCber (roEeii): . 



ApproxlniBte Value- of 

i 



Value. 



IBBS. 



I'JUl 



82,345 I 
64,889 



£ 

503,430 

65,776 



locreMc.. 17,456' 437,654 



£ i £ 
3,884,891 87,776 
1,652,275, 67,604 



2.182.616 20,272 



£ 
428,075 
326,224 



101,851 



£ 
404.707 
317,323 

87,S84 



Bacon-curinq Establishments. 

These were 39 in number, employing 196 hands, against 37 with 
123 hands in 1895. The output increased in value from £86,022 for 
189ii to £159,564 in 1900, the business done in hams having pro- 
gressed very greatly. 



C«n«ua Yeftr. 


Number 

of 
Works. 


Handi eu. ployed., Wages paid. 


Motive Power. i 

1 Rnrk>- 


M. . 1 H. 


F. 


j i power. 
Steam. Water.' Gas. 1 

1 1 


1901 . . 

WJO . - 


39 
37 


£ 

185 11 113,891 
118 5 1 7.314 


1 

496 17 1 2 

80 , 7 1 1 


H.-p. 
2 250 

..1 49 

1 


Increase. . 


2 


67 G 1 6.577 

1 

1 I 


416 


10 ] 1 


2 ! 901 

1 



'^"* , M.ieri.1 



Output for Year 1900. , 

! Total 

nthnr I Value of 

]-,rd. P?" I Output. 
ductH. ' 



BacoD. Ha III i. 



£ C*t. C*t. I C*ll. 

i'^ji.. ]].',, /;.'>; :m,jo:j 21.836 2,082 
yfj*,.. l,r>.b(j^ :i:i,20(j 800| 20 



Approximate Value of * i 



Land. 



; BuUd- 
\ inga. 



Machin- 
ery and 
nant. 



4,182 159,664 19, 37725, 960| 16,655 
86,022: 6,82311,090 4,605- 



Jrjcr. J'J.7*1'J 



H4:i, 21,0361 2, 062j 4,182 73,542 12,&64;i4,870i 12,250 



t Value of land. 



■ Valufc 'jt iMti'l ku<J i/uildJasHKiven with butter-Inctory In one oaae. 
linlJoiuitE, HI"; iflsiii not mattm in one cane. 

Fish Cubing asd Pheserving. 
Th«r<; With a considerable decrease shown in the quantity of fish 
cure<l in 1900 as compared with 1895, but the value of the lesser 
outptii was set down as £4,778 inori" than in the earlier year. 
Tli<; quantity cured in 1900 was 1.082,820 lb., against l,719,512ib. 
ill 1895. The output of tinned fish increased from 113,304 lb. to- 
ii88,84y lb., and the total value of all pro<lucts of the 28 establiah- 
mi'iJte losjt.' from £10,29!^ to £25,173. 



BCtTTKB JiND CHKSSB rACTOKlBS. 131 



Cntts* Tr*r. 


Suiobn 

of 
Week!. 

i7 


Band* cfnpla;«d. 
M. F. 

145 3 
74 1 


WaCMpud. 

M. r. 


]l>tan>to 

NVOudMe.^ 


1»1 
1896 


£ 
7.445 
3.3J9 


£ 
73 
13 


£ 
7,714 


iDcmue 


1 


61 


1 


4. 316 

1 

Total 
Cfthwof 


Anxror 


5. 590 


Piih cinvd. 


Flabt 


□Dad. 


OthoT 


lIMUiTVllWOt 


Ytmr. 




>iIA- UaohinBTW 



lb £ lb £ £ £■£££ 

ISOl .. 1.083.&d013.1S2 3S8.849 6.:M6 5.7^ 35,173 "S. 997 3,858 3.440 
1896 .. 1.719.513 8.404 113, 3(M 1.88S 10.S93i3.90i3.783 3,045 



Inci. 4,779 175.545 1.318 5.7S5 14,88l|6,035 7(1 1.395 
Deer. 636.693 



BnTTBB AND Cheesb FaCTORIBS- 

Here a most excellent result is shown by the comparison. Not 
only did the nnmber of factories increase from 170 to 247 between 
1896 and 1901, besides skimming stations and creameries in con- 
nection with them — 202 against 105 ; bat the number of persons 
employed was more than doubled (1.188 against 576), and the value 
of the output rose to three times the amount for 1895. The figures 
are. £1,535,360 for 1890. against £501,274 for 1895. 

The produce of factor\'-made butter for 1900 was set down at 
29,758,3101b.. and for 1895 at 11,336,7761b., while cheese made 
similarly increased from 86.460cwt. to 139,687 cwt. in ihe same period. 

It is to be regretted that there is no estimate of butter and cheese 
made on farms, so that the total produce for the colony could be 
arrived at. 

By far the greater number of factories for making butter are in 
the North Island, the number having been 174, out of a total of 247, 
which turned out 24.500,000 lb. of butter in the year 1900, leaving 
somewhat over 5,000,0001b. as the output for the Middle Island. 
Tarauaki is the provincial district in which the operations are by 
far the largest. 12,500,0001b. of butter being the result of the 
factory operations, and nearly 32.000 cwt. of cheese. Wellington 
factories show for 1900 a total of over 7,500,0001b. of butter and 
32,000 cwt. of cheese. Otago makes more cheese (52,000 cwt.) in 
her factories than any other district. The butter was found to be a 
little short of 3,000,000 Ih. for the year. 

The money invested for pui-poses of this industry in laud, build- 
ings, machinery, and plant has largely increased. Full particulars 
are given in the subjoined table : — 



133 



NKW ZEAIAND OFFICIAL. YBAU-BOOK. 



• RftndB Amount 

■2 I Employed, pud in Uk^rti. 



Ukcta i np-po*rer 
Ubm! 



C«iiBus Tear. 



1901 
1896 



M. r. 



H. 



5 I "a : I 



Amonrit 

of 
Hone- 
power 






S S 



IncreiBc 
Decrease 



■247 
170 


l.lfiS 23 
54B 28 


£ 
95,461 
39,716 


£ 
97-2 

441 


223 
234 


37 
33 


8 
1 


i ■ 
lis! 


H.-p 
3.399 

1,531 


77 


617 .. 

5 


55,745 


531 


11 


4 


7 


.J .. 

a 5 

1 


868 



Cbf 



Produce for the Yeus 1900 uid ues. 

"~ I Other 

(. I Butter. Pro- 

duce. 



£ 'Qimui. Valae. Qnantity. Value. Vftlue. 



Totkl 
Value 

Offt'l 

Produce. 



ApproxiinAte Value of 



Lend. 



lis-. 



TooH. £ Lb. £ £ 

1901 6,984303,75829, 768, 8101. 203, 5-2027, 87-2 
1896 14,323146,15811,336.776 355,116 .. 



£ £ £ I £ 

1.535.15038.780)47.30; 303.663 
501,27427,335 91,601' 115.070 



Tncr. 3,661157,60018,421,534 848.404 27,8721,033.87611,445 55.706 87,593 

I 



GR.UN-MILLS. 

In 1896 it was remarked in the Census report that the result of a 
five year's comparison was to sbow a decrease in the Dumber of 
grain-mills in operation, and decline of bands employed, also in 
grain operated upon. The result for 1900 is more satisfactory. 

Althoogh the number of mills working fell from 90 in 1896 to 78 
in 1900. the hands emploved increased from 419 to 515, and the 
wheat Tis-ri from 3.315.43.3 bushels to 4.004,789 bushels, besides a 
slight -.z'zT^is^ in other kinds of grain. The total value of the out- 
pot. bo-*evir. -^tcl;r.ei from £374.656 to £682,884. A statement is 
given. :-. 'iJ.rSry.i hil) details: — 



C«!f;5- V«J- 


y~zL.heT 

M.li(. 


:>; HajL4* 

Jt F. 

513 -> 
41i' . 


M nv h ine-povc r 

.; ^ RiiTVie- 

« ^ i ^ i 1 

it H.-p. 

49.254110 15 ^ .. H i.4ii 
l-j.s** .- 51 45 1 1 i,33S 


Somber ol 

^S" Seta of 
St^ Rolle«- 


1901 

lc(9f. 


S3 
144 


406 


Incrck't 
DecTe*t* 


12 


94 


^ 


^. 364 110 i JW 

6 10 1 . 


61 


93 













BI8CU1T y.icT0Bre8. 



Tmi. 



Um Tntra ItVO dad UKT^ 



Wluat. 



OUiar 
QmIu. 



V«ln». 



itorilwTaui 

imduoL 



FlotiT' 



MmI. 



Api«aiiitwt« Value > 



Vkln*. Lknd 



Butli!- 



Uacbln. 



•A 



iftDt. 



1%1 



BusbeU. 
l.OM.TBS 

Et.ltl5.4a8 



BtiahflU. 
m.44B|6S8 



£ T TaD>. 
,6<2|83,0n 
,319!8I ,(I3S 



,418teS3 .86444.(1^189, 817 
.48121874.656^1, 7S0 184, TH 



mi. 151 

179.403 



tnor. 
Ovor. 



180.850 



90.803 



107.&77I 



1.084 



0.064 



lOl.TTS 



2,DQ8 



1,607 



1.748 



Biscuit Faotobieb. 

Twenty factories ai'e shown as in operation in 1901 aj^aitist 17 
five year* previously. But 109 more males and 133 more females 
were employed in the later vftar. The corap&rieoo eliows thai not 
much more was done in bisciiit-inalciDg <lunng the year 19U0 ihnti 
ui m95. ih« figures hi^ioK 3,2<yj tons against 3,003 tons. But 
the ratunis (or 1900 sho'vs aUo confectiouury made valued ui 
£56,039, and other products to the value of £38.474. Tlie total 
output came to £197,939, while in 1B9S Lbe sum was only i:iXt}.979. 



Cta»a» Tesr. 



Nnmbar 

or 
Works. . 



Handc. 



Wmiw. 



1001 
ISM 



InarcMM .. 



109 



U. 



UnclilnB-powar 



lUM. 



Rta-ni W»Ur 



138 



£ 
84,981 

18,801 



15.4JW 



£ 

4.S4S 
1.855 



3,1«) 



Horar- 

poww- 



U>7 



Oaaina Ymur. 






Tuiti VaIimuI 

UanufkciurM for 

ItKUudlMO. 



Airprosltuou VaIuv«( 



LUd. tfuUaiuKB. 



UacbliMTii 

anilltuit 



1901 

1896 



Ton*. 
3,aS7 
8,008 



197,989* 
118,070 



2o«t«aM 



SU 



70,010 



£ 

14. MO 
11,340 



S.GQO 



35.567 
ai.9T0 



13,«9S 



e 

39.786 
Uft.JI&l 



18,7B8 



Fhuit-prrherviko akd Jau-makiso. 
The weight of fruit hoitled or preserved in New Zealand during" 
1900 waa returned at 84,500 Ih, against 72.7901b. in 1896. Th.; jaiii 
manofactura increased considorably. tho figures being 3,303,39d]h., 



■ InelmllDK I,W8 lou* coati'olloiiery, vUai^ » tii6fia». and oihat proilticU tklned nk 



124 



NEW ZEALAND OPPIOIAL YEAR-BOOK. 



and 1,930,0581b. for 1895. Other preserves were also made in 1900 
to the extent of 179,532 lb. How it arises that the returns show 
fewer haods and factories ftt the time of last census than at the 
previouB collection cannot he explained. 



* 'cBKiiii Vp»r. 



I ! H&uds 

! ot ; 

Works I SI. ! F. 



WftgeEi paid. 
M. F. 



Macbine-powet 
iiHed. 



I'JOl 
1896 



13 
22 



Iocre&.*e . . 
Decreiue.. 







£ 


£ 


85 


S'2 


6,317 


1.7 


103 


90 


5,101 


1,4 






1,216 


31 


18 


8 







SteADi. 



Gm. 



Amoaot 

of 
Hora«- 
power. 



Vklaa «f 

□•ed. 1«m 
1)11896. 



t 



! H..p. / 

117 42,404 
77 20,548 



40 I 21,862 



Uuiurulturt^ii, 1900 ftna 18Ki. 



Fmit. bottled 
Ymt. 



J Mil made. 



Other Pre- 
■ervMi, 



QiiKHtit iValuo. Quantity. VKlne. Quantity V»]n(>. 



Value ol 
I all 
I Huiii- 
t&eturei, 
i 1900 
uidlHU. 



tppTo: 

V»l( 



»ln« of 



Luid. 



Build- 
ings 



UmUd- 
erT»nd 

nut. 



Lb. £ , Lb. i £ ' Lb. 
I'JOl.. 94. .500 9503,303,39554,120179,532 
If*96..: 72.7901.6761,930.058.^,355 52,118 



Incr. 11.710 
r>ecr. 



726 



■2.373.337 20,765127,414 



£ £ 

3,022; 58,092 
1.077' 36,108 



£ £ £ 

5.1609.835' 6,940 
4,5049,666; 4,496 



1,945 31.984' 656. 1.44£ 
I 30 



COSFECTIOSERY W0RK8. 

This indastry is becoming an important one. The value of the 
inannfactared articles tor the year 1900 reached the sum of £88,580, 
which is £oo.34o in excess ol the value returned for 1896. The 
number of «-~iablishii)ents was '26- and the hands employed show an 
increase fro::: •39 to -Wo. of whom 147 were females. 



\--'l.r "•■„■.!* euipli)T«l. Waives pKiil. Mptii>*-powpc 1 Value ot 



^nr 




11^ 


f JI. F 
UT 11,12SS,6<X> 


'^toaui. 
1 


Oaf. 

* 


(•ower. 


need in 

l«n«IKlIG8G. 


i-.*>: .. 


H.p. 

19 
21 


47,150 
14.867 


ICfT. 


IIT :S.?7.i3,0ft» 




-■ 


2 


33.263 



Icf---: •♦lu^ i-,-.t «irm !aKr 



UREWGKfEH. 



125 



OH«niV«V. 



r»la*. 



Ontpnt I 



1901 

1R96 



tncniu* 



ToTw. 
1.100 



38.410 



IS. 710 



S 



53,345 



£aii4. Bui III \ag*. 



£ 

21.271 

2,610 



iet,6&i 



£ 
17,709 

3. aw 



13,S59 






Utd PIMI. 



e 

17.975 
'i.465 



1£.610 






* InfnrmiiTlan nitt nvkHiiM*. 



Brkwrriks. 

Although the uuuib«r of bmwerieo iu the aolooy in 1901 vtt.» 
fewer than that for m96, the hunds cuiployed were more uumerouK, 
and ihe quantiiy of beer iniknufac lured coosidenibly greater, 

While in ihu year iS95 there were 5.249,127^ gallons brewed, the 
output for 1900 amounted to 7.379.i>i^l Siillons, being over Iwo 
uiillionB of gallons ol increase in a. five-year period ; and the value 
increased pioporiioiiately. 

The quainitic's of bee.r on which excise duty was paid lor con- 
t-uropiion were, for 1H95, -I.OgGMOO Rallons. and 0.811,280 Rations 
for 1900, being in each cast; a somewhat leswr quantily than that 
r«tomed as mannfactured. 

It was noticed in the report on the Onsna of 1896 that con- 
sumction of beer per head of population had fallen since 1891 from 
7-699 Kalloiis in 1B90 to 7-421 i^allons in 1)49^, and the quantii; 
manufactured showed very little increase.. But from 1H95 to 1900, 
a» shown above, the brewing proceeded at ft considerable rate, and 
the consuniptiou piT lu-ad lias advanced from 7 -421 gallonit to 
9'160 gallons No doubt prosporons time* have brought about this 
resalt. 

The importeii btwr eiit*red at the (.'usroins lor home consuaiplioti 
decreased in quantity from 201,770 yalJoni* in 1895 to 176,620 gallons 
m 1900. proving Uiat the colonial-made article is more and more 
taking the place of the beer brought from abroad. In the year 1892 
361,394 gallons were brought into New Zealand. 



1 1 

CanniK xe>T. q e 

B4 


Hands. 




■ 
P. 




UoUw-pnwtf vinplaT**! 


U. 


F. 


K. 


fit<*ra. 


TO&Bm'. 


Ou. 


Wind. BATitt. 


HmmL 


1901 . . 74 
1896 . . 85 


677 
4(U 


a 

6 


B 
63.493 
(17.837 


B 
77 


56 

S6 


6 


6 
4 


1 


a 


9 
14 


lDena*o .. .. S19 

D»oTea«« .1! 


Z0.1G6 


77 


. . 


2 


■• , -i 


ii 



126 



HEW ZBAI.&ND OFFICIAL YKAK-BOOK. 



CeuiuH Yt&r. 



Atnoant 

! of 

I Horse- 
power. 



Kuntber ol 



M»t«rIaJB uaed dnring Teat> IBOO 



I'JOI 
1H90 

Incre&No . . 



CenHUB Year. 



Horaai ' Dr»yii an.™- 

employed, employod. °°B"- 



Lb. 
149 2,424.5a5 
149 1,607, 14J 



U^l. 



Bopa. I T«lD- 



632 


176 


441 


ISO 


191 


.. 




4 



817,361 



1901 



Increane 



B»sh. Lb. £ 

455,035 562, 2451158, 2l» 



328,059 424,839 



126,976 137,406 32,506 



125,706 



Beer ui&de, 1900 aad 1803. 



(jumillty. \ Value. 



Approxiniftte V»lue of 



I*nd. . :-oilding. JSd^".7 



7,379,581 
5.249,278 



553,6-27 

336,734 



£ 

78,691 
51,533 



£ I 
139,014 ! 
115,033 I 



£ 
76,SS4 
63.850 



2,130,303 216,893 i 27.1C1 



•23,981 



13,034 



Malthoubes. 

At 33 iiialthouseK, which were in connection with the breweries 
befortj mentioned, 6'23,6S6 bushels of barley were malted, being Id 
(ixceas of tlie quantity for 1895 by 267,278 bushels, or nearly 75 per 
rent. Thu lar^e additional quantity of beer made in 1900 required 
incroaRod operations in malting. 



Niiiiiliiir' HandH 
Cvniui YoHV. of I Em- 
' WorkB. ployed. 



WagHH 

paM. 



Mkc blue- power Qi«d. 



.Steam. Water. j Oae. Horse., Hand 



tlWl 
m9U 



H3 



InareAHO 
Docrouo 



U5 
95 



50 



£ 
14,i»94 

9,398 



5,696 



5 


1 


4 


2 


3 


1 


1 


1 


2 




3 


1 



21 
25 



AmoQut 

of 
Borae- 
power. 



H.-p. 

110 

69 



51 



I Value of ""'fy uialted. 1003, ia». 
OiiMim Vt<nr. , MatcrialH 



I'.KIl 



liiorraKO 



£ 

TJ.'JU 

r.'j.Hsi 

19.330 



Qimiitity. 

ituaholi). 
ll'J3,i;rt(i 
3.W,4m 



\'llllK>. 

£ 

105.1171 



Approximate ValQa of 



£ 
2.S,920 
6,686 



£ 
41,110 
27,910 



2(17, 278 -^3,575 , 17,2.'« 13,200 



£ 

10,008 

2,909 



7,099 



NoTK.— In KMiii' cntf* thi' viiliic nf Imiil. liuUdliicH. mix! plant has been inclnded in tha 
Tviiirnn tiinilHliiMl l>\ pri>iiri<>li>rii »l lirtm i>rii><i w tvhlch the umlthousos belong. 



DERATED WATBK AND COHDIAL FACTOBIE8. 



127 



COLONIAL-WINB MAKING. 

Besides 26,513 gallons of colonial wine made in 1900, and also 
400 gallons of brandy used to fortify the wine, 27.537 gallons of 
cider were manufactured. These results are satisfactory on com- 
parison with those of 1895, when the wine amounted co 15,860 gal- 
lons. The quantity of cider increased from 19,178 gallons to 
27,537 gallons. The value of produce increased from £8,963 in 
189S to £10,330 in 1900. 



Census 
Te»r, 






3i 



9 



fi iS. ¥. 



1901.. 
1696.. 

Incr. 
Deer. 



14| 49 
19, 41 



U. F. 

£ I k 

3,320 92 



i1 . 

.S3B 

111 



ib 






made. 



1(1 



995 



Cider. 



■SSs 



f-fiS 



Approsinikte Value ol 



T.^A IBnUd- Michiuery 
^*''^- IngB. Und Plftnt. 



'H-p.| OollH. OalU. , £ £ 

2 14 26, 51327, 537ia330'l0156 

2 : 6 15,860 19,1788,9638,224 



8l 10,663 



8,3691,367 



1,932 



£ 
6,074 
2,929 



2,146 



£ 
2,953 
1,679 



1,274 



Abrated-water and Cordial Factories. 

Although the number of factories under this head slightly de- 
creased between the censuses of 1896 and 1901, the operations were 
very much greater in the year 1900 than in 1895, and with this 
is shown increase of value of manufactures, as well as quantity, 
to a considerable extent, besides a greater number of persons 
employed. 

The money value of all manufacture for 1900 amounted to 
£151,811, against £98,609 in 1895; an increase of nearly 54 per 
cent. Over £10,000 of additional money was paid in wages during 
the later year, while an increase from 1,091,580 dozen of aerated- 
water bottled to 1,886,024 dozen, besides a greatly enlarged busi- 
ness in cordials, tonic beer, and other drinks is recorded. The full 
particulars are tabulated below : — 





No. of 
Works. 


Hands 
employed. 


Wages 


>ald. 




Haobiiie-powei 


used. 




CeoBUB 
Yeur. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


8t«UU. 


Water. 


Horse. 


! Hand, 

""■ Klectri. 
cal. 


Horse- 
power. 


1901 
1896 .. 


125 
132 


437 
330 


15 

17 

'a 


£ ' £ 
31 ,771 284 
21,184:261 


49 
46 


10 

17 


21 
11 


34 1 12 
24 1 35 


H.-p. 
250 
216 


Incr. 
Deer. 


7 


107 


10,587 


23 


3 


7 


10 


10 

.. 23 

1 
1 


!54 



12S 



HEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAB-BOOS. 



I 

: IfMinfKctuTen for the Yeftni 1900 and 1S95. 






Aerated Cor- | Tonic 
Watern, ' diaJn. i Beer. 



MiseellMieoui. 
Quan. ValuB. 



CldsrJ ii ! 



b , Approxlnikts Vain* at 



' Hi. 

oa I I FUDt. 



Doz. 
]«01.. I.8H6.024 



Doz. . Diz. I Gain. ' £ Qaia. £ ' £ . £ 
2.').47fl 89,82113,356 5,.S569,950 151, eili33,037 34,875 



Inc. 
0«c. 



794,444 



IWC.. 1,091, 580li0, 72017. 4151 8.907* 1.350 fSO 98. 609119, 47632, 439j37,4S9 



4.75872.406; 4,449 4,006 



53,20313,561' 3,436 



£ 
37,9GC 



16S 



■ Includinff COOO fiallouB vincftu. t Cuka. 



Coffee and Spice Works. 

The number of these works was 18, the same as in 1896, but 
tb« hands fell from 119 to 78. The value of manafactnred goods 
iieclined from £74,339 to £45,628 in the five years. 



Sauce- and Pickle-making. 

This indaatrj- progresses steadily. It employed 77 males and 51 
females in 1901. Sauces and pickles were manufactured to the 
value of £31,258 in the previous year, more than doable the amount 
made five years ago. 



CirDini^ Ynir. — t 



lllUl 
18% 

IncreaM 
I>cc[ease 



Si 
■li 



1 



ilandn 
i-mploye*!. 



77 
It 



51 
:!4 



:« 



W RR^H iwul. ; ,„^^ „^ I Amount 

- - Hone- 

power. 



M. 



F. 



£ E 

4.62S 1.760 
l.HA'i G2-2' 



SU>aiu. 



H.-P. 
71 



Value 

Of 

Materials 

aoed. 



20,605 
7.934 



■2,7'JS 1. ]:■!!* 



14 ! 12,571 



ManiifactnreB (or llir Ymrs 1900 Mid IM95. 
C«D>D« YiBr Raiices. licklcs. 

Qnanlity. Value. Qimiitity. Vuliio. 



Otlier 

Condi- 
litentR. 



Approximate %'alae of 



Total 
Valne of 
Uanufac- , „ . . 

*"^- ^■^- tall?- 



HachiocTT 
and 
Plant. 



.Doz. Pnt,* £ Doi. I'nlK t 1" £ £ ' f . * 

1901 .. 44.r.04 ll.lL'S HI. 110 ■10, 378 '.).752 »l,-35a 17120*12, 375' 7,220 

1996 .. ■ -Si.tm G.in) ;t.;»49 3.79:1 ;!,395 13,417 5175' 5.160> 1,574 



Increase iJ.l.OeS 4,899 2t,lC.l 6,.^.i*5 O.WT 17.B4111945 7,215! 5.6*6 



COOPEBAaB». 



129 



Soap and Candle Woreb. 

The development of these works was at a moderate rate only 
between 1896 and 19U1, the value of manufactures of all kinds 
reaching to £158,649 for the year 19l»0, and £152,298 for 1895. 
In 1900, 92,321 cwt. of soap were made, and 26,690 cwt. of candles, 
besides other manufactures to the value of £20,611. 



Census Year. 



1901 

1896 



OenauB Yoat. 



1901 

1896 



Increue 
Deareaee 



InoTWBB . . 



Number 
of 


Hi 
emp 

U. 


inds 
oyed. 


Wa«M paid. 
M. F. 


Uaotaine- 
powei tued. 


Amount 

at 

HoTvy 

power. 




Works. 


F. 


Water, 
SteuD. tias. 
Hand. 


24 
22 


224 
187 


£ £ 
8 19,009 2S9 
3 16.882 21 


20 
17 


4 I 

1 


H,p. I £ 
346 112.f>23 
252 98,194 


' 


37 


5l 


2,127J 218 


3 


4 


94 


14,429 



Manufactures lor 1900 and 1805. 



Soap. 



I Quantity. ' Value. 



Candles. 



Value. 



jot. 



Cwt. 
92,321 
85,637 



6,684 



£ 
76,591 
71,382 



5,209 



£ I £ 
61,447 20,611 
58,512 22,404 



2,935 



1,793 





Approximate Value of 


Total 




Value 


>, 


of 






Hauu- 


,..., Bulld- 


a«2 


factured. 


^•^- U.K.. |g- 




1 


a 



£ 
158,649 
152,298 



6,351 



£ 

10,432 

9,884 


£ 
27,184 
20, 110 


£ 
29,198 
28,882 


548 


7,074 


361 



COOPEKAGES. 

These numbered 23, according to the returns for 1901. 47,072 
casks were made in 1900, against 33,418 in 1895, and the manufac- 
ture of kegs increased greatly. The 1901 returns show also the 
constroction of butter-boxes to the number of 169,147, and of 
ebeese-cases 33,165, against 78,378 and 3,660 respectively for 1896. 



CtfUU YOftT* 


Number 
of Works. 


Bauds 
employed. 


Wages. 


Uaoblne-power 
used. 

Steam. Gas. 


Horse- 
power. 

H.-p. 
177 
110 


Value of 

Uaterials 

used. 




M. j F. 


1901 .. 
1896 .. 


23 
21 


137 
76 


1 


£ 
10,923 
4,250 


1 

16 1 
10 1 .. 


£ 
19,942 
10,281 


XncniM 


2 


61 


1 


6.673 


6 1 1 


07 


9,661 



130 



NEW ZEALAND OPPICtAL YBAB-BOOK. 



CeiiMiiM Year. 



Incrtaie 



MAnu[»ctur«fl for the Veara 1900 j 
uidie9S. 



I Total I 
.Value or' 



ApprozimatB Value at 



i H»« rj..i.B Butter ; Cbeew- Outpnt. ] ,_„^ UDlld-iUaofaiiwTT 
; Keg*. Ca«lCB. . I ^^ I I*nd. j^ ^ p,^. 



No. 

i-2,5a'> 

1.G80 



lo.aoo 



tioxee. ' casea. 

No. No. . No. 
47,072 159.1«! 33,165 

:i3, 41878, 378! 3,6fiO 



13,054 80,76!)' 2l).505 



37,521 5,663 



18,288 2,872 



£ ' £ 
7,813' 8.303 



19, -283: 3,297 3,353, 4,525 



4, 46a! 3,778 



Sawmills, and Sash and Door Factories. 

There has been a very great development of this industry since 
W.i6. Although only 35 additional mills were returned as working 
in 1901, the hands employed increased from 4,059 to 6.812, and the 
ffirst-cutj sawn timber from 191,053,466 fi. to 261,583,518 ft., an 
Hd'lition of 70,530,052 ft. The figures given for resawing, moulding, 
Ac, show a retrograde movement, but the number of doors and 
sashes made increased from 61,550 to 91,376 in five years ; and the 
total money value of all manufactures or produce of the sawmills 
reached the sum of £1,268,689 against £898,807 at the previous 
census. The value of the plant largely increased. 

The quantity of first-cut sawn timber for the year 1900 was far 
greater in the Auckland Provincial District than in any other, the 
order being as follows: — 

Feet of Timber Bawu 
(flnt ontting). 
Auckl&nd . . . . . . 109 , 124 , 543 

Wellington .. 41,375,471 

Otago .. .. 40,482,149 

Hawke'aBay ., .. .. ,. 22,382,990 

Westland . . . . 13,971 ,951 

Nelson .. ,. 12,212,951 

T&ranoki .. .. 11,881,139 

Marlborough .. .. .. 5,437,365 

Canterbury.. .. 4,714,959 

The increase at Auckland in five years ia from 79,464,526 ft. to 
109,124,543 ft. At Westland also the increase is noticeably great, 
considering the magnitude of the industry there. 



CeDSUB Yi'iir. 


No. of' 
iUlU. 1 

1 


M 1 F. 


I'uM. 
M. , F, 


Motive- power uaeil. 
Steam.' Water.i tlas. 


Amount 

Horse- 
I'ower. 


19v)l., 


;i84 ' 


0.(^05 7 


£ ' £ 
5i;i,l'>2ii' 2G« 


317 


24 


3 


H.-p. 

8,744 


IS'JC.. 


liCIU 


4,0,')r. ' 4 




274 


20 


1 


6.409 


IncrcsRS 

Dec FOB KC . . 


M.-. 


2.750 :i 


4J1 


h 


2 


2,335 



OASWOKKS. 



131 



C«naus 
Year. 



Output for tbe Ye^ra 1900 and 1605. 



Sawn Timber. 
Quantity. { Value. 



l'o»tB f l«>o'-l°fi. Skirting, 4c, 

BailH,' , I ' " 

&c. Quantity. Value. 



Mouldings, 



Quantity. 



1901 
1896 



Inc. 
Dec. 



CenituB 
Veai. 



Ft. 
261,583,518 
191,053,460 



70,530,052 



£ 

971,048 
027.959 



343,089 



£ ' Ft. 1 £ i Run. It. 

19.277 34,824,246, 172,127; 9,152,598 
10.998 41,026,223' 173,766!l2.653,S68 



8,279 



6,201.977 



1,038. 3,500,770 



Value 



£ 
42,970 
44,104 



1,134 



1901 
1896 

Ido. 



Out)<ut for 1900 and 
1M)5— cott tinued. 


Total 
Value 
of all 

Output. 


Approximate Value ot 








Doom an 

Quantity, 

No. 
91,376 
61,550 


d Sasbei. 

Value. 

£ 
63,267 

41,981 


Land. ■ Buildings 

i 


Machinery 
nnd 
Plant. 


£ 

1.268,689 
898,807 


£ 
187,398 
180,958 


£ 
108,015 
100,607 


& 
408.207 
298,797 


29,826 


21,286 


309,882 


440 


7,348 


109,410 



Gasworks. 

The operations of the gasworks in the colony for the year 1900, 
contrasted with those for 1895 and 1890, show such expansion as 
must be considered highly satisfactory, and this notwithstanding the 
increased use of electricity in substitution for gas. 

There were 30 gasworks at the time of the census of 1901, 
employing 572 hands, against 27, with 295, in 1896. The wages 
paid in 1900 amounted to over £70,000 sterling, against £38.000 in 
1895, and the value of all produce was £290,567. against £199,025. 

In quantity, 786 milUon cubic feet of gas are shown to have been 
manufactured in 1900. against 532 milhon feet for 1895, besides in- 
creased quantities of coke, tar, and other residuals. 





h 
O 

> 

'a 
o 
K 

•27 


Hands 
employed. 


Wages p 
M. 

£ 
70,38S 
37,747 


aid, 
P. 


Machine-power 

UGed. 


6 

1 

P 

O 

E 

< 


Produce for the Years 
1900 and 1695, 


CenauB 
Year. 


Oas made. 




M. ' F. 

1 

568 4 

■293i 2 


9 k 


.1 


Quaatlty, Value, 


1901 
1896 


£ 

IhS 
102 

83 


24 

19 


1 
1 


12 

a 
* 


H.-p. 
12C 


Cubic feet. 

786,531,150 
532,060,300 


£ 
245,000 

178,190 


Increase 


3 


li75: 2 

1 


32,641 


116 


254,470,650 


06,804 



132 



MBW ZBALANO OFFICIAL YBAK-bOOK. 





Prodi 
Co 


ice for Ilie Yenrs 1909 and IKJ 
eonlinued. 


a— 

1 iS 




Approximate Valna of 


Ceoaui) 
Ye»r. 


ke. 


Tar. 


Total 1 
Valun : 
of all j 
Produca. Land. 

i 


a. 1 »? 

'0 \ ^ ^ 




Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity., Value. 


& 1 aS 


I'JOl 
1896 


Tons. 
38,830 
17,339 


£ 
32,968 
14,446 


Gallons. 
693,181 
345,632 


£ £ 

11,666 934 

4,6491,734 


£ 
290,567 
199,026 


£ 

65,555 
41,422 


£ 
88,874 
79,610 


£ 

817,130- 
645,641 


lacr. 
Deor. 


21,491 


18,5-22 


347,549 


7,016 


800 


91,542 


24,133 


9,264 


171,489 



Lime and Cement WoBKb, 

Fifteen of these works, employing 184 hands, were in operation 
in 1901. In 1896, only 79 hands were returned. The value of 
manufacture for 1900 was three times as great as that for 1895, and 
that of machinery used more than doubled during the five years. 



CenBua Year. 


Kumber 
of 
' Works. 


Hands 
employed. 


Wages 
paid. 


Motive Power 




Hone- 




Males. 


Males. 


Btcam. Horse. 


power. 


1901 
1896 


15 
14 


184 16.577 3 
79 6,560 


2 


H.-p. 

466 

269 


Inoreaae 


1 


106 : 11,017 1 .. 

1 




177 


CeoBua Year. 


Value 

of 

Materials 

used Id 1900 

and 1»9S. 


Total Value 

of 

Manufactures 

for 1900 and 

1895. 


Approximate Value of 


Land. , Buildings. 


Machinery 
and Plant. 


1901 
1896 

Inorease 


1 

£ 1 £ 

18,397 46,142 

4,631 15,881 


£ £ 
3,881 i 10,218 
3,181 : 7,270 

i 


£ 
24,337 
11,968 


18,766 




29,26 


1 


700 ! 2,948 


12,369 



Bkick, Tile, and Potteky Works. 

These works employed in 1900 close on double the number of 
hands that were engaged in 1895, and the number of bricks rose 
from 18,800,000 to 40,900,000 for those years. The value of pottery 
made, including drain-pipes, rose from £31,503 to £34,810 ; and the 
total value of all the manufactures from £66,140 to £122,230. 



BBIOK, TILS, AND POTTEBX WORKS. 



133 



Otago shows first in the output of bricks made, Canterbury next, 
then Auckland, while Wellington takes the fourth place. The 
number of brick, stone, or concrete houses increased between tbe 
last two censuses from 6,490 to 7,517, a rate of 13'66 per cent., 
while those of cob, sod, huts, &.c., decreased substantially in 
number. Houses built of wood or iron increased from 134,092 
to 153,945, the rate, 14 per cent., being slightly higher than that 
which obtained for brick and stone dwellings. 





i 


HuidB 


WasM p&ld. 


U!iL«iiine- 


^ 


Numb«r of 






ein|>lo}ed. 


power D»ed. 




Hfi.clilit 


IE uted. 


C^niua Year 


o 




















*S 


H k en 


h 




a 
3 


U. 


B. 


M. 


r. 


B 

d 


S 


i 


i 


•: 

3 


•> C 

C C 

a 


a 


6 IE" 






a 










m 


a 


IB 


fi 


E 


< 


It. Ku 


-n&. 








£ 


£ 




1 






n.p. 






19U1 


lOSi B38 .. 


6?, 336 




G9 


189 


1 


4 


659 


109 


77 


IS96 


lOS 451 I 


28,179 


60 


38 


170 


1 


1 


519 


108 


sa 


IncrB«vB« 


.. S84 


.. 


35,157 


.. 


as 


3 


140 


1 




Decrease 




a 


■■ 


50 1.. 


■■»'■■;■■! ■■ 


•■ 


ift 







ManufkctuTM for the Teuri 1900 and IBBS. 


Ceosna Yeu. 


Briclu iDKda. 


Pottery, Ac, made. 




Oommon. 


Firo- 
brioks. 


Value,. 


Drain- pi poB. 


Tllea. 


Flower- 
pota. 


1901 
1896 


No. 
40,976,766 

18,805,715 


No. 
318,651 

ms.Boo 


£ 
86.578 
34,637 


No. 
1,226,296 
1,175,065 


No. 
310,076 
464,851 


Doa. 
8,111 
8,347 


Increase 
Deo reus 


22,171,060 


119,951 


61.941 


51,231 


154 [775 


6,236 




Uauufactures. 1000 
Bud 1895— eon linued. 


1 
1 

Totftl 1 
VaJueof i 


Approximate Value of 


Cenaa* Yeax. 


Pottery, Ac, mcule. 


Land. 


i 




Hlacel- 

luieoue : 

V&lue- 


Value of 
Pa Her y, &a. 




tures. ' 

1 


Buildings, ""^.i-^ 


1901 
1896 


£ 
7,475 
4,249 


£ 
34,810 
31,503 


1 


£ 
22,230 
66,140 


£ 
41,123 

24,074 


£ 
37,718 
24,917 


£ 
35,726 
27,594 


Inorease 


3,226 




3,307 




56,090 


17.049 




12,601 


8,132 



10— Yearbook 



134 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAB-BOOK. 



TiNWAHE FaCTOBIBS. 

A large development is observed in respect of this industry. The 
value of the manufacture rose from £63,723 in 1895 to £98.587 in 
1900. In 1890 the value of the Roods was only £14.297. The 
number of hands increased from 289 to 337 in five years, and the 
establishments from 34 to 60, and the wages paid from £19,742 to 
£23,107. But the increase shown in this industry is largely due to 
the inclusion in the later year of small establishments of which no 
account was taken in 1896. 



CenauB Your. 



; Number 
I of 
■ WorkB. 



HanrlH 
employed. 

M. P. 



W»g>'B p»id. 

— . . . 

U. ! F. 



Uotive Power. 



1901 
1896 



iDoreaBe 



GO 


836 


1 


34 


288 


1 


26 


48 





£ 
23,107 
19,743 



£ 
36 



3.3G5 86 



Ste&m. 


Water. 


CFu. 


1 


1 

• 


7 

■ 


■• 


•■ 



OeQBQB Tear. 

1901 
1896 


Value ot 

«""«■ used In 
P**""' 1900 

anil IRHi. 

H.-p. £, 

23 sa.sos 

27 i 32,835 


Increase 
Decrease 


' 19.718 

4 ; .. 



To'al V«luo 

of Maiiufai;- 

turoK an 'I 

Ke^iftirK in 

1900 and 
1895. 



£ 

98,587 
63,723 



Approximate VaJae of 



Land. BaildlngB. 



34,864 



£ ' £ 
24.907 I 22,100 
10.660 7,475 



UachiticrT 
and I'lant. 



£ 
9,907 
7,714 



14,247 i 14,625 ! 2,193 



* lotormatioii not availnhle. 



Ikon and Buasr Foundkies ; BoiLEit and Eanqe-making ; with 

Engineerino. 
The total value of the manufacture (including repairs) in con- 
nection with these industries was returned for the year 1900 at 
£924,171, or more than three times the amount for 1895, which was 
£302,815. This great increase is nearly all found in the figures for 
Otauo, where tlie value of manufacture given at last census had 
reached £512,021, no doubt being swelled by the dredge-making 
work. There were 1,948 more hands employed in 1901 than five 
years previously, or an increase of 118 64 per cent., the actual 
number of persons being 3.590, against 1,642 for the earlier 
year. That a considerable development of the business would be 
exhibited was of coiuse expected, on account of the stimulus given 
by the growing requirement for dredges in procuring gold from 
river-beds, Ac. 



AOBIOULTUBAL IMPLEHRNT FACTOKIEB. 



135 





Number 

of 
WorkB, 




flands amploysd. 


Wagei paid. 


Horse- 
power. 


CenBQB Tmt. 


U»le 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


1901 
18y6 


111 
90 


3,580 
1,639 


JO 
3 


£ 
306, 77S 
129,699 


£ 

431 
64 


H.-p. 
1,577 
1,093 


Increase 


21 


1,941 


7 


177,079 


367 


484 


Cenaaa Tear. 


Value 
of Mati-TialB 

iiBBii or 
operated on. 


Total Value 

of 

Manufactures 

(lucJudliig 

Hupiiini). 


Approximate Value of 


Land. 1 Bnildlnga. 

1 


Machiuerj 
B11C Flaat. 


1901 
1896 


£ 
446,507 
100,273 


£ 
924,171 
302,815 


£ 
127,346 

70,811 


£ 
89,001 
56,152 


£ 
177,935 
126,172 


IncreBso 


346.234 


621,356 


56,635 


33,849 


61.763 



NoTE,~Tfae alKive table does not iaolude fllteen Oovernment Hailnayand Mainten- 
ance wiirkshopa (eisht Railway WDrkahops and seven MHlittenance workshops) : Hands 
eiui<)o\ed in year 19 0, 1,636: wages vaid, £lS.)J)a6 ; borse-poner employud TKO; materials 
nsed, £193,1150; manufactures and repairs (3 locomotives, 34 bouie canlaue", SO boMlfl 
br ke-vans, 14i wagnDs. 1,102 taupauiiDS, and repairs to ttie value of :E:i6.3uai; tbe total 
value of 'I anufactures and repairs in the hailnay norksbops being £M-'>,9i6, and tl>e value 
of machinery and )ii&at, £:'T,64. Tbe value of uiaterialn used and value of reiialis aro not 
stated in Maiatenance worksbojis returns. 

Ammunition Works. 
There is aa ammunition factory in ihe Auckland District, where 
106 hands are actively employed. To give more details might be 
considered a breach of coiilideiice. 

AORiqULTUKAL IMPLEMENT FACTORIES. 

Although the numbers of factories and hands employed as shown 
Id the latest returns do not indicate development, the total value 
of ail manufacture appeara to have increased from £102,054 to 
fl38,094, including repairs. The number of implements made 
during 1900 is greater under nearly att descriptions than for 1895. 

From whatever cause it may arise that the hands are returned 
as only 584, against 581 in 1895, the fact remains that the opera- 
tions in the factories were very much greater in 1900 than five years 
before. This is clearly shown, both as to money value for the total 
and as to number of implemeats, under a long series of descriptive 
headings : — 



Ceusna Tear. 


Number 

of 
Works, 


Hands 
employed. 


Wages paid. 


Motlve-poiveT. 


Horse- 
power. 


Value of 
all 


M. 


F. 


M. 


P. 


Steam. 


Water. 


Matei'ials 
used. 


1S96 


33 
34 


5!^4 


s 


53,879 6'i 

44,.5B1 .. 


23 


1 


860 

S17 


£ 

4D.072 
2ti.'J04 


Incrraxe . . 


i 


3 


3 


0.298 62 
.. I.. .. 


1 


US 


S2.16S 



136 



MBW ZEALAND 07FICUL TBAB-BOOK. 



f>iDDt» Year. 



Idttl . . 

mm:.. 



HKDufacturefl lor Teara 1900 and ISaS. 



o 



No. 
669 
&90 



279 



No. 
864 
578 

286 



■n A 

St 

Q 



iq ? □ a 

oosZ 

EQ 









No. 
208 



136 



No. 


No. 


No. 


292 


219 


242 


377 


182 


104 




37 


138 i 


85 


■• 





No. 
358 
169 



ta 



No. 
18 



i 

6 

No. 

196 
3S 



158 



f^Diua V«ar. 



UknufAclurei for TAArei 1900 ftnd lEQG— (unffnurd. 



^ 
Z 
e 






>°B 



\l 



a 






sill 









No. 
4(1 
18 



28 



No. 
S5 



19 



No. No. 

17 ; 75 

1 ' 69 



13 



e 



No. 


No. 


No. 


89 


1,815 


, , 


DA 


S8 


SI 




1.776 


,, 


6 


•■ 


SI 



£ 

15,1&7 
12^743 



S,414 



lUatm* Yuar. 



I Mil 








Tt>tB.| V«]H? 

of ^aiiufac- 
turoB-t in- 
cluding 
Uejukirni. 


AppTDidmate Valn« al 




iMicd. 


BuildioBiuj ^ji-7 


■■ 


£ 
]38,OU4 

10-2,054 


£ 

i9,&yi 
19,900 


£ £ 
21,504 1 20,244 
21,336 ! 30,031 




30,040 


309 


168 : 

9.787 



Pkinting ani> Bookbinding Establishments. 
'I'hiK irxJuHtry ranks amoDgsl the first ic respect of employmeDt 
t,\ JuiudH. 2,fii!7 males and 507 females were returned as engaged 
in JL til last (:«:i)ttus, the males increasing from 2,123 in 1896 to 2,627 
1(1 I'jOI iwjiiittie hands have increased greatly. In 1891 there 
ti'-.n: <,ft\y VM; ; in 1896 the number was 228, while in 1901 it had 
fiw.ii III 'Vj7, women and girls. As to the value of product it was 
wi .l'<wij for the year 1900 ai £704,285, against £389,124 live yeara 
«:M.ili'-r , Ijiit how far these last figures can be relied on is uncertain, 
'f'tu-ri: it% 'iiflJcuky in making them up. 



COACH-BUILDIMO AKD PAIKTING. 



137 



Cananm Tekr. 


Namber 

ol 
Works. 


Hands employed. 


Wages paid. 


Maohine-power used- 




M. F. 


M. 


F. 


Steam. 


Wati^r. 


Oaa. 


1901 
1896 


188 
154 


3,627 
3,123 


507 
228 


£ 
268,041 
204,165 


£ 
16,564 
12,137 


19 
22 


14 
16 


93 
50 


iDorease 
D<-cre&i>e 


34 


504 


279 


63,876 


4,42? 


3 


'■2 


43 


Census Tear. 


Ukchioe-power used— 
eontinued. 


Horse- 
power 


Value 

of all 

Prodncts. 


Approiimate Value of 




Blactrie. 


Oil. 


Hand. 


TAnd. 


iuildlngs. 


Uacli i nerr 
and Plani. 


1901 
1896 


5 i 6 

s 


78 
64 


H.p. 
956 
532 


£ 

704,286 
369,124 


£ 

109,130 
66,847 


£ £ 
160,787 , 289,621 
124,369 1 203,699 


Incrpa*e 


5 5 


9 1 424 


315,161 


40,283 


36,4'.B 85.922 



' Mote —The table does not include particulaiB For GoverDmeut Printing OlDce. 



Coach-building and Painting. 

The value of the manufacture and repairs rose from £148,969 in 
1895, to £216,077 in 1900, an increase of £67,108. or a rate of 
4505 per cent. The hands employed also increased from 807 io 
1,185. 



Census Year. 


Number 

at 
Works. 


Hands 
employed. 


Wsges paid. 


Mactaine-power used. 




H. 


M. 


Sleam. 

17 
19 

2 


Oas. Water. 


1901 .. 
1896 .. 


160 
116 


1,165 
607 


£ 
83,356 

57.a77 


9 2 

4 2 


Incceaxe . . 
Decr-^ase . . 


44 


378 


25,979 


5 ' 

.. i .. 





Amount 

ot 
Hone- 
power. 


Total ' Approximate Valu 
Value of 1 


e of 


Census Tear. 


M&nu- 1 
fac lures | 
(includiug Land. 

Knpaire). 


Buildings, 


Machinery 

and 

riant. 


1901 
1S96 


138 
119 


H.-p. 1 £ 
216,077 1 70,622 
148,969 41,376 


£ 

55,972 
40,076 


£ 
24,217 
24,350 


Inorvase . . 
Decrease . . 


9 


67,108 ! 29,246 


15,890 


133 



138 



NBW ZBALAND OFFIUIAL TKAB-BOOK. 



Cycle Works. 

A very great advance has been made since 1896, as the number 
of works was found to be 71 against 19, and 378 males besides 17 
females were engaged, being an increase of 270 persons on the 
number previously shown. The value of the manufacture and re- 
pairs rose from £18,817 for the year 1895 to £65,047 for 1900, or at 
the rate of 245-7 per cent. Cycles being now used not only for 
pleasure and exercise, but also in business to a certain extent, the 
mdustry of making and repairing these articles is necessarily found 
expanding v^itli time. 

Among the establishments shown for 1901 there are indeed a con- 
siderable number of purely re pairing- shops, and these were not taken 
into account at tlie previous census. But apart from this qualifica- 
tion the returns show a large genuine increase in the operations. 



Census Year. 



1901 
1896 



Inoreane 



Number 

of 
Works. 

71 
19 


Hands. 


W«ge». 


Uao bine-power 

USM. 




M. 

378 
125 


F. 


M. 


F, 


Sleam. 


Qu. 


1 


17 


£ 

20,873 
5,962 


£ 
570 


i 

4 


16 

4 


1 


H..p. 
95 
S3 


52 


253 


17 


14,921 


570 




11 


1 


62 



CenauH Yvar. 



1901 
1896 



IncreaHO 



Value < 

o( ; 

..MaUriaU 

I used in , 

: 1696. I 



20,821 
7.6'JC 

19.12S 



Number of 

CycleB 

m an ufBiU lured 

In )gi10 
and 18US. 



1,'J88 
734 



Approximate Value of 



1.2.14 




46,230 23,540 



4,841 



Saddleky and Hakness Works. 
Of tliese. 115 were returneii. In the total value of manufac- 
ture ;ind repairs there is an increase, cause^l chiefly by the inclusion 
in 1901 of small sadillers' shops which were not reckoned as 
factories in 1H96. 



Con SUB Yoar. 


1 

Number 

of 
WorkH. 

11."-. 


Hands om|iloyed, : 

M. P. ' 

i 
U20 23 1 


Waflaa i 
M. 


aid. 


Value of 
Materials 




F. 


used, 19U0. 


1' .. 


£ 
40,808 


£ 
1,026 


£ 
75,724 



1901 

' InoliidiiiR a nuiiibrr of smsU Faitdicry xnd harnesB-uiaking concerns, which weM 
not dealt wiili as " factories " at (he previous census. 



F-BU^HONOBBINO, TAMNJNO, CUBBYINO, AND WQOLSCOUBINQ. 139 



Ceo BUB YeBT. 


Total Value of 

Maiiiifacturee 

I including Kepaira). 

1000. 


ApiiToxim»te Va1u« of 


Luid. 


Buildinsa. 


UAChlnery and 
Plaoi 


1901' .. 147,626 


£ 
54,380 


87,035 


£ 
5,144 



* luQluding « Qiimber of imali saddlery and bar hsbs- making ooncerns, which ware 
not dealt with aa " faatorieB " at cbe previous cenauB. 

Brush and Bboou Making. 

These works numbeied 12 in 1901, against 15 in 1896. The 
hands employed numbered 128 at last census, and the value of 
manufactured articles for the year 1900 was returned at £21,131. 

FELIiMONGERINQ, TaNNIKO, CuBRTINQ, AND WOOLSCOITRINO. 

Good progress was made in this industry between 1896 and 1901, 
not so much in the direction of increasing the number of establish- 
ments, hut in liands employed, with quantity and value of manu- 
facture. The hands increased from 1,629 to 1,963, and the woo! 
scoured or sHped from 19,723.481 lb. to 2o,793,239 ib. The value 
of all produce or manufacture for 1900 was £1,888,107, against 
£1,237,'252 in 1895, or more than 50 per cent, in five years. 



J 




Hands 
euipl 1 ij'cd. 


ptTd. 


He live 
Power. 


* 

1 

e 

EC 


3 




PI 




d 


U. 


F. 


U. 


F. 


£ 
1 




H 


k 

c 0. 


1901 

Increaj^e 


No. 
119 1,937 
117 1.633 


mo 

6 
6 


i.'ig.iBO 

116,715 


a6» 


49 


9 

B. 


1 1 
1 


H,p. 

1.108 

em 


i,ai6 


£ 
1,161,965 


£ 
131,178 


2 834 




43,405 


10(5 


8 


i _ 

1 




423 


'36 




05,iBa 


Cmhsiib YsBir. 


To 

-1 


IK at Uark i>»ed 

tUo. , 
- — — 1 ys 

as 1 ^s 

- 1 


BJid Kli 

■S3 


id. 

o 


Uanuf|U!t.n 
Yeu 

WflOl 

uid iSUpiiod. 


r^B or Produce 

BlUOOandiMUL 

FilllllB 

Bbcipped at 

W&ol. 


for |be 

Hldm 


1901 
1896 


Tens, 
3,384 

3,419 


Tons. " 

306 
1,423 


ConB. 
465 
9J9 


TOHB. 

1,177 
24 


Ton=. 
5,331 

5,2:25 


Lb. 
25,793,239 
19.723.481 


No. 
4,02f>.5J8 
3,879,560 


No. 
173,075 
154,505 


Increase 
Decreane 


35 


1,118 


106 


1,163 


106 


6,069,758 


147.038 


23.570 



140 



NBW ZBAI>AND OFFIOIAt. YBAK-BOOK. 



ManafMsturea or Produce lor 
the Y««ni 19 aJid IW}— eont. 



CMUtia T««r. 



Skin* Baited or 
»*n»*^-, Pr«erved. 



Other 
Prodacts. 



1901 

van 



IneresM 
DecrasM 



No. 
272,775 
S.'i6,91t- 



584,143 



No. 
4,031,974 
1,418,792 



2.613,182 



£ 
64,296 



Total 
Valae of 
P'oduce 

and Manu- 
f&cturas 
for tlie 

Ypan 1000 
and 189 -. 



Approximate Valoe of 



I«Dd. 



Bnlld- 
ings. 



£ 

1,888,107 
1,237,252 



650,853 



£ 
52,819 
41,490 



10,829 



£ 

102.855 
77,186 



25,669 



Uachlaer; 

and 

Plant. 



£ 
80,778 
53.739 



28.049 



Ship and Boat Building. 

The reports on the censuses of 1891 and 1896 were to the eflFect 
that this industry was not shown as a thriving one by the returns. 
In the table now put forward the results are better, as to number of 
hands employed, vessels built, and total value of all manufacture for 
the vear 1900. But the number of establishments has fallen from 
40 to 32, and boat-building is shown to have declined. 



CrmuaYear. 



I'JO! 






N amber 

of 

Yardi. 


Hands 
empluyid. 

M, 


Wage! paid. 


Total Valna of a)] 

Man u facto -«■ 

(includinfE R«pairB>, 

ISOO and le«5. 


H. 


»2 
40 


211 
108 


£ £ 

13,476 45,811 

6,724 25,283 


8 


103 


6,752 20,578 



Sail, Tent, and Oilskin Factokies. 

A« V'lth thf; nbip and boat-building yards, these industries ^how 

^'U-/ fti-v: IN the number of woiks. but a considerable increase in 

Mm i,<i '•wr of hands employed, and in the value of the output 

Tf.'t VA*! Vitl'J" '■jf manufactures in 1900 was returned at £44,854. 



<>fik'iB Vi-ar 


1. * 
it 

■?■ 

■■¥> 

'A 


HBtiH. 
M, Y. 

l-Vl 8! 
'.fl .01 


Wages paid. 


III 


"J—^" Approiimate Value of 




M. K. 


<d z * ' — ; •- 

t. =g Land. ,^^ 'and Plant. 




i £ £ 

10.44C 1, 91)6-24, 62;^ 

r,,^m l,3Gl .. 


£ £ £ 
t-1.854 -22,976 15.700 
Hil.lGC13.106; 9,835 


£ 
2,217 
693 


It '/riiH! 


4,786 635 


■■ 


U,CS8 9.871 


5,875 


1,524 



woollen uills. 
Furniture Factories. 



141 



In this branch of industrial work fuller returns have been 
obtained for 1901 than were secured in 1896. It may be taken, 
however, as & fact that a substantial rise took place during the five 
years in the operations of these establishments. 



OoDHUi Yr&r. 


m 

a. 


HuidB 
employed. 


WogeB paid. 


Motive-power. 


H. 


F, 


M. F. 


Steam. 


Water. 


Gu. 


Oil. 


Eleo- 
trio. 


1901 


144 1 1,243 


67 


88.843 


£ 
2,262 


17 


4 


29 


2 


3 


Cenaas Ye&r. 


1 

; Value 
Horse- of 


Total 

Value of all 

Manaiac- 

tures. 


Approximate Value of 


power. 


Material 
ii»ed. 


r,ind. 


BuildlugB. 


M&ahlnerT 
and Plant. 


1901 


H.-p. £ 
369 101,595 


£ 
241,024 


£ 
75,200 


£ 

71,884 


£ 
23,254 



Chemical Works. 

There was up to 1896 a steady growth in the value of the 
manufacture, from £34,283 in 1885 to 41,586 in 1890, and to 
£76,320 in 1895 ; but the value of output for 1900 was £64,834 
only. Ninety-five hands were employed at last census in eight 
establishments. 

Woollen Mills. 

The woollen mills of the colony are now ten in number, and 
employed 1.693 persons in 1901, 769 being males, and 924 females. 
These factories, therefore, provide more occupation for women and 
girls than for the male sex. The increase in male bands emploved 
is from 655 in 1896 to 769 in 1901, and in females from 761 to 924. 
In 1891 there were only 373 women and 200 girls. 

As ^o value of manufacture of alt kinds, the increase is at the 
rate of 19 per cent, for five years; the figures being £302,423 for 
1895 and £359,382 for 1900. 

The increase in quantity of tweed made, from 1,297.012 yards in 
1895 to 1,445,867 yards in 1900, or about 12 per cent., is not so 
great as that in flannel, the production of which reached 1,191,234 
yards for 1900. The produciion of blankets has also greatly 
developed, the figures being 28,576 pairs in 1895, and 49,523 
pairs in 1900. Bugs, shawls, hosiery, and yarn also show high 
increases : — 



112 



NBW ZlSAliANU OFFtCIALi YBAH-BOOK. 





o 
it 
o 

u 

s 

1 

r. 


employed, j vva„es. 

] 


HuhiiM- power 
Dwd. 




CenaDB Year. 


U. 


P. 


M. 


P. 


CD 


1 


pow«r. 


1901 . . 
1896 


10- 
9 


769 ' 924 
655 761 


£ 
71,454 

59.533 


40.547 9 1 3 
32,036 ' 9 ; 2 


H-p. 
1,554 
1,400 


Increase 


1 


114 163 ! 11.871 

1 ' 


8,511 .. 1 .. 


164 



Census Year. 



Wool UHod in 1900 
anil 1S95. 



Quantity. 



Value. 






Hanutaetares tor the Tears 1900 
and it»S. 



Tweed. 



1901 
1896 



Increaso 
De'.:cc»se 



Lb. 

3,257,31!' 
3,485,893 



22.S,574 



£ 
162, 

100.135 



62,785 



£ 
920{43,161 

39,]8:i 



C,021 



Yds. 
1.445,867 
1,297,012 



148,855 



do h. 



Flannel. 



Blaa- 
ketB. 



Yda. 
357,228 



357.228 



Y U. Pair*. 

l,liU.2S»;49.623 

554,256,28,570 



636,978 20, 94T 



llaniifacttiri'B for Ye&rx 
1 1. '1.0 and 183J— ctHifrf. 


Total 
Value 

of 
Manu- 
factures. 


Approiimate Value of 


Census Year. 

Slia»ls 

nlld 
' KUKS. 

1 


Shirting. 


= 53 


I.a»d. 


»ulld- 

iUKS. 


Ma- 

cbinery 

aud 

Plant. 


1901 .. .. ' 26,806 ' 

1896 .. .. 20,020 j 15,3R4 


r 
t 


£ 
3.5!l,362 
302,423 


£ 
11,264 
11.050 


£ 
93,454 
68,353 


£ 
172,704 
144,066 


Increase .. i 6,786 | 
Dtcrensc .. ] .. | 15,384 


56,959 


214 


26,096 


28,639 



* One mill not iu npi'vation. 

■t "Otiipr iiianiifactiiri'»"io 10(<(i coi-tiiKtiui of 'i-iLMillj. vani and S'.MO dozen horleryi 
and ill lMir>. of ir>KHi:211i. anii ^.1^ KiiiudloH of yurn. 2i.iA7 doKcu and iit<,0001b. of bosierj, 
^Mkl kt.itt->(i ganiieutt. Bud 13.<XXi inuca. 

Clothing .-^nd WATKnrKOOF Factories. 

The number of iiands increased from 307 males and 1,761 
females to 431 males ami '2.081 females in five years. Employing, 
as it now does, about 2,500 persons, this industry ranks high in 
regard to the absorption of i.ibour, esp^iciiiUy tiiat of tlie female sex, 
of whom over two thousand are require I, a'i above shown. 



BOOT AND SHOE FACTORIES. 



U3 



The value of all manufacture for the vear 1900 was returned at 
£329.026, against £258,352. in 1895. 

The making of waterproof garments is also shown to have de- 
veloped considerably, whether conducted in conibinauon with 
clothing factory work of the ordinary kind, or as independent 
estabUshmenta. 

ClOTBIMO P&CT.-iRIEtl. 



CaniuB Year. 


o ■ 

i 

3t 
9.^ 


Hands 
em ploy od. 


Wages paid. 


^ o i Tntal 
u g , Value ot 
g g, , Hanu- 
o o fa^itureg, 
Bb IWtOBnd 
<2. 1935- 


Approiimato Value d( 




M. 


F.- 


M. 


F. 


Land. 


Build- 

inaa- 


Mftctiinery 
and I'lant. ; 


1901 
1896 


21 
27 


431 
307 


2,081 
1,751 

330 


£ 
37,778 
20,450 


£ 
63,023 
16,789 


H.-p. 1 £ £ £ 
67 1329. 02631, 20046, fil5 

(J2 258.35218,550 29,900 

1 


£ 

11,432 
8,264 


IncreiBO 
DecroasD 


6 


124 




11,328 


16,234 5 ' 70,674 12,65010.715 


3,178 



In addition to clothing factories, six establishments were in 
1901 engaged in the n)aiiufacture of waterproof garmenls only. 
These in 1900 turned out 15.384 waterproofs, valued at £13,378 ; 
besides which 25,196 waterproof garments were made in the cloth- 
ing factories. 

WATKaPROOF MaKINQ 



CensuB Tear. 


is 


Hands 
employed. 

M. ] F. 

I 


Wage 
M. 


1 
) paid. ' 

F. 

"£~ 

2,822 
2,540 


1901 
1896 


6 
4 


22 
15 


£ 
92 1,807 
78 ' 1,344 


Inorea-e 
Decrease 


2 


7 


14 


469 


2B2 



Approximate Value of 



o ^ 
R 

H.-p. 
S 
2 



1 



Land. 



£ 

3,020 
2,650 

370 



Build- 
ings. 



£ 

3,655 
1,900 



1,755 



Machinerr 
! and Plant. 



£ 
1,170 
706 



404 



Boot and Shoe Factories, 

The total'value of all manufactures, as brought out. is £529,254 
for 1900. The output from the factories during 1900 was 1,161,873 
pairs of boots and shoes, 104,583 pairs of slippers, and 166,027 
pairs of uppers. 

Excluding gum-boots, during 1900 boots and shoes to the value 
of £187,629 Wfre imported into the colony, nearly the whole being 
subject to a duty of 22J^ per cent. The United Kingdom supplied 
to the value of £126,705, and the United States of America £42,658. 
Besides these were imported boot and shoe vamps and uppers, 
valued at £8,100. The exports of leather, the produce of the 



144 



MBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAB-BOOK. 



«oloDy, during the same period, were valued at £112,867, and of 
boots and shoes made in New Zealand, £534. 



CeoBUS Yoar. 


Is 

2 


Hands 
employed. 


Wages p&id. 


Power. 




M. 1 P. 


1 
M. i F. 

1 


SMBm.|wuer. 


e. 


Bwid 
Knd 
Oil. 


1901 


126* 1,906 


790 


105,227 


£ 
27,216 


•■ 


2 


26 


98 


H.p 

184 



C«DBUB Year. 



Value 

□r 

. Mate- 

I rials 
I listed In 



Mauoracliires for tbe Years 
1900 and 1895. 



ISOOaDdi"^^""^ SlipperB. 



Uppers. 



Total 
Value 

of 

Manu- 

facturee 



ApproiimaW Value ol 



Land- 



Bniid- 



Ha- 

cltiiiBry 

and 
Plant. 



1901 



£ 
273,325 



Pftire. 

1,161,67.3 



Pair?. 
104,583 



Patb. 
166,027 



£ 
o29,2M 



57,415 



& 
70,189 



£ 

49,388 



*lDcludliig a number of small bootmakloR coneenut whiefa were not dealt alth 
' factories " at the previous ccusuh. 



Hosiery Factories. 

At the census of 1896 returns were obtained from 7 stocking- 
weaving factories, employing 1 male and 132 females. The wages 
paid amounted to £2,541, and the value of the output to £9,357. 
The census of 1901 shows a very large increase on these figures, as 
will be seen in the statement given herewith. 



Census Yoar. 



^ 


; 


o 


" 1 


u 


". 


a, u : 


.0 


o 


F 


u 




•: 


y. 


h. 



Rands 
employed. 

M. F. 



Waees paid. 



M. 



F. 



Motive Power. 
Bteam. Oos. 



Horse- 
power. 



1901 



17* 17 



£ £ 

2C5 I,3-2S 6,702 



5 



H.p. 
71 



Value 

of 

Uaterial 

used. 



£ 
18,032 



MaDiiIactureB for the Year 1900. 



S ° I Approximate Value ot 



-, V _ ' ■ Shirts 0thi>r 

*^"^"* ■'■"■ HaK-hose.l Hose, ■ sLd Knitlad 

Pants. Qoods. ^ a j i 

«S Tanri Build- 
Quantity. Quantity. QiiantUy Value. ' H*^ I i-ana. | ,^^ 



Machinerj 
and Plant. 



1901 



Dozpn. n.-^ZPii. I)r.z n. £ : £ ' £ 

H9,001 ii,529 1,0.53 ■ 480 ;31,265' 4,605 

I ! ! ; 



£ 
6,790 



£ 
8,602 



* (>Q(^ factory not in oticratioa in 190n, and one fnecorv iu operation itiv moalbe oalj, 
NoTH.—Tlie nbovn tai>le dotts nut includti 5.1,03) dostn hose, half-bose, nnder-etairti, 
pant*, and other kuitted garuienis whicb are eiveu in "WooUen-Iactonea" ratum. 



FHORMIUM MILLS. 



145 



BoPE AND Twine Works. 
Bope and twine making would appear to have advanced since 
1895, to judge from the value of all manufactures given in the re- 
turns, which amounted to £U7,863 for the year 19U0, against £52,400 
five years before. Nevertheless, the actual quantity of rope made 
represented in weight is shown as slightly less than at the earlier 
census year. As to materials used, phoriiiium comes by far the 
first, 1,502 tons for 1900 being utilised, against 1,452 tons in 1895. 
Of manila only 291 tons were used, against 169 in 1395. 



C«asus Yeu-. 

1901 .. 
1896 .. 


N amber 

of 
Works. 

17 
24 


HacdB 
employed 


1 Waees 
PHld. 


! 


dotWe Power. 


HoTse- 


H. 

192 
150 


. M. 

£ 

13,136 

6,B40 


1 

6 
5 


Wftter. 

4 
6 

2 


Oas. 

1 


Horae. 

1 


power. 

H.-p. 
494 
2U0 


Incraasa 
Decrease 


.. 1 42 

7 , 
1 


6,2d6 


1 i 

: ■■ i 


1 


1 


214 


1 
CeDHus Tear. 


Materi&lH used in 1900 and 1895. 


Phormiua). 


Manila. 


Otber Materiala. Total Value. 


1901 . - 
1896 . . 


ToDB. 

1,502 
i.452 


£ 
28,663 
19.251 


Ton p. 
291 
169 


£ 

13,140 

4,664 


Tona. 
87 
85 


£ 
4,575 
4,335 


£ 
46,378 
28,250 


lucreKSQ 


50 


9.412 


122 


8,476 

= = - 


2 


240 


18,128 




Mauntac 


ares tor 1900 HJ)dl8}S 


Approximate ' 


/alue of. 


CenBna Year. 


Rope , Lines, Twine 


Other 

Uaiiufao 
turei. 


Laud. ' Buildings. 


Macliinerj' 

aud 

Plant. 


1901 .. 
1896 .. 


;Torm. Toas.' Ton- 

1 274 . 85 . 1,727 
j 289 27 , 1,327 


Tons. 
295 

37 


£ 
1 87,863 
. 52,400 


£ : £ 

6. 546 9.313 

7,247 6,855 


£ 
39,450 

26,859 


lDOr<>ase 
Decrease 


.. 1 58 , 40tl 
15 

1 


258 


35.463 


.. 1 2,458 

701! 


12,591 



Phormium Mills. 

A complete collapse in this industry was shown by the returns 
of 1896. At that time only 52 mills were left in operation, and the 
hands employed had fallen in number to 484 men and 163 boys. 
The returns for 1901 show a revival in the mills to 101 in operation, 
with 1,619 men and 179 boys. In 1891 there were 177 mills with 



146 



HEW ZBAbAND OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOK. 



2,169 men and 1,029 boys, so that the development obtained 10 
years ago has not) been recovered in fall, thoagh the posUioa has 
improved greatly since 1896. The wages paid stood at £101,016 for 
the year 1900 ; nearly 100,000 tons oE raw material were used, and 
12,000 tons of fibre dressed, besides 1,000 tons of tow produced. 
The monev value of the total output was £203,492, against £32,546 
in 1895, and £234,266 m 1890. 

The export of phormium for twelve years has been as under : — 

Exported. VmJue. 

To DO. £ 

21,168 931,789 

15,809 281,514 

12,799 214.543 

12,587 219,375 

4,677 60,256 

1,806 21,040 

2,968 32,985 

2,709 30,CT4 

4,8.M) 74,556 

10,371 184, 4U 

15,906' 332,182 

10,171 195,728 

* Tlila is greater than tbe qu«ii(jly roturued as drsMed in 1900. 

The uncertainty thai has attended enterprise in the matter of 
flax-niiiliiig still remains, but an Act has been passed forbidding the 
shipping of phormium for exportation from New Zealand unless it 
has been previously inspected by a Government otficial, and graded 
under regulations which have bten made for the purpose. This 
will have the efl'ect of preventing badly-dressed flax of an inferior 
quality from being sent away, and thus injuring the reputation of 
the article generally by depreciation. 

The most important particulars given in the returns are tabulated 
below. 



Year. 




1890 




1891 




1892 




1893 




1894 




1895 




1896 




1897 




1898 




1899 




1900 . 




1901 





CeDEiiB Year. 


Hands 
Number i emplojed. 

of { 


^^'a^vs 

paid. 

-^— - 

101,046 
17,544 




dachine-iiowAr ai«d. 




Works. 


Meu. 


Hoys, 

179 
lf.3 


Steam. 


Water. 


1901 

18u6 . . 


101 
52 


1,519 

484 


7ft 
23 


34 

30 


Incrense 


49 


1,035 


10 


83,502 


52 


4 


Census Yoar. 


Amount ^-„ „, 
Hnru.. Maetiinos 


Raw Maturinl used. 
1900 and 1893. 


Fibre drenRed, 1900 
and less. 




poTer. "-' 


- 


Quantity. Value. 




Quantitj'. 


Valns. 


1901 

1896 


H. ,.. 

1,190 
553 


105 
65 


T..I.H. 

90,571 
21,770 


53,06 
7,77 


1 Tims. 
i I 12,035 
5 1 2.9y9 


201,235 
31,771 


Inoreft'ie 


637 


40 




74,81 


31 


4S,289 1 9,036 


169,464 



MINES AKD QUABRIB8. 



147 



OeiiBUB Yoar. 


Tow produced. 


Total 
Value at 
Out|.ut, 

lOUO 
ai)<1 IB95. 


Approximate Value ol 


Quftntity. 


Value. 


Land. 


BulldlBgs. 


Macbinery 
and Plaut. 


1901 

1B96 


Tons. 

],063 

406 


£ : £ 
2,257 1 203.492 
776 32,546 


£ 
24,644 

12,448 


£ 

11,212 

6,531 


£ 
28,590 
12,380 


Incriiaae 


656 


1,482 170,946 


12,)96 


4,681 


16,210 



MINES AND QUAERIES. 

GOLD-QUAKTZ MiNING AND OltUSHING. 

Returns were received for 120 gold-quartz mining and crushing 
works in 1901. In 1896 there were 168 of these returned, and 135 
in 1891. Of 120 quartz-crushing works in 1901, employing 4,333 
hands, 78, with 3,370 persons employed, belonged to Auckland 
Provincial District, being located at the Thames, Waihi, and sur- 
rounding country. 

The census tables show £796,871 as the total value of the gold 
obtainpd by quartz-crushing in the year 1900. ConipariBon with the 
two previous censuses shows the output in 1895 (£492,478) to have 
been higher than that of 1890, but considerably less than than that 
for ]900, quoted above. 

The value of the machinery and plant for quartz-crushing in- 
creased from £241,715 in 1890, and £335,474 in 1895, to £733,927 
in 1900. 



CeDim Tear. 



Number 
of Worlie. 



HuDdn 
employed. 



1901 
1896 



Increase 
Decrease 



120 
168 



48 



M. 



4,333 
2,814 



1.519 



w««paid. "^^^itr'""\ 



Steain. ! Water. ' 



£ 

382,058 
226,791 

155,867 



148 
49 

99 


74 
70 

4 



Horse- 
power. 



H.-p. 
5,919 
3,688 

2,231 



Ceo BUB Tear, i 



1901 
1896 

Increase 



Quarts 
cruslied. 



Tons. 
356,058 
163,743 

192,315 



Gold 

produced 

1000 aud legy 



Oz. 
214,789 
140,612 



65,177 



Sliver 

produce'1 

lOUU and 1895. 



Oz. 

326,457 

81,302 

245,155 



Value ot 

Gold and Silver 

prrKliiceil 

1900 aud 1895. 



£ 
796,871 
492,478 

301,393 



Approximate 

Value of 

Mnobinery 

BUd Plant. 



735,927 
335,474 

400,453 



148 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAK-UOOK. 



HtDBAULIC GoLD-MININa. 

Beturns for the purposes of the table showing results of hydrauHe 
gold-mining were obtained from public companies and parties of 
miaers operating on a large scale ; but, so far as the numbers of 
persons employed are concerned, nothing like the actual facts are 
disclosed, and the quantity of gold shown to have been won must 
fall far short of the true total. The number of men engaged in all 
kinds of alluvial gold-mining during the year ended 31st March, 
1901, was 7,659 Europeans and 1,576 Chinese. Of these nearly 
1,000 were employed in dredging. The hands employed shown in 
the tables for the two classes of alluvial mining number 1,927, so 
that there must be some 7,300 Europeans and Chinese whose earn- 
ings are not included in the tables. 



Ceasaa Year. 


Number 

of 
Works. 


HandB 
eiuploj ed 


Maciiioe-power 
used. 


Amount 

ol 
Horse- 
power. 


Claim M working Day 

aod Night, or 

Day only. 


M. 


Water. 


Electricity 


1901.. 
1896.. 


130" 
105 


962 
714 


21 
26 


2 
2 


H.-P. 
342 1 

156 1 


Day and nignt, 3T 
Day only, 87 
Day and iifght,3& 
Day only, 73 


Iticnase 
Ducreane . . 


25 


218 


7 




186 


■• 




Expenditure during 1900 »nd 1B05. 


1 

' Yield of 
i Gold. 


Value ot 


CeoBue Year. 


Labour. 


1 Water. 


riant ai 
HepairE 


dl Uanase- 

. ! uient. 

1 


Total. 


Gold. 



1901 .. 
1896 .. 

Increase 
Decrease 



£ 
76,00B 
48,964 



27,044 



£ 
19,998 
17,414 



1,984 



26,373 
40,183 



13,810 



6,652 

7,208 



556 



£ I Ob. 
128,4311 35,059 
113,769, 31,101 



14,662 3,898 



£ 
135,944 
122,871 



13.078 



■ Six miaes were not ia operation durine 1900. 



GoLD-DItBDQlNO. 

During the quinquennial period 1895-1900 this class of industry 
has become of great importance, not only as a gold-producer, but 
from the fact that all the works in connection with the building and 
repairing of dredges is done in the colony. The number of dredges 
increased from 35 in 1895 to 145 in 1900, and the hands employed 
from 2o8 to 965. The yield of gold during 1900 was 71,778 os., 
valued at £287,061, against 18,124 oz. and £70,016 in 1895. The 
expenditure in 1900 was as follows ; — 



qold-dhbdoiko. 



149 



Labonr . . 

OOftl, plAnt, And repftlra 



t 

78,238 

1SS,IH& 

16,806 



Total .. .. .. .. £363,6^ 

The capital invested in dredging is £690,130, aod the value of 
machioery and piaut £526.600. Of the lotal nomber. 121 dredges 
beloDRod to the Oiogo Provincial District, 23 to Nelaon s,ad Weet- 
laud, uud 1 to Marlboi'ough. 



CwKua Tm. 


Nuictwr 




Uand* 
Vmiloyed. 


Ua«tiiac-pover oaad. 


Amount of 


Wurha. 


M. 


Stoftm. 


WAtar. 


•pMlBed. 


BanC' power. 


1901 

1896 .. 


146* 
3& 


065 
356 


134 
30 


S 

a 


9 


H.-p. 
8. Oil 

yes 


DeareftHB 


190 


707 


104 


1 





a. 078 




Eipapdltiira during I9QD ftnd IMS. 


Yitia 

at 

Gold. 


Vtino 
or 

Oold. 




OMOMHiTaar. 


LttlMur. 


Coa.1. 
P1*DC, It ad 
BappAln. 


Uuiwe- 


ToUI. 


g°2a' 


IflM 

1886 


78 .2M 
27,iai 


]88,t>4« 
2S , 159 


16.908 


< 

2S9.S93 

.513,517 


o». 

71,778 

18.124 


367,061 1 528.600 
70,016 1 &6.003 


Inoieiue 


51,11* 


162.897 ' 13.044 


530,045 


53.CS4 1 217,045 ' 4*2,597 



* Inoludinii 31 On^mm not Id ov«railon durios 1000. ftnd 10 droditoi foe wtioti no pftr- 
tlcnUn a1 oparaliaua ooulil bo obiained. Tliroo of thu dradin warn ttorkmg a law 
moottiaoiily. 

Tl tnuat bft rememhf^red that a great part of the gold yield in the 
colony is ohtained h-om alluvial workings, of which no returns are 
required by the Census Act to be rendered, so that the figures yiven 
abov* most not be regarded as 8howin<( any approach to the total 
productiou, which amounted to £1,439,602, or, with silver, £1,478,481, 
lor ihe year 1!)00, 

Thti leturus for quarl£-uiiuiug uud gold-dred^in^^ are beUevod to 
be fairly correct, but those far hydraulic iiiiuiug fall far short of the 
total, ^o attempt has been made to obtain returns from iudividual 
mmers or small partteii, aiid these uoiuprise tho buik of the alluvial 
luioers. 

Colli BUiBS. 

The table shows the full output of all the collieries iu the colony 
during l&OO. The quantity uiiued w«« 1,093,990 tous, ayaiuat 
726,651 in lt^95, an increa&u of 367.336 touK or over 50 per cent. 
The quantity imported during 1900 was lli4,033 tons, and tiic uxport 
amounted to 1H,368 tons, 112,707 tons of which were New Zealftiid 
produce. The number of petBonH employed in coal-minuigincreaaed 
from 1,799 in 1895 to 2.460 in 1900, and the value of machinei-v and 
plant from £148,367 in 1896 to £372,093 in 1301. 

II — Vaar>book 






T«ii». t 

l,(K^a,gtio 86a.7R7 



Appnisl- 
ToMl I iDAta 
Valav or I VkiiMof 
Oaipul. ^M InwT 



MO.TTB 873.003 



NOTK,— t(«veraJ prlvAhi miuos worhad ttjr owoon for Uwif own rminliaDieiita kj* not 
iD0lui>6<l Id itia AbovA. 

SuMHAHibiiD Results. 
A suintiiary of all tba information obtained under the Onsus Act 
relaliag u> mmes tvnd quarries is appeuded : — 





Number DtWorka. 


SaDibotoI H&Ddftan]pJ«T«& 


\ 


ism. 


XBOe. tS9U 


leoft uea. 


tab 


<}oid-<]u»rts mining and erushing 

wofki 
Htdfaul-a gold miDiEig.. 
[J 'Id dredgiug 
Oulli«iii>«|( 

Bwna (roftameU'. if).) (iu»riaa 

ToUl« 


ISO 

130 
14A 
145 

8 


168 

305 1 
36) 

IM 

IS 


ISA 

74 

95 

9 


4.88S 
f 963 

3,460 

SB 


3,614 

744 ) 

1,7»9 
S9 


1.971 

1.655 

35 


TjIB 


484 


313 


8.77ft 


5.674 


4.130 



f 





&pprojtimU« Value of Oulput. 


ApptotiiBkM Vain* nf M*Milnairy 
KadPtut 




1900. 


leSG. 


1890. 


1000. iao& 


TASn. 




£ 


£ 


S 


4 


< 


J 


Oold qHn.rtzm>ninf[ 


796.871 


492,478 


278,693 


735.1HT 


335. 4T< 


141,715 


ikDil cruflDlngwor 


kB 












'SjarAUlic gold- 


136,044 


113.769 




1307,750 


• 




mitims 
O^-<1d'dr0dRlng 




■ 


78,73a; ■ 


■IM.STO 


287,061 


70.016 


1 &36,G00t 


:86,003 1 


CollUri' »S 

Sbane (buiHioR) 


540.776 


370.400 


279,777, 872.003 


148,367 ;iB£,671 


2,793 




1 






quarriM 




6.041 


4,467 


4,6G0 


4,070 


6,744 


Bwi'O (nHMl'instaJ, 


8,8il 












Ac) quarriM 












Total- . . 


1.77I,B18 


i.i»a.70t 


536.8701. 819. CWO 


573. 914- 533,400 



• VO.U* oln]»cb]»«T> ■n<l|>lani atai m iiydrtuLicsDld-oiminKitot rotnmt-l: eaplUI 
Iiiv«*l«d, iSOAiSn. t Capital luneniod. Inroiaiatlnti liiDain]il>t«, ;Ca Ital inr<«t«d. 

JIftlJMU. I KiguiM (tir iwwa MKen rroui M ues Kai>i>rt; c«n«u ntarc* l.«uad uhwi0- 
p)«|w, and tsBulLt uot rallablo. Value ol outpui lakan at \ttm, par ion. 




IUPOBT8-~8faowlag tIm In the Value of Importa to New Zealand 
(uoliwlT* of Spaol«i, 18d& to 1901. 



Import* fnnt VnlUd EiDsdcm — ihown thw : 

^H • Autralia uid Tacmuifa 

^H oiW Britub piMMuioDi 

^H fortifn MUDtriM 

I 



P 






£898,«M 



£$)3.AAC 



£Sn,li4 



£9»,61$ 



£a,970.1ftO 



MBMM 



£661,083 



£&6.m 



£989.980 



£4,71S.»ro 



£996.983 



£fi,a3e,84II 



£l.lfi3.6%> 



£768.959 



£1.140.03S 



£5,14S.803 



£1,175,990 



£099,968 



£1,211,688 



£$.na&.13H 



£1^16,140 



£2.01S,3ia 



£984,548 



SMAjnt 



£1.889.008 



£6.453.784 



£1,979,330 



£6,985.831 



£6.118,053 £7.080,379 £7.994,901 £B.9ll,4O0 £8.619,666 £10,907,386 £11,817,915 

1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 - 






rfle=- iKT ix.-3ss 



"»Ii» III IT "arTamw *^ ^»T'n *T^ sacvmlj^ 3M wr^mi^ 
=«i«att xiazaEuanwiL. <c ^ioRMptVirc tot 3«$!ict»£ k» 
— -■' ■ *> a» macmiBti iir 3ih TMinEcr* witKn t: k. t&MOkOK «r wM 
£r TrgnTwnrTT ac nr asaiatnc js- nM» v x;«» mt ^m>» »t:K--Mic xht 
ixsut -VST a Tmnua j ^mrt - 3irrAt^ S4>« Jiwanif. 

=IL_~^-=)2i-. Taem t^itt^ m^wtwa:, m^Jnof smumv IS* «iU«t « 
=a tL ipnuiac nor sik ftmnrr m I:*rc ««s- «3#»i* <^k nfnun^ ^a^jtv *t 



:»» 



uas: 

ZHiT 

Tie *3=ifcisani: 3c-T«-T-»«Ei ,■c«*^,•T«^a «s ^wvw^i^ f&SKV' i^*« *,■* 



4 


i 


^ Jit.W 


h*»t^i» 


f.AWvJVS 


i^mt^io^ 


».«f.a» 


Kiaf^tat 


f. JIK^ j«!i 


i. iSSi^-MK 


•f. J^<^.M» 


i./'^&.f^ 


». a: :» 


•vc^ir^ 


f-'^ssftir 


.v*w.:"- 


1. «w. r» 


*^.;5K,«S!. 


- ..<■ s« 


'■.*».5?^ 


i^iS.-. sss 


-.»•,«£ 


KSftf-,tW 


*^ia:,«» 


?^.-sf.*a» 


j^JvlJ^lWf 


^t. iMi-,n» 


Vv«f .S»f 


:;,N.- «). 


:;.s!*,of 




SECTION n.— IMPORTS; CUSTOMS AND EXCISE 
REVENUE. 

iHronTS. 
Tav. quantities and values of imports used in m&kiQg up the Gguros 
givtiu iu this portion of tbe statistical iaformatiou aro obtuiiied 
from Customa tiQtrics, voridod wbore oecessary, ae with goods subject 
to an ad valorem duty, by uxamiuatiou. For uxports, the " free on 
lioant in New Zealand " valui) is ^ivGD ; but, as regards the main 
items, the Coiluctor oi CuatoiiiK examines curofully thei amounts 
stated, ibnd compares tliBiii with eiirrent pncQ-liHtis, to prevent ar.y 
over-estimate. Goods transhipped at a foreign port are regarded aa 
imported from the country where they were orifpnally shipped, and 
exports as destined for the country where it is intended to land 
them. The countries named, however, may not be those of origin 
or destination, as no attempt h made to trace the goods beyond the 

g arts disclosed by the documents presonced to the Customs. Vfiry 
b&la Cftrgo in transitu passes through Kew Zealand. 
The total declared values of the imports in 1901 amounted to 
£11,817.915, being an increase on the corresponding total in 1900 of 
£l.l7i,S19. These figures, however, include specie. The value of 
coin brought into the colony in 1901 was Jg4Ql,499, against £433.770 
in Che previous year, and if these- auiounts are excluded, the increase 
oa the values of all other articles will be found to reach the sum of 
£1.146,090. 

The valuo of imports for oach of the past fourteen years was ; — 



YOAT, 

1888 

ISRS 
IB'JO 

IB'JS 
1B94 
I89a 

18^7 

IS'M 

istra 

IDOO 

laoi 



Iiup'urU. 

Inclusive of 

S|focic. 

5,941,900 
6,306,868 
6. 260, SOS 

fl,50.t,R49 
6,943:,(»6 
0,9n..!16 
6,788.020 
0,40^,129 
7,137,3-20 
6.0!,r,.\l)i3 
8, 230, GOO 
8. 7.19. 633 
10,046.006 
I1.B17,»I5 



ltii)>ortB. 

sxolualVQot 

Siiocio. 

6,450,050 
a.SHO.MU 

»,4:)i,iui 
6, 74:1, 544 
ti,4iM.STll 

6,y90.177 
6,U5,95S 

7,0.'i5,37y 

7,ain,a)i 

&,2ll,40'J 

8,013,050 

10,307.396 

ii.afls.iie 



The expansion movem>ent observed as proeetidiuij; since 1S94 bo 
1900 is found to have been continued durinj^ the year 1901, and 
at a high rate of increase; but the figures inuhide about half a 
million of money for railway plant imported by <Jovernmont. 

It will be seen thai the value of impoits. exclumve of siwcie. rose 
from £5,430,050 in 1888 to £6,743.544 in 1892, thf^n fell to 




dJ 



IS3 



Nli.W ZEALAND OFFICIAL YKAK-UOOK. 



£5,990,177 in 1894, afber which there ensaed a steady advance ye&r 
by yea.!- lo £11,353,416 in 1901. The movement for the period 
189'4-1901 16 a rise at the rate of 90 per cent, in monoy value, or 
a sum of £^,363,389 : for the ten years, 1892-1901, the increaae »J 
£4,610,a72, or 68 por cent. In quftiititie* of various imports the 
iucreattes vary, and full particulars of every kind of article imported 
in 1901 are to be found in detail further on, which may be critically 
exainioed with those in similar tables given in the previouB Ycar- 
booka. 

The degree of expenditure of loan moneys by the geuoral and 
local GoveruQicut may somewhat affect the qucBtiou whuD oon-j 
sidcriug the rise of imports. And, wheu ooUBulciui,^ tho oyures re- 
lating IQ expenditure out of loan accouuts, thu matter of aids from 
thfi Cousolidatod Fund (which are includtid) pro&ents itself, besides 
other features in canneclion with this sabjtict. 

The expansion of imports i» still furthor to be considered in coii> 
nectian wiih the condition of the nianufacturBs of the colony, for an 
increase ol imports arising from a decline of internal manufacturea 
would scarcely be regarded as a satisfactory position. But Sec- 
tion I., preceding this, exhibits a most substantial general develop- 
ment of the maniifacturps o( New Zealand since 1895, not only in 
tho great primary industries, but throughout. 

It is desirable to consider not only the total value of the import 
trod^ for different years by comparing fibres, but to ascertain the 
ratcB 2>er capita of fKJpulatiori;, to judge wliethw the iuiportK aie 
relatively greater or less than they have been. The fairest com- 
parisons are from calcutatioos nia<:le after deducting specie imported. 
Jor in the year lS9i, as an instauoe, no less than £7973i3 was. 
brought to the colony in coin. 

The figures for eacli year from 1888 stand thus: — 



Teui. 



IBBS 
1880 
1890 
ISHl 
1S92 
1693 
leSi 
180S 
1896 
1897 
1«89 

ismo 

I90L 



InipOTlB VBW liead ot mnui PapuUUoii,. 



luoludiDK 


Eicludlug 


Spwla. 


SpMlc. 


< 1. d. 


C k. d. 


& 16 4 


8 lu a 


10 S 6 


g IK & 


10 S 


9 11 


10 e 6 


10 4 8 


10 16 a 


10 9 11 


10 


9 16 ft 


9 19 U 


8 10 9 


» « 10 


8 16 8 


10 1 11 


19 1 


11 8 8 


II 1 7 


11 3 T 


11 8 1 


11 18 1 


11 9 8 


IB 18 10 


13 T 4 


IS 8 10 


U'll 11 



Using the figures exclusive of the specie, it will be seen thab» 
though comparisons for years since 1888 do not show by any means 
a steady rise sincu that year, the positioa is that whereas the 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^p 


^m imports proper were only £8 IQs. fid. p«r head of population in the 
^B first period of x>he table, they had increased by £5 12s. 6d per head 


^1 in 1901, and increase is observed in oach year's figares since 1894, 


^M amouDting Co £6 15s. 6d. for the last eight years. 


^B l3y meacis of the accompanying table, in which the articles 


^P imported are arranged lu groups according to their naturo, the 


^m increases in valae oaa be traced to their gpeclBe heads : — ^m 


^H 1MP0HT8 Poii Prra Yrabb. ^^B 


^H Gronpof Prlnctp»l ArtUlM 


1BB7. 


ues. 


1B». 


1900. 


^H 


H 


fi 


£ 


£ 


£ 


£ 


^V Apparel nnd «lopit 


363,389 


354,940 


893.689 


451.679 


463.194 


Bouii and itlioea 


133. 203 


13D.9U 


1S1,51>3 


194.811 


3U.:jI0 


Cotton pifcc-goods 


414,673 


417,789 


447, 4SK; 


fiU,G07 


■II7II.56B 


Draporv .• 


844,589 


348.890 


896,690 


438,399 


443,863 


. IlBilrarcikmhery 


TO,853 


85,98S 


84, SOB 


95,401 


110.746 


^K HbM and oapa 


«S,310 


66,416 


68.184 


66,799 


70.018 


^U Hosiu; 


«8,71M 


76,786 


90.545 


103, -JUl 


101,481 


^H Linen maoufActorai . . 


67,089 


56,573 


09,167 


83.306 


89,916 ^ 


^H Uillinory 


3S,2d5 


36,074 


36.98S 


43.318 


43.380 ^H 


■ Siiki 


71,400 


79.910 


87.6a& 


97.939 


131.987 ^H 


H Woollens 
^B TotiUi.. 

' AgriouUural implemenie 


S9S,440 


asfi.un 


21)7.387 


330,713 


348. 606 1 


1,938,B96 


1.935.009 


2,123,136 


3,420.241 


3.474.978 


ll.OUS 


17.234 


17.063 


l^.WS 


10,744 


Cutlory 


19.036 


23,722 


10.764 


aa.om 


27,149 


UardmLre nnd iron* 












nuHigerj . . 


223. (65 


349. 6C& 


355,701 


380,814 


316.380 


^_ Bail! and lailwajr boUe, 












H Ac. 


00,489 


42,778 


63,557 


118,464 


146, au 


^H IroD ftDtl xteel , oth«c, 












^H pig, i*n>ugl]t, wiro, See. 


&39,304 


6Q4,1S4 


689,162 


860,361 


683.906 


^V MaohinAry . . 


368.416 


42ii.0n 


406.55! 


536,439 


aw. 019 


^ NiiiU 


83,879 


86.793 


81.368 


46,050 


4(1.084 


RkilwAy p9»nt 


46. OSS 


57.324 


68.807 


63,128 


SU.Stl 


Sa wing - m oo h i nc H 


SI.MS 


80,613 


30.801 


37,429 


88.337 


^B Totab 
Sugar 


57.908 


70.631 


59,066 


77.447 


84.528 


1.406. lU 


1,602,794 


1.576.356 


2,113.319 


3,461.696 


873,407 


425,270 


354,925 


451.522 


489,936 


, ^ .... 

^P Total*.. 
^P Beer 


178.350 


183,717 


186,^691 


199,99* 


aiy.Ofia 


»1,757 


608,987 


038. 616 


651.406 


709,035 


39,614 


87,844 


30,166 


84.396 


34.949 


' Spirita' 


178,844 


167,020 


215,685 


11)8,283 


248,634 ^M 


Tobacco 


164.889 


161 .836 


181.179 


198,961 


331,889 ^H 


^m Wipfl 

^B ToUb.. 


50.202 


48.614; 61.640 


55.0V8 


63. 887 ^^ 


43S,04<J 


485, 214] 490,654 


486,537 


564,499 1 


^^H * laoladea maibylkbod and parhunad apiiiM, and apirita ot wine. J 



^M I5i NKW KKA1.ANU OFFICIAL YUAJt-HOOK. ^^^^^| 


^H IiironTit FOB FlvB Ybabs— confinneij. 1 


^H Gronpor Prlnoipul Artlolo* 
^H luiponixl. 


larr. 


IMM. 


IHOO. 


IOWl 


ini. 1 




£ 


£ 


£ 


£ 


£ ^j 


^H Ptiiitwl looka 


131.080 


133.901 


135.482 


174.111 


184 9fi4^^| 


11G.4S5 


109,961 


133,300 


136, 8&1 


140. air^^ 


^H Stationery 
H [ToUJ*. . 
^B Bags and Backs 


9-2,671 


98,iC9 


100.875 


96.408 


113.433 1 


387, S86 


34:1,831 


308,617 


407,410 


433. 75& 1 


104,401 


ln,uG 


133. &96 


141,810 


2I4,98T^H 


^1 Co&la 


9S,139 


105.333 


92,81S 


130,406 


1fil,S34^^H 


^H Ftkncy Rnntl* . . 


100,8'24 


108,796 


nu.ni 


128,389 


145. »JW^^ 


^H FruitK (irtuludtiiR freah. 










1 


^H pruierved, boEtlad, 
■ aried) 










1 


183.133 


181.447 


180.690 


926.188 


248. 9SS 1 


■ OiU 


163,793 


16a.523 


120,967 


306.770 


238.S9ft 1 


^B Othar Importt (exelud 










^^^1 


^^M Total ItnpnrU (ox- 


a.C86.762 


•2, 122, mo 


2,879.687 


«,flfK,ftin ^i^nRUi^^H 










1 


^^f dudiug ipema) 


7,aei,20i 


8,211,409 


8,013.6^610,207,836 


n,3&8.4l6 1 


^H Specie imporlod 

^H Total ImporU . . 


61 Mi 


1U.19I 


1^5.977 


438,770 


464. 499 I 


8,065,233 


8,230,600 


8,739,633 


10.616,096 


U,817,9L8> 1 


H 0( £iL,3o3,41G the toLal value of goods importfiJ during 1901, 1 


^^ the chief itBtuB were as umier: — ^^fl 


^■^ Article*. jwrCo.it ^^M 


^^^^L CloLtiing. clrep>>r}-, Ac. ., 2,474,978 21'AO ^^H 


^^^^H Moul, mAchiaury, uid iuiplomoQtfi.. 2,461.696 21-68 ^^H 


^^^^K Toft nnd Hitgar 70t>,0!t6 GSfi ^^H 


^^^^B Wi»e, bucr. xpirlU, and tobactco 5e<,4!>9 4-07 ^^H 


^^^^^k pK[i«r, book', and »t«.uoneiy 438, 75S 3 86 ^^^| 


^^^^H Otb«t imporu 


4,704.468 41-44 ^H 




11,353,416 100-00 ^1 


^V The declared value of the clothing, drapery, Ac., imported in- 


■ creaBed from £3,420,-211 in 1900 to £2,474,978 in 1901- Tn 1897 


^M the valufi of the import was £1,928.B96. The iron, machinery, and 


^M impknientH iniported in 1901 were valued at £2,46l,G96, an increaeo 


H of £1.055,f)85 on the corresponding figures for 1897 (£1,40G,111). 


^H The value oi itu^iLr and L^a iniporied in 1901 shows uu iticruoKd. 


^M when conipafed witli 1900, of £57.569. B«er, wine, spinls. and 


^1 tobacco show aii increftBe of £77,962, from £436.637 in 1900 to 


■ £564.499 in I9CI1. 


^M To the total value of "Other imports (excluding specie)," ia 


^M 1901 l£.'3,70<j,40o), hIiowu in thu tabiH above, armii, ainniunitioDf 


^M and explosives contrihuted a sum of £201.688; bicycles, trieyoles, 


^M and fittiTigs. £L2o.230; drugs, chemicals, and druf^gists' wares. 


H £212,430; patent medicines. £33,661 : manures. £134,186; musical 


^M instrunicnta, £1X6,396; glass and glassware. £133,434 ; carlhcuwore, 



IMPORTS. 



166 



£69,422 ; floorcloth and oilcloth, £79,479 : furniture and upholstery, 
£63,09(i : cement, £48,669 ; leather and leather manufactures, 
£75.7a3; seode. £60,669; and limbec, UlVMo-i. 

Goods tniport<<d hv iiiQants of thi* " Purceia Post " Hy&tuiu during 
1901 were valued at £109,683. 

Value of Pree axd Dutiable Imports. 

The values of the imports iuto New Zealand duriag the years 
1900 and I90I arc given in the next table, cluKsified according to 
the duties lo which ihcy were hable, and arranged so as lo show the 
declarud value of goods ou which specific or ad valc^etn duties at 
various ratuti are payable, aud of those odunCted free of duty :^ 



I 

to 

I 



PoelOT lo wtaieh [tuport* ii*bu. 


Vala* of Im 


porta. IdM. 


Valuaof Impart*, ISO). 






4 


M 


t 


i 


Speeifle daUne .. 






a,3OT,T9e 




a,404.«ei 


Ad vnlorevt duties— 












6 percent. 




339,760 




fiss.flia 




10 pftr Cflnt, .. 




ifa.im 




170.433 




15 por cent. ., 




ii^SBi 




l.';0,777 




90 per com. 




2,363.340 




2,3M,3U 




2-ij peroenC. .. 




106,825 




aos.ang 




2d per c«nt. 




B34.936 




9U4,473 




40 percent. 




I, MS 




1.086 




Variouii 




127.2S2' 




8,b75 




Para«la-poat (vanouij 




87,069 


J nni 679 


109, &a8 


4. SHI ,.194 

i.687.«ai 


Dnty-frMi (oxoliidioi; specie) 


,. 


8. 737. 9^6 


.. 


Sp«t)is Importttd . . 


^^ 


, , 


488,770 




161,409 


TotAlt 


£10.64^,096 


£11,817,918 



The- proportions of free and dutiable goods imported during 
1898. 1899, 1900, and 1901 are compftr^-d with similar figures for 
1894, the yeai' preceding that in which the altered tariff came into 
force: — 



;tM. 



laa 



WB. 



1900. 



lOU. 



UeKhkndUfl — 
I>atUbla 
ImporU (IcBB BpeGl«) 



Total nstdubyroosivcd 

Dntfipsrertit. of LiuprirU— 
ia.\ On du1i^bl<^ imporlH 
(b.) On all merolin&iiiHio 



1,871,778 
4,118,405 

5.990,177 



£ 

'J, 800,040 
5.411,363 

8.211,400 



2,342.999 

5,070,65' 



3,737.92r. 

C.473,*(W 



4.687,431 
6,(106,93'! 



B,61H,(>56 



10.ai7.326 



11,. "153. 116 



t 
1,572.467 




2.046,453 



2.174,4af- 



2,196.767 



Per Cent. 
30 09 
28 70 



Frr ceEit- 
8S-&6 
21-SO 



Por Csna 
32 96 
19 35 



* Tl>a untiunt (or 11)00. undor llin heatlirg '- Vnnoua," inoludea ibe V«)u« ol 
ttDporUi ttftblL- Id nil ad valoifm duly, dut vii wbJob a lo««r duty nu l*vi«d 
u&eler tba bltorcd UriH of 1900 lot pait ol tba year. 




166 



NBw zbaIjAnd official ybak-hook. 



I 






GtroAH. 

The value of sogftr (incluiliiif^ glucose, riiolass»<t, and treacle) 
impoi-toii in 1901 wa« £4B9,9i3fi. an incrfiusc of £3R,414 on the amount 
for 1900 (£451,522). The vahio of this import for the last threaj 
years has avftraged only £432,128 per aiinuni ; but for the tlir«ft 
years, 18ft2, ifi83, and 1884, the average, with a much smaller 
population, was £515,907 for each year. The smaller average 
amonnt for the last three years is due, not so much to a reduction, 
in the quantity imported as to the fall in the price of sugar, &uA\ 
partly bo the fact tliat the proportion of refined to raw sugar has] 
vastly decreased. 

The following figures, giving the consuniption per head of st ^ 
in Austmlosia, are, saving tfaose for New Zealand — and oxcludmg 
a proportion (301b. per head) deducted ou aecounv of Maoris— taken 
from Mr. Coghlan*8 "Seven Colonies of Anatralaaia, 1^99-1900. "i 
The figures stating the cx)nBnmption of tea, given further on, arS' 
also taken from the pame source: — 

A»HUAi. GoHsuupnoH or Svoab i>xr Head ih Aukthalasu. 

Lb. r.b. 

.. 129 9 



Queeniliuid .. 
Weetorn Aueimlia 
Ntw South WalM 
South Aiutnlia 



ViRtoni* 
Tasmania . . 



.. 114-3 
. . 103-0 

Tba. 

The quantity of ton entered for consumption in 1901 was 
5,508, 6101b. Supposing Maoris to use, on an average, lib. per head 
per annum, the consumption of tea per head of the population, 
exclusive of MaoiTs, would he. T lb. in 1901. 

Ankval Cokbcmptios op Tha per Hxad ix Auhtbaladia. 



WoiMrn Anatrivliix 
Jiew South W»l<« 
South AiiRtTii1i& 
QaoeuBland 



10-0 
7-8 
7-7 

7-7 



Vintorift 
New Zealand 
Taamaoift 



fisBB, Spikits, ani> Wine. 
During 1301 excise duty was paid on 7,134,800 gallons of beer; 
and 188,490 gallons of beer, oDC.OTl gallons of spirits, and 123,693 
gallons of wine were entered ttt the Customs for home consumption. 
The actual quautity of beer made and usefl in the colony bas- 
JDCreased from 4.243,760 gallouB in 1886 to 7,134,800 gallons in. I 
1901:— 
Urkk HAKDrAcnriutD in Kbw Zxalako ox wbicb Bxc»b Ddtt was TAtth 




(W. 




o*i. 


. 4.948,760 


1884 


.. 4.SOT,»30 


.. 4,254.100 


1895 


. 4.98fi,40a 


. . 4.(150,.V>0 


1096 


.. 5.38S,9eO 


.. 4.IO2,4S0 


1897 


,. 5.741.90« 


. . 4,676,840 


i8oe 


C.013.1M 


. . 4.007,030 


itov 


41,361.900 


.. 4.752,790 


1900 


6,81 1.M0 


. . 4,678,600 


1901 


7,194300 



BKBIt, SFnUTB, WINK, TOB&OCO. 



157 



The followi]ig table gives the consumption per head of alcoholic 
liquors by the people, excluding and including Maoris, showing 
separately the proportions of beer, wine, and spirits from 1883 to 
1901. To the amount of beer manufactured in the colony in each 
year on which excise duty was paid has been added the amount 
brought into consumption from imports : — 









B««r. 


Spirits. 


Wiiw. 


Tmt. 
















BzclndlDB 


Inolndlng 


Bxolndlng! loolading 


Bzoladiug 


luolnding 




MKoria. 


Maoris. 


Mnoris. 


Hnoria. 


Maori*. 


MmtU. 




Qai. 


G»l. 


O&l. 


o»i. 


Qtl. 


ChJ. 


1883 






9-486 


8-709 


1088 


1005 


0-315 


0-291 


1886 






7-861 


7-833 


0-820 


0-765 


0-212 


0-198 


1889 






7-6ai 


7136 


0-698 


0-660 


0-176 


0-165 


1892 






7-807 


7-838 


0-706 


0-664 


0-174 


0163 


1895 






7421 


6-996 


0629 


0-698 


0136 


0-127 


1898 






8-427 


7-995 


0-668 


0-634 


0-146 


0-139 


1899 






8-683 


8-160 


0-687 


0-668 


0-148 


0-141 


1900 






9-150 


8-696 


0-720 


0-664 


0-162 


0-145 


1901 






9413 


8-919 


0-766 


0726 


0-159 


0161 



A comparison of the annual consumption of beer, spirits, and 
wine per head in Australasia is added : — * 



BMr. 


Spirits. 


WIn«. 


GaJ. 


G»l. 


Qal. 


12-36 


0-91 


0-60 


914 


0-73 


0-61 


11-43 


0-73 


135 


9-13 


0-40 


1-98 



Boer. 



Spiiita. 



Wina. 



Queeiuland 
New South Wales 
Victoria 
Sooth Aastralia . . 



WesCern Australia 
Tasmania 
New Zealand (in- 
otuding Maoris) 



Gal. 

2150 
7-19 
7-99 



Gal. 
2-21 
0-38 
0-63 



Gal. 
1-38 
0-09 
013 



* See " The Seven Oolooles of Anstralaaia, 1607-06. 



Tobacco. 
The tobacco entered for consumption in 1901 was 1,970,889 lb., 
and the consumption per head of population, including Maoris, 
2-40 lb. 

Atxbaqb Asscal Cohsuhptioii FEB Hbad of Tobacco ik vaaioua GouKTBisa. 







Lb. 




Lb. 


Holland 


. 6-92 


New Zealand . . 


. 2-40 


Western AoBtialia 




. 6-08 


Canada 


. 211 


United States 




. 4-40 


Viotoria 


. 2-06 


Turkey 




. 4-37 


Ftanoe 


. 2-05 


Aoatri a- Hungary 




. 3-77 


Sweden 


. 1-87 


Denmark 




. 8-70 


South Australia 


. 1-83 


Switzerland . . 




. 3-24 


Tasmania 


. 1-80 


Belgiam 




. 3-16 


Spain 


. 1-70 


Oennany 




. 3-00 


United Kingdom 


. 1-41 


Queensland 




. 2-86 


Italy 


. 1-34 


New South Wales 




. 2-5S 


Bosaia 


. 1-23 



H 158 HBW ZaA.LAND OVTIGIAt. YBAU 


-BOOK. 


^M 


■ luPOBTB PnOM DiFFBRBNT GOUNTHIRS. 


I^H 


■ The imports rrom the Uuited 


Kingdom to 


New Zealand in Ifl^^^l 


H were valued at £6.885,831, or aa 


iacreaae of £381,317 oq the T^tf^^ 


1 of goods impi>ri.ed from the Home country during the previous year. J 


From BriliBb oolonics and posHSKsiong the imports were 


£2,913.666,.^ 


ail increase of £288,494 on the amount in ]900. 


m 


The following are iho values 


3f 


imports from different countries ^^ 


or places in 1901 and 1900, gtren 


in the order of the 


inc reuse or J 


decrease froin each ; — 








^H 


t:«iiiitrv , Colonr. 8taM, ftc. 




1901. 

£ 


ism 

t 


iBcrMM. ,^H 


Onitnil Kingdom 




6, 836, SSI 


6.604.484 


881,847 ^H 


Uniti-d S attn (Kiut Co»«t) 




I, 17*, 741 


958, 2FW 


216,459 ^M 


Now SoiiLb Wiil-t 




1.8J2.O20 


l,0'>a.792 


169.234 ^M 


Unit&d Smlba (Wwl Oout) 




S10,Q15 


103,587 


186, IMS ^H 


ViolorUk 




Ml. 431 


AO^.OIS 


89.418 1 


J*»* 




SS,41S 




88.416 J 


BonRiU .. 




asi.iss 


255.011 


75.377 ^m 


MitMen lal&nd . . .. ' 




a-j.aqa 


ia.tJ65 


It, 783 ^M 


OariilKoy 




imjm 


182,074 


^M 


Chin« , . ., , , 




15,324 


1,495 


19.8-J9 ^M 


B Ikiuui 




6^,083 


4!J.Sd5 


1^,71^ ^H 


0«) InD . . 




134.743 


123. H»S 


11.I0U ^1 


Suiith Aiiatralik .. 




89,319 


^'J.U6 


10.j»3 ^1 


Pic'iflc Isl&ndB . . 




o^.Tsa 


61,025 


7.708 } 


Grrocc .. 




19.768 


16,(>5S 


4.105 J 


TA)iinnni& 




14,^-10 


41.1U6 


8.t»4 ^d 


P'lilippniu IilKridii 




I5,739 


13.474 


3,-i05 H 


Ukly 




9,311 


6.976 


3,2J6 ^1 


Jtpitti . . 




45.465 


4g.4IM 


S,0G1 ■ 


Woaiarn Auiitrfttia 




4,H4e 


3.811 


3,085 ^H 


Sweden 




11. sw 


10.101 


1,708 H 


SwiiMrt&Dd 




s,6ao 


I.IT9 


^H 


FmnoA ,, 




»7,7W 


2S.896 


1.883 ^H 


CikrilhHik . , 




89,538 


82.1fiO 


1.989 ^H 


Auctritt . , 




3,816 


1,063 


1.254 ^1 


M&d ru 




1,084 


S'2S 


561 ^1 


Mmiritius 




1.G60 


1,189 


631 ^M 




4t2 


!&> 


277 ^H 


Hillana 




• 17,314 


17.190 


184 ^M 


Bombay 




175 


a4A 


1»0 ^H 


ViftHL liidi«a 




1,517 


1.405 


113 ^H 


CAnnrj- ItilEiodB . . 




149 


TO 


^1 


I>«iitukrk 




SOB 


SIT 


^M 


I«)rd Hone laUnd 




47 


. , 


^M 


N»i»l 




66 


u 


^M 


A<)«n 




T 


, , 


^M 


Aigaulljie Re{)ublio 




7 


• ■ 


^M 


Country, Colwi}', SUI*. Ae. 




1001. 


IMQ. 


Decrease ^^H 


Qa««i)slnnd 


_ 


aS,8SS 


99.030 


72, 192 ^H 


F.ji . . 




. 


»49,70C 


S64.510 


Id .804 ^1 


A*ift Minor 




, 


IS.UIO 


20,7'25 


S.8I& ^M 


K»ngk'<ng 




. 


IB, 215 


ao,9>3 


2,708 ^H 


SifiR&pon 




, 


35 /.38 


28,393 


754 H 


B>irm&ti 






I,07U 


1,773 


701 ^M 


Turkov .. 






, , 


584 


684 ^H 


BriiiHli Columbia 




8,640 


8,996 


8» ^H 



IHPOBTB HOBTB AND HIDDLE ISLANDS. 



169 



Countrr, Colonr, State, fte. 
Portugal 
Egypi .. 
Umjko . . 
Gnpe Colon; 
Norway 

Norfolk loliuid . . 
Ellioalaluid 
MnlM .. 
Weal Indiefl (British) 

The following table Kives the 
in New Zealand for the last two 
tude for 1901 :— 



Wellington 

Auckland 

D nenin.. 

Lyt elron 

InvercBi^n and BInfT 

Napier 

Timaru .. 

Wanganni 

Nelson . , 

Oreymoutb 

New Plymouth 

Oamaru . . 

Poverty Bay 

W«fi"tpors,. 

H^kitika.. 

Patea 

Wairau .. 

Kaipara . . 

Tauraiiga 

Pioton . . 



IMI. 


1900. 


DeoreaM 


t 


i 


£ 


652 


778 


221 


657 


840 


183 




160 


160 


330 


487 


167 


154 


285 


131 


38 


140 


102 




75 


75 




23 


23 




19 


19 



value of the imports for each port 
years, arranged in order of magni- 



1901, 

Jt 

8.046,707 

8,023,566 

2,203,824 

3,072,186 

328,727 

218,140 

176,967 

153,679 

135,779 

74,842 

73,631 

55,393 

49,746 

32,254 

22,023 

16,088 

14,376 

7,114 

1,875 

1,366 



1900. 

£ 

2,767,066 

2,617.329 

2,158,177 

1,770,709 

28S,170 

209,418 

143,090 

145,267 

140,514 

59,460 

67,338 

47,559 

49,278 

37,750 

12,693 

15,561 

15,942 

7,883 

3,639 

1,591 



■ Ibiports, by Provincul Districts. 
The values of imports in each provincial district during 1891 and 
1901 were as under : — 

1801. 

£ 

1,621,352 



1901. 

£ 

3,082.300 

89.669 

218,140 

3,200,386 

15,742 

168,033 

96,865 

2,249,163 

2,587,944 



Auckland 

Taranaki 26.776 

Hawke'sBaj 194,653 

Wellington 1,397,452 

Marlborough 20.338 

Nelson .. .. 157,606 

Westland .. -. 58,736 

Canterbury 1,247,683 

Otago .. .. .. 1,758,406 

The value of imports by parcel-post (£20,847 in 1891 and £109,683 
in 1901) must be added to ihe above figures in order to make up 
the totals (including specie) of £6,503,849 and £11,817,915 for the 
respective years. 

Imports, North and Middle IsIiANDs. 

Separating the value of the imports for the North Island from 
that of the Middle Island, it is found that whereas in 1891 the 



160 



NHW ZBALA.MD OFFIOIAL YHAB-BOOK. 



former received imported goods to the value of £3,240,233, agaioat 
£3.242,769 for the Middle leiand, in the year 1901 the North Island 
imports exceeded those of the other, the values being reflectively 
£6,690,495 and £5,117.737, or an oxcaaa for the North Islaad of 
£1.472,758', or 28-78 per cent. 

Details of all Abticles of Impobt. 

Details of all imports for 1901, giving quantities and values of articles 
introduced into the colony, with the amounts entered for Home con- 
sumption, and the amount of duty received, are next shown : — 



Obhbbal Iufobts isto ths Colosz of New Zeal&kd DDBina thb 


YXAR 1901. 


{For rates of Duty, sea TaxlB, pp. 83 to fl9.) 








Value ol 

Total 
Imports. 


Bntered for Home 




Artlelee. 


Total Quontitlea | 


Consamptioa on 


Amount of 


Imported. 


Importation and 
ex WarehooSB. 


Daty rseatved. 


Aoid — 




£ 




£ s. d. 


Acetic 


236,557 lb. 


2,914 


340.864 lb. 


8,130 a 


Carbolio 


33,549 . 


652 


, , 




Salicylic 


3,210 , 


322 


. . 




Salphurio 


145,044 . 


1,259 






Tait&ric 


91,176 . 


4,842 


90,035 lb. 


375' 2 1 


Unenamarated 


84,371 . 


1,575 


, . 




Alkali- 










Potash and canBtio potash 


1,444 owt. 


2,121 






Soda aah 


13,201 . 


4,331 






Soda, carbonate and bi- 










carbonate 


9,733 , 


3,461 


5,847 owt. 


493 7 5 


Soda, caustic . . 


12,236 , 


9,073 


, , 




Soda crystals . . 


148 . 


42 


149 . 


li'lT 10 


Soda Nilioate . . 


2,152 . 


787 






naenmncTated 


3,036 , 


1,589 


, , 




Alom 


1,055 . 


442 


, , 




Animals, LiTisg — 










Birds . . 


1.731 No. 


228 






Cattle 


30 . 


2,132 


17 No. 


810 


Deer .. 


9 . 


50 


, , 




Dogs .. 


62 , 


327 






Ooats . . 


5 , 


22 






Horses 


289 , 


17,017 


275 No. 


375* 


Kangaroos 


2 . 


5 






Pigs 


1 . 


35 






Poultry 


311 , 


714 






Sbeep 


249 , 


3,178 






Turtles 


10 . 


42 






Apparel and slops n.o.e. . . 




462,109 


£459,547 


114,88618 4 


Apparel made to the order of 










rsBidents in the colony 




1,065 


£1,078 


481 6 5 


Amu, ammunitioii, aod ex- 










ploaives — 










Aoooutrements 




4,429 






CapB, perouBsion 


6,084,000 No. 


896 






Cartridges, 10- to 24-bore 


4,807,460 , 


16,293 


4,779,200 No. 


3,584 8 8 


Cartridges n.o.e. 


10,875,785 . 


13,959 


£6,382 


1,376 9 


Cartridge-cases 


244,200 . 


407 


241,700 No. 


90 13 8 



aBNBKAIi IMPORTS. 



161 



Obhxiui. Ikfostb ntTO thb Oolony of New Zbac4KD dubiho 1901 — contimud. 







Value of 

Total 
Imports. 


Bntared tor Home 




AzticlM. 


Total Qaantltiea 


CooBumptlon on 


Amonat of 


Imported. 


Im)>ort&tioD Sitid 
OS Warehouse. 


Datj received. 


Anna, ammunitioa, uid ez- 


1 


£ 




£ d. 8. 


P t OBi vee — cont inutd. 










Detonators for dyouaite 


928,275 No. 


1,592 






Dynamite 


150,000 lb. 


7,128 






Fixearuu 


81,999 Ho. 


94,972 


£15,674 


3,134 16 2 


Fusfl .. 


206,665 coils 


5,153 






Ijithofraoteur and oordtte 


223,880 lb. 


11,867 




. , 


Ordn&nce Btores 




14,684 


, , 




Powder, blasting 


516,376 lb. 


12,590 


. . 




spotting 


14,745 . 


2,116 


13,687 lb. 


842' 3 6- 


Sfaot .. 


580 owt. 


706 


201 owt. 


100 8 11 


Swords 


14,482 No. 


10,134 


^ , 


, , 


Other ezplosiveB and iin- 










ennmernted . . 


60,6201b. 


4,757 


, , 


, , 


Asphalt.. 


1,695 cwt. 


565 


■- 


■■ 


Baoon and hams 


6,001 lb. 


200 


4901b. 


4 1 5 


Bags and saoks — 










Gomaacks 


918,757 doz. 


206,447 


, , 


, _ 


Un enumerated 


54,917 , 


8,540 


£416 


83 8 


Bagging and sacking 


, , 


2,800 


£26 


3 15 


Basket ware and wiokerware 


, , 


2,579 


£2,579 


515 17 10 


Beebe-de-mer 


2 owt. 


4 


£4 


16 


Boer 


186,910 galli. 


34,949 


188,491 galls. 


16,849 3 


Belting, leather . . 


39,9181b. 


4,818 


38,8701b. 


647 16 10. 


. otfaei than leather 


, , 


17,785 


, , 


, , 


Beverages, non-alooholio — 










Aerated and mineral 










waters 


7,242 doz. 


1,649 


£1,691 


316 6 


Coffee essence 




7,883 


£8,048 


1.609 10 9 


Xiimejuioe, sweetened . . 


4,075 galls. 


876 


£907 


226 14 6- 


, unsweetened 


35,329 , 


8,267 


* . 


, , 


TTnennme rated 




4U 


£461 


120 S 7 


Bioyoles and tricycles 


8,014 No. 


54,057 


£52,684 


10,536 16 6 


Uaterials for 




71,178 


£32,401 


6,480 2 4 


Bisonita — 










Fancy, and other kinds . . 


85,590 lb. 


4,066 


84,7671b. 


706 6 2 


Shipe', plain 
Blacking 


17 owt. 


21 


17 owt. 


2 11 7 




4,467 


£4,341 


668 3 2 


Blaoklead 




3,135 


£3,280 


666 


Blaa 


218,982 lb. 


6,155 


200,8511b. 


1,673 15 2 


Boats .. 


17 No. 


4,165 




, , 


Bones 


29 tons 


160 




, , 


Books, printed . . 




140,847 






Boots and ehoea . . 


98,577 doz. pr. 


200,909 


£194,468 


43,756 6 1 


Oom-boota 


1,030 , 


10,306 






Borax .. 


2,049 cwt. 


2,414 


. , 


, , 


Brass " 










Pigs, bars, tubes, or sheets 


537 . 


3,288 


, , 


, , 


Forging or stamped wsrk 










in the rongh 


241 . 


914 






Uanafaotnres .. 


. . 


7,832 


£7,711 


I, £42 5 9 


Bricks — 










Building 


6,000No. 


11 


.. 


.. 



163 NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAB<BOOK. 

Oenebal Imposts into ths Colony of Nxw ZbaiiAhd ooBnio 1901 — continiud. 



' 




Value of 

Total 
ImporU. 


Encereil for How* 




ArtiolM. 


Total Qa»ntlU«i 


CoDsumptioD on 


Amonnl of 


Imported. 


Imporbidon and 
«i Warehouse. 


l>aty reoaivid. 






£ 




£ s. d. 


Bri cka — continued. 










Fire . . 


128,208 Ho. 


1,019 


£806 


161 10 9 


Olber kiods 


16,859 . 


91 


, , 




BniBhware and brooms 


3,lB0doE. 


1,834 


£1,851 


«SS 16 


BrunheB (oloLhes, hair, 










b»t, and toilet) 




5,163 


£5,008 


1,001 IS 


U n en u m e ra tod 


. , 


6,2-35 


£6,082 


1,590 10 4 


Materials for . . 


. . 


7,801 




, . 


Buckets and tube — 










Iron . . 


919 doz. 


657 


£551 


187 17 


Wood 


35 . 


19 


£19 


8 16 


Building materials, uoenu- 










merated 




796 


, , 


, , 


Butter .. 


18 owt. 


95 


•• 


•• 


•Candles . . 


2,258,1771b. 


41,947 


2,174.3311b. 


9,059 14 3 


CaneB and Fattane 


. , 


1,560 


, , 


, , 


•Canvas . . 




40,458 


, , 


, . 


•Oar&mel, brewers' 


22,324 lb. 


833 


21,824 lb. 


S73 16 


oereal . . 


132 , 


3 


133. 


11 


-Cards, playing 


41,366 paoks 


868 


42,438 pooks 


1,060 19 


Carpeting and druggeting.. 




89,692 


£38,667 


7,717 9 6 


Carriagflo, &c. — 










Carriages 


246 No. 


5,545 


£5,377 


1,075 10 


Caru, drays, and wagons 


112 , 


1,469 


£1,467 


99S 8 


Perambulators and go- 










oarts 


63 , 


88 


£88 


17 IS 


Materials for . . 




7,657 


£7,685 


1,537 


Materials for axles, arms, 










and boxes 




16,383 




. , 


Carriage and cart shafts. 










spokes, and felloes in 










tbe ruugb 


. , 


7,236 


, , 


, , 


Carriage and cart-makers' 










materials 


. , 


16,245 


, , 


. , 


Oasks, empty 


1,815 No. 


2,005 


£2.005 


400 16 


Cement . . 


101,554 barrels 


48,569 


93,914 barrels 


9,391 8 


Chains and chain cables . . 


7,432 cwt. 


8.634 


, , 


_ , 


Charcoal 


3,449 . 


1,689 




, , 


Cheese.. 


37 , 


121 


£96 


19 13 


Chicory 


721b. 


5 


721b. 


18 


Cbina, porcelain, and parian- 










ware 




23,155 


£23,026 


4,605 6 5 


Clocks 


46,549 No. 


15,145 


£15,159 


3,081 16 7 


Coal 


149,764 tons 


151,334 


, , 




Cocoa and chooolate 


388,9971b. 


39,640 


366,8501b. 


4,585 IS 7 


Cocoa beana 


133,540 , 


5,087 


, , 


, , 


Coffee- 










Raw 


325,020 . 


11,208 




_ _ 


Boasted 


4,915 , 


257 


4,805 lb. 


60 1 8 


Coke 


1,014 tons 


3,002 




, , 


Combs 




1,367 


£1,364 


873 14 8 



OeNBRAl. lUFORTS. 168 

Obhibai. Imfobts into thb Oolomy of Nbw Zralakd dubihq 1901— continued. 







Value of 

Total 
Imports, 


Entered for Home 




AitlclM. 


Total Quantities 


ConBDmption on 


Amount of 


Imported. 


Importation and 
ex WarehouBe. 


Duty received. 


Con feotionery — 




£ 




£ 8. d. 


Choootate in plain trade 










packages 


lS2.8031b. 


7,688 


160,6291b. 


1,881 13 S 


CtiocolaM, lane; packagOR 




6,875 


£6,768 


1,353 12 10 


Unenumerated 


434,162 , 


13,581 


427,6S91b. 


3,564 1 6 


Copper — 










Naila 


seocwt. 


1,688 


, , 


_ , 


Pig, bar, aheet, and tube 


4,651 . 


22,609 




, , 


Bod and boU .. 


2S6 . 


880 


, , 




SlieaUiing 


768 . 


2,802 


. , 




Manufaotuies .. 


, , 


51 


, , 


, , 


Copra 


599 tons 


6,419 


, , 


, . 


Cordage 


6,446cnt. 


14,726 


£13,601 


2,720 5 10 


UawxerBof ISin.andoTer 


140 . 


2S3 


, , 




Iron and sbeel . . 


11.705 . 


25.822 


, , 


.. 


Cork, CDi 


, . 


S,793 


£9,068 


1,813 12 8 


Cotton piece-goods — 










Buiter- and cheese-oloth 


. , 


4,265 






Calico, white and grey . . 




142,238 




. . 


Corduroy, moleakin, and 










beaver-i-kin . . 


, , 


3,656 


. . 




Leatfaer-oloth .. 




7,105 




,, 


Shirting)), ooloured ootton 




83,270 


. , 




. flannelette 




6,738 


, , 


, , 


, nnioD, oi6d.per 










7ard and ander 




2,926 




, , 


Tubular woven cotton 










oloth 




4,624 




, , 


Waterproof material 


, , 


36,813 




. , 


Unenu me rated 


, , 


228, 94» 


£2131,235 


34,425 10 2 


Cotton- 










Raw .. 


3,8121b. 


67 


, , 


.. 


Wants 


8,88Scwt. 


5,671 


, , 


, , 


Wiok 


112,2951b. 


4,980 


, , 


,. 


Catlsr; . . 


-• 


27,149 


£26,746 


5,949 5 


Doom, plain 


496 No. 


265 


496 No. 


49 12 


Dnpery 




281,116 


£276,998 


65.799 10 7 


Laoe and lacea 


, . 


46,7H2 


£46,246 


11,561 8 5 


Ribbons and crape 




19,76L 


£19,767 


4,939 7 1 


■TallorB' trimmings 


, , 


96,206 


, , 


.. 


DrogM — 










Baking powder and jreaat 










prepMrations 




287 


£302 


60 10 


B<)fli.ed gl\ oerine 


, , 


1,143 


£1,116 


223 4 


Chemicals n.o.e. 




3,909 


£3,665 


679 15 6 


Cream of tartar 


772,5891b. 


28,967 


611,0661b. 


3,379 8 10 


Drags, druggistn'enndriea. 










and apothecariefl' wares 


, , 


71,763 


£71,287 


10,693 2 6 


Tinctures and medicinal 










spirits 


18, 2961b. 


1,019 


16,4761b. 


823 16 1 


Anhydrous ammonia 




3,353 






ArBenic 


940 cwt. 


1,010 


, . 




Diiinfeotant* .. 


-. 


4,341 


.. 





16ft 



NBW ZBAX.AMD OFriCIAIi TBAB-BOOK. 



GcncKU. Impobts ihto thb Colony or New Zsu^uid DOBOia loni tTimtinueH. 



ARWm. 


Total QaaatiUos 


Va] no ot 


l^&Ij3it(HiI(>jr HoBia 
Caiiauii]]jiiaD oa 


Amonat at 




Imponed. 


ImpiKii. 


SI WBrehooia. 


DUIJ EOOkiTsd. 


BRi^-<C>'R<iflU«<J — 




£ 




£ B. 1. 


fcdd preaervfttJTA 


V. 


3,065 






(xoma 


, , 


3,053 






liiKii lii iilm and ttee- 










wasfaea 




1,396 






Wsltme 


^ , 


693 






liaiieuui twrks, leftveB.&o. 


, . 


1,261 






Pboaphonu 




t,106 






Poteniam cj&nida 


7,998 owt. 


ll,6S7 






Sb««p-dip 


_ , 


31.980 






Sbaep- ftnd hotM-drench«j' 


4. * 


73 






UnanamerRted 




17.475 






Vjm 


'■ 


16.ai3 




.. 


Eactbenww 




99,423 


£&3,3S4 


13,676 U » 


E«p 


18 dot. 


11 






■o^jnv-pftckiDg .. 


2.7lSawt. 


9,GM 




, , 












SniritQOfui 


1,656 gals. 


*,9fll 


l,GlSgala, 


1.318 3 3 


, . 


80 


£81 


13 4 I 


Bm — t-i' T'U— 










Eaea^Tptos 


10,5.531b. 


a, 806 


£3,339 


467 16 6 


Other kinds 


45,670 . 


S,936 


■■ 




FftDCf goods and %oj» 


1 , 


lis, 356 


£141,256 


ss.a&i 2 i 


Pelt ■hcAthing . . 




4,814 


, . 




FiT«-«Dgines 


7 No. 


1.119 


, , 




Pira boM Mid other ap- 




3,928 


^. 


, , 


pliances 










Fircwodu 


e I 


1,321 


£1,181 


336 4 


Fish— 










Ancboriei, Bslted 


35 owt. 


61 






Dried, pickled, and salted 


2.397 , 


4.433 


3, 105 owt. 


1,097" 11 T 


Potted and preserved 


2,111.0101b. 


18,8^5 


1,900,111 Lb. 


16,Bai 5 9 


GofaUaa Int .. 


^, 


S 






ViiUDfUeUe— 




301 


J^3 


73 fi 


Fiib'books 


, . 


IGl 


,. 




t^cesuiserate^ 


. . 


2,670 


£2,587 


n?' 6 10 


Floek 


125 cwt. 


l-'iT 


£131 


la s 


Fi{>r>r<;i'>tb and oilciach 




79,479 


£77, sea 


15,473 10- 3 


Flour 


G15 oentalfi 


245 


615 cfiD bale 


30 11 « 


yr^^,. ii,liJ,fc!— 










cai*ff 


6 tons 


22 


£lons 


6 11 


Crwnoneiued 


^ . 


3,GGD 


£2,&G7 


533 g $ 


Fooii, farir.s.3*>jU6 — 










Arrowroot 


83,317 lb. 


750 






Macaroni and verm i cell i 


li>7,f)74 . 


1,415 


,. 




Maiz«aa and corn-flour. . 


1.006.81)1 . 


l-i.Sl-l 


1.024.600 lb. 


1,067' 3 10 


Sago and tapioca 


17,575c»t. 


iLs^a 


., 




Uuenumerated 




2,447 






Fruits. boitl«d and preserved 


50,204 doa. 


11.0115 


£13.750 


3,437 9 T 


Fruits. dried- 










Currants 


2,913.943 lb. 


40,334 


a.8S9,179lb. 


U,tt39 IS % 



aKNBRAl* IHPOBTS. 160 

Gbhbral Ihpobts ihto thb Colony or Nbw Zbaund dubdio 1901—contiHV4d. 



ArtiolH. 



Fruits, dried— conitnwerf. 

Une!iun]*r»ted 
Frails, iraeh 

ApfiicH. wears, plums, Ao 

Applcri and peKTB 

CurrantB &nd roepbeiries 

XjemoDB 

Other kioda 

Ijemon- and orange-p«el 
in brioe 

Preserred in sulpfauroas 
ftoid 

Pnlp and partiftllf-pre 
verred fcait . . 
Fungus . . 
Farniture and npholetery. 

Kapok 

Uaenumerated 
Furniture-, knife-, and 
plate-powder and polish 
Fnra 

Oelatine and isiDglaas 
Glass— 

Bottles, empt; 

Mirrors and look ing-glaseex 

Plate, bevelled. &c. 
r other kinds 

Window 
Olassware 
Olue and size 
Gold-leaf 
Grain and pulse — 

Barley 

Beans and peas 

Gate .. 

Wheat 

Unenu me rated 

Oroond, unenume rated , . 
Grease .. 
Orinder? — 

Heel- and toa-plates 

Lnenumerated 

HiAaidashery 

Buttons 

Sowing-oottoni 

Unenumerated 
Hair 
Hardware 

CofBn furniture 
Hats and caps . . 
Hatten* materials 

13— Year-book 



Totril Qi]«atltiei 



2.269,361 Ih. 
1,358,606 . 

1,010,960 , 

974,010 , 

23,274 , 

737,584 . 

23,272,823 . 

418,442 , 

30,744 , 

5,493 , 
11 owt. 

5,409 owt. 



57,4101b. 



412,788 sop. ft. 
2,732,610 . 

117,808 lb. 



35 centalf! 

801 . 

127 , 

997 , 
3.4G7 , 
4,308 . 
3,964 owt. 



878 owt. 
139,713 doz. 



Vi.1 ii« of 

T.-ml 

llii{[iOi ll. 



£ 
37.540 
19,026 

18,123 

9,874 

224 

6,892 

106,182 

2,447 

320 

68 

21 

40,055 

18,259 

4,782 

5,397 

4,827 

4,516 

42,044 

6,228 

6,049 

13,049 

26,793 

40,276 

3,059 

1,118 

37 

539 

27 

199 

2,589 

4,030 

2,830 

1,219 
19,717 

19,193 

28,668 

59.255 

3,630 

1,716 

2,59.559 

2,354 

70,013 

18,676 



Eotore4 fur Horn* 
Cn-DRuniiiiiDii i>a 

ei WarcilioiiBe. 



2,278,6941b. 
1,296,671 , 

1,010.960 . 

974.250 , 

23,274 . 

737,684 , 



30,744 Ih. 
5,493. 
£39,209 



£5,353 
£4,806 

£4,643 



£6,185 

£5,013 
£13,010 
■2,742,150 Bup. ft, 
£33,911 

109,7691b. 



31 centals 

802 . 

123 . 

992 . 

3,435 . 

3,067 , 

£2,860 

£1,303 



£19.198 



£■248,965 

£2.274 

£68,383 



AiQoant of 
DalrrwalTSd. 



£ «. d. 

9,404 11 3 

10.797 5 9 

4,312 6 8 

2,029 13 9 

48 9 9 

1,5»6 12 8 



128 2 

34 6 7 

9,803 5 5 



1,070 U 6 
1,201 9 3 

928 10 6 



1.646 6 6 
1,253 5 
2,601 18 6 
2,743 2 10 
6,782 2 10 
686 1 1 



3 16 
Si) 1 7 

4 11 11 
37 3 10 

128 15 11 

163 6 9 

572 1 

293 5 9 



3,839 12 3 



49,793 1 9 

454 18 

17,095 16 H 



1^ MBW BBALAND OFFIOUL YBAU-BOOK. 

auira^ iMFOsn mo tbb Ooix>kt or Naw Zualasd DtmHO IWl—etmtiiuud. 



MwwV 



Att1i'lwi> 



TqUI QoKiilltlM 
luiporlML 



I'llitMdM 

|.i.l.i>4>.|>lil<i«, lllUIll"*!-- 

(t>a tukiiit* and xritan* 

(luwuiiutaiiAiail 

liiiitniMItu 

Ii>>ti Mint itU«l 
A»l(l» . ■• 

lUr. UM. mhI ((m 

(ti.lLu ftllll IIUU 
I^HoUitVa (nrfltllpi 
liitlvftiilaud lUftiiufMtuTea 

lli...|. 

Il""|>. HKlviiiilMd 

I'lB .- 

|'l|iua mid llitingi 

IUll.> .■ 

luilway liolti' <^nd fasten- 

Lii>i.i>i Miiil (Uftte ' ■ I 

llliui.i, H»lvaniMd, oorru- 1 

DhLuiI ■ ■ 

tilK.ol, HiilviMiiHed, plain j 
iiUi'lua wnl Htftndardii .. . 
I.it.b« .. ^ ■• 

iVuB, ImioliiH. bftrbed .. 
Willi, tuiKiiiiH. plnin 
Wiio, UliiHroil'li Ki>d tele- 

lr,|li|illllll« 

tViiti imlUriK .. 

tViH', iiiiHiuiinurftted . . | 

liiiutitiiiinrMlnd .. [ 

I iiilllna. luid preaeives 

Ikllii.d. i.iMiKariirKted ■■ i 

J<. 't.lli.ii' .. •• i 



154 torn 

481b. 
103,ft65 , 



168.3091b. 



867 No. 
8,973 . 



TG3 tons 
14,065 , 
19,967 owl. 
70 lODS 

l.GlStona 

3,056 owt. 
7,7'J8ton« 
6,970 . 

16,B86 . 

2,117 , 

6,074 . 



. Vklua of 
I Tut*] 
luiyorlc, 



£ 

fi,000 

2,798 

1 

4,a84 

101,481 



7.412 

7,062 
1,571 

8,57! 

87.755 

18.045 

225 

1,800 

a, €91 

3,279 

24,381 

1,319 

fiO 

7,061 

147,364 

22.610 

a, 155 

1,030 

18,214 

2,26B 

38,102 

7e.fitf5 

119,590 

38,754 

68,4&S 



r.nuired tor Homk 

CODKIHUptlDn DB 

lrii|>oruitinD Bad 
a% U'ar«liou«D. 



48 lb. 
89.475 . 
£100.!;73 



£G4 



£1.476 

^,400 
£85,821 
£17,364 

£4S8 



£973 

3,059ei*t. 
£78,729 

£394 



DtiLy robuiad. 



■. d. 



R 

a,a96 17 9 

30,0?4 13 1 



la 10 



294 18 10 

1.679 19 a 

17,164 3 8 

3,578 17 « 

87 10 10 



MS 

asg 

S.98& 



4 i 

8 7 
8 11 



a 16 



167.1t5iOwt. 


199,42.'3 1 


164,738 cot. 


16.473 16 I 


38.454 „ 


33,096 ! 


98.264 , 


3.869 16 11 


336 tons 


4,117 


£4,046 


809 5 11 


S. 202 No. 


9,996 


3,186No. 


1.410 12 6 


2,52Gtons 


33,129 '■ 




, , 


(>,333 . 


63,061 






166 , 


2,331 








24,341 < 




^ _ 


552 . 


8,168 


. , 


, , 


3 . 


33 1 


■- 


.. 


419,912 lb. 


7,167 


421,4161b. 


8,511 16 1 


C7,fi06 , 


2,547 ! 


64,966 , 


1,063 11 10 




34,349 1 


£38,693 


6,718 n 11 



QBNHBAIi IHPOBTS. 167 

Gbbb&al Ixpobts ihto thb Ooloht or N>w Zbaumd ddbibo IWl—ctmtmutd, 



ArtialM. 



Total QoMtMlM 
IiBportad. 



Irfunpa, Iftntaras, ftnd lunp- 
wiflk 

Kg! uid ban 

Pipe .. 

Sheet 

MftDufftetiirm 
Leather . . 

Chunoii 
Leather manufactures — 

Boot and shoe vampa, 
appen, laoeo, Ae. 

Unennmerated 
Ligbthoiuea matertala 
Linen rieoe-goodi 

Forfar, dowlas, and flax 
Rhaetioga 

Forfar, dowlas, Ac, oat 
up under supervision 

Linens n.o.e. . . 

Hessians and oarim 
Linseed 
Llqnorioe 

Uaobineiy and machinea — 
Agrionltnrat 

Ptongbs and barrows 
Dairving 

. engines for 
. boilers for 
Dredging 
Eleetrio 
Engines, steam 

boilers tor 
gas .. 
Floiir- milling . . 
Ota-making 
Mining 

enginea for 
boilers for 
Oil-refining 
Paper-milling .. 
Portable and traction en 

ginea 
Printing 
Refrigerating -. 
Sewing and knitting 
Wnod- working . . 
Woollen-milling 
Uneaamerated 
Materials for and parts 
Malt 

Rice malt 



}Oowt. 

635 tons 
451 owt. 
17,241 . 

497,9421b. 



7 tons 



33 No. 
107 , 



48 No. 
48 . 
270 , 



91 No. 
37 . 



56 No. 
ll,425No. 



6.318 bush. 
IS, 366 lb. 



Tain* of 

Total 
Importa. 



£ 
19,164 
84 

8,925 
484 

14,196 
212 

66.208 
491 



7,614 

1,470 

171 



18,118 



17,702 

54,098 

116 

2,964 



72.698 

10,744 

30,054 

1,822 

4,661 

78,890 

63,203 

7,701 

9,215 

21,181 

2,890 

37,679 

37,014 

23.266 

11.954 

1,096 

1.207 

22,04G 

21.176 

11,881 

88,227 

10,498 

10.551 

105,410 

13,926 

1.666 

125 



Entered for Hon* 

OoDnmpUon on 

Importotlon and 

•z WarehonM. 



£18,735 
£3* 



461 owt. 

16,526 . 

£219 

409,S411b. 

£iL78 



£7,669 
£1,420 



£1,640 

£13,116 
£17,809 

7 tons 
£3,014 



£3,129 
£4,986 
£76.068 
£25,826 
£8,024 
£2,355 

£2.569 
£37,211 

£23,360 

£12.046 

£1.096 

£928 



£19.714 
£10,626 

£1,657 
£9,349 
£80,708 
£2,039 
8,238bnsb. 
18,3681b. 



Amoant of 
Dntr recalTed. 



£ n. 

3,746 19 

6 16 


d. 
7 



79" 1 

1,289 11 

42 11 

2,668 13 
95 11 


11 

10 



7 



1,726 12 
293 12 


6 
5 



328 1 6 



3,461 16 8 

77 1 
602 15 11 



106 9 

249 6 

3,803 8 

2. 532 11 

1.604 16 

471 




6 
5 




128 9 
3.721 8 


6 



1,168" 

602 6 

54 16 

46 8 


6 





985 IS 
531 6 


10 
6 


82 17 

467 9 

U.841 10 

301 9 

323 17 

76 18 


6 
6 
1 
9 





1^ HBW BB&I.AND OFFiaUX. TB&B-BOOK. 

; ■xsm.Ki. iMfOWCS ikto thk Coloht or New Zsaiakd dubihq 1901— ^lontimud. 



■VT U gtw* 



t'l.'uiiw.^ or poliahM, »aa 

UlAUUtlftV^tlirM 

tWw u, k't rv'Utih-»»wn . . 

liwWtlWM ftU>,t VWtiM— 

Wftx 
MikiN ftwU itiktltllR ■• 

Kl(.aii>l*t««. t>»Wnt ftnd pro- 

.inimmuil »"J l»oque»a 

tttUtMtWAM • > 
Ntik v>lli»i w W onumartted 

■<1, ^1(1 MtO 

Mil "*'il 



U 



\t 



IMiWtl 



III kIiiiU - ■ 

,U..|llHi 

ii»i Wv, (*«'■ ■- 



<iil|, 1Ml»'>' 



V .:^ 






9,045 tOD8 
12,796 . 
11,886 , 



sratoDB 

93,781 groBa 
35.493 . 

67,635 lb. 



54fiNo. 
10,613 awL 
1,662 . 
690 No. 



913 owt. 
810,4971b. 



5 owt. 
2 . 
1 , 
240,044 lb. 



62.970 owt. 

274 , 
15.961 galls. 

6,8711b. 

33,860 . 
143.325 , 
129,906 No. 

48.7061b. 

1,016 owt. 
1,32] No. 



VaIub of 
Illll>DII«. 



£ 
46,667 
41,927 
46,692 



6,932 
1,825 

15,308 
2,708 
6,466 
2,309 

33,661 



1,269 

10.664 

2,391 

487 

9,828 

2,289 

7,543 

42,894 

2,909 
16,112 

2,750 
40,630 

4 

18 

17 

13,507 



39.733 

301 

2,363 

148 

2,. 183 

6,618 

471 

732 

1.277 
225 



92,025g*llB. ■ 12,568 
1,287 doz.pt., 507 
6.345gftll8. ! 1,073 



CnEPAuruiiiLon on 

liuiiortacion aail 
ol WntehausC', 



£6,998 



79,363 gross 
32,085 . 
£6,349 
£2,246 

£84,906 



£1,279 

£10,469 

£2,239 



£16,438 

£2,743 
£40,293 



241,2731b. 



62,208 owt. 

195 . 
14,428 gftlls 

7,4521b. 
32,037 , 



49,037 lb. 



79,303 gftlls. 
£450 



Ainciiiul of 
Duty ri!d«lT*d. 



£ s. i, 



1,719 7 « 



6,775 2 

1.603 4 1 

1,869 18 11 

449 5 1 

5,335 IS 



819 16 1 

3,097 17 1 

447 14 9 



4,109 7 S 

685 17 4 
10,073 6 



3,010 13 3 



6,230 17 

39 6 

860 14 3 

62 3 8 

400 9 4 



406 13 10 



1.982 11 6 
67 9 7 



GENBRAIt IHPOIVrS. 



46^ 



Okhbbal Ikpobts WTO THE OoLONT 09 N»w Zbalakd DOBiSO 1901— COtUiltUtd, 



Ajttclu. 



Oil« — continued, 

ColEft 

Fish, pODgain, uid aeal 

Linseed 

Keroaene 

Mineral, other kinds 

Heatifoot 

Oliva, bulk 

OiJ?e, bottled .. 

Unenumerated. bulk 
UneniiTneraied, bottled 
till enum era tud 

Oilmen '■ stores . . 

Onions .. 

Opium .. 

Paints &nd colouia — 

Ground in oil . , 

Mixed, reftdy for use 

Unenumei&ted 
Paper — 

Bags, ooarse 

Bags, other kinds 

Batter- paper . . 

Paperh&ngings 

Printing 

Wrapping 

Writing 

Cnenamerated 
Pearl barlej 
Pefts, split 

Peel, candied and dried 
Perfumery — 

P^rEuniQcl epiritH 

Toilet prepacfttiaDH 

U'DBFiitmeiRlsd 
PbatDgrapbic goods 

Oopper, glass, and zino 
platee 

Cameras and lenses 

SaDaiti^erl surfaces 
Pickles . . 

FictureB, pAinticgB, Ao. 
Picture^ Irames and mounts 

Pitoh 

Plants, trees, and shrabs, . 
Plaster of Paris . . 
Plate and pInCed ware 
Porttnantoaui ., 

Leather and leather-oloth 
bag! |.. 

PotatoM 



Total Qaabtltlea 
liiiijoried. 



14,303 galls. 
42,-479 . 
279,248 , 
8,041,828 . 
219,800 . 
1,615 , 
7,542 , 
3,514doz.pte 
115 galls. 
162,301 , 
5,779 doB.ptB 
73, 339 galls. 

ig,822owt. 
3,470 Ih. 



35,544 owt. 

5.174 . 

11,066 . 

36 . 

2,586 . 

3,389 . 

1,061, 616 pieces 

120,676 owt. 

4,879 , 

12,446 , 

658 . 

99 . 

1,184 , 

16,0721b. 

1,239 galls. 



6, 196 galls. 

1,263 owt. 
4,603 owt. 



Tatoni 



Ta,tue of 

Tutal 
I iii|>oi«. 



£ 

2,147 
4,137 

41,182 
128,656 

17,820 

168 

1,458 

1,659 

19 

17,650 
2,655 
8,797 
7.179 

10,082 
4,-299 



46,663 
13,050 
13,104 

37 

4,321 

6,731 

29,675 

113,438 

5,726 

23,967 

1,101 

50 

588 

414 

6,797 

7,311 
1,396 
7,074 

1,374 
7,649 

13,905 
1,711 
7,121 
1,126 
620 
4,103 
1,184 

46,406 
4,635 

76 
170 



RttUr«d for Home 
ConHumpUoEi on 

IxupoTUiU'au mnd 



13,838 galla. 
361,717 galla 

156,432 , 

1,466 . 

7,192 . 

£1,442 

148, 636 galls. 
£2,781 

£6,972 
30,157 owU 
3,3091b. 



34, 243 owt. 
4,S87awt. 



37 ewt. 
£4,886 

£29 t 242 

4,099 owt. 



99 owt. 
1,187 , 
17,988 lb. 

1,306 galls. 
£7,104 
£1,403 
£6,855 



5, 346 galls. 
£5,870 
£1,125 



£44,833 
£4,505 

£78 
£135 



Amoant of 
DuLVTMsivsd. 



£ B. d. 

845 ]4 

6, 543' 18 6 

3,910 16 8 

36 12 11 

179 15 10 

216 6 

3,715 18 4 
409 13 1 

I 1,394' 6 8 
1,007 17 7 
6,617 10 8 



4,280 8 10 
1,096 15 11 



13 17 6 

1,096 7 T 

4,336* 6 3 

1,024' 16 1 



4 18 

118 13 
224 17 



1,958 11 5 

1,775 18 6 

350 17 8 

1,345 18 



876 19 11 

1,174 1 1 

225 4 



8,966 9 6 

1,126 e 

15 13 

2» 19 



u^^*^>*~ 














ValUB o( 

Total 
IiupoHs. 


ICnlerudfarHonie 




AiUolvL 


Tolsl QuuitlliBi 


ConaumpUoD oo 


Aiaouni III 


Imported. 


lDqpQrt>cloti and 
ai. Waroboiuv. 


Ciity iMMir^d. 








£ B. d. 












SiaTsotjpM ajid mfttrioea 
Tjy tna mftterl&U, n.o.c. 
ProTuiosi n.o.e. . . 


, , 


S64 


£186 


46 10 


, , 


18.845 


, . 


, , 




6,296 


£6,316 


1,348 3 6 


Piunpa .. 




4,890 


£3,828 


760 18 1 


FnUj .. 


5,646 owt. 


3,871 


6,637 owt. 


563 14 3 


QoiekailTer 


9,9011h. 


1,843 






Bmat 

BMlmypIkBt— 


38tcni 


161 


, , 












Looomotlvei . . 


67 No. 


163,966 






Parts of looomotivu 


, , 


40,138 


, , 




UnsBttioanted 




831,416 


£3,156 


431* 4 


Bmis 


11,411 owt. 


8,710 


. . 




Rica 


54,697 , 


86,024 






Bioe-flonr 


72 . 


6S 


109 owt. 


83* IS 4 


Bngi, M klnda . . 


•• 


18,561 


£13,4a0 


3,684 1 


SACohftrine 


6,876 oz. 


301 


6,008 01. 


486 3 


Saddlery uid buneaB 


. . 


41.864 


£83,661 


6,712 5 8 


Harness-oil and oomposi- 










tion 


. . 


3,789 


£3,663 


580 10 3 


Baddlers' Ironmongery .. 




33,129 






Collar'cheok 


, , 


4,663 






Bait 


13,685 tons 


SC,8M 






Book 


895 . 


869 






Saltpetre 


114 . 


1,468 






Sanoea .. 


13,686 gals. 


9,429 


13.669 gals. 


2, 781 14 8 


Saosage-sklns 


186,3851b. 


9.683 


187,6671b. 


3,845 16 9 


Seeds— 










QrasB and clover 


I3,670cwt. 


36,375 






Unenamerated 


, , 


24,294 


,. 


• • 


Bbale 


aOltons 


5G9 






Shells 1 


4 owt. 


19 






8 bip- chandlery . . . . 1 




10,034 


.. 




Rillu 1 


_ . 


121,937 


£121,558 


80,38911 9 


For flour-dresiing . . i 




362 






Silver 


BOOoz. 


98 






BkJDS and pelts — 










Fur-ski DB 


16, 008 No. 


620 




, . 


Kangaroo and wallabi . . 


27,276 , 


1,234 




• ■ 


Unenamerated . . i 


24.372 . 


2,225 






Slates, roofing 


147.445 , 


1,3.S8 






Soap- 










Common 


10 cwt. 


13 


10 owt. 


2 8 9 


Boap-powder, extract of 










soap, d:o. 




5,25.1 


£4,960 


993 a 


Uoenumerated 


995,019 lb. 


24,694 


£24,384 


6,095 18 T 


Specie — 










gr :: 


, , 


3,239 




, , 


■ * 


437,322 




, . 


SiWer 


.. 


23,938 


.. 


.. 



qknkrAl imfobts. 



171 









Value of 

Total 
Imports. 


Entered tor Home 




AMolM. 


Totet Qnantltle* 
ImporMd. 


CbwBumptlon oa 

Iniportktion and 

ex WarehouMi. 


Amonnlof 
Ontj reoalTad. 


Spsatmaiu illivtrktiTe of 




£ 




£ S. d. 


natonJ tei^noe 


, . 


364 


, , 


^ , 


Spioai — 










OroDnd 


ai,0161b. 


929 


30,8001b. 


388 6 8 


Ungioiuid 


871,46fi . 


•11,767 


884,137. 


8,301 1 9 


SpiriM— 










Bitten, oordialH, and 










liqoean 


8, 328 gain. 


8,216 


3,816 galls. 


a,8S3 7 2 


Bruid; 


83.363 . 


83.882 


73,197 , 


67,767 7 10 


OenBra and gin. nn- 










sweetened 


82,890 . 


30,232 


64,731 . 


61,777 3 


Methylated 


632 , 


63 


268 . 


IS 3 


Bam 


19,660 , 


8,864 


19.928 . 


16,938 6 8 


Sweetened 


6,448 . 


1,840 


7,896 , 


6.916 10 


Whisky 


491,888 . 


171,331 


438.647 . 


838,917 18 5 


Uaennmerated 


2.202 . 


1.770 


2.263 . 


1,810 13 8 


Spirits of wioe . . 


40,183 , 


2,841 


1.463 . 


1,169 7 7 


Methylated, ia bond 






88,668 . 


839 4 4 


Sponges 
Staroh 


i.goiib. 


389 


£842 


SI 6 


994,863 . 


10,881 


964,217 Ih. 


7,961 16 3 


Stationeiy — 










MaDofaetnred . . 


, ^ 


48.026 


£39,020 


9.765 4 


Not otherwise ennmerated 


. , 


43,696 


£85,977 


7,195 7 8 


Apparatas (or teaobiog.. 


, , 


6,498 


, , 


, , 


Bookhmden* materials . . 


% 


6.834 


, , 


_ , 


Card board- boxes, mate- 










rials for 


, _ 


10,286 


, ^ 


, , 


Uoeiinmetated 


, . 


6,684 


, , 


, J 


Stearine 


398,067 lb. 


6,631 


887.6251b. 


898 16 7 


Stone— 










Bnilding 


2, 748 tons 


4,463 


, , 


, , 


Flagging 


5 . 


28 


, , 


_ , 


Q ranite,dieBBed 


, , 


2,964 


£2,972 


743 


Grind-, mill-, oil-, and 










wlMt>stones .. 


.. 


3.786 


.. 




Sugar — 
Raw .. 


781 , 154 owt. 


890,691 


3,9131b. 


6 14 


Sedned 


116,533 . 


95,115 


79.366.164 . 


165,346 3 1 


Olooose 


*.768 . 


3,774 


691,721 . 


3.466 10 1 


Holassee and treacle 


4,082 , 


1,456 


2,513,713 , 


6,336 18 


Molaues, mixed with bone- 










blaok 


87 , 


37 


, , 




Salphnr 


5,971 , 


2.196 


.. 




Tallow 


,. 


1 


.. 




Tanning materials — 










Crude back 


4. 100 tons 


35,476 


, , 


, , 


Other kindu . . 


, , 


4,434 


, , 


, , 


Tar 


, , 


903 




, , 


Tatpanlins and tents 


, , 


2,914 


£562 


112 8 


Tea 


6,770.9361b. 


319.089 


6,508,6101b. 


45,905 1 9 


Textile pieoe-gooda other 










than silk, ootton, linen. 










or woollen 




18,393 


£18,110 


3.622 1 6 


Artiolee made ap from . . 


.. 


10.271 


£10,076 


2,519 1 8 



IYQ Niew ZBAIiANU OVVlOlAL yKAK-bOOB. 

tlHNKiiAi. iMi'oirrn i»TO THK CouMiY OX Nitw $^E&LAKu DDBixo 1901 — cmuimuit. 



ArtlAlM* 



LttUiaitlill dlilKBlo* 
t-tiH'i liBWn 

l'*lllI||M 

luiu . 

Itawri, iirm'»i't\ ■ ■ 
iriiiitiornnr*)^') 

liii.t.|i 

Hl.«nl 

YImmoo • ■ 

1li.*>ri>lLli>' riirniHliingii And 

MMrMilit'iLiirnd .. 
IHlCMK'Iln* 

Miiiin 

'.|i.r.|.< ihii'l fill Ilium nnU— 
4 !«■ Mill liwI^'liftU 

iMiMlriiinr*' iiinflltine I'lol 

tgi.«rlMi, ■li-'i'"!", »nd forki 

'< —r l>'*»»l ■■ -: 

'\.,ti.:tMiOf, ilrinni, »na 

ihfi'liiriii •■ 

i(. t-. mi'l iiiiLling 

l-'l III>HI«t*<l 

I'lfiin-.iiiKi ■ml |jibrftitola 

Uri'-'i'iit ti-r ' ■ 

^..>i.>'>>i wikI H"''' "'"" 

J ^ k«h|>.- linili.driAd.ftnd 

,.r iifMl 

/l^ .rt'ii 

»; . I 1.. , 

II .. 
■' •■III. 
ii "-If >• 



ToUl QauitltlM 



344,450 No. 
9,660,087 BUp. (t 

i.yso , 

a,£DQ,9B4xQp. (t 



3,538 owt. 
82,689 lb. 

:tT,9Glowt. 



: ee,!HMlli. 
11.730,692 . 

i 107.537 . 

I 198,902 , 

i i,4£a, 

I 



l08.213Bn>>'- 
417,001 lb. 
47-4 cwt. 



Se^HOagiUA. 



S9,l&6Na. 



HbH.fttU lb. 
1. 7*1 lb. 



Tuul 
ImparU. 



4S5 
11,339 

3,171 
732 

58 
72,277 

2,56iJ 

16,770 

1,456 
34,088 
ll,91'J 

1,WK) 

3,078 

137,474 
34,&OS 

4<;,Ga4| 

IGO 
20,400 

10,303 

37,343 
1,842 
3, ,155 

1:3, aes 

84.623 

11,378 

l*,i!7a 

11.006 

1,81U 

841 

154 



19,027 
3,B83 ! 



RnUmd for Horn* 
Com iimpll^ii iMi 

tuiporuitlQD BUll 
■( Wualiouie. 



Ataaunl «f 
Oaif racalvad. 



343, 910 No. 



590,304 No. 
14.630 . 

S.66l,87Saup. ft. 
141,450 . 



£11,1490 



5S.22&Ib. 
1,661,677 . 

97.165 . 
S7,76S.400No. 

6,83801.. 
I. 493 1b. 
«SO,328 



£2.37& 

£is,a5B 

£13,02& 



17,82& : 3€,863gBi8. 



1.030 
4.7Hd 



£074 

48,696 gaJe. 



21,022 ' £30. 77a 

IJ.SUS 897, 1931b. 
404 . 

65 1,780 lb, 



£ f>. d. 
34 T 9 



520 6 
58 9 

a 18 

s.oei 17 

282 IS 



2,972 10 9 



S,222 12 

290,7^3 8 11 

30,507 13 2 

59,2«8 12 

170 19 8 

52& 4 

5,osa a 



475 12 

2,591 13 5 

ISo" 5 7 

3, SOS 13 

3.066 C 

194 15 6 

1,217 8 1 

4,154 11 8 

2.603 U T 

li' 2 6 



aBNBBAL IMPORTS. - 173 

Oknbhal Impobtb ihto thb CoiiONT OP Nbw ZBAI.AIID DURiMo 1901 — contituud. 







Vtlneo* 

Total 
tuiiart*. 


Bntere-I tor Houe 




ArtdclvL 


Total QaaatitiH 

Imported, 


CoiiHurajritioD on 
ImpoTtatiob bdA 
ox WarehonBe. 


Atnoont at 
Daly toeeLV«d. 






£ 


£ B. d. 


Whiting and abolk 
Wine— 
AustralJui 


12,343 cwt. 


1,398 


12,344 owt. 


617 4 g 


69, 356 gals. 


21,643 


55,821 gals. 


13,680 7 


Sparkling 


11,212 


20,164 


10,348 . 


4,656 11 11 


Other kindK 


60,048 . 


22,030 


57,923 . 


17.377 7 


Woodenif BTe 




28,110 


£14,983 


2,996 14 3 


UoaldingB 




12,535 


£12,157 


1,823 U 7 


Wool— 










Greasy 


1,149,7341b. 


30,707 


.". 


.. 


Scoured 


256,401 . 


7,037 




,. 


Woollen pieoe-goods 


, , 


319,770 


£817,089 


63,417 15 11 


Blaoketa 


24,616 pain 


9,811 


£9,767 


1,953 9 3 


WoolpaokB 


?5,304diz. 


36,664 




' 


Woolpooketa 


520 . 


266 


■- 




Tuns .. 




5,534 


£5,709 


1,141 17 


Ooir, ilax. and hemp 


■- 


10,692 


•• 


■■ 


Zinc — 










Perforated sheet 


474 cwt. 


854 




.. 


Plain sheet 


7,686 . 


9,382 




.. 


Spelter 


4,319 . 


4,534 




■ 


Zino manufaotures 


•• 


154 


£154 


81 4 


Uinor ArticEes r«qujred iai 










tbemakling-up of apnarel 


.. 


8,086 


.. 


•- 


Artiolesand lOBie rials auiuid 










ooly lot and to bs aaed 










solely io th^ fabrication 










of goods in the colofiy ,. 




23,495 


.. 




KiBceltaneoun ^Qoda — 










Manufactured . . 




12,839 






U D m aQ ala ct ured 


, , 


4,540 




.. 


Vanilla beana .. 


27,7521b. 


8,348 


•- 


■• 


Paroels Post 


• • 


109,683 


•• 


22,406 10 5 


ExciSB Dnms. 










Tobsooo, maDufaotnred 






51,9301b. 


2,596 10 


Cigars .. 


_ , 


, , 


2,160 , 


162 


Cigarettes made by hand . . 




.. 


2S8 . 


11 18 


pbarm&copceiatinccureA.es- 










WQCes,eitf£LCU,aQdniedi' 










oinal spirits oootaiiiing 










more than 60 per oeat. of 










proof spirit 


, , 




53,501 . 


2,006 5 7 


Phannaoopoeia tinotnres, 










fto., containing leae than 










60 per cent, of proof spirit 


. . 


.. 


1,545 . 


10 6 


Onlinary and flavouring 










essenoss 


■■ 


■• 


S88 gall. 


172 19 



174 



HEW ZltAIiAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



CusTous Bbvbncb. 

The Customs and excise duties received during the last fire 
years are ahown in detail, aAso the rate of revenue per head of mean 
population, inclusive and exclusive of Maoris, for each year : — 





lan. 


IWS. 


IBW. 


imo. 


MIL. 


CcVtOMS DOTW^- 


£ 


£ 


£ 




£ 


£ 


SplriU .. 
Win* 


364,219 


396,313 


414,395 




442.090 


4T8.SI6 


30.518 


31,138 

19.158 


32,045' 


3S,614 


35.864 


AU. Bref. &c. 


19.035 


17.694 




17.562 


I8,S<9 


OisVB, CiRArettsc. ftfi<l Snufl 


65, SIT 


71.430 


77,910 




82,351 


90,19» 


Tob»cco .. 


^i,6m 


257, S16 


363,057 




279,651 


996,010 


Tfa 


■!6,08I 


78,676 


79,975 




6a, 960 


45.yos 


Cofr«e. Cocoa, &c.. . 


5,7a'J 


5,469 


6,96S 




5,a86 


4 ,647 


&ag»t And MolAflteB 
Opium . . 


148,716 


154.355 


162,787 




166,876 


17a, 0S& 


5,&2A 


S.SOl 


6,139 




6,436 


6,6ia 


Other OOTjdft by Welghi 


187,498 


187.758 


19a,t*87 




17fl,654 


161,486. 


aid TAloi«ni , . 


634, 049 


&97,fl06 


Gea,7S3 




775,049 


808.531 


f JtbM Dutiea 


102,025 


10&,9S7 


di,i£& 




94.687 


69.»ia 


pArtwIi pMt 


8.BSS 


11,735 


14,366 




16,643 


3a.40& 


TolAis, CuBtoma Dutiea 


1,9]S!,16I 


1,961,726 


S.043,003 


3,170,354 2,191.798 


Excise DuTiKs. 














Ttnoiures^H«w Zealand .. 


983 


•1,2*4 


t9,036 




:i.686 


ea.isd- 


*Ct^*rs, CfftAreecei, nod SnufT 














— N»w- /^eAi&nd-msknuf ma- 














tured .. 


191 


152 


ai 




las 


171 


TobACCQ — Nevr - Zealaiid - 














Uiaou(u:tiUi«d . . 


3.358 


s,2aa 


8,3SS 




S.376 


s,5g& 


H«er — New Zealuid 


71,765 


75,164 


7a.96& 




85,141 


89.18& 


Tfiula, ExeiBiB Dutifli .. 


75, MT 


76,812 


83,715 




B&,SB4 


94.163- 


Kavariu« from Customs 


£ a. d. 


k n, d. 


£ s. d. 




£ B. d. 


£ 8. d. 


liuii&i per h«iu] of meiiTi 






1 






u(|^ul>tiori I'dHCludllig 












a 18 


2 IS 3 


S 14 S 1 2 16 10 


3 16 4 


(i|ti;""JiAluding Mwriit .. 


S 10 3 


2 10 6 


3 11 6 Ifl 11 


3 13 £ 


|(«VM»»B Irini Kicriitfl Duties 






1 






|lir ImkI of me^u) populo- 












lliill lEXrAM^ing M4nr>i .. 


2 10 


2 1-7 


2 2& 2 4 


2 5 


|>|II4> nri'Iudinff MfcoriH.) .. 


1 ll'T 


2 04 


^ 1-1 


2 27 a 3-5 



• liiHu'lloK "C "XciKi^ dntf on ciilincrr Kiid UAVcnrlne ctiKentMS. f Inoludlng JI4fr 

.liiMi Auit "0 tntl\hift tnil flkvounoK e»BeDi;i^. ani) £U on pmfumed BpiTitii. ; Id- 

.411I1I1U Imtfivt*^ •lull "b culipary •»<! Aavciurini: i^Baunri'i. | InclndloR £173 duty on 

ulllUFf •ii'l tim'/tiuri\UI wiwni-M mill J'hi on p«ir[iiui«<l spUil". 

Tlin {Juatonts reveiuit: for the year 1901 amounted to £9,191,798. 
liuil ijiii tixc'm: duties to £94.153. The revenufi from Customs waa 
I'J Itiu. 4d. per head of population excluding Maoris, and £2 13b. 5d. 
if lluiy '>e included. In 1888 the Customs revenue was £2 6b. 2d. 
|itit hmui of European population, and from that time the propor- 
titih imireaBed slowly year by year until 1892, when it reached 



0U8T0MK KKVBKUK. 



175 



P 
* 



£& lis. 6d. per head. During the next two years there wae a 
falling-off; but 1895 and following years show increaeen. the pro- 
portion for 1900 being higher than in any year wnce 1883. Details 
for twelve year* arc given ; — 

COBTOltS ReVBKUK PEIl HUAD OP EUSOFSAK Pol'UIATlOS. 

£ t. a, 

1B96 .. .. .. S 9 n 

1697 .. .. .. 9 18 

1896 S 18 8 

1W39 iU 5 

1900 .. .. .. 9 16 10 

.IWl S 16 4 

Dating from 1B90, the t&xatiuii by way of Customs and exoiKe 
duticH together iucrctastid hom iC'^ lis. '2d. in that year to £2 lis, lid. 
in 1896, to £2 15fl. Id. in 1897. lo ii2 13s. fid. in 1898, lo £2 Us. 8d. 
in 1899. to £2 19h. 3d. in IfKK). and decUiml to £2 Itts. 9d. in 1901. 

There was an alteration of tftriff in 1895 in curtain iuiius,, but 
the aninunc of duty paid in 1899 does not bear a higher propurcioQ 
to the total value of inipoits (If^ss specie) (or that year tlian the duty 
paid in 1894. prior to the new tariff, to the imports of that year. 

In thf vear 1900 certain duties were lowereti and exemptions 
granted. 1*60- ift now chargt-d only 2d. per pound, instead of 4d. ; 
oununts and raisinfl arc lowered to Id. per pound ; cnndte;) are Id. ; 
cocoa and roaat^d coffet-, 3d. There is also reduction on stearine 
for match umkiug, on paraHin-wtLX, and wax inatchea. Patwiil and 
proprietarv medicines bear lb per cent, duty, also certaiu di-ugg and 
chemicals. Steam-engiiies, or paits thereof, are chargw) 5 per c«nt. 
The new exemptions are various. 

With these circumstauces there has been a greater import of tax- 
able articles, which would seem to iudicaio that purohasing power 
hod increased. It is at loast certain thai ihe value of imports ro^e 
from £3.990.177 (excludiug specie), in 1894. to £11,353.4113 in 1901. 
notwithstaudiug the changes of tariff. 

The tarifl has beeu givun in full in this book (gee pages 83 to 99.) 
The rates of iluty levied include IBs. per gallon on spirits; SOs. 
per gallon on perfumed spiritB; 7ei, per pound on cigars and snuff; 
17s, 6d. per 1,000 of ■2Jib. and under, and 6d. per ounce weight 
over S^lb. per 1.000. on cigarettes; 3s. 6d. per pound on manu- 
factured and 2b. on unmanufactured tobacco, Sparkling wine is 
charged 9fi. a gallon: ,\nstralian. 6s.; other kinds, 6s.; ale and 
beer. 28. The duty on tea is 2d. the pound; on cocoa, chocolate, 
and chicory, 3d. ; raw coffee, 2d. : roasted. 3d. Sugar, molasses, 
and treacle pay ^., and glucose Id. per pound. Opium is charged 
40a. per pound. The remainder of cht: Customs revenue, with small 
exception, is made up of charges on goods by weight, ad valorem 
duties, ranging from 6 to 40 per cent., and receipts from the foreign 
parcels post. There is also an excise duty oi Is. per pound on 
tobacco ; Is. 6d. per pound on cigars, cigarettes, and snuff; 3d. per 
gallon on beer; 9d. per pound on tinctures, ikc., manufactured ia 




J 



17'j NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOK. 

th<; eolony, containing more than 50 per cent, of proof Bpirifi, and 
'Vl. i^ir ponnd when ^ss than 50 per cent. Also, 12s. per gallon on 
c-j)]nar>' Savouring essences ; and 20s. on perfumed spirits. 

iiy " The Tobacco Excise Duties Act,: 1896," the excise duty on 
cigarettes made in the colony is now (from the 31st December, 1896) 
2s. *>]. per pound on machine-made and Is. per pound on hand-made 
cig-irelteB. 

"The Tobacco Act Amendment Act, 1896,". .enacts that all 
packages of manufactured tobacco shall be labelled before leaving 
the manufactory, and provides for the issue of warrants to lue 
cutting- machines for cutting duty-paid manufactured tobacco for 
sale (or to be used in the manufacture of cigarettes by hand), and to 
manufacture cigarettes by hand, under certain conditions. 

The duties authorised by "The Timber Export Act, 1901," will 
be found given on page 99 in detail with the full tariff. 



SECTION III.— KXP0BT3 AND TOTAL TRADE 
Thb valub of all the «x|)ort& in 1901. exclusive ol horses and 
forage sent to Sooth Africa with the New Zealand Contingpnis, 
ivas £1*2.881,434: the value of New I^ealand produce, exported, 
£13,690,460: an average of £16 6s, 3d. per head of popnlaiion, 
against £17 Is. lid. for the previons year. The decrease in the 
Toloo of exports of New Zealand produce for 1901 in respect of 
that for 1900 amounts to £364.789, or 2-79 per cent. 

A comparAtivc table sboTting thi^ value of Now Zealand domestic 
exports for fourteou years is given further on. with comments. 
The continuous rise observed from 189& to 1900 was arrested in 
1901 

A conipaTaEive statement of uxports according to value for the 
two yeani jg {{iven, sbowin({ the amounts for various principal 
articles, being the produce or manufacture of the colony, classified 
accordiag to their nature into groups : — 



Tbc Hiss. 

Gold 

SilT»r. uai miuvrals . . 


Tmt 1«». 

«e.i8G 

. I.ISO.WU 

52.174 


V«uU»I. 

£ 
143.176 
1.7M.7B4 
74,003 


Iaor««M 

In 

1001. 

A ■ 

44.040 

$i4,isa 

21, 5M 
8^9.761 


I>«anSM 
Is 
ISOl. 

1 

■ ■ 


TotftI 


. i,«n.sis 


1.969,0Ca 

17.851 
8,901 

965 


•* 


Tint PifiiiEttiRs. 
Piih 
Oyatera 

Ocbar 


18.644 

1.078 


1 ' 
i!m9 


T98 
"iia 


Total .. 


21.674 


3S.017 


348 


• • 


Tax FoKXst, 

KKuri'gam .. 
Timbei— 

Hkwu uid bewn 

Olb«r 


7.19-2 
63S,993 

Kt2,174 
1.48A 


13,46a 

440.114 

aw, 609 

1,191 


6.a6i 

62,636 


l?6ii70 
*fi»4 


Tout 


B63.I44 


764.467 


■ 1 


108,607 


1 

AStHALS Alto PHODDOI, 

Br«( Md poik (Mlt«d) 

Butt«r 

CheMa 

MidM 

r.i*«.aU>ck 


16.777 
9.580 

740, eai) 

239,111 

48,089 
89,616 


17.72S 

10,335 

BSa,40R 

338,685 

43.470 
16.SL8 


OM 
695 

141, 7se 
9.574 
1.481 


Aa!u7 




1^8 



NEW ZBAI^KO OFFIOUL TEAH-BOOE. 









Inereate 


DeoreaM 




TearlSOO. 


Year 1901. 


in 

um. 


la 

IflOL 




< 


X 


M 


t 


Ahihau uxd Pboddci — eontd. 








Freservad mekto 


94,034 


87,683 


. . 


6,841 


FroBen meat 


. 2,128,881 


2,258,262 


139,881 




Rabbit-tkins . . 


41,689 


67,046 


16,867 




Saaiage-skini 


43,1S8 


89,498 




3,660 


SbeepskinB and pelts . . 


279,391 


364,579 




14,812 


TaUov* 


868,473 


351.710 




16,768 


Wool 


. 4,749,196 


3,699,103 


'.'. 1.050,093 


Other 


8,794 


7,280 




1,614 


Total 


. 8,786,858 


7,969,197 


•■ 


817,661 


AOBICUI/TDRIT. PbODCOTS. 








Bran and ataarpa 


13,062 


15,294 


3,332 




Ohafi 


76 


93 


17 


, , 


Flour 


17,044 


8,496 


, , 


8,649 


Grain — 










Barley 


28,236 


13,341 


, , 


14,994 


Beans and peaa 


25,275 


26,023 


763 




Maise 


24,676 


16,086 


, , 


9,490 


Malt 


50,506 


33,263 


, . 


18,264 


Oats 


552,370 


922,301 


370,031 




Wheat 


361,494 


276,111 




75.883 


Hops 


18,874 


17,189 


8.315 




Oatmeal 


26,622 


27,591 


969 




FotatoBH 


26,134 


90,658 


66,524 




8eedB'(grass and oloier) 


93,006 


69,937 




28,069 


Other 


9,393 


18,112 


8,719 
301,831 


■• 


Total 


. 1,280,666 


1,532,386 


■■ 


Manutactdbbb. 








Apparel 


3,664 


7,227 


3,573 


, , 


Leather 


112,867 


112,400 




467 


Pfaarmium (New Zealajid hemp 


) 332,183 


195,728 




136.464 


Woollen manufactures 


12,528 


13.769 


1,231 


, , 


Other maoufaotuies . . 


88,111 


96,023 


7,917 


-■ 


Total 


649,342 


426,142 




124,200 


Miscellaneous 


13,454 


17,298 


3,844 


■• 


Total exports (colonial produc 


e 








and manufactures) 


. 13,055,249 


12,690,4o0 




304,789 


Speaie 


23,903 


11,614 




11,289 


Other exports (BrUish an 


d 








foreign) . . 


168,009 


179.350 


11,341 


■• 



Total exports .. £13.246,161 12,881.424 364,737 

The class designated " Animals and Produce " shows by far the 
greatest value, the sum for 1901 being £7,969,197, which includes 
£3,699,103 for wool and £2,253,262 for frozen meat. The total 
value of exports in this class decreased during the year by £817,661, 
on a total of £8,786,858 in 1900. 



SECTION IILt^EXPORTS AND; TOTAL TKADE 

Thb ' value of all the exports ic 1901, exclusive of horses and 
forage sent to South Africa with the New Zealand Contingents, 
was £12,881,424 ; the value of New Zealand produce exported, 
£12,690,460: an average of £16 6s. 3d. per head of .population, 
against £17 Is. lid. for the previous year. The decrease in the 
value of exports of New Zealand produce for 1901 in respect of 
that for 1900 amounts tp £364,789, or 2-79 per cent. 

A comparative table showing the value of New Zealand domestic 
exports for fourteen years is given further on, with comments. 
The continuous rise observed from 1895 to 1900 was arrested in 
1901. 

A comparative statement of exports according to value for the 
two years is given, showing the amounts for various principal 
articles, being the inx>dace or manufacture of the colony, classified 
according to their nature into groups : — 



Tec MiHi. 
Coal 

Gold 

Silver, aDd nunerala . . 


Teuieoo. 

M 
98,136 
. 1,439,602 
52,474 


teu 1901. 

M 
142,176 
l;763,784 
74,003 


InoreiAe 
Id 

laoi. 

£■ ■ 

44,040 

314,182 

21,529 

379,751 


Decrease 
in 
1901. 

M 


Total 


. 1,690,212 


1,969,963" 


•• 


The FisHBBiBS. 
Fuh 

Oysters .,. 
Other .. ~ 


18,644 
1,95S 
1,078 


17,851' 
■ 3,201 
965 


1^249 


793 
"il3 


Total 


21,674 

7,192 
622,293 

232,174 
1,486 


22,017 


343 


■■ 


Thk Fobbbt. 
Fungus 
Kauri-gum .. 
Timber— 

Sawo and hews 

Other 


12,463 
446,114 

294,699 
1,191 


5,261 
62,525 


176 i 179 
294 


Total 


863,144 


754,457 


•- 


108,687 


ASIWtliS USD Pbodocb. 
BaooD and hams . , 
Beef and potk (salted) 
Butter 
Cheese 
Hides 
TjiTe-etook 


16,777 

9,530 

740,621) 

229,111 

42,039 

39,675 


17,722 
10,225 
882,406 
238,686 
43,470 
16,518 


955 

695 

141,786 

9,574 

1,431 


23! 157 



180 



nW SBAIiAND.OrPICIAI. TBAB-BOOK. 



QCABmiKS OF THE FaiSClPAL ABTTCI.B8 OP NsW Z>AL,Ain> PBODDCE 

Exported —amtinued. 



Itenu. 


TeikT ISOO. 


Tear lUl. 


Increaee 
lolSOI. 


Decraaw 


Agriccltaisl Products: — 










Bran ajid iharpa . . Tom 


4,493 


4.754 


963 


_ , 


Cbaff 


25 


28 


3 




Plour .. ... 


2,613 


1,305 




1,308 


GruD, ImuJ«7 .. Buifa. 


243,048 


119,779 




133.369 


beanaand poM 


174,523 


166,184 




8. 339 


, matse 


193.720 


134, U7 




69.273 


. m&lt 


220,893 


141,324 




79.569 


. Ota 


5,818,648 


10,514,924 


4,696,376 




. whest 


2.867,069 


2.301,092 




665.977 


Hop* .. Cwt. 


2,876 


4,296 


1,423 




Ofttmeal .. Tons 


3,972 


8,338 


351 




Potatoes .. . ; 


13,423 


32,834 


9.413 




' Se«d8(gTus and cloTez) Bash* ' 


351,630 


294,347 , 


.. 


57,383 


UaDnfacttms : — 










Ale and beer . . Gals. 


18,615 


19,449 


834 


, , 


Cordage .. Gwi. 


1,532 


647 


,. 


885 


Leather .. CwL 


18,131 


18.281 


150 


, , 


'Pfaonniam (New Zea- 










land hemp) .. ToBB 


15,906 


10. m 


,, 


9.735 


Soap .. Cwt. 


3,936 


6,014 


3,078 


•• 



• At 901b. to the boibel. 

The Dumerical increases in sach articles as batter, oate, wool, 
coal, silver, gold, timber, potatoes, hops, rabbitskins. and soap, are 
all most satisfactory, and in some cases (notably buttco-, timber, gold. 
silTer,-coai, oats, and poiatocs) very considerable ; while, on the other 
hand, the export of taUow, sheepskins, pelts, and phormium, and some 
other items (including kauh-gum), declined in 1901. The rates of 
increase and decrease for the principal articles fu« exhibited in the 
table following : — 







Ikckeasks. 




Export of 
OaU.. 


Bmtc 

C« 

., Bosh. 


of Increase per 
at. in 1901 over 
autify in 1900. 

. 80 71 


Rate 
Export ot Cet 

CbafT . . Tons 


ot Increaae per 
it. in 1901 oT«r 
antitr in ISOOl 
. 1200 


Silver 


.. Oz. 


. 74-95 


Oatmeal . . Tons 


. 11-81 


Potatoes 


.. Tons 


. 7u 12 


Leather .. Cwt. 


. 8-27 


Orslers 


.. Dob. 


. 63 27 


Bran and sharps Tons 


583 


Soap 


.. Cwt. 


. 5J7a 


' Ale and beet .. Gals. 


4-48 


Hops 


.. Cwt. 


ll>-44 


Wool ..Lb. 


4-34 


Fungus 


.. Cwt. 


4:i-59 


BacnaandhamR Cwt. 


311 


CoaU 


.. Tons 


. 41-65 


Ct>eese .. Cwt. . 


1-40 


RAbbit-ski&E 


.. No. 


. -U 97 


. Hides ..No. 


1-23 


Timber 


.. Pt. 


. 24 87 


1 Beef and pork. . Cwt. 


1-09 


Gold 


.. Ox. 


. 31-94 


Meat ([foien) . . Cwt. 


0«9 


Butter 


.. Cwt 


. 1681 








Mi&m 



I £RUIO 
4UM.ni 



«t 



MajM 



Mmjsm 



ttjmjm 



tlOOAJB 



£1.331.993 



AUBJOl 



Msua 



fUBI^S 



tmM 



tlMS^BIi 



£Lia.\tt 



Mimfiut 



iM.ir 



MUitmi 



J!U«».7S0 



MtMiMi 



w.a» 



2T1UIT 



ilAJUBO 



iVM^SW 



«ai.UT.UB 



49M,TS1 



^UaSAB 



£!,««& HM 



it.cM.aaB 



^4,>u.(m 



iiusLtn 



XITKLIM 



MmAu 



tutnjon 



tx.na,n$ 



MKBJH 



is,aai^H 



ce^»o.ua xgjT7j36 iMMjsr £iajM,ni 4ii.tw.tm sisjMMa xa.m>.i>n 
1895 1896 1897 18S8 1899 1900 1901 



[T» Tim ]m«« I<V. 



'(■»• rk> 



i 



» 
» 



^^^^H 


^^^^1 


p. SXPOUTS. 1 


^H 


P IBI 


^^^1 


y 


I>KC[tKJU(ItS. 






ExDori ot 
WtiiU ebons 


Out Id IVuluvcr 
QnuiUty In IMC. 

-Lb. .. ei-ae 


KxporC of 
Preserved me&t 


Bal« of Dbctiwsii paj- 
Cani. In IDOI over 
QninUtjrln IBUD. 

Cwt. . . 20 59 


Uinr nit 


. Tom 


msma 


Wbeat 


Bush 


. . 19 74 


Cord«ito 


. Cwt. 


57 77 


Soedii 


Bii>li 


. . 1629 


Barley 


. Buih. .. 


a»-7s 


Tallow 


Cwt. 


■ . 8-62 


Flotti 


. T<ms 


0000 


Bsftoa and peM 


Bilh. 


4 78 


Pbonniiuo 


. Toaa 


8606 


SAU-iagii-tkiu*. . 


CwU 


. . 2'75 . 


Malt.. 


. Buah. .. 


86 03 


Fish . . 


Cwt. 


.. 2 as 


Ma M 


. Kuah. .. 


36 76 


ShnopokiDS Mid 






Guni (KikUri] 


. TOOB 


2677 


pelu 


So. 


l-*5 


Lifo-atoek 


.Mo. 


24-25 









The position as lo vidne in respect of a period of fourteen ycftrs, 
1868 to 1601 incluaive, ih presented in a table ginng tUo doincstie 
exports for eftch. TJie most iinporttunt items of export given under 
tha headiiig "Other New Zealand Produce" arc coal, silver, 
minerals, fish, oysters, funpus, kauri-gum, timber, bacon and hams, 
salud and preserved meats, tallow, sheep- and rabbit -skins, hide*, 
eanaage- skins, and livo-stock. The aggregate value of these in 1901 
_WM £1,681,1U. 

ExpoBTS OF Nsw Zbauihd PaonucB. 



Wool. 



atiis. 



Pracen 

UMt. 



1866 B,115.099 



ia8» 

1890 
1891 



1807 
180S 



I 



8.976.375 
1,150,099 
l.lStJ.GBG I 
189& t.31S.3u7 
1898 8.774.738 
4.8U7,0I6 

iaaas,669.mi 

1866 4.991.8481 
4.443.114 
4. 645. MM 1 
1B99J 4. 824.6^7 1 
19004.749. IWil 
3,099,1031 
I 1 



914,909 

785.49ffi 



isoii: 



7f»l 

,OW7.173 
DM. 968 

015. SSt 

a87,86&Jl 

,162.191 

U41.4'^8 

960.204 

nw,69i 

SIS, 1802 
4111). [»-J 
763,784 



i 

62a. 900 
7fia.ST4 

.osT.on 

, tot. 7-24 
,033.377 
,08.1. ir>7 

,194,645 
.903.711 



Batter 

HnA 
CbmiM. 



197.170 
21 H, 945 

■i07,B87 

«8,204 
H&4.271 
3BG.48S' 
a7S.5lO 



A^enl- 

tiinO 
Produce. 



Hftnn- 

AwtUT*! 



Oibor 

K.Z. Pro- 

diiio«. 



905,907'288.M8 
.424.2B7 5fi9.880 
.a8U,BB4 1647,947 

894,407)420,357 
.036.687'i67.677 



:2dl.9:i8|Ul.8H^ 



,5r)«,iJHf*> 

,6y8,7.'i(t 
,098.e.'.G 
,1S3.S6) 

,258,202, 



539. 4GU 
7ia.Gi7 
i'69.731 1 



716.546 
317,6M 
826.029 
578,358 

495.17^1 



M6,636 1365.164 



C 

1,260,461 
1.288.647 
1.898,687 
1 516.75a 
1.345,708 



224,9681.288 626 
168.703 1.409.869 
108.OH1 l.a09.V4'.l| 

197 .Willi 360 TS.^! 
4 U) . 677 -iSa.ftOA: 1 ,6U5,7115 
013.679378 Oeoll.«(J7,7l6 

.iaii.ftG.'i54B H42'i,y'ja,iiaj 

,5;i2.38C4-.25,143,l,90&,Gli2 



TotAl, 



7.3&S,1S8 

9.042,008 

9,428.761 

9.400.094 

9.865,868 

8.567.448 

«,C»H5,] 48 

9,S»0,15S 

y.lV7..H!i6 

9..'yj6.2fl7 

10.324.988 

U.7i)9.740 

13.055,249 

1^,690,460 



Tlie preet^ding table shows that the value of the exports of New 
Zealand produce full from £Et.i28,761 in 18<)0 to £8.3H0.153 in 
1895. rose in 1HJ)6 lf> £9,177,33fi. to 1897 to £9.596.267, in 1898 to 
£l0.3a4,9fi8, in 189i> to £1!. 799,740. in 19O0 to £l.%05o.249. and in 
1901 declined to £12,690.460. 

Thns there was a net increase of exports, since 1895, to the 
value of £4,3(r0,>1o7, all New Zealand produce, and far more than 




d 



183 



HBW ZBAL&HD OPPIOIAL YHAK-BOOK. 



a recovery to tlio ligureB for 1800 and 1891 (after which had 
foUoweii a docreaso in values). Wiih the amount of increase in 
uioney must tie considsred Lhe state of prlcea of the vfkHous kinds 
of produce. 

The export of wool, measured by quantity, rose from 102.817,077 lb. 
in 1800 to 146,3-20.07y lb. in 1901. or at the rate of 43S0 per oen»., 
and that of froK«n uieat from 698,894 cwt. to 1,857,647 cwt. 

Gold, loo, wliicb was exported to the quantity of 187,041 oz. in 
1890, increased to 465,658 oz. in 1901, the rate of increase being 
upwards of 14'2-7S per cent. 

The ri>-export trade of the colony would seem from the sab- 
joiued figures to huve beou almost stationary for the last ten 
years, the ligures (or 1890 arul 1901 only diffijriny l>y a sum of 
£38,79.5. The re-exports of mercUandiiie in 1901 were valued at 
£179.350, or only a little more than 1 per cent, of the total exports, 
■excluding specie. 



18M 
1S91 

1593 

ie»5 



KxroRTS or B&tnsB, Porriok, akd othbb Oolosuii Pbodccr 
(Kxri[.Dt>iKO Sfeoib). 

f 
.. HU.565 
iaO,7U5 
125 .052 



12a,40-J 
13C.4('r2 
13V. WO 



1896 
18U7 
1H-J6 

I8jy 
1000 
1901: 



e 

132.571 

134, MO 
1^,68S 
1G3.009 
179,300 



With these sums may he contracted the re-export trade of New 
South Wales— a State having' less than double the population of 
Now ZtJwlaud— which, exclusive of specie, amounted iu 1900 to 
£4,708.567, or uo less than 21 16 per cent, of the value of all goods 
«x ported. 

Exjxtrts frofn t}te North and Middle Islandi. 

The exports from the North and Middle Islands respectively, 
«xeludiQg "Parcels post," during the last three years were as 
under: — 



VMT. 


Xonb islftDil. 


Middle IkIadiI. 


PropottlOD to Tui«l Ex|>ort. 




< 


t 


Nfnth Uland. Middle Ulaikd. 


latw .. 


.. fi, Oil. 239 


5,016,230 


50 40 -19 60 


1900 .. 


.. 6.707,064 


6,526.897 


50-70 40-80 


1901 .. 


.. 0.077.7a4 


6,7fi7,o1G 


\'-U &fi-76 



The Middle Island exported in 1901 more than half of the 
total for the two islands. 

Wool exported arid produced. 

The quantity of wool exported in 1901, as previously shown, was 
146,820,079 lb., valued at £3,699,103, an increase of 6,113,5931b.. or 



WOOL EXPOBTBD AMD PRODDOBO'. 



isa 



4-34 per oont. on tho quantity exported in the previous year, but ft 
diicreaao ot £1.050.093, or '22L1 per cent, on the value. The 
annual production of wool is btist estimated by taking the exports 
for tile twelve inontlia iiniiitniitttely preceding the commencement 
of shearing, an<) adding thereto the qu^Jitity used in the colony for 
ui&uufacturing purposes, 

The following shows the produce for otwih of the last fourteeaj 
years cading oa the 30tb September : — 



Xmt vndUis sotb S«pMiDbor. 



1888 
1880 

1890 
1891 

1893 

imd 

ISO* 
1695 

lem 

1897 

1896 
18dO 
1900 
1601 



QnkDUty 

LoQfti nun*. 



89,:i7l>.26y 
',l,'i.()lH,.ii(7 
10i,3di,lBii 
108.619.173 
110,&60.060 
119.(113,874 
lliti,4HU,4A7 
189,884. TOtf 
l88,Jf09,(i7a 
I81,-I10.9o& 
ISO. 401. 8^9 
ua, 611.308 
U«,B:iU,S15 
143,064,788 



Lb. 

4.07-J,568 
3.550.004 

2,37y,ay3 

2.319.073 

9,G29.»55 
3,476,155 

S.siw.ias 

8.UBtl,984 
8.«)e,409 
3,703,831 
4,Sfi8.605 
8.2J8.8y2 



To 1*1 Annnal 



Lb. 
68,35.1.831 
90,174.511 
105, .Wl, 478 
111,537,546 
1U,1J4'J,(MJ4 
122, -273, 729 
130,9.'.0.613 
132,63-J,901 
13a.iHW.fK)7 
137,709,42* 
m. 10^, 330 
147.903,708 
148.052,907 
147,694.718 



From these figures it appears that, notwithstandinj; the de- 
craiue since iy98f the wool-clip has increatted by over 68 percent. 
duriuy the last foiirteeu years. 

To arrive at a perfectly correct escimata of the increase in wool 
production it would be necessary to take into consideration tlie pro- 
portion of grea^^y, scoured (and sliped), and washed wool exported 
each year, the washing process of course greatly reducing the 
weight. The perceutagus of greasy, scoxured, and washed wool to 
the total quantities exported duriu^ the last four years are :— 



For Csnt. 


Scourod *n4 Slijnd. 
Por Cent. 


Wubnd. 
P»r Ceut 


78 ea 


30-36 


1-03 


77-64 


lUM 


083 


78-62 


90-10 


1-38 


78-45 


20'G1 


1-14 



Tho incroaso in tho wool-production is. of course, mainly due to 
I the greater uiunbcr of sheep— namely, 20.233,099 in April, lOOl, 
[against 15,423,328 in May, 1BS9. A comparative stat.en-ienl for 
BveraJ years is supplied, showing the number of flocks in groups of 
lises :— 



d 



HMW KKALaND OFPtOIAIt YRAH-BOOK. 
NouBBB OP Flocks. 1890 to 1901. 



I 



tUmeof Flo«b. 



Under nOO .. 

WO itud under 1,000.. 
l.tXW , 2,01)0. . 
2,000 , fi,000. . 

5.000 , 10.000.. 

lO.OOO , 20.000. . 
BO.OOOanii iipwrird^ .. 

Total* 



ISO. 



lUHL 



IHH. 



ISH. 



IBM 



1900. 



IMO. 



T.aea 

l.SSB 

586 

a&i 

16U 



8. Baa 

3.033 
1,193 
701 
3U 
331 
17fl 



11, 309 ilS.SSO 



10,814 
2,«7 
l.lt» 

aaa 

sso 

17B 



15.837 



IS.OSfj 
a.605 
1,160 

a<«o 

SSI 

H7 



17,703 



13,836 
2.709 

2.4ia* 

341 
231 
144 



19,722 



13.239 

3,810 

a,G21t 

ass 

106 
139 



18.337 



11.700 
9.099 

2,877: 

397 
164) 

188 



18.360 



•From lOOn to 2,000, 1.TM flockii; fralti LW1 tn S.nm, ni4 flmiki. 
f trcmLUmioiioo. I,0T1 H-'Ck.'-, Iroiai. 00 \oi.i»t).nra Hooka. 

: Fioiil l^OO toS^SM, 9,IMfli>rlia: trom 2.»n toS.OOO.fiB- floclUL 

It will li» appamnl that tlic general tenilcncy of increase since 
tbe year 1890 is towanls tha multiplication of the smaller ftoplre, 
whose owners are better able to cope with the rabbit diflifulty 
than the large runholders. 

Export of Itabbil-skim. 

Prior to 1878 rabbit-skins were a vtry snmU item in the exports, 
but in that year the number sent out of the colony amounted to 
3,951,209. Ten years after (1888) the export had rifien to 11,809,407, 
from which it increased to 17.041,106 in 18*13, the greatest number 
aK vet ex|iorti-d iu a year. From 1895 the IaII was rapni. and the 
export for 1898 only ruachod 0.607.934 Bkins. Iu 1899 there was 
a, elif^bl upward tondtinev. tltu nuiiiber oxporled being 7,891,4348^ 
which, howovor, fell to 5.R!K).893 ia the year 1900, whilb in 1901 
7,122.00H Bkins wuru exported. 

The tigiires for the years in which there has been decline are 
quoted :— 



i 



Tmf. 


SuiiilMir ol Rnlitilt-filLliiB 


T«w. 


Number nr IUbhIt-«U 


etporiM. 


oxpnried. 


1898 .. 


.. 17.IM1.10G 


1898 .. 


.. 6,C07.B31 


18tf« .. 


.. 14.i;67.3e.5 


1899 .. 


7.fi^l.648 


UBM .. 


.. 15, jay, 311 


ISOO .. 


S,(i90.HlW 


16M .. 


.. 10,628,612 


lOOL .. 


.. 7.112,008 


1897 .. 


e,(yjy.a34 







From the above it will be seen ihat the importance of the export 
has very much diminished. The fall, represented in money value, 
has been : — 



YOM. 




ValuaoriUbbtt-AliliiB 
oiportod. 

.. 138. »93 
.. 87.998 
.. 85.022 
.. 6S.59t» 
47.472 



If WW, 

laos 

1899 
1900 

I'JOl 



T&ltJo o( IlkiiMt-tkkiiu 
•ilKiriml. 

.. 61.607 

.. 81.118 

41.689 

67.046 



While the amount of money received for this produce of the 
colony shows less proQl than formerly, it may be a satisfactory 




FBOZEN HEAT BZPOBTED. 



185 



result, as seemingly indicating some abatement of the rabbit pest. 
Xiarge quantities of frozen rabbits are now exported, and are alluded 
to in the remarks on the frozen meat industry on the next page. 

Export of Sheepskins and Pelts. 
These form a more important article of export at the present 
time than the rabbit-skins, though in the year 1888 the position was 
the reverse as regards value in money. In 1888 the number of 
sheepskins and pelts sent away from New Zealand was 1,646,401, 
against 4,601,631 in 1901, a rise of 179-49 per cent, for the period 
between those years. The value increased from £83,674 to £264,579, 
or 216-58 per cent. Figures for the last eight years are quoted : — 



Yeur. 


Export ol SheepBklaa 
md FelU. 


Yei. 


Export of StaeepBkiiiB 
BJid Pelte. 




No. 




No 


1894 .. 


.. 2,681,562 


1998 . . 


.. 4,995,335 


1895 .. 


.. 3,230,539 1 


1899 .. 


.. 4,960,054 


1896 .. 


.. 3,001,791 


1900 .. 


.. 4,669,180 


1897 .. 


.. 3,668,051 


1901 .. 


.. 4,601,531 



Export of Tallow. 

Besides wool and meat, tallow is largely exported, and since the 
year 1888, when 136,460 cwt. were sent away, the export in- 
creased to 335,360 OWE. in 1901. In value this export considerably 
exceeds that of either sheepskins or rabbit-skins, and the money is 
indeed more than the total for those two articles taken together. 
The eight latest years show the following results : — 

Tallow bxpobtzd. 



TMtn. 


Cwt. 


e 


Yean. 


Cwt. 


£ 


1894 .. 


.. 199,400 


204 


499 


1898 . . 


.. 347 


160 


302 


141 


1895 .. 


.. 263,660 


260 


999 


1899 .. 


. . 338 


620 


311 


649 


1896 .. 


.. 222,540 


208 


821 


1900 .. 


.. 367 


780 


368 


473 


1897 


.. 310.200 


259,964 


1901 . . 


.. 335 


3(jO 


351 


710 



Frozen Meat exported. 

Frozen meat now takes second place among the exports of ' New 
Zealand produce. In 1901. 1,857,547 cwt., valued at £2,253,262, 
were shipped in the colony. An account of the development of 
the industry was given in a special article in the Year-book, 1894. 
The total export for each year Etince the commencement of the trade 
has been : — 



Teajr. 




Lb. 


Tear. 


Lb, 


1882 .. 


.. 1,707,328 


1892 .. 


. 97,6:^6,557 


1883 .. 




. 9,853,200 


1893 .. 


. 100,262,453 


1884 .. 




. 28,445,^28 


1894 .. 


, 114,827,216 


1885 .. 




. 33.204,976 


1895 .. 


. 127,018,864 


1886 .. 




. 38,758,160 


181)6 .. 


. 12:1.576,544 


1887 .. 




. 45,03o.984 


181)7 .. 


. 157.687,152 


1888 .. 




. 61,857,376 


1899 .. 


. 173,798,576 


1889 .. 




. 73,5r.4,064 


1899 . . 


. 208.972,624 


1890 .. 




. 100,934,756 


1900 . . 


. 206,621,072 


1891 .. 




. 110,199,082 


1901 . . 


. 208,015,264 



186 



HBW SK&lfAHD OfriOlAIi YBAB-JiOOE. 



Tbt9 above figures for 1B99 include 139,221 owt.. or 4,876.&34 
(number) of frozeu rabbits and hares in the bkin ; those for 1900 
iucluiie 12.260 (731 cwt.) of hares, and 6.601,997 rabbits, weishinfc 
167,971 cwt., valued at £J&4.83(i, and ihoso for 1901. inchide 42.202 
(2,943 cwt,.) of hares, and 4,830.669 (12i.353cwl.) of mbbiiB. valued 
ax £117.813, 80 tliat ihcBo animala can hardly now be looked upon 
u wholly a nuisance. 

To ascertain the total value of the meat export in 1901 it it 
necessary to take ioto conKidciratton, with the amount of £2,3S3,263, 
value of frozen meat before staled, £10,868 (or frozen fish; also 
the value of preserved meats, £87,&H3 : of salted beef and pork, 
£10,236; and of bacon and hams, £17,732, 

Gold exported. 

The amount of gold exported in 1901 WM 455,658 02., an in- 
crease of 81,944 oz. on the quantity exported in 1900. 

The total quantity of gold t^iitwed for duty to the Slet December, 
1901, which may bw reckoned as approximately the amount obtained 
in the colony, was 16,0(j4.4d9 oz.. of the valup of £59,139,884. For 
fuller iuforuiatioD. buu spucial bectiou oa luining. 



Grain exported. 
The value of the grain exported in 1901 was £1,286,811. 
grain exports for 1900 and 1901 were mode up aa under : — 



The 



leoa 



\va. 





Diuliola. 


£ 


BiialiHit. 


£ 


Wheat . . 


. 3.867.OG0 


861.401 


s.aoi.oos 


276.11 I 


Oat« 


. 5,818.648 


069.370 


10,514.024 


yaa.aoi 


Barloy .. 


IU9.04» 


38.293 


119.779 


13,341 


Malt 


330.893 


50.506 


141,8-24 


82,353 


MaiH 


198.730 


24,575 


121.447 


15,085 


Pmui and beoni 


174.538 


36,976 


166,184 


36,028 


By* and iiBrnai:nor»t«d 


11,946 


1.6W 


5.765 


798 



Votal qnantiiy and value 9. 53U. 847 £1,034,014 18,878.615 £1,285.611 

Compared with the previous year the quantity and value of grain 
exported in 1901 »liow encelleni increase. 

Dntil 1899 the decline in ihe export of wheat bad been very 
great, as will be seou by the following figures: — 



TMr. 

law 

1832 
1B94 

1896 



WliMit «<i<(irioil 

Biiiliet* 

. 4.4f.7,02C 

. 3,460.774 

338.904 

458, ISS 



TMr 

189* 

1900 
I'JOl 



Wbeak Ma<arud. 
UnalMlB. 
10,090 
3.001.676 

9.887.060 
2.301,098 



The imports of wheat during 1898 exceeded the exports by upwards 
of 60,000 bushels, but m 1899. 1900. and 1901 the imports were 
prartkiiily nil. the amall quantity introducod into the colony being 
for seeding purpoees only. 





bUTTP.Ii AHS CHRKSE BXPOBTBD. 



167 



In oat», the quantity exported in 1901 ahowB a large increaae 
over thai for tlie previous year : — 



Tmt. 

1691 

1806 



Export of OAM. 

Bumbolii. 

4,OKU,4U 
3,BS0,4M 
1,963.S88 



Toar. 

1898 

1S09 
UXX) 
1901 



Export «i oui. 

JJ. 618,048 
10,514.024 



The acreages unoer cereaU for the lest thrps years have been ; — 



Land in nhsAi {for ChrotiHing) . . 
, out" . 

Utrley 



Aaxem. 
369,749 
398,343 

49. COS 



1000- lilO]. 

AcrM. 

306.465 

449,SS4 

30, SSI 



tDOl-lWS. 

AOIBB. 

10:i,l€3 

40.i,--'24 

SG.&14 



Butter and Cfieese exported. 

Tbe total quantity of butter and cheese exporlecl in the pn«t 
thirteen years, and the amount of either commodity sent to the 
Dniied Kingdom is tabulated :— 



T-.. 


TOUI 

Bi sport of 

Butl«r 


BncMr 

Kspmrtm) to tb« 

United 

Kingdom. 


Tobtl 
Export at 


CIWM* 

Bx|virc«ilUitlM 
KinipJoni. 




Cirt. 


Cwt. 


Cwt. 


OwL 


isaa .. 


87.9S5 


21,099 


2G.66B 


7,633; 


1930 .. 


34.91ti 


2C,579 


40,4A1 


31 ,043 


1601 


39.430 


38,989 


31) .770 


29.6G& 


180S 


53,930 


41,509 


41,4^3 


30,000 


1B9S .. 


AS, 149 


62.SC8 


46, Wl 


41.667 


1804 


60,771 


69,843 


ftS,CS5 


04,S4O 


ieo« 


57.964 


65,194 


76.748 


73,36» 


1896 .. 


71 ,353 


6a,(Hii 


71 .372 


SS.fioa 


1S97 


9B,002 


79.849 


77,683 


(57, (581 


1839 .. 


96.301 


80.814 


68.711 


41.112 


1809 ,. 


lSfi.086 


131.603 


69.440 


40,001 


1900 .. 


ITS. 683 


1C5.871 


103. 8J9 


81.908 


1901 . . 


001,591 


170,903 


104,^94 


74,510 



Of the butter exported in 1901, 170.903 cwt., valued at £740.980, 
were shipped to the United Kingdom: 3.826 cwt., value £18,415. 
to Now South Wales; 14,488 cwt., value £64,973, to Victoria; 
2,966 cwt.. vahie £14,G24. to Taemania ; 2,49:^ cwt., value £11.251. 
U) Westeru Aubtralia ; l,480cwt-. value £0,438, to South Australia; 
482 cwt., value £1.928. to Tiji ; 4,0b9cwt.. value £19,118, lo Cape 
Colony and Uiitnl ; 804 cwt,, value £4,573, to ilie South Seas; 
7 cwt.', value £38, to the United Slates of Aniericn, West Coast ; 
5o%vt., valuo £26, to Japan ; aud 8 cwb.. valued at £40, to other 
countrieB. 

Of the cheese exported. 74.510 cwi., valued at £168.159, were Hont 
to the Dnited Kingdom ; 16.572 cwt., valoe £38,531. to New South 
Wales; 6,478 cwt.. value £15.353, to Victoria; 4.796 cwt., value 
£11,503, to Western Australia ; and 1,033 cwt,, value £2,723, to the 





133 



NBW ZKALAMD OFFICUt. YKAH-BOOK. 



Other Australian States. While the quantity o( batter exi»rted 
in 1901, 201,091 cwi.. show* an increase of 431 per cent, on the 
quantity espurlnd in IHH^, tho iiicreaae in the export of cheese 
auritI^ ihu tliitieeu years hats bi-eu at the raW oE '293 per cent. — 
101,294 cwt. in 1901, as against 26,558 cwt. in 1889. 

Phomtium exporud. 

Phormium, of which 10,171 tons (excluding 342 tons of tow), 
valued at £i9i5.728, were exported in 1901, shows a ooniiiderabio 
decreai^e ill the export, on coinparin)^ the ^gures for lani year with 
those (or 1900, when the quantity seut away was 15,906 tons. Out- 
side of thu queatiou of prices, a Urge permaaeni development of this 
industry depcud^ on the cultivation and careful soluctLou of the 
plauts ua<jd, and on iinproveiueuts in the method of propariug the 
fibre. 

Kauri-gum eJtportid. 

The export (or 1901 (7,541 tons) is a substantial one. The vala» 
was £446,114, or an average of £59 3s. iJd. pec ton. Full informa- 
tion as to the uses of tliiii reaiu and the Itauri-gum industry generalll 
JB given in a special article in Part III. of the Year-book for H 
It embraces interesting matter from the report of the Royal Com-"' 
misbion whieh laveHtigated the whole subject in 1393. 

Exports from different Ports, dc. 
Tho following table gives tho values of the exports from each 
port in New Zealand for tho last two years, arranged in order of 
ma^itudo for 1901 : — 





1001. 


1900. 




£ 


< 


Lvttelton.. 
WalliugCon 


.. a.480.470 


it.&as.oia 


.. I. 943, sea 


a.&M.a'tft 


Aitcklimd.. 


.. l.vi'Jii.Tyd 


3,008.901 


I>unediD . , 


.. 1,4&4,:137 


l,'17H,U71 


InvercArglll tni BlnfT 


.. ],00S,a78 


741,750 


Tiiniuti 


84n,9A6 


933,949 


Napiwc 


.. 806, no 


770. IU> 


I^ow Plymouth 


.. 4IHi.5H0 


»99.7O0 


(iKyinrtiuh .. . 


. . 4iMi,'jm 


li.15,SB.S 


Poverly Buy 


. . 3T3.S17 


4M,125 


Wnitgauui 


aai , ie:i 


d&G,'JtX} 


Oaiimm . . 


SGd.WS 


:i24,016 


Kftipnra .. 


.. iw.aiB 


144,680 


Wnirgiu and Fi«Uiii 


127,705 


141,039 


Ni)]«on 


^7,218 


68.80a 


WattArn . . 


68.1'.H 


104.231 


WeBtpott .. 


6I,'JG5 


45.897 


P*K* 


40.iyo 


87,717 


Hoktlikk .. 


S4,818 


25,476 


Taiuaiiga .. ., 


. . 


646 


The decrease of exports* du 


ring 1901 was £14,834 at Di 



£33,443 at Lytlelton, £1-15,569 at Auckland, and £401,432 at 
WeUington. 



DBTAIIiS OF ALL BZF0BT8. 



189 



Details op all Exports, 1901. 







Quantities. 


Value Id Sterling. 






British, 




Britlih, 








Prodnoe 


Foreign, 
and other 


Produce 


PoreiRn, 
bnd otner 








and 


and 




ArtlclM ttzportea. 


llaou- 


Colonial 


Hanu- 


Colonial 


Total. 






f sett) res 


Produce 


taotures 


Produce 






of the 


and 


of the 


and 








Colony. 


Maon- 


Colony. 


Mann- 










(aotures. 




lactnres. 




Add— 








£ 


£ 


£ 


CnrboliD 


lb. 


, , 


20 




1 


1 


OneDumocftted 


r 


1,792 


., 


12 


.. 


12 


Alkali- 














HodK. c&UBtio 


owt. 




1 


.. 


1 


1 


UneBDmeraied 


M 




84 




44 


44 


Ambf-rgrb 


lb. 


5 


.. 


100 




100 


AtitiiiB.lB, livmg — 














Birda 


Ho. 


14 




1 




1 


Dogs 


^ 


90 




66 




66 


Cattle (horaed) 


^ 


290 




2,407 




2,407 


Horses 


» 


265 


8 


8,628 


180 


■ 8,808 


Piga 


^ 


75 




130 




130 


Poultry 





3,664 




561 


.. 


681 


Sheep 


t. 


3,668 


.. 


4,705 


.. 


4,705 


Other kinds 


^ 


, , 


2 




10 


10 


Apparel and slops 


. 




-. 


7,227 


1,813 


9,040 


Arms, ammunition, a: 


ad explo- 












sivea — 














Aocouiiemente 


No. 








66 


66 


Cartrii^gea . . 


* m 


IS 


BOO 


iiisoo 


103 


53 


156 


Dynamite .. 


lb. 






175 




15 


15 


Firearms 


No. 


. 




S8 




227 


227 


Fu*e 


coils 


, 




8,160 




272 


272 


Ordnance stores 


i - > 


. 






139 


346 


485 


Liiib-afrOiCiteii &o. , 


lb. 


. 




150 




11 


11 


Powder, blasiing 


^ 






150 




6 


6 


Powder, sporting 


# 






1,625 




148 


146 


Swords 


No. 






30 


,. 


119 


119 


Unenumerated 


■ 








GO 


60 


Bacon and hams — 














Bacon 


owt. 


2,589 




7,319 




7,319 


Hams 


- 


2 


yu 




10,413 




10,413 



Bags and sacks — 

GomaackB . . . . doz. 

Unenumerated . . , 

Basketware and vickerware 
Beer .. galls. 

Belling, leather lb. 

Bevercuie*', nou-alooliiDlic — 

Aerated and mmerai waters, doz 

Limejiiice, un^wseteued galla. 

Unsnumerated .. , 

Bicycles and triojclaB . . No. 

ifaterials lot 
Biseuits — 

Panoy, Ac. ■ . lb. 

Ship's plain . . owt. 



38,202 



679 


8,376 


19^49 


7,340 
10 


2,200 
36 


22 
1,736 


5 


226 


3.SC5 
4,793 





149 

23 

2,176 



350 

5 

3 

68 



71 
3,536 



7,727 


7,727 


1,248 


1,397 


2 


25 


1,675 


3,851 


3 


3 


8 


358 


1,011 


1,016 




3 


1,854 


1,922 


1,483 


1,463 




71 




3,536 



190 



NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAK-BOOE. 



Dbtaiu or Aix Exports, ISOl—cantinusd. 



ArttpjAH AspatMd. 



QnuUtlm. 



BMto 

Bookfi, printed 

BoDtE uid ehoee 

Br&n 

Bnwii m«na features 

Brick'L, Fire , . 

Brui-hn&re uid brooma 

Butter 



No. 
tons 

doE, pre, 
tons 



■nd 
UkDD- 
r»clnrea 

oEcha 

Colon;. 



14 
10 

360 
4,400 



No. ] 3,300 
c*»V. 1 30i]fi91 



lb. 



No. 



Mo. I 
barrels 
tons 
cwt. 



No. 

tons 

lb. 



Cftndlea 

Cttnoa and fftbtAilB 

Citnvas 

Cnrpetini:; And dtuggoting 

Carria^e-i, Ac- — 

GArringes 

Ga,TM. tlrd)'!!, 4ind wagonB 

Pieranif]iilat,DrB 

MftteriaJH (or 
CEuks, empty 
C«tneDt 
ChAff 
Chains 
Gheetie 
ChinamAre 
Clookn 
CoaU 

Oocoa and Ubocotate 
Cofl-e— 

Raw 

R' lasted 
ConTectioncrr 

Cbocolato in fancy packaftcfi - ■ 

in plain Irado pack- 

Afion . . lb. 

Copper manufacturoB .. 

Copra tons 

Cordage . . . . ont. 

HawBers 

Iron and steel 
Cork, cut 
Cotton piece-goods 

StiirtingH 

Waterproof material 

Ciienumerated 
Cotton — 

Raw lb. 



104 
159 

12 



IDO 



21 

29 

i 

ii031 
47 

28 

,294 



,643 



Britlih. 
Ji'oreiKii, 
kDil oilier 
L'olonJal 

MlDEl- 

laecnrea. 



208 
.431 



647 I 



1 

411 



Ta1i]«lii BkarUnc. 



f Toducn 

aad 

Uaita- 

lartni ea 

Coloaj. 



Briliob. I 
Forelcn, 
ind of ti«r 
Colonial [ 
Prod DCS ' 
• Dd I 
UanD- ' 
tavtam. i 



916 ! 
200 

60 



19 

8,805 
2,264 

6,098 i 

30 I 

766 \ 



1,272 

i 

4 I 

2!)5 j 

10 I 

62 '. 



2,867 



9se 

42 

2,470 

1,356 

13.851 

2 

29 

39 

883.406 

a 

21 



761 

309 

8 

11 

353 

30 

92 



238,685 



142 



176 



9 
S33 



5 

iil56 



£ 
190 

100 

2 "457 
955 

8 

41 



13 

"9a 
7*6 

4B 



51 
656 

132 

"72 

202 

IS 

8.867 

237 

174 

2 

17 

51 

80 

32 

47 

663 

14 

119 

24 

1,242 

280 

22 

5.721 

61 



T<^tal. 



£ 

ISO 
l.OSS 

a 

+.927 

&,3ll 

13.661 

10 

39 
7* 

U»2,40& 

It 
St 
St 

716 

799 

309 

8 

6S 

1,008 

153 

9S 

78 

238,685 

203 

13 

151,048 

237 

174 
11 

S50 
51 

80 

87 

47 

1.819 

14 

119 

34 

1,243 

380 

33 

5,731 

51 



DKTAIL8 or ALL BXfKOtTB. 



191 



DwtuJM or 4U. EzKuas, 1901— omlMiiid. 





QBkHmiML 


T>lm in Slairlinf. 






Bnlkb. 




Rritwli. 




■ ■ ■ ■ 


PndVBw 


■bddilMr 


FviidiKa 


UdCillbat 




ArUcIeB citportad- 


■■m«- 


CtJoBlal 


Urnnn- 


Cvtonia] 


T«Ml. 




CkctarM 


PMdtw* 


toM&m. 


SK-Inf 




Mttat 


and 


attk« 


Mid 






OBleay. 


liun- 




KUB- 






• 


bctaraa. 




fketiu«a. 


' 


CoUoD — eoKtmtud. 


' 




£ 


£ 


£ 


WmIc ewt. 




S 




18 


IB 


Wick lb. 




ana 


.. 


14 


14 


Ootlerr 


-- 


■■ 


■- 


lea 


162 


Doom .. N(h 


16S 




S9S , 


., 


3d9 


Dnper? 






174 ' 


3.153 


3,997 


L«f e ftod Iv^e? 


,. 




, _ 


T8 


78 


Drm^Si chemicolB. uid dniggine' 












WWBB 












Cfa«mi?«Isa.o.e. 


■ - 




9C4 


190 


434 


I>rugt. driigsiwtB* windnM, asd 












*potbM&ri«s' w&ns 




. , 


674 


a. MA 


3.476 


Sheep-dip . - 






G99 


3.S^S 


3.933 


XHsiafectuit" 


. , 


_ , 


14 


33 


47 


!>;« 


-■ 




■■ 


83 


93 


B^rtbeD'Wftr* 






40S 


946 


1,353 


Eggi .. ■. chw. 


3^805 




14S 




146 


BD^nA-pukiDg ami. 


6 


u 


4T 


163 


910 


BftM'ces. (iKrdUti&g . . g*llft. 




6 




1 


7 


EMBOLtal oilfl.. .. lb. 


-■ 


9 


-- 


3 


3 


pAJicv goods uid toj«.. 


, , 


^ _ 


i.OdS 


2.esi 


5.7S3 


Vin iioM ud olfaer *ppll*HceA 


.. 




4 


.. 


4 


F»b- 












Drirf Bwt 


1« 


68 


aga 


143 


4a& 


Pattad ujd preserved tb. 


313,696 


71,^8 


6.700 : 


9,073 


8,773 


Proxca owl. 


a. GOT 


I . 


10,858 




10,658 


On No. 


315,000 




3t5 




ai5 


Flont tOM. 


i.aos 


, , 


8,19S 


. . 


8,495 


Vooda, ADim&l — 












UnenniueriLUd 






103 ; 




103 


Toad*, r&rinftceous^ 






1 






Mftiuin* sad corutlonr lb, 




3.900 




30 


ao 


Unenumeiuted 






138 




128 


Fraiu — 












Battled nnd prerarved doa. 


GO 


121 


IS 


43 


63 


Dried: Cair&Dta .. lb, 




a-5.7ii 


1 . 


96^ 


363 


Kftisiiu . . 


., 


8,56S 


, , 


aoi 


901 


Unanumemted 




n.im 




344 


343 


Frwh 


34.403 




36S 


.. 


963 


Pulp ftbd parLiftll; praserrAd 












fruit \h. 




ISO 




5 


5 


FongiiB ,. .. cnt, 


5,902 


.. 


IS, 453 




13.453 


Pumitnre and npboktery 


, . 


-, 


1,03a 


■t'7 


1.510 


Kkriok ■ 




1 




3 


8 


Fpinhiire, knife, aod pl«t« paw- 












dat Kod poluh 


• • 


-- 


• • 


306 


208 



192 



NBW ZEAI.AND OFFIOIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



Dbtails 


O* 


ALL ExpOBTS, 1901 — continued. 










QutDtllEee. 


Vat 


g« In gteiUnf. 






BrlilBb, 




Brftlih. 








Freduo* 


Fareten, 

Mid otiier 
Col o Dial 


Proiliiiee 


Fore Ian, 
(Liiil DUier 

CctniiiaL 




ArtlelM txpArtod. 




end 


»iid 
Ub.dO- 


Tol^ 






laelnrM 


Fcoduc« 


IsctuTei 


t'ro^iioe 






of the 


Mild 


of lUo 


sod. 








Ooloay. 


HSDU' 


Col (IB J, 


UanB- 










fsQtuiea. 




factarem. 








1 


£ 


£ 


I 


PuTfl 


■■ 


1 


6 


■■ 


8 


<31ft»s boUles. empby . . 










TO 


« 


Qlo-iawAre 


., 






34 


689 


619 


Olua B.Dd ^ize-- ,. DTTt. 


"l91 


, , 


94 


, J 


9( 


GlycQiine 




793 




1,170 




l.lW 


Gold . . 


ox. 


455,65tl I 6 


1.75S.T&4 


SB 


l,7S8.eiO 


Grain &nd palse — 




1 








Barley bush. 


119,7791 


13,241 


, , 


18, Ml 


Beana and peas 




166,1841 34 


26,028 


18 


S6,«6 


Maize 




124,447 


15,085 




is.oes 


Oats 




10,514,924 




922,801 


, , 


9S9,9n 


Bye 




5.757 




791 


, _ 


m 


Wheat 




2,301,092 




276,111 


, , 


S76,U1 


UoeDumerated 




B 




2 




s 


Oround, , .. cen: 


'ale 


,. 


16 




18 


u 


Grease o 


wt. 


, _ 


7 




10 


10 


Grindery 










6 


1 


Gam, kauii b 


3ns 


7,541 




446,114 


■■ 


446,U4 


Haberdaaheiy 










709 


?« 


Button! 








, , 


18 


u 


Hair o 


wt. 


799 




3,120 


, , 


3,UD 


Hardware, bollowate, and ir 


on- 












mongcry 








490 


2,778 


S.M 


HatB and caps . . c 


oz. 


88 


157 


345 


239 


fiSI 


Hay and atraw . . t< 


ana 


814 




2,700 




2,no 


Hemp 


> 




10 




440 


440 


Hides ] 


•^0. 


47.875 




43,470 




43,470 


Hoiioy 


lb. 


18,536 




374 


. , 


374 


Hops . . 


vt. 


4,298 


648 


17,189 


134 


17,333 


Horns and hoofs .. b 


ons 


73 




1,024 


, , 


1,0M 


Hosiery 


-■ 






795 


531 


1,S9S 


Indiariibherandguttaperoiiagt 


)odH 








361 


361 


Ink, printing .. 


lb. 




3C 




4 


4 


Instruments, musical — 














Harmoniums and organs 


sTo. 




2 




65 


65 


Pianofortes. . 


, 




21 




726 


796 


Uneiiumeraled 


. , 








356 


3» 


Instruments, scientific 










776 


776 


aurgioal and den 


tai 


'.'. 






92 


9S 


surveying 


. , 








40 


40 


Iron and steel — 














Bar, bolt, and rod t 


ms 


,. 


4 




67 


St 


Bolifl and nuts . . a 


wt. 


i 670 




5*7 


MT 


Galvaui^ed manufactures 




1 


222 


220 


441 


Huop t 


)ns 


.. 


1 


.. 


14 


U 



DETAILS OF AIX BXPOBTB. 



19S 



DsTAXU or 


tT.ri EzpoaxB, 1901 — continued. 








QuanUties. 


Talne In SlBrliiic> 






BrlUih, 




Brltlsb, 






Prod nee 


ForelRn, 
end otner 
Coloniel 


PrediiM 


Foreivn. 
eud otDU 
Colon U 




Artiolei BXport«d. 


and 
Mkon- 


and 
Uanu- 


Total. 




Isetaree 


Produce 


factnrea 


ProHaM 




of tbe 


>ud 


of Ibe 


and 






Colony. 


UaDD- 
faottUTM, 


ColoDy. 


Hann- 
taotttrea. 




Zion and steel — continued. 






£ 


£ 


£ 


Pig torn 




1 






5 


5 


]n[H>B and fittings 




18 






364 


364 


Sheet and plate 




1 






IS 


13 


Sheet, Kiil van iH'd oorru gated owt 


., 


2,638 






2,456 


2,456 


Staple-! and Btandarda ton 




1 






17 


17 


Taiiku, each 400galle. No. 




57 






194 


194 


Tank-, raoh 200 g«lls. 




19 






36 


38 


Wire, fencing, barbed tons 




46 






640 


640 


Win netting 










68 


68 


Jamo, jellies, and preserves lb. 


7,708 


6,984 


110 


89 


229 


Jellies, oonoencrated 


, , 


1,733 


. 


65 


65 


Jaweller; 




, . 


36 


200 


236 


lAmps and lanterns 


. . 




10 


112 


122 


Ijard.. owt. 


660 


, , 


1,377 


, , 


1,377 


lioad, pigs and bars . . tons 


8 


5 


114 


83 


197 


Ijeather owt. 


18,281 


91 


112,400 


387 


112.787 


Leather manufaetures, un- 












SDumerated 




_ , 


28 


60 


S3 


Lime busb. 


2,4B0 


, , 


113 




113 


Linen piece goods 

Uniirad centals 


, , 






14 


14 


1,140 




"770 




770 


Maobinerv and machines — 












Agricultural 






4,344 


9,259 


13,503 


rhairyipg 






43 


632 


675 


Drerfgi'g .. 






840 


2,639 


8,479 


Electric 




. , 


3 


689 


692 


SngiuPB, gas and oil . . No. 




3 




140 


140 


Engines, boilers (or . . No. 




S 




6,397 


6,397 


Floar-milling 






4 


175 


179 


Oas-making 








558 


558 


Mining 






134 


615 


749 


P*P'r milling 








1G5 


166 


Priuting 








418 


418 


Refrigerating 






26 


1,252 


1,277 


Sewing and knitting No. 


2 


180 


9 


675 


684 


Wood-workiag 








116 


116 


Wool'pre8Bing 




■■ 


409 




409 


Unen lime rated 






42G 


6,926 


7,352 


Materials for, and parts oE 








917 


917 


Malt.. bush. 


141,3'34 




32,252 


. , 


32,252 


Manarea, anenumerated long 


230 




1,061 




1,061 


Marble, dressed 






108 




108 


Matches and vestas — 












• Wax gross 




2,767 




575 


575 


Wooden 




6,771 




494 


494 








1,100 


57 


1,157 


"tI. rntrn .. .- centals 


66^460 




27,591 


■ • 


27,591 



lU 



NBW ZBALAHD OFFIOIAIi YKAH-BOOE. 



Dbtaiea OF" Au^ EzpoBTs, 1901 — cotUinued. 





- 


Quantitia*. 


Value in BtarUng. 






British, 




Brfttah. 








Produce 


Forelen, 
and otlier 
Colonial 


Produce 


Foreisn. 
and ottier 
Colonial 




Articles exported. 




and 
Uana- 


and 
liana- 


Total. 






factnres 


Produce 


faclurea 


Pioduoa 






of the 


and 


of the 


and 








Colony. 


Uasn- 
lactorea. 


Colony. 


llanu- 
f acta res. 










£ 


£ 


Mea.tB— 














Beef, fre^h . . 


owt. 


130 




165 




165 


frozen 


ff 


221,211 




258,951 




358,951 


salted 


^ 


7,357 




8,463 




8,463 


Eif^nevB, frozen 


* 


5,279 




9,581 




9,581 


Lamb, frozen 


carcases 
= cwt. 


1,513,017 
513,187 


\ 


781,831 


■■ 


761,831 


Mutton (ffhole car- 














cases), fresh 


owt. 


8 




11 




11 


Untton, frozen (whole 














carcases) 


carcases 
= cwt. 


1,806,671 
949,845 


1 

f ■■ 


1,027,668 




1,087,668 


Mutton (joints), frozen 


^ 


43,092 




48,410 




48,410 


Pork, frozen 


„ 


3,341 


■ ■ 


6,SS5 


, , 


6,585 


Pork, salted 


cwt. 


924 




1,762 




1,769 


Poultry, frozen 


pairs 


1,946 




419 




419 


Veal, frozen 


cwt. 


107 




173 




178 


Other kinds, frozen . . 


^ 


1,189 




1,881 




1,881 


Babbits, frozen in the Ekins No. 
= cwt. 


4,830,669 

124,353 


1 

f ■- 


114,552 


-■ 


114,658 


Hares, frozen in the skins No. 
= o«t. 


42,202 
2,943 


1 

l" " 


3,261 


-• 


3,361 


Potted and preserved 


, 


35.258 


2 


87,683 


28 


87,706 


Extract of meat 


lb. 


i 3,615 




847 




847 


Unenumeraled 


cwt. 


i 345 


1 


507 




SOT 


Medloines, patentand proprietary 




i 


438 


293 


731 


Metal, Manufactures of 


, , 


1 


L ' ■ 


1,294 


6,116 


7,410 


Typewriters 


No. 


1 


; 2 




17 


17 


Metal, old 


owt. 


! 7,792 




3^206 




3,906 


Milk, preserved 


lb. 


: 945,772 


i 40,724 


17,805 


841 


18,646 


Millinery — 




, 










Featliers, ornamental 








55 




55 


Oiiher kinds 




1 
1 




32 


338 


870 


Minerals- 














Antimony ore 


\\ ns 


! 30 




136 


.. 


186 


Copper ere . , 


_ 


3 




105 






105 


Fireclay 


, 


\ 15 




39 






39 


Manganese 


, 


; 208 




614 






614 


Quartz, auriferous 


, 


390 




6,663 


1 




6,668 


Soheelite ore 


. 


i '^ 




83 


' 




S3 


Sulphur 


, 


' 143 




360 


\ 




360 


Unenumerated 


- 


146 




1 630 


1 




630 


Nails 


owt. 


1 


528 


1 


467 


4G7 


Naphtha 


galls. 


i 


1,413 


! 


■ 130 


130 


Nuts— 




, 




1 


1 




Almonds in shell 


lb. 


1 


356 


1 ' ■ 


1 7 


7 


Unenumerated 


, 


; "78 




2 


1 


_ , 


9 



DETAILS OF AI.L EXPORTS. 
DvTAiLa or all Expobts, l^l—caniinued. 



195 



AtUcIm «xpm-lad. 



QiwtiUlli 



Ptadac« 
■nd 

futurea 
of th« 
Colauy. 



No. 



gidls. 
gaHfl. 



Oftn . . 
Oil— 

Ctuitor, bulk 

Cod-liver 

Colsa .. ' 

Coooanut 

Fish, penguin, and seal 

Linaeed 

Mineral, kerosene 

oth«T kinds 

Neatafoot . . 

Olive, bulk . . 

Whale 

tJneaumerated, bulk , 

bottled, doB.pts. 
Oilmen's stores 

Onions cwt. 

Oysters doz. 



35 
3B3 



Hrrilili. 

■.III) Diliflr 
CDionliil 

P] od U CB 

Mm-ou- 

lacture*. 



VHluainBhtrlluE- 



ProdecB 
■ad 

tactiit«a 

C oloQ J. 



Britkli. 
L'oielJ'ti, 
Blirl otlicr 

ffFlrniiiil 

I'rti'Jiica 

and 

fsrtu] OS. 



250 
171 



160 

544 
154 



195 
680 



Paints and colours — 




Ground in oil 


cwt. 


Mixed ready for use . . 


, 


Une numerated 




Paper bags 


, 


Paper — 

Printing 




. 


Wrapping . . 


^ 


Pearl barley . . 




Petfutnery — 




Perfumed spirits 


galls. 


CJoenumeiated 


.. 


Phormium 


tons 


Tow 


, 


Pboiographio goods 




Pickles 


galls. 


Pictures, puintiagE, drawing 


H, &o. 


PicCdreftAuie^ And mounte 




Pitch 


cwt. 


Plants, ahmbs, Ac. 




Plate a&d pl&bHdn&re .. 


, . 


Pollaril and shai-pa 


tons 


Potatoes 


, 


Printing materials 




Provisions n.o.e. 




Pumps 




Bags 


owt. 


lUoe 





360 
1,168 

6 

970 

70 



10 



22 



171 
342 



507 



354 
062 



345 
17 

1.155 



3,C54 

99,836 

440 

50 

306 

6,261 
28 



186 



410 

335 

2 

5 

143 
169 



48 

107 
6 



960 



1,350 



12 

142 
977 

10 

750 

33 



195,728 

1,140 

13 

859 

9 

112 

609 

108 

1,443 

90,058 

7!909 

49 

842 



42 

4 

163 



26 




77 


, , 


, , 


629 


, , 


4,924 




40 


7 


10 




42 


430 




37 


597 


, , 


19 


248 


1,474 


11,199 


120 


3,201 





646 

1,455 

5 

11 

180 
221 



Total. 



42 

4 

16S 

26 

77 

629 

4,924 

40 

17 

42 

430 

634 

19 

1,722 

11.319 

3,201 



658 

1,455 

147 

988 

190 

971 

33 



73 


73 


16 


16 




195, 72« 




1,140 


334 


347 


U 


19 


915 


1.774 


6 


15 


7 


119 


2 


611 


2,398 


2,506 




1,443 




90,658 


393 


393 


854 


8,763 


299 


348 


.. 


842 


1,044 


1,044 



196 



NEW ZBALAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



Dmtaiu of aix Ezfohts, 1901 — cotUinued, 





. 


Qaantltlet. 


Talufl iu Biarlilil. 






Brittah. 




PrUiKh. 








Prodttctt 


Foreien, 
■uri. oiWr 
Colon i si 


rre4v» 


\.\>A oUiav 
Co-loulsl 




&nScleB eiporled 


. 


■ □d 


Usuu- 


Tetal. 






(■.ciuiaa 


PrtHluca 


tmctu 1 oi 


I'lortnce 






of cbe 


STld 


ef ibe 


ind 








Coloay, 


Uciunc 


Colony. 


laoiura*. 












£ 


£ 


£ 


RngH 


■ 


■■ 


■■ 


i.eei 


70 


4.751 


Sa^chAriiie 


OB. 




2B0 


. 


14 


11 


Sa-ddlAry atkd harness , 


. • 


, . 




723 


U8 


6C5 


8*lt 


. 


J 


, , 


, , 


2 


S 


8a.alicR, window 


pi^i r" 


1,301 




894 




IjU* 


SftUCea 


. galls. 


4 


'170 


5 


109 


114 


8)ii:ii<a,ge-akitiB 


owl. 


9,iaa 


96 


a9,49B 


ass 


40.068 


Seedi— 














GtAKA and clover 


^ 


53,563 


20 


69.9$7 


45 


69,983 


UiienuRieraied 


• • 






1,4T2 


&i* 


I, ate 


Ship chRridlerv, n.o.e. . 


■ 






298 


789 


1.087 


Silk piece-goods 


. 






.. 


<92 


«9S 


Silver 


oz. 


571,134 




65,258 


.. 


65,258 


SkiDS— 














Calf and other 


No. 


3,709 




3S6 




386 


Rabbit 


„ 


7,112,008 




57,046 




57,046 


Sheep, with wool 


f. 


2H8,833 




30,039 




80,099 


Sheep, wiibout wool 


, 


4,362,G98 


1,236 


234,540 


70 


334,610 


Soap- 














Common 


owt. 


6,014 


4 


4,732 


5 


4,737 


Un enumerated 


lb. 


, , 


4,153 




201 


901 


Specie — 














Gold 


• 4 






, , 


- 7,679 


7.679 


Silver 


1 ■ . 


.. 






3,875 


8,875 


Copper 


* , 


.. 






60 


GO 


SpecimeDS, illustrative of natural 












science 


, 


, . 




971 


4 


975 


Spices, unground 


lb. 




22,075 


.. 


6,352 


6,35» 


Spirits — 














Bitters, cordials, and liqueurs 














gaUs. 


., 


18 




16 


16 


Branily 


• 






997 






523 


528 


Oifneva and gin 


^ 






1,249 






335 


835 


Methylated 


, 






260 






25 


85 


Rum 


, 






383 






78 


78 


Whisky 


^ 






8,104 






3,256 


3,256 


Spoi ges 


lb. 






100 






36 


35 


Stationery 


• . 








1,566 


1,763 


3.839 


Stearine 


lb. 


12 


742 




246 




346 


Stne— 














Building 


tons 


701 




721 


.. 


721 


Wrought 


. . 






104 


.. 


104 


Greens tone 


o»t. 


201 




1.535 




1,635 


Pumice 


tons 


938 




2,814 




S,8U 


SuR&r — 














Refined 


lb. 


577,985 


149,484 


4,916 


1,195 


6,111 


M .lasses and treoole 


* 


2 


900 






14 




11 



DVIAILB or AIJ> EZFQBTB. 



X97 



Dbuilb or Midi BxFoaxs, 1901— continiutJ. 








QnuiUtiM, 


Vilue in Sterlini. 






Brllidi, 




Britlih. 






FrodBM 


Foreln. 
and □tfa*!' 
Colonial 


Frodnca 


ForelxD, 

kCd OUIBI 
C^ftgqlfJ 




ArtI elM «xport«d. 


and 

Maon- 


and 

UlDD- 


Total. 




future* 


Prod 11 c» 


CactnrBi 


froduoa 




olth* 


And 


DlUl« 


Mil 






ColVBV, 


Maiia- 


Colonf. 


Uuia- 








iMtDTM. 




lutma 










£ 


£ 


fi 


Tallow -. .. K>nB 


15,699 


. . 


819,834 


.. 


319,884 


Mutton stock, ftod oloo- 












marg&rinfl .■ tons 


1.368 




31,786 


.. 


31,765 


Oil .- tonB 


6 




101 


.. 


101 


T«rp^>^^^^^ "^"^ t«CLkB . . 






6 


60 


66 


Tanaiug materiivli— 












B&rk .. .. tons 


50 




157 


• ■ 


157 


To* .. .. lb. 


, , 


gyiaii 




4. IBS 


4, IBS 


Taxtite pieae-gooiiE, Atbet thui 












Bilk. oottoQ, liD«n, or wooMqq 




.. 


-. 


90f 


9S7 


Aftiolea made up irom, otbar 












than appkreE 






ig 


15 


34 


Timber— 












I^gB, henn . . sap. it. 


3.298,589 




6,701 




6,701 


SattD, undrcfiiied .. Bup. (t. 


65,869,783 




266,716 




266. 71S 


tiressed . . , 


3,653,997 


, ^ 


21,280 




21,280 


StftvoB .. .. No. 


67,800 




432 




i3i 


Dnenameiated 


, , 


, . 


602 




603 


Tin, aheet owl. 


, , 


ais 




904 


504 


TiDwure 






345 


1S3 


S77 


Tob&ccD — 












M«niif&otiir(d lb. 


, . 


S5,799 




5,839 


5,839 


C);g|l,t« .. . 




s,aoi 




950 


900 


Gig&[«ttea . . 




15,160 


-. 


4,7a5 


4,735 


TobAQCo-pipea ftnci casea, Ita. 




-. 


-■ 


02 


9'3 


TooU, unenu ma rated . . . . 


, , 




70 


723 


793 


Tramnfty plant 






.. 


e 


8 


^tu-pentiAe .. giJs. 




B 




1 


I 


Twine .. .. lb. 


175 


1.868 


« 


37 


41 


Binder . . owt. 


8.976 




6,153 


.. 


6.153 


Ne^ta and DettJng 


.- 


.. 


" 


S 


6 


UmbrellM tknd pftr&aola 


-- 


.. 




1S4 


194 


VkhIsIi and gold alzo . . gula. 


13 


796 


..^ 


415 


431 


Vegetabka 




-- 


144 


11 


155 


Watohoa Ho. 




1,258 


■■ 


1,065 


1,065 


Wax— 












Beeswu owt. 


i 




20 




20 


Par&An tb. 




leius 




183 


183 


Wbnlsbone owt. 


11 




220 


.. 


220 


Wine— 












Anitr&lian .. gale. 




645 


.. 


206 


206 


Sparkling . . 




375 




713 


713 


Other kinds 


80 


998 


40 


590 


630 


Woodtfiiware .. 






1,098 


958 


2,05(i 


Wool— 












QreMj lb. 


U4,S78,Ga3 


106,608 


2,643,491 


4,464 


2,647,955 



14— YMtr-book 



19B 



NBW ZEAI^NU OPPICUL XBAK-BOOK. 

Vwrkns or AEX Bxports, 1901— «otii»ntHK^ 







<}ll«BllllM. 


Vmiam In SMcltng. 






BrltUb, 




BrlLiib, 








Produve 


PorMsD. 
Mid otbnr 


Prodnee 


CokiniiU 




^ Aitl«lei axportvd. 






Mid 
Uftod- 


Tot^. 


H 




fkoliirmi 


Pruduvp 


faotura* 


Ptodnoe 






of the 


knil 


orilM 


Mid 








Colony. 


UftDtt- 
fMllOMA 


Ool«Dy. 


Muw- 




Wool — amtinutd. 








JB 


£ 


fi 


Soouied 


lb. 


10,097,641 


SB.G^fl 


Sd5,996 


8,619 


S99.m 


Slip«d 


■ 


14,10^7Ia 




404,419 




404,419 


Wubfld 


lb. 


1,677,990 


, , 


W,897 


. . 


SS.:89T 


Woolpftolra 


do£. 


13 


49 


14 


40 


M 


Wgatlnn pioccgooda . . 




, , 




7.56a 


1,846 


9.109 


[i«,Lni 


1.813 


•• 


1,494 




1.4M 


Varna 


•• 


■• 


■ • 


81 


86 


J| 


Zinc, ipeltei 


cwt. 


403 


13 


864 


iA 


1 


Oooda, miaooilutecns— 












m 


Mftnafnotared 


, , 


, , 


, _ 


340 


ass 


t^ 


DDDiAnur&otuied 


•• 


■• 


•• 


1.144 


284 


1,378 


Faxuali Ftxt . . 


•■ 


■- 


I " 


16. U4 


■• 


16, IM 






Total Value of Trade. 
The value of the total tta<ie of New Zealand advanced from 
£13,431,804 in the year 1386 to £24.699.339 in 1901. But of these 
auictuDt& Bome portion was coin. Exctudtog the specie, the figures 
for mm are £12.8^3.736, and for 1901, £24,223,23&. 



Vmc. Total Tr»4a. . Ini|«r». 



Eiporu. 



1SB6 

I88S 

18S9 

1B90 
1891 

>1B99 

iaesa 
rie94 

1896 
[1896 

1897 
1 1898 
11899 

'laoo 

1901 



£ 
13,431.804 

13,U1,684 
13.709,SS£ 

15.050.727 
10.072.245 
16,070,216 
16, 477. -JO? 
15.806.879 
16.019,067 
11,900,363 
16,4!)B.43A 
38.073. 310 
18.748.KW 
30.677,906 
33.Ba2,2fi7 
94.699,339 



£ 
6.7&9,0ia 

6.243,515 
5,y4l.JK)0 
6.a0H.Bt>8 
6,960.525 
6.603.849 
6,018,006 
6,911.515 
6,788,030 
6.400.139 
7.187.320 
8,05.5,22.'^ 
8^330.600 
8.789.633 
10.646,006 
11,81T.915 



£ 
6,679.791 
6.866.169 
7,767.8^5 
U,341.H64 
9.811,720 
9.606,397 
0,684,851 
B.9S5,364 
9.231,047 
8.660, ■324 
9.3S1,105 

ui,(nr,,9n:i 

10.517,955 
H.93S.S35 
k8.24C.lGl 
13,881,434 



Imparta 

losorndkBg 
Bp«ei«V 



e,SlS,SS8 

6,06i.aei 

6.430.060 
5,960,688 
5.928,806 
6,431,101 
6,743,544 
0.494,279 
5,9!W,177 
0^115,958 
7.035,ft7» 
7,994,301 
A, 311, 400 
8,613, GSG 

10,207,8«(; 

11,353,416 



Biporta 
loxciudine 



BxottMof 

Bnieru o»«» 

ItBUoru 

(•lOllllllDg 



£ 
6,634,518 
6,680.778 
7,408,906 
9,188,964 
9,369,316 
9.660,859 
9.490.92U 
8,630,845 
9,221,550 
8,518,110 
9,399.907 
9,741,222 
10.'1IO,H38 
11.^23,422 
13,2M.258 
19,869.610 



£ 
919,900 

616.4 
1,972, li 
3,903,3: 
3.^^^0,^ 

8. ISO.: 
a,748.i 

2.186,1 
3.291.373 
>J. 403,166 

2.301.; 

l,747,( 

3.809.766 
3,015,939 
1.916.894 



.489' 



TOTAL VALUB OF TKADB. 



Iflfl 



TliQ trade for these years has been selectBil for exhibition in 
tabular form )^ecausc during each ot the &erieB there weih an excess 
of exports over imports, wheriias pre%'iou3ly the reverae obtained, 
anti the colony was purcliasmg to an extent not covered by the 
vfthie of the export. During the last sixteen years the excess ot 
exports over imports, 6xciii<iing money sent to and from the colony, 
aiiioiintccl to a total sum of £37,4:^8,038, 

How different the foregoing conditions were from those previously 
obtaining will be seen by observing the balance of trade for the 
years lyui to 1885 inclusive : — 



U01 

1863 



BXCOIM r>r hupoTtm 

£ 

,. 1,406.638 

,. I,0*8,*e6 

761,9a$ 



IBSi 
IBB5 



Bkocwih of Iiiiporia. 

£ 
235,981 
539, 23y 



The fp'adiially declining excess of imports tnmed in 1886 and 1887 
to a small excess of exports, but. sabscqucntly the excuas of exports 
was very great, and attained the sum of £3,640,421 in the year 1S90. 

Again considering the roHults for the aixbecn ycara, 1886-1901, 
during wliich the baiancL- was in favonr of the exports, the external 
trade is shown for cacli year per haa*! of population, the calculations 
being made exclusive as well as inclusive of specie, for the purpose 
of arriving at exact conclusions as rf^ganl trade in goods. In the 
year 1894 the imported money aniounted to a sum of £797, B43, 
maktug a substantial differctiue in iho rates. 

Excluding specie, the trade pyr head of population increased 
Irani £22 Is. 7d.. in 18B6. to £31 2s. 9d. in IWl : imports from £10 
178. Id. to £11 liu. lid., and exports from £11 48. 6d. to £1% 10s. lOd. 



• 





laeludiug ejioc! 


c 


BxelDilluii Bp«ol9. 




Tol»l tntf 


ImporM per 

HMd of 


Exi'orts per 
KcBd of 


ToWl Tr*ao 


Unporwper 


Exporu par 


T«u-. 


per H<.>^ 


|ior Hffnd 


I toad of 


OS Huaa 


M»uu 


M«iin 


uf Mania 


Me&ii 


Alt'ftU 




Poimlatluii 


I'oiiulslion 


L'ci|iulittii>[j 


ro|i Illation 


PoimlkVian 


pGpiilniii>a 




(•xcloillivi] 


(vtclli'llni; 


|e soil! "ll 1)8 


lexclndini 


(osoludJiii; 


(aicliidlos 




UaorU). 


Maoris). 


UaarDii. 


Moor is). 


Mauris J. 


Mmm'ib). 




S % A. 


< •. d. 


C >. A. 


M ». A. 


£ •. d. 


< «. d. 


1686 


93 1 & 


11 13 2 


11 9 3 


22 1 7 


10 17 1 


11 4 6 


1687 


ai Id 8 


10 9 5 


11 10 3 


21 7 6 


10 S 4 


11 4 1 


1688 


S3 13 IL 


16 i 


12 16 7 


31 4 


8 19 6 


12 4 7 


1889 


S3 9 U 


10 5 6 


15 < 5 


21 IS 9 


9 15 6 


15 3 


1890 


S5 39 10 


10 l> 3 


16 IS 8 


34 19 4 


9 110 


15 8 4 


1891 


25 10 4 


10 6 G 


15 3 10 


as 7 10 


10 4 3 


15 3 7 


1603 


35 18 2 


10 16 3 


14 16 11 


35 5 fl 


10 9 11 


U 15 7 


1893 


Si S 


10 9 


la u 'J 


T2 IB 11 


U 16 3 


18 9 6 


leu 


33 11 9 


9 19 11 


18 U 10 


S3 7 11 


8 16 5 


18 11 6 


1S9S 


Si 11 10 


9 4 10 


12 7 


21 2 a 


8 IB 8 


13 a 


1906 


33 5 8 


10 1 U 


13 a 9 


33 2 a 


9 19 1 


IS 3 1 


1897 


35 11 


IL 3 3 


IS 17 8 


24 11 7 


11 1 7 


13 10 


1898 


35 9 3 


11 9 7 


14 5 8 


2fl U 


11 3 1 


14 S 10 


1890 


37 11 8 


11 13 1 


16 16 4 


27 7 8 


11 9 8 


15 18 


1900 


31 5 9 


13 18 10 


17 G 11 


30 18 8 


13 7 1 


17 6 4 


1«0I 


81 16 a 


15 8 10 


16 U S 


81 a. 9 


14 11 11 


16 10 10 





300 



KBW ZEALAND OWICUL TGAH-DOOK. 



The highest record of tra<^e (excluding specie) waa chat for 1874, 
■when tiio rate per head was £41 48. 5d., the imports, in conaeqaenM 
of the lartjo expenditure of Iwrrowed money, amounting at that 
time to £,'2i 17s. per bead, against £14 lis. lid. ia 1901. 

It has been customary to leave out the Maoris in eatimating the 
sum per head, for their indnstries and necessities swell the volume 
of trride in comparatively so alight a measure that the amount per 
head of European population can be more truly ascertained by 
omitting them altogether. 



Trade with different Countries, States, or Coloniss. 

The trade with the United Kingdom in 1901 amounted to 
£16,181,206, comprising 65-51 percent, of the total. 

With the Australian States, trade was done daring IdOl to 
the value of £3.973,151; of which New South Wales claimed 
£2,246,091, and Victoria £1,396.264, made up as follows:— 



Expoant vbom Nkw Zk/llxsu. 



To New South Witle*. 1901 
. VioWria, 1901 



M 
1,094.085 

764, BSS 



ExPOBTft TO 1?KW ZlUJiXD. 



From New South Wale*, 1001 
. Violom, 1901 .. 



1,222.03(1 
Ul.iSl 



The latter amounts, in each case, represent the declared valuev 
of the imports into New Zealand from the States mentioned, nob 
their export value as gi\en in the New South Walu« and Victorian 
retuniB. 

Included in the exports to New Zealand from New South Wales 
is coal to the qunntity of 149,004 tons, vahied at £150,670. 

The tra<le witJi Fiji and the other Pacific Islands (includiDf* 
Norfolk Island) decreased from £622,056 in 1900 to £605,516 in 
1901, 

Both imports from and exports to the United States iu 1901 
show an iucreasu when comptuced with the previous year's ligureB. 

Of the exports to the United States iu 1901 the values of 
the principal Now Zealand products were: Coal, £1,941 ; kauri- 
mm, £290,510; hides, £3.4^0; elieopukina, £6,641; rabbit-akina. 
£7,267; Bausage-skius. £18,697; onions, £2,185; gmss-seed, £6,710; 
and phormiuui, £20,424, 




TBADK OF AUHTBAI^SIA. 



901 



The following tflhle shows the value of the totnl trade with 
the United States for each of the past tec years, 189'2 to 1901 
inclusive, daring which period the trade has increased consider- 
ably. 





Traub with thk Usitid Statbs. 








Imp or U tram 


Bsport* to 


ToUl 

I^wla. 


Tmt. 


AttAAtlO 


fteUe 


AtUotie 


PMdflo 


i 


Porta. 


PorW. 


Porta. 


Port*. 






t 


f 


£ 


M 


1 


1693 


aU,799 


36,838 


459,314 


61.483 


003,434 


a898 


M6,74S 


38,636 


430,843 


6S.706 


87&.'J2fl 


IBM 


869,1% 


35,495 


330,829 


5G,3C7 


081,887 


tfS 


S5t,S2S 


42,410 


a98,M6 


16,105 


710.873 


K 


ll«,6dd 


78,151 


:26ft. 564 


6S.02S 


81».-l39 


wr 


231,389 


106,106 


252, oia 


133,083 


l,OOH,140 


18S8 


700,556 


99,8SG 


887 ,059 


286,074 


1.4X3,544 


1999 


887, Mfl 


87,403 


S87,6M 


i^MH 


1.308,808 


1900 


958,386 


103,587 


434.314 


84.483 


1.630.661} 


1901 


1,174,346 


240,615 


ffaj.iT.'j 


lHl(i,304 


1.984.389 



The development hi the deceDoia) period La at the rate of 114*86 
per cent., or an increaee in value of £1,031,915. 

The trade with India and Ceylon reached a total of £478.767, 
against £391,301 in 1000. The importH — tea. rice, caetor-oil, wool- 
packs. &c. — were reckoned at £468,561, leaving a balance of only 
£10,196 for exports. 

Trade of Attstralasia. 

The EollowiDg table gives the value of the imports aoid exports of 
what arc now the Australian States and the Colony of New Zealand 
lor the year 1900 :— 




SUM cr U9lcny. 



Qna«uUnd 

New South WaloB 

Victoria 

South AustTkliA .. 

Ditto, Koctbarn Tacritory 

Westom Auiti&lin 

TftsmantA 




T«lal y»iv»«t 



ImporH. 



7.184,119 
37.061,071 
16,301,811 

8.0.14,552 
130.667 

5,962,178 

3,078,667 
10,U6.0&6 



BxiMrla. 



9,581,562 
38. 164. 516 
17,432,552 

9.029,157 
163,319 

6,853,054 

3,610,617 
13,346,161 



QVur 
Ixaportm. 



2,997,450 
608,445 



33.553 

88fl,876 

586,900 

3,600,065 



Ezoeuof 

Imporla 

ovvr 
Ksporti. 



879, 90» 

S,99S 



flOfl 



NBW KKALAND OPPICIAL VBiUt-BOOK. 



Ill the precfidiQ); table is given the total trade tntvords and oat- 
wards of each State and colony, counting twice over the valnc of 
■^(utdn produced in one State or colony and carried thenco into 
another, and renkoning the same goods throo times where thoy are 
imported from without into one Stale or colony and re-exported 
thence in the satue year into another. But, in order to form a 
just idea of the trade of Anstralaoia as a whole, it is necessary to 
eliminate the inter-atatt; traffic altogether. From the following 
table the value of imports and exports exchanged between the 
various States has accordingly been excluded : — 





EZTIBHAL TllADX 


or Atj«TaALi£iA. 




Tm*. 


ToMI Trado. Imporla. 


BsporM. 


GxoeBS 

or 

Import. 


of 

Bxpovto. 




1 
1 £ 


£ 


1 


£ 


lesfi 


TS.SM.iH il.lSB.OdS 


Bl. 084, 406 


10,051, 632 


" 4 


law 


75,113.918 38,4&1,160 


86,692,658 


1. 766. KM 


■ 


1991 


84.565.778 41.335.033 


43.240,745 




1.916,712 


1B9S 


75,3^.083 3i,5a9.SOl 


40,796,482 




«. 906.981 


18911 


67,788,738 


27.925.990 


89.802,748 




11.936.756 


law 


6S, 192,203 


2ri. 063,630 


89.128,572 




13,064,948 


1396 


67.624.917 


37.425,725 


40,198,1392 




I2.77S.8OT 


1896 


74,611.263 


34,420.506 


40.090,666 




6,670.070 


1897 


8a.M9,SG8 


37,862,741 


45.706,827 




7,844.086 


1608 


85,600,443 


37,810,588 


48.389,659 




10,97D,376 


1899 


97,637, 19i 


39.990,123 


57.&47,071 




17.656,948 


ItfOO 


104,396,7)7 


48,861,998 


65,M6,t84 




7,694,861 



It will be observed that in the year 1S85 the exoeaB of imports 
over exports for Australasia aumunted to no less a sum than 
£10,021,632. and thai five years later tho exuetJH of imports had 
fallen to £1,758,502. In 1891 the [H>sitioi) was completely re* 
versed, tho exports exceeding the importH by £1,915,713. This 
excess increaBed to £6,266,931 in the fallowing yeiir (1899), and to 
£13,064,942 in 1894, but decreased to £19,772,867 in 1895, to 
£5.670,070 in I89G. It was £7.844,080 in 1897, £10,979,276 in 
1698, and in 1?99 the excess of exports over imports nmounted to 
£17.656,948. In 1900. howevor, thero was c fftlling-otf in the vaJuo 
exports, and the excess amounted to only £7,^94,851. 



H 




TIUBH OP ADBTBALASIA. 



903 



The trade per haeA ot t)iQ population in each of the SCfttes of 
the Anntralian Commonwealth and New Zealand in 19D0 was : — 

Tm0B PK» Head of thk Populatioh im 1900. 



P 



Btato or Oolany. 


tion. 


laiporta. Bxt>oct*. 


Tou] Tndtt. 






J 1. iL < R. d. 


£ *. d 


Qu«fli)s]ai)d 


490.S35 


U IS 19 10 10 


84 S 10 


M«n South Wftlos 


m 1 * 


i,35i.aas 


90 7 ' 20 15 11 


41 S U 


Viclof la 


- ■ - 


i,iyi,ftoa 


15 7 a 


14 19 5 


'JO 19 7 


SouLh Auiitntlia 




358, SD5 


21 14 1 


93 13 9 


4£ 7 10 


Ditto. Northern Te 


rritor^ . . 


i,60O 


a« 16 7 


a4 11 « 


&4 7 1 


Westeni AnnGnlia 


• . • 


177.480 


38 11 10 


88 12 2 


73 4 


Ttumnniit 


* ■ ■ 


Hi, 115 


12 


15 2 3 


27 3 a 


Sam Zoaluid 


. 


763,594 


13 18 10 


17 G n 


31 S 9 



But Ihe valuer of the exports of the ADBtmllan States, more 
especially Nhw Soutli Walos, Victoria, aod South Austmiia, are 
largely increased by the inclusion of articles the produce or manu- 
facture of q£her States, colonies, and countries. 

The value of home productions or manufactures exported from 
each Stftte or colony in 1900, and the rate per head of meao 
population, wore as follow: — 





Homa Prodoc* 


Vmr HoiLa of 


SikU or CoIod;. 


exported. 


Popnlauon. 




M 


X ». d. 


Qucooglanil 


. 9,304,689 


19 1 7 


New tjoiith Walos . . 


. 18.673,468 


19 IS 9 


Victoria 


. ]3,D18.SS6 


11 13 B 


Sdulb Australia 


. 3,CL0.51T .. 10 4 X 


Ditto, Hoitbern Territory 


160. 46G 


34 « 3 


Western Autttra.lia . . 


. 6,639.827 


37 a 8 


Tiuitiiuiiit . . 


2,5aQ,3l)9 


10 6 


Mbw KeaUod 


. 13,055.249 


17 1 11 



The next table sots forth the amount of tho trade of each of 
the above-named States and colony with the United Kingdom in 
1900:— 



SlKM or Colony. 



QiMBD«laniJ 
N«w Sonlh WriIm 
Tietoria .. 

Soulta AtutraUft . . 
Ditto, Nortbom Territory 
Wostam Aurttnlia 
Ta«mti>iiift 
Hew Zealand 



Imporca from 

Uin Unltod 
Kluifiluiii. 



a,ioo,7oa 

0,933,117 
7,005,028 
8,397,684 
B2,403 
5.235.746 
6SS.G63 
6,6(M,iB4 



Rxport* 
totbn United 



S.S71.6G6 

S. 279. 272 

6,363,085 

2,825.6iy 

24,760 

4.368.419 

68B.600 

L0,3&9,84S 



Tot4l Tr«d« 

wltli 
lh« Unitod 
Klugdom. 



6,379,363 
18,196,S8B 
13,418,718 

4,723.208 
57,163 

8,494,165 

1.917,368 
16.768,896 




iW4 



HEW-ZKALAND OPPIOIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



The statement amended shows the relative importance of Aus- 
tralasia as a market tor the productions of the United Eongdom : — 

BZFOBTS or Hoini Phodoctions fboh thb IJhitbd Kuiq&om, is 1900, to — 



Britiih Indift and Oeylon 

Gennany 

Auatnlasia . . 

Franoe 

United States 

Gape of Good Hope and Natal 

Ruasia 

Holland 

Belgium 

Japan 

Italy 

Sweden and Norway 

Dominion of Oanada 

Ai^entine Repablio 



ai.918,63B 

27,999,712 

37,061,678 

19,977,913 

ig.7B0,BSl 

12,757,876 

11,001,300 

10,987,401 

10,776,706 

9,776,166 

8,772,114 

8,719,481 

7,605,267 

7,142,738 



The exports to other countries did not amount t« £7,000,000 
in any one case. 

Australasia as a whole, with a population of about 4,500,000, 
thus take the third place in importance as consumers 'of British 
produce, the exports thereto being nearly seven-eighths the value of 
similar exports to British India, with its 290,000,000 inhabitants. 




<s 



4 



SECTION IV.— POPULATION. 

The population of New Zealand (exclusive of the Cook and certain 
other Islands which were proclaimed to be within the bonndaries 
of the colony on and after the 11th June, 1901), as estimated for 
the 31st December, 1901, with the increase for the year, is shown 
below : — 

PopnUtion as entimerfctBd kt the oeDaui of Slit PeraoDi. UalsB. Femalot. 

March, 1901 {exclaiive of Maoria) . . .. 772,719 405,992 366,737 

Increase from Slat March to 3l8t December, 

1901:— 

By ezoesa of birtfaa orer deatfaa .. .. 9,680 4,493 5,087 

Ezceaa of airivala over departures .. .. 6,85S 3,738 1,620 



Eatimated population, exolualve of Maoria (also )_„_ -._ ... --^ „__ ,_. 

CookanaotherlBlaDda),on31atDecomber,1901 |™7,667 414,228 373,434 

Maori population, cenroa, 1901 .. 48,143 23,112 20,031 

Total eatimated population of ColoD;r ('<- 
olndine Cook and other Islanda) on Slat 

DeoflBober, 1901 .. .. .. 630,800 437,335 393,465 



It has been found impossible to obtain reliable information as to 
the popnlation of the newly annexed Islands in time for this publi- 
cation. A census is being taken of the principal islands, but Che 
results are not yet available. 

The number of the Chinese in New Zealand at the end of the 
year 1901 was estimated to be 2,846 persons, of whom 31 were 
females. 

Ingrbase of Population. 

The increase for each quarter of the year 1901 was : — 

Firtt QuarUr. 
Inm-ease from: 
Exceaa of birtba over deatba 
Ezceaa of arrivala over departurea . . 



Second Quarter, 
Exoeas of births over deatba 
Bzoeas of departurea over arrivala (decrease) . . 



Total. 
3,277 
1,164 


Hales. 

1,660 

804 

2,364 

1,522 
-568 


Females. 

1,717 

360 


4,441 


2,077 


8,317 
-711 


1,795 
-148 


2,606 


954 


1,653 



^K 206 NBW &B1LAND OPFICtAL YBAB-BOOK. 


■ 


^B Third QuarUr. 




^1 


^^f Inaraue troou : Totkl. Mftles. 


Fenal* ^^M 


^M Excess of biirtha over deaths .. ,, S.895 I.36G 


i.sat^H 


^H ExoMN at iirriviilB ovoi dopiutur«i 


1,9()2 1.5a 


7 

a 


908-^ 




4,7a7 y.yc 


1,834 


^H i'tMtrfli (htarter. 






^H SxMH of births over d««tbH 3,368 1.605 


1,763 


^^M Bzuu ot arrivals over departores 


4.167 2,7C 


19 
4 


1.458 




7.585 4.31 


3. 221 


V^ Year 190i. 






^1 EscoBB oC butba ovir dokth* 12,867 G,053 


G.eoA- 


^H li^xcaBB of arrivals over dopartUTOt 


e.saa iM 


5 
U( 


1.98& 




19,879 10, &e 


8,784 


" The movement of population since 1885 


is giveu 


ixt. Al- 


though the large in<:reaBe in 1893 by excess of arrivals over | 


departures woe not maintained during the eigh 


following years, the 1 


arrivals in the colony uevortheleBB exceeded the depfbrlurea 


io caoh 1 


of these years, and the total excess of arrivals for the 


tenvoar 1 


period 1892-1901 inclusive is found to be 35,678 


perHons, drawn from- 1 


other Statoa, coloiiieu. or countrios. The tiuiiibJr may ha somewhat I 


greater tbaa the actual /act, but probably 


not very much so. 1 


Reference to the possible source of error and its degree 


wilt b» 1 


found farther an. 




1 




„_^ . . luDr«MedDrlDBtheYMU 
Brtliuiiled 1 


C«nt«B[aial | 










lac rou* ■ 


Tmt. 


"jlSt* iByE»c.e«or 


ArrLnla 


Net 


oa ■ 
PoplllB.tlon ■ 


j 


OAcember. 


anet Dsktiiij 


DopartDFeii.' 


lUOTBUO. 


1 
h«*loD> Yaa» H 


■ 1885 .. 


575,172 


13,612 ' -a.744( 


10,608 




1-93 1 


■ 1886 


5S9.886 


13,164 


. 






1 


■ IB8T 


e08,SQl 


12,998 








1 


■ IflAH 

■ 1B89 


607, &80 
616,053 


l»,ig4 
12.&85 


. -17,1941 


&B.B66 




10-21 J 


■ 1690 


eas.fiOB 


12,21i4 








^M 


■ 18^1 


634, osa 


1I.7S& 


} 






^B 


■ 1893 


CM, 438 11,41T 


4.gse 


16,375 




S-68 ■ 


■ 1893 .. 


67S,36fi 11.420 


lO.ilS 


31.86S 




SM J 


■ 1894 


gSG.iSH u.mo 


2,206 


13,8«8 




306 ^M 


H 1S95 


698.706 11.G83 


895 


12,578 




1-83 ^H 


■ ISH 


714.102 12,iao ; 1.473 


13,R5S 




1-95 ^W 


■ 1897 


729.0^6 12.143 2.793 


14,894 




3^ 1 


H 1898 


743,4tii.H 11.711 S.(id6 


14.407 




198 M 


■ 1899 


7M,605 11,1S5 1 1,887 


18,042 




175 ^H 


H laoo 


766,278 12,S46 1.831 


14,177 




187 ^H 


^ 1901 7ST.&57 1S.8AT 1 ^.&Vi 


19,379 




383 ^^ 


^H 'CorrKled wbnro nmrBrar> In •ceordknoe witli c:«ti»u» T 


)«olta. Tho nmouBt ol loM ■ 


^H tiy do-iiartarv* In llic ixnrlod IsWfil, though coiToct In tlio 


■4tgr<iiRat<-. oannot b* alio- 1 


^H cftted with esACkuasa to Hit reapooUva y «»ra. 1 IiObb. 


i 


i 



AHKtVAUi A2tl> UKl-A^IUHUU. 



997 



Ahuivalb and Depabtures. 

The number of jwrsons who arrived iu the colony in the year 
1901 was 25,086, an increase of 7.012 on thu number lor the pre- 
vious year. Of tho arrivHla in 1901, 22,066 parsous weie classi- 
fied as adults, boiug above tJiu ai;e of twelve ytiare, arid 2,420 as 
childreu. The toLal number of males wan I6,96B and of females 
8,118. The arrivals from bhe United Kin^loni numbered 2,563, 
and froiii Australia 19,023. BesideH these, 334 persona came from 
Piji, and 2,266 from the South Seas and other ports, iuchiding 
arrivals by rnail-etoaDiers from San FranciBco. 

Classi^ed in respect of birthplaci^. it ia found that 4.768 of the 
arrivals were persona bora in Australasia, 19.391 in the United 
Kingdom, and 54 in otlior British ponsessions. Of 8S3 perBons 
bora in foreign countincs who arrivad during 1901, 1&9 were born 
in Germany, 104 in Frauce, 26!J ni the United States, 32 in Den- 
mark, and 36 in Sweden. 

Among the arrivals in 1901 are noticed 146 ** race-aliens," or 
persons of other than European descent, Particulars of birthplace 
and sex are as under: — 

IUrtli|ila«e. 
Aalft MiDor .. 
ChiDK 
Syiift 

Piioidc lalandH 
Fiji , . 
IndlK 

New Zeailftnd.. 

Total 

The practice of nominating immigrants to bo brought out 
partly at the Government expense has be&n discontinued since (he 
IGth December, 1890, and there was no free immigration in the 
year 1901. Certain reductions are, however, arranged by tho Ageoc- 
Oeneral with the shipping companies in fares for men with moderate 
means who intend to take up land and settle in the colony. 

Only 75 Chinese (74 men and 1 woman) arrived in the colony 
during 1901, but 14^ (140 men and 5 women) left, the departures 
thus exceeding the arrivals by 70. 

The total departures in 1901, including 1,178 oBicers and men of 
the contingents for service in South Africa, were 18,564 persons, 
being ',^,321 more than in 1900. Thus, the movement of populatiou 
both to uud from the colony is found to have h&sa greater thau iu 
the previous year. 

The departures from the colony by the Union Steamship Com- 
pany's boats, as given through the CunEoms Department, are cliecked 
by special returns kindly furnished by the pursers of the steamers, 
and, where pereons wiio did not book their passages have been 



M. 


F. 


Tockl. 


6 


4 


10 


.. 74 


1 


75 


.. 17 


10 


37 


.. 21 


7 


as 


1 





1 


1 


S 


i 


1 





I 


1 





1 


. . 122 


m 


H6 




306 



KBW KHALA.ND OmOIAX. TBAR-BOOK. 



omitted, the necessary additions are made. The pnrserB' retoros 
a]80 8erve to prevent tlie occasionx.! omission of the full namber 
of persons leaving by any one vessel, which soinetimes had hap- 
pened ptevious to the introduction of this ch»ck. Unless more 
passetigets are at uuy time of great pressure taken away from 
New ZonliLud tliati can lawfully be carried, the returns of out^ of 
population should prove v^ry fairly correct, and indeed the last 
census shows that the estimated population even after five years' 
interv'al was a very close approximation to the trutu. 

01 the departures in 1901. 17,123 persons were over twelve years 
of age, and 1441 children. More than twice as many males left 
the colony as femaloB, the numbore beiug 12,436 and 613^ rt^spec- 
tively. The departures to the Unitoa Kingdom amounted to 
1,1j2 persons, and tliOHO to Australia uumborcd 15.218. Besides 
these, 215 persons left for Fiji, and 1.970 for oth<^r ports {including 
passengers for San Francisco, and ihe troops for Soutli Africa before 
mentioned). 

In 1S91 the colony lost population by excess of departures over 
arrivals, but lu each of the years 1892 to 1901, inclusive, New Zea- 
land has drawn to itaelf more population than it has parted with. 
notwithstanding the attractjous of Australian and other gold-tields. 



Cauflus, 1901. 

The population of the colony (exclusive of Maoris), as returned 
in the census schedules for the ni^lit of the Slat March, 1901, 
was 772. 7iy persons, of whom 2,857 were Chinese, and 2,407 half- 
castes living amongst and as Europeans. 

A census of the Maori popuktiou was laken during February of 
IdiJl, when, according to prehiniuary returns made by the euumera- 
tors, the number of tiio Native race was found to be 43,143 
persons, including ^.l.'I.S half-castes living as Maoris. 136 Maori 
women were returned ilb married to European husbands. The com- 
plete population (Burupeart and Maori) of the colony was therefore 
81.'5,862 persons, as exhibited in the following statement, specifying 
the numbers for each sex ;— 



Populittion (exoliuive ot penons ot ili« ub- Panoiia. 

oncrinalcativeriice.of mixed KuropflBJi antl 

Nftlive bliMcl, a[i<l (J!iino»o| 
HftlJ-i:iut«« «n<l pcrKun* n't mixed ntoe living 

as nnd smoniB Burope&nB .. .. it.lOT 

OhioDs« .. .. .. .. a.B&7 

AboriRin^ niicivoa (inclmjing 198 Mmici vrivea 

of Eurupentiity 
Btlf-ctMUs and persouB ot mlxod ruca living 

Btiiong ftnd as membevca o( Maori tntica .. 

ToUl popuJftUon on aist March. 1001 *S16.e63 



MalM. 



Keuicla*. 



767, 4&S 401.979 »ea,476 



1.186 

a.ass 



1,219 
8S 



* Nol iDcltldlnK 399 pcnoni. offlcan uiil ciwwa ot two ItrltUh msfi^' 




l-OPULATIOK. 



309 



The total half-c&Bbe or mixed European and Native population 
w&B 5,540 persons. The number of half-castes living aatong Europeans 
increased since 1896 by 148, or al the rate of 655 per cent. In that 
year the number oC Maori wives of I'luropeariK was 229; io 1901 it 
was IW, The Chiueee decruascd froui 3. Til at the time of the 
census of 1396 to 2,S57 in Mariih. 1901 ; or at the rate ol 23 01 per 
ceut., caused niatuly by the excess of departures over arrivals. 

The Maori population fell from 41,993 in 1891 to 39,864 iu 1896. 
and increased Lo 43.143 in 1901, according to Lhe returns. 

The increase on the total European population between April, 
1896, and Slst March, 1901, arnounteii to 69.359 persons, or a rate of 
9-86 per cent, Between the census of 1891 and that of 1896 the 
numerical increase was 76,702 persons, or 12-24 per cent. The 
average annual increase in the period 1896-1901 was at the rate of 
1-90 per cent. 

The populatiou of the principal divisions of the colony on Slst 
March, 1901, was— 

North Ulftnd and k^IjbcceiG inlet* (aitolaBivft 

ol MiiLiri*) 
Middle Uleindl ftnd adjaceul isl«U (exclafiiva 

of Maoris) 
Stewftrt liilRnd .. 

Cbatliitrri Isl&rjds [dxoluKiTB ot Mnori*] 
KcnoB^eo Ifilaods 



3LIO,i571 

272 

207 

8 



UnlM. 
206.606 

112 
b 



fwnik]**, 
163,965 

182.858 

106 

95 

3 



Total [orth* ooloiiy (flxduiiv* of MAoris) 773,719 405,993 H6I'>.727 



Pboi'ortion op the Skxhs and DaNsiTY OP Population. 
The gradual equalization of t)te numbers of the sexes and growing 
density of population and dwellings in the colony are alluded to in 
a farther table. 



Ditto of 

BttuuLTBtlou. 

December, 1B61 
F«brua.rT, 1871 
April, isai .. 
April. 1691 
timnb, IDOl .. 



Number of 

F«tnftli>i Co 

62-16 

70-62 
81-79 

sa-ss 

90-33 



NumlMt ot 

Puraonii U> a 
Bi|uar<T Stilp. 

Lion 
'1A5G 

7-427 



Nutab«r of 


Kunbtir ftf 


fi«r»fin« IO 


tnhaliiWI 


Wl lulilLtjUnd 


DutDlllnKi to 


DoiilliaK. 


» Suuiire Ulla. 


4-42 


0-314 


4-46 


0*548 


2-12 


O'OIT 


5 06 


1-191 


4-B6 


1-527 



Increask op PopuijAtion at Succbssivk Cknsusks. 

The inurease of populatiou ol European descent at successive 
census periods has been ; — 

Dftt« ol Enumeration. 



Dacembar, 1858 
1S61 
1864 
186? 



Populatiou. 
59,4,13 

90,021 
172,159 
aiB,GGS 



Nnmerlckl lacreka* CivQt««iRMil 

Purttiiu. iDvrtMio. 



39.608 
73.137 
46.610 
37.795 



39-99 
73'86 
2701 
17-18 



SIO 





:fxw 


ZKAJ.XXD OFFICUL 


TKAK-BOOK. 




■DmMmid 


B»».<.ili 




VnMrtMllMaMM 


o-S— 


PcfcnMj. 


1871 


SS6..'BR 


4a, in 


IS-flB 


Ifanb, 


18TI 


298. S14 


iu.flBe 


»H 


* 


1878 


414. <1S 


n.sn 


is-s 


April, 


I8SI 


4S9.93S 


W.549 


l*<ff 


Umnh. 


lASIS 


578,463 


tt.m 


»4t 


Aptfl. 


lan 


630.658 


T6,t09 


XfrM 


• 


ia9B 


«».a60 


aa.j59 


9''8B 


Vftnb. 


1901 


773,719 







POPDUTIONS UP PitOVINCIAL Dl£TRICTS. 

These are stated u in March, 1901, H-nd at the 
eensos. Toranaki stands first for rat« of progress with an ioci 
of HV-i^ per eent. id Bve years. WetJingtOD comes next ntth 16 per 
ceot., Anckland third with 14-57, Marlborongh and Nelson hava 
increased from 6 lo 7 per cent., Canterbory and OtaKo saoMviws 
«Ter 5 per cent. 



PiovlMtetOMvidL 

Aocklftod . . 

Tana&kt .. 
H&wke'i Bay 
Wvlltngton 
Ukclboraagb 

HtlMO 

W««tJaad .. 
CuiUrbarf 

OU«o 

Kcmudvc Island! 
Total* 



April, un. 
isa.sM 

81.176 

84.038 

lai.SM 

13,433 

S&,734 

14.469 

135,838 

1S3,M4 

234 

7 






Konwineftl CMi 



708.960 7T3.719 

I-IDktmm. 



Sa,874 

6.660 

1.886 

19.500 

843 

S.181 

37 

7,183 

9,901 

-87 

1 

6o.»se 



14-aT 
aiu 
♦•or? 
lG-00 
675 
6-10 
0^6 

fi-61 
-11*4 

11-88 

»-86 



POPCL&TIOX OP COUKTISS AXD BoBOCOBS. 

New Zealand is, by " The Coantiea Act, 1S76," divided tni? 
counties and borongfas, eicepting certain oatljing islatids, which 
are not wiibin county boundaries. It is provided by ibe above- 
mentioned Act that borooghs Hhall nol be included in counties. Id 
Marcb, 1901, the number of tbe counties wb6 136. Of these, the 
North Island had 52. with a population aaoanting altogether to 
216,725 persons. Tbe Middle Island bad 33 coantie*, the population 



^ 



h 



PopalaUoo <azoludlng BCaorli) of Ihe ProTtnolal Districts and or th« 
North uid Middl« IsiuidB at the Censuses of 1896 sAd 180i. 



■ r^iti. 1IW. 



aueouwa , . ui»m 



KAatalf BAT . UJMm 



wStAIMTAM . ttlMa 



, n*JU.Bainm»K ttAUM 



WtanLWIIft . . 1*>M 



cruvo , . lat.i 



M*aCH. I-Mt. 



• UENUHlt . . 


t]«,(n 


TIRHHAKI . ■ 


■T.aM 


ttk'tnf *>>•/ . 


MttU 


«rCLklH«T«lt . 


14I.H4 


UmlMHIHH 


I4M| 


HCUOH . . ■ 


*',«• 


wnruLM* . . 


t4.«0* 


«kHrcn»un . 


<«t.O«l 


OTkOO . . 


■ra.ia* 



s 

I 

■ 

i 

t 

i 

s 

■ 



(Tht Usori popt/latio/i, whioti Is not dtall with in Iho ditgrtmt, wt$ rt- 
turned in i896 as 39,854 persons, and In IffOt «s ^3.^■^3 persorii.) 



PiTo &c« ptgt iV) 




rum lo* Mr 



d 



POPULATION OP COCHTIBS &ND BOROUQES. 



211 



iKmg 200,618 persons. Stewart Island is a county in itself, and had 
a population of 253 persons, exclusive of persons on shipboard. 
The names and populations of the various conuties in the colony, 
with their interior boroughs set opposite, were as under at the 
■date of the enumeration : — 



Countie*. 

MoufEonui 

Od Bbipbourd .. 
WtaangaxoA 

On •hipboard .. 
Bar of Ulanda .. 

On ehipbourd... 
BobsoD 

Od shipboard 
Wbuisarel 

On sBlpboard 
OtamaMa 
Kodney 

On abipboard .. 

Waiteniata 
Od Bbipboard.. 

Eden ... 



Hanukau 
Coromandel 

Ou abipboard.. 
Tbames ... 

On shipboard. 
Obinemnri 

On shipboard 
Plako 
Waikato... 
Walpa ... 
Baglan ... 
Kawhla ... 

On shipboard . 
West Tanpo 
Bast Tanpo 
Botoma... 
Taaianga 

Whakatene 
Opotiki... 

On shipboard . 
Waiapu ... 
Cook ... 

Wairm 
Hawke'R Bay . 



Clllton ... 
Taranaki 

On ■taiptMard . 
Stratford 
Hawara ... 
Patea ... 
Waitotara 

WaaeaDtii 
Ba&iptikei 
KIwiiBB ... 
Otona ... 

Fob angina 
Vaaawatn 



CeuHua, 
1901. 


Borough >. 


CensDs 
1001. 


9,BT4 






18 






Wt 






1,797 






93 






a.sn 






» 






«,ei3 






163 






6,380 

31 

9.TS1 


Whaogarei 


l,4is 






3.6T8 


■ ■ 




17 






T.OSB 


Birkenhead 


1,057 


87 


DsTonport 


8,893 




On shipboard... 


1 


19, au 


OreyLynD 


4. no 




Anckland 


... 84,913 




On shipboard... 


874 




Parnell 


4,666 




Nenmarket 


3,060 




Onehnnga 


3,016 




On shipboard... 


47 


19,906 






4,169 






11 






B,(MS 


Thames ... 


4,009 


8 


On shipboard ... 


11 


e.0T6 






60 






9,436 


TeAroba 


888 


3,183 


Hamilton 


1,953 


a.sao 


Cambridge 


969 


1.697 






1,113 

1 

987 










966 






1,307 






1,790 


Taoran^a 


Ml 


770 
1,438 


On shipboard ... 


1 






6 






711 






6,303 


dlBbonie 


9,787 




On shipboard 


68 


1.773 






6.833 


Napier ... 


8,774 




On shipboard... 


941 




Hastin(>B 


3,650 


9.535 






11,194 
93 

5,081 


New Flytiiouth... 


4.406 


Stratford 


2,097 


6.347 


Hawera 


3.131 


3,046 


Fatea 


691 


3.476 


Wanganui 


7,399 




On shipboard 


B 


4,018 






7.670 


Marton ... 


1,101 


9.344 






6,778 


Fellding... 


3,998 




Palmerslon North 


6,534 


1,5.S6 






3,000 


Foxton ... 


1,911 



ai2 



MBW ZIALAMO OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



Gonntlaa. 

WftlplkWa 

AUtlo 

Cutlepolot 
Bketabima 
MkurlcevUla ... 
HutcrtoD 
Boatta Wblranp* 

Hntt ... ~ 



Bonnda ... 
On Bhipbo«rd . 

Uulborougb 



KAlkonn 
ColllDRwood 
On Bhlpbourd 

On ibipboud . 



Bnllsr ... 
On abipboard . 

lRftng»huft 
Gwy 



WeatlftDd 

Amari ... 
Ctaavlol ... 

Aihley ... 
Selwyn ... 



AkAroft ... 

Aah burton 
Gerftldiue 
Levels ... 

If&ckenEle 

WftiUki... 



Wmltaemo 
Walkou&itl 



Cmuo*, 
1901. 
4.6H 
B.MO 

B,ST6 

s.aoo 

1,048 
«T 

i.m 

3,133 
6,«]0 



7,171 



MS 
9 

6,ei8 



1,7U 

«,«90 

as 

7,SS3 

a 



4,SB8 

i 

4.0K 

I, an 



l,40B 

1.149 

i.iao 

11,099 
30.787 



3,660 

11,342 
6.991 
9.406 

1,613 

5,65.1 

9,an6 



3.014 
4,082 



Borooglu. 



DknneTlrke 
WoodTilla 

pKblalOK 



HMtMton 

Cwluton 
Oraytown 

Wellington 

On BbiplxMurd . 
Onslow ... 
Melrose... 
Petone ... 
Iiower Hntt 
Euoil ... 



Blentaelm 
Plctan ... 
On sblpbOArd , 



Uotuekik.-. 
Biehmond 
Nelson ... 

Onstalpboud.. 
Wastpon 

On sbipbOMTd.. 

Brannar 
tiraymoulli 
On sblpboMrd .. 

HoUtlkti 

On shlpboArd... 
Kamurn 
Ross 



Eaiapoi 

lUneion 

Lyttelton 

On Bbipboud ... 

ChrlBtctiuroh 

New Brigliton ... 

Sydenta&m 

St. Albans 

Linnood 

WoolBtoD 

Sumuor 

Ak&roK ... 

On ablpboard... 
Aabbiirton 
Teuiuka... 
Tiniaru ... 

On ebipl>o&rd 

WklmBto 

Oaiimrii 

On Hhi|))ioanl ... 
Hauii'dcn 

I'kliiierHton Boatb 
HkwkHbury 
Port Clialinert ... 
On ship board... 
Nortb-UBBt Valley 
Maori Hill 
West Harbour ... 



Ooauua. 
ISOL 

9.aiS 

on 

i.goB 



9,MB 
1,906 
l.Ui 

48,638 
338 

1.499 
S.90S 
3,780 

i.en 



s.su 

875 

9B 



aas 

S4S 

7,010 

iS! 

fl.B9B 

336 

1,879 
6,T«8 

a» 

1,9«S 

6 

1,U1 

814 



1,766 

1,7« 

4,086 

391 

17.fi3B 

1.008 

11.404 

6.007 

6,787 

9,931 

614 

6SS 

5 

1,463 
6.4S4 



1.3S9 

4,836 

17 

381 

736 
690 
3.056 
149 
3,697 
1,560 
1.466 



ORIKP CITIES AND 8UBDRBS. 



313 



C«tU>U«. 


Ccoaii*. 

torn. 


BoroUcbB. 


OMiiat, 


pA«iliniil« 


a. Ml 






rutri „. 


... T.lfO 


OanwUn 


... u.aitt 






On iliipboud 


sv 






Rtwlyii .. 


.- 4.8M 






Morxlngton 


^ 4,00k 






C»vralikii] 


ff.asB 






Be. Kimi. 


... j.no 






Soiitli nunsilln... 


... ff.W 






Oroaii Ii^lkO'd ... ,„ 


m 


i^ 




Mo»niol — 


... i.in 


R. .- 


4. TBS 


MlltOB ,„ 


],«] 






KallaiiKftU 


i.tea 


Tukpekft 


B.tn 


lAwrnDco ... ... 


I.ISB 






RoKburKh 

Tuiaoiil ... «. 

Bi.lc]iitli« 


418 






asD 


COnllH .^ 
Hwnlototo 


.. CMS 


... I.OIT 


... S.TW 


N**vl.>!r ., ... ... 


Bca 


TtBoml 


... 4,3DS 


Cromfftll ... ... 


Uft 






AI«xM)<irit 


H18 


lAH* ... 


... S,SS6 


ArrowtowD ... ... 


4]0 






Qii0on*lo«D ... ... 

Oon ... 


mo 


SOUfhlMld 


u.sea 


... t,)IM 






M»Uilr« 


SBT 






Wlntuu 


474 






InvorwirBXll 


6.81S 


[ 




laFcriMntl)] Nortb 


MS 


^^ 




InvaiMrKllI Routli 


1.8T4 


^m 




InvnrmrgUI Ea»1 


H« 


^V 




Araitnl 


ata 


^^ 


* 


OlaiisioDi' ... ... 


1^ 






G*<i>i>i'i'tlinwa ... ■» 






On wliii'liuard... 


BW 


WallACe 


... T.W 


Blveiion 


as 


rioVil ... 


lU 






Stownrl Inland ... 


BBS 






OD^IptKMril... 


19 







Tho total county populatiou amounted to 4I7.S96, or ^404 per 
cent, of ihe total tor the colony.* In counties are included all 
towns not oonsututed innnicipnt boroughs; but, on the other 
hand, the people living in many of the boroughs can hardly be 
called town population. Th» population in boroughs was 350,202 
persons, or 45'32 per cent, of the whole. For every 100 persons 
resident in coumics in 190i there were S4 residing in boronphs. 
lu 189S the eounties had .^91.735 persons, and the boroughB 807,294, 
or, in other words, for every 100 peraonB in counties, 78 were 
residents of the borotigha. Thus it wilt he seen tliab the proportion 
of the town to the county population wa-s greater in 1901 than in 
18%. 



ChIEP CiTIRS and StJBUBBB. 

The Cities of Auckland, Christchurch, and Dunedtn have con- 
eiderable suburbs. Tiie suburban population of Wellin^^ton is com- 
paratively sinall. The following gives tho names and populations 
of the several localities which may fairly bo tormod suburbs of the 
four principal cities: — 



' For |Kii>iiUUon of rldini;*. road dUtrlata. a.Dd IcMalltiaa, IM 0«Dau> vOdDUe. Pwrl L 
15— YMr.book 



I 



MEW EB&lt&HD OPnOUb VS&B-HUOK. 



Borougli*— 

Sjdeuhsm 

Si. Albana 

Iiinwoad ,. 

New Brighton , . 

VVooUwu 
Hoftd DiatrlotM— 

8 prey don 

Hatiiwel! (fxirt).. 

Kicuaiiun ipori) 

Avon (purl) 

ilealbcuit« 4 put) 




SlfBCIMBS Oir OUBISTCaCBCU. 



PopulftUoB. 

CvoaUK. 1901 . 

. Il,<ti4 

. 6,007 

. 6.787 

l.OOB 

8.582 




TotiL) Buborbf 
Cliriiichuroli CUy .. 

Total CbrtBtcbiuc 
and 8Utiutb« 



»d,909 
17.ftS8 



67 .«l 



6,706 
43 .638 



40.844 



In laying off tho aubiirbR of Chri«l- 
cbutch lb« boundarioa ol iho Chrin- 
otiurcb Health Diarict hate be«n 
maiuly followed. 

SuttVHBS O' DvKKDtli. 

Borough* — 

Cavcritii un .. ft,966 

Vaon liiLI .. 1,660 

UorniiuituiJ ,. 4,006 

Horth-Eut Valley . . B.SSI 

RoRtyn .. 4,689 

St. Kilctiv .. 1,700 

Soubb DuiiodiQ 6tM8 

Wmi Uiu-bouf .. ],l8t 

Total aubuiba .. aT.All 

I>uMdio City .. S4,879 

Total DDuedm aod 

«ubutb» . . 01,300 



Tho increase of population for ten years at Llie Tour chief centree, 
with their suburbs, waB : — 



Aneltlaud and Bubucbs 
W«llingtoi) and sabarb* 
Cbriittotiurcli uid Kuburbk 
Dniiodin and lubuibi 



Csnrai. 
18BI. 

51.387 

34,190 
47.846 
46.860 



CvmiH. 

1001 
C7,Sit6 
49,844 
57.041 
68.890 



Nain«rlcal InervaMi 

16.98& 31-08 

16,154 44-S3 

9,1^6 19 88 

6.681 ti-n 



Thus tlie Lwo priucipal oiiies of the North Island art* found to 
have progrossed between 1891 and 1901 at a greater rato than 
those ol trie Middle Island, and Wellington in particalar to hav6 
develop&d at more than Ihreu times the rate of Dunedin, and mora 
than twice aa fast as Chriatchureb. 




rOPULATION 09 10WNBHIPR, VILLAOBB, KTC. 



316 



Whtla New South Waleo and Victoria present nhat ia termed by 
(hd Rtatiaticmn of tbe former colony " the diflquiabing Hpentacls of 
capilat towni growing with wonderful rapidity, and eiu bracing 
ID tbeir limits one-third of the population of the territory of which 
Uicy are the centre," New Zeulaud in saved from tUia by cbo 
configurutiou oE the coutitry, wiiiuh has r^uulted in thu fortuatioD 
of four cliiof towns, besides otlitTS c( secondary iinponance but 
nevorthuless trading centreii of coriKideriible ccnsequeiiizc. 

Population or Town Dibtiuoth and Sham. CRNTKKii. 

Beeides the boroughs, there were 35 town distriekg (iucludiiiD 
the special town district of Rotorua. constituted under "Tb« 
Thei-mal-Springs Djstricta Act, iStil,") which are portions of the 
counties in which they ars Bituatod, Ono only of these, Hauip- 
Blead, has more tlian 1,000 inhabitantB. A list of thoaa (own dia- 
trlciR 18 aubjoinad, with populations, as in 1901 : — 



■ Town Dlatrict*. 


Po[]iiIk.- 
%iaa. 


Town DUtri«u. 


Povola' 


K»tllD 


aco 


T»rgu1al« 


7«a 


Helaunvilla .. 


611 


Orimindvilla .. 


459 


P&^&kuift 


886 


WaijjAWA 


66S 


To Awamntu.. . . 


865 


Kftlkorft Nortli 


ses 


Kibikihi 


.. 22^1 


Pftabhersion .. 


639 


NgaraawKhiA 


.. £49 


Johnaonvillfl . . 


Mi 


B^loruft* 


914 


Uavelook 


S16 


Opoiilcl 


687 


Amberlvy 


4Lf 


WutaralBalaighy 


.. 766 


South tttltlgo .. 


tee 


OpuciKko 


(66 


HKiupstaftid .. 


.. MIS 


Inglevood 


.. 71« 


TinnaLd 


5n 


Hormikaby 


870 


daroldin* 


■ ■ we 


M&Dftia 


««7 


AllantoD (Eotmerly Oe»y| 


9M 


Wfttftriay 


416 


Ontrftm 


ISO 


Lethbridgfl .. 


.. sao 


ClinLQQ 


4SI 


BuUb 


501 


Wyodbam . . 


. tij 


Halcumbq 


■ ■ 88S 


Otftuiau 


.. 4*6 


Clyde (Wairoa) 


6113 







In addition to the boroughs ami town districts above referred to, 
(he census results showed for 1901 throui^liout the colony uo less 
than t>ht3 plaisus of tbu nature of tovvii«hips. viUug^s. or small centres 
without bouudaries. It id impo!)>iiblu lo liay that the populatious 
of Ihesa small centres are all strictly accurate, even for the 
oeusus date, or given in such a way as to be 6t for comparison 
one with another. In diffcreni crvnen cnore or \gss of surrounding 
country nmy liave been considered as belonging to the centre, but 
there is at least at each plaice mentioned some sort of □■icleus of 
population, if not a w&Il-deQned village or towaahip. In making 
the statement the best has been done with a diflKcult maT.ter, ana 



> Oouatltattd umlM - rho TIiBraiKl-HpnDa* Uliitrlcu Aoi. lesi. " 



216 



NEW ZEALAND OKPECIAL VEAR-BOOK. 



the informntion is given as useful — in some cases, like that of 
Waihi ftod Reefton, important — even if open to objeeiion here 
and there. Tlie county in which each is situated is also given : — 

VoiinimU-iv. 
■2Hi 



I 



P 



AbboUforri, Tweri 

Adair, Leielv ..206 

AdUDfl'R FiAt. Braoe .. .. 76 

AdftnuonV SouililAiid ,. CO 

Addiann's Fl>t. UulU .. 303 

Ah«ura. Ocoy .. £19 

Albuij, Waltemnta .. S7 

Albert Town, VinconE . . 73 

Aironl Fon-st, Aslibiirton .. 321 
Alfradlchu (kod viuiaii;), Mutor- 

ton .. .. ..332 

A!liMid<vl«. Wwhotao . . .. U5 

AJlsnlon. Athburton .. .. 8S7 

Alma, VVaittUi .. .. 123 

Alton, I'ilCca .. .. .. M 

Andnmoii'ii Bajr, P«nuiaul& 6ti7 

AiitiAt, Selvyn .. . lOJ 

Antonio's Flat, Inan^ahua .. fit 

Aoagatctc, TiMirun^a . . . . H 

Aoroa, Koli«r>n .. .. 373 

Aplii, Potiangina .. ,. 13S 

Aramoho. vViitotua .. .. 1,0Q2 

Arapoliu. HobKon .. .. IfJD 

Arainpa, Hobaon .. .. S&S 

Arden, Tiiiwi .. .. S7 

Argylp, SoulLUnd .. .. 80 

Archi)rlown, W^Kllftud ,. 74 

Aruodnl, Ournldlno .. .. 3S 

Achlcy. A«l>Uy .. .. QPi 

Ashhuni, (ur>d viaiDiljr), Oroua &4& 

Athol, Southlniid .. .. 73 

A70tidiil<i, Kduii .. .. 8iK 

AvraliurL, MaiiawatB .. .. 43 

Awakiiio, KAwtiia ., .. 134 

Awanui, Wainnn .. .. SI 

Awhicu. Mnnukau .. 4IS 

Bainham, rullinitwood .. MB 

Bald Rill Flat, Viuceut .. 175 

BalJMivv. Pabiaiua .. .. 73 

Bannochburri. Vincenl ., 3'J4 

Barklv. K<->titl.lrind .. .. 63 

Barry'- Bitv, Akuoa .. 154 

BwtiDgM, TiULpoka . , . . 39 

BftftconctlchU Lovslk .. .. 132 

Beok'a, Manioioto . . . . tiT 

Bsllakt, Seloyn .613 
Bfl'flold V>]t«g« SoitlsniMit, 

Ocialdina .. .. .. 16« 

Dolgrove, W&imoa .. l&fi 

Bendigo. Vinc«nt . . . . 49 

Bennett's. ABlilay .. .. 77 

Berwick. Taien .. 87 

Ularkbiill. Orsy .. .. Bfta 

Bl»ck':< Point, ln»nKabua 31S 

filaokwater, iD&Dgthuft .. 149 

Blair Xaioil, Taiert . , . . 86 




Blue Spur, W«8tlMid .. 

Bombay, Muxukau 

Boweniomi, TitumD^ 

Biigliton, Buller 

BrightoD, Tdieri 

Brigbt<nftlar, Waimoa 

Broad Biiy, Poninsiila 

Sruckville, Taieri 

Bunkl«y, book 

Buffalo (aod vioinitjr), Coro- 

mundcl 
Bittllowu. Obineraari .. 
Bunaythorpe (and TtoiaiCy) 

Oroua 
Btirkn'it. Mivokcnr.ifi 
Buriimdn {am! vjuiiiilyl, Tai*ti 
liurnveil and Loreli'sFlaC. Btuc« 
Burwood, Solwyn 
Oabbnife l^fty, tioroinftndol 
Call&glifin'ii, Woatland 
Cainbrian'ii, Hanioloto 
Cftinbridgo Wfec, Waipa 
Oftpn Poulvfifid, Biiiler 
Capltixtou. IginiiKAbua. . 
Cardinniv, Lake 
Caatloultllo, Waitotftm 
Ciutlepoiiie, Caailepoint 
Centre Buili, SoiUhlaiid 
Cbarlemon, Biiller 
CharlUii), Southiftiid . . 
Ohattnn, 8>utliland .. 
Gbclivniiniii, Kinitea.. 
OliertHcy, Aubbiirtan .. 
Clftrc-ville, Watrarapa South 
Olatkvilk, Astiley 
CliTden. WalUco 
ClITLan, CdUirgnood .. 
Clyde, ViiiCFUi 
Coaitirookdnle, Duller.. 
Coal Creek. Tisapeka .. 
Caalgate (and vininlty), Selwyu 
CobOen, Orey 
Colliogwood, CollingWDod 
Caopto«n, Aknna 
tkirarnandrrj, Corantftndel 
Courtenay, S«)wyii 
Crufton, itmngitikei .. 
Crouiariy. Fiord 
CniAhirgton, ItiAngahiia 
Cullrn-iville, MailMrough 
Culvordan, Amari 
Uaor^. Soutbland 
DaleflpM, Wa>rarapa South 
Danii>1towu, Wallkov ,, 
Diitficld,Sc]w]rQ 
DargaTille, Uobion 



PapuUHoo. 



14a 

143 

469 

S9 

140 

18 

19 

103 

338 

182 

ISS 

19A 

US 

32 

63 

IDO 

108 

91 

3» 

&» 

oa 

SS9 

98 

60 

874 

in 

129 

4i3 

Ifi 

06 

663 

161 

248 

98 

ISS 

H 

87 

44 

811 




^^^^^^H^ OF 


TOWMSaiPS, VU.LaOBS, ETC. 


217 1 


^H Populfttloa- l'oi>uJ«iloa. | 


^* DaboMh. WaiMki 


84 1 Gowen Cro^B, Obioemun 


383 


Dobonkh Bay, W&ikouaiti 


163 , Ooldaborough, Wostlatid 


146 


^^ Danlftir. WAngKitui 


61 GortlonSpocliilSo«i<Mnont.l'iako 


89 


^K Donnlabou, BulUr 


793 


Oovernorii B«y. Akaroa 


189 


^M I>tllinhn>. Wastluid .. 


l&S 


Grabamncowii, Whuigatei 


60 


^H DipUrn, Soulblftod 


(>8 


Granity Cr«ok. Bailer 


sm 


^H Di^ylescoo, Soluryn 


154 


Graatmeie, Soabhland 


187 


^1 Dromuro, A«htiutton .. 


78 


GnattonJ (and vIoLDtly), Haiigi- 




^H l>runimon<^, WiillaaB .. 


2m 


tikel 


133 


^H Dtiity liknd viaii)U^), ManukftU 


Stil 


GcaendaLe, Salwyo 


840 


^H DiirtbMlc, Waihamo 


ICS 


Green laluid fiuab, Taiari 


»9 ^M 


^1 Duiifiunvillo, Qroy 


oo 


Ononlaao, lildcn 


391 ^M 


^H Dankeld, Tuftpelia 


105 


Greonpark, Selwyn 


336 


^H DutJAAad?!. Sfllwyn 


3843 


Gceurbon. TikU»n^ .. 


99 


^H I>untr'>on, WiuE&ki 


18t 


GroT»town, Marlborough 


353 


^H Duriviowu, WBiigaDui 


335 


Outntuna, CiPiuiaodel 


lOT 


^H l>uvituoht!llo'« ttAy. Ahftroft 


H5 


Hakaru, Ocamatea 


44 


H BMtCIiv*, H*nke'» Bay 


141 


HakataraiiiMa (aad Tiotai^), 




^H Eul DtptoD (and vioinity). 




Wuiinau .. 


364 


^H Soiilblniid 


lao 


HafDilton, Manlototo.. 


3T 


^1 Kutorn KiiKh, W&IImm 


17 ' Hainp'tfin. Watpawa .. 


afii 


^H Eiaatiown, WanK^uui 


3oH H^lnUft, PitlliHtUit 


303 ^ 


^H Bsai Wiatou. Soucliluid 


15o UiiiiuieT SiTiogH, Atnun 


131 ^H 


^H Bdaodalo, SouuiUnd .. 


180 fUrwo^, SouEhland .. 


ai ^V 


^H Kgmont. Tiiranniki 


:j» 


HMliugN, TliAintvit 


lis 1 


^H Bk0l«)iu»A, Kkstaliuna 


310 


Uiutwull, M'lunoevilla 


330 I 


^H Elie^inete, Selwya 


103 


HaLiei;'^, or Neloou Creek, Qr«y 


IX I 


^B EiebAin. Hawem 


400 


H^irarahu, Alibimkau., 


es J 


^ Erillrld. W*UAki 


161 


IlavMlock, UAwkn's Bay 


874 ^^ 


EiivrurLh, GatftldiDO .. 


105 


HawMdoti, Aiibloy 


M ^M 


^_ Etuiok, Tu&puka 


68 


Hawaii, Vincent 


39 ^^ 


^B Bv&uBdAle, WaiKou&itJ 


6a 


Hawlboru'lals, Soutliltuid 


43 1 


^H Bwabarii, MAnigtoUi .. 


103 


H«ddon Buoh, W<ill>c« 


146 I 


^H P«itdown, Buller 


75 


Hflndaraoo (and vicinity). Walts- 


1 


^H Fairfax (and vtoiniby), Bruoe . . 


183 


mata 


327 1 


^1 Fairflold. Taieri 


110 


Heutey, TatPTi 


139 ^m 


^H Furlio, Miuikansia 


Ba7 


Herb-j-t, \Viiit»lii 


388 ^H 


H Faldwiok. WallKoo 


33 


Usrburtvilbi, Pnungaia 


138 ^M 


^H F«ndall(tn. S«ln-yn 


809 


H>rloi (and vlainilil.Tuapnka,. 


306 ^H 


^H F«niliilli. SoulliUiid .. 


70 


HiKbaliflu, Feiiiiifula . . 


339 ^H 


^H Pcrnaidfl {and vioioity], Aihlay 


&M 


}l<kiir&>ig', WhaiigkT«i 


495 V 


^H Pvrntown, CoKiugwooil 


81 


Uikuuuu. Tbatiias 


153 J 


^H Flax Siftftmp. WaikauniCl 


87 


UaiRrovx. WnilKkl 


37 ^m 


^H Flaxton. Aoliley 


17 


HitutuTi. Tiisn 


193 ^H 


^H Foidvll, WAUgaooi 




383 


Ilirxtflclil, Wa'taoQ 


53 ^^ 


^H Form>»o, Soultiland 




131 


IL^bioavillo, Waiumata 


13i 1 


^V Ftftnbtoii, Lake 




3S5 


Ho^lgkiniion, Wbllaoe . . 


4$ ^J 


Frasartown, Wairoa 




175 


Uiiliour*, Manttuiiui .. 


srrs^H 


OkliOm, W>)n.kntaQ« 




14 


Uoimesdale. VVkIIoloo . . 


i» ^H 


Gartldd. Walaca 




43 


H^)mio^, Solwyn 


189 1 


a«org«town, Waitakl 




84 


HororfttA, Kninryii 


2a» J 


G«rmao Bay, Akacua 




155 


Huwic'k (am! violtiilr), Mannkait 


617 _^M 


Oibbstou, Lftka 




1&8 , Iljia. Tard.iiaki 


ta ^M 


^_^ Oibbnlown, Collingwood 


Vj-i iluiakamai ScratTord .. 


4fi ^^ 


^H Glmmerbiirn, MiiiiiobDta 


I9r> 


IIiiiranKi,Tar*naki 


40 1 


^H Olauavy, WaiiiiAta 


98 


ii'ikor-nui. Wllal^H•r«f 


110 J 


^H OUnili (aad vicinity), L«Tela . . 


9» 


liiiiibervillQ, Kaiigi(ik«i 


wt^^M 


^H Olanoroiiv, Latta 


18 


Hiintly, Waikdto 


sss^^H 


^^^ Olanotv, HtucM 


81 


Huruivui, Ashler 


6» ^^ 


^H OlantuiiavL, SolwyD . . 


153 Hydv, Mauiototo 


i« 1 



^1 218 K£W ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAK-BOOK. 


^ 


^V PopuUUaD, PotmUSoo. | 


^^ Id» Vfcllcp. Vioflent . . 


. 203 


Loitbflald. A.e}iioy 


S98 1 


In&ngahurv JiinctioD, In&ng&hua UH 


Lcppert-in, TamnaM .. 


86 1 


^_ [iiglonood. SoiitiiiAnd 


4Q 


Lfovin, HoronhoDua ■ .. 


1.U7 ^J 


^H Inlingtnn, Salvryn 


S89 


Uahflold, Piako 


" ^1 


^B .lAckcycr^nn, Oruiift 


65 


Lime HilU, Southland 


w H 


^M JanepliviUo, SouthlKirl 


19 


Lincoln (and violoil;), Selwyn.. 
Llnlley, Southland . . 


«• 1 


^H Kaeu (And vloir)ii:y), Whftngitroi 


k S34 


04 1 


^M Kaihu. H^bsoo 


. lOS 


tiiiiLon, Oroua 


61 1 


■ K>ki Iwi. Wnitntivr& .. 


. in 


Littio Akalna, Akaroa.. 


333 1 


^m Rikjkohn, Bay oi Iilaodii 


. 115 


Iilving^lone, Waitaki . . 


1S3 ^M 


^K Kiukour^. KtiikoiiTa 


510 


Longburn (auJ vicioilj), Oroaa 


SS8 ^M 


^M KaitaU, Maogunui 


JOB 


Long Busli. Southlaad 


SIS ■ 


KftlUwa. I'ah<Atn& 


05 


I^^ong'flrd, InangiUmS. . 


85 


, KKkkniiJ (Narth). Wftiulli 


I9fl 


I>Dnn'idKn. tlnuthlacid. . 


Hi 


K Kukumi (South), Wattaki 


]8t 


(yjwburn, Vmoeot ,, 


188 


^K KftkaritnioA. PaUsa 


IIT 


Lowiher. Smthlaocl .. 


ts 


^H Knnicii. VVcallanrl 


. 149 


Luggato, Vinoant 


SI 


^H Kitpnngn, OoriimKnilal 


. Sin 


liDiiiiiiian, Southland .. 


ars 


V Kkcaka. Oouk 


. 110 


Lucnadeu BxKnsion, Soutllluid 


163 


Karangnhnki', Oliinemuri 


30ft 


Lvell. Baiter.. 


tn 


KkUi, HokikngA 


48 


Maaandrnn, 3oathland 


so 


Kniiknp'Bkitiia, Wnitemnta 


. MS 


M'^i'i'itown, Laka 


us 


Kttunlioliore. WDavK-tiut 


101 


Uaukayiown (and Wotalty), 




Kawakanft, Bay of Inl&nda 


'ins 


Ohin«miiri.. 


l.fMK 


Kawarau Qirge, VinocDi 


40 


Kf&okaiiaie, Ohaviot 


US 


KkwIiia, Kaiwhi* 


ISS 


Maorafl** [and riainfty),WRibvni'o 


99 ^ 


EmI, AwbUy .. 


166 


M&heao, Waitaki 


sas ^M 


1 Kennftily Bay, Onromandel 


89 


M&iUand, Southland .. 


as H 


^H RenRingCon, SoiillilnQd 


56 


Makakahi, Pahiatiia .. 


4S T 


^f Kereru land vioLnUj), Horc 


■ 


Makarawa.Soutblaud . . 


870 1 


nhcniia .. .. , 


. 376 


T>lAk(!tii, Tanranga 


" 1 


Kiirrytown, LsveIb 


ir.ii 


Makikihi, WBiinato 


113 1 


KilUtiohv, S*lwyn 


n 


Makomaku (aui] vloinUy), PaM^ 


^ 


Kiniborloy, polwyo ., , 


. 149 


tua 


184 ^M 


Kimhnlton, Kmiti*ft ., 


319 


Makuri, Pahiatim 


85 H 


^B Kingaclown. Ii«v«lii 
^f KingttO'n, Lake 


lli 


Makubriku. Waipawa .. 


371 1 


CI 


Mnnakau, HorovbeonS 


IM 1 


Kirwee (and virinity), Selwyn . 


. 833 


Mardaviile, Soutblaiil 


199 1 


Kohlnuf. F'lihinLua 


53 


iVTinsahan, Pnhialua.. 


43 1 


^m Kahukubu.Hukiu.iiga.. 


1J8 


MangAmahua, MatiriCSVill* 


ISl 1 


^B KokotigA, Maniototo .. 


4S 


Mamgainaire, Pabiaiaa 


s« 1 


^^ Kamakn, Pohangioa .. 


5? 


Mangaonoho. Raiigiiikei 


849 J 


^B Konini ((icinicj-), Pahiatua 
^H Kapa, Thainei 


247 


Mangaro (andvlomitv). Mannkan 


70« ^M 


1G6 


Mangataindko, PaUintua 


171 ^1 


^M Kori), Tiicaiinki 


&i 


Maugawai, Otamatea . . 


1(18 


^M Kuaoiunu, Coromand«l 


876 


Manganvka(atidTicln)ty),Rangi- 




^^ Kiikiiniii (Htownittown], Kb«ta- 




likoi 


966 


hmia 


13S 


Mai)(|oiiui, Mnngnnui .. 


M» 


Xuri Biiih. Taiori 


148 


^tau«(ordtown, Waikoiiftttl 


877 


. ISO 


Manurewa. Mantikao.. 


70 


Kurinao. Cliithh ,. . 


94 


Manutahi. Pal«a 


7i 


Kurow, WaiLaki 


set 


Maori Oully, Umy 


T 


Kyebum IMsgingii, ManTototo . 


190 


Hapourika, WeaUaod . . 


ao 


Kyobiirit, Up|nT, Manjotolo - 


7ft 


&taritna, Pahintua 


so ^ 


Knko [InytMi. Lukr 


1134 


Mnr-ilcn, fi»*v 


sr H 


Ijarrikiii", Wetland 


90 


Mar*ljnlIlown, KiwitSK 


60 T 


Lander, ManJototo 


43 


Mariliiborouah (and fii>tnlty). 




LocilitCown (and vioinitj), Kumg 


- 


Wftirarapa Bouth 


551 1 


K tihal 


. SS^ 


Matnkanui, Vincant 


ai9 1 


H^ LvMton, S«li«jc 


. asT 


Uavakaaa, Itudaoy 


ira ^J 



^^^^^^V POPOLATIOH OF 


TOWNBHIPS, VILI.AOBS, BTC. 


U9 


^H PopuUtlon. Pnpa 


aiioa. 


^* Mfttnkohfl, Otun&tM .. 


sas 


Ohiwa. Opotiki ,. 


19 


MutKmhu, Waip&w» 


S9i 


Ohoka, A><lilcy ,. ... 


JM 


M«ukit (•iiid vicinilj). Bt«nalBH> 


90B 


Okftiftnn, ilaworn 


M 


MftoricaviHc, M«i)iica*illa 


aos 


Oikaihau and Omapcro, Bay of 




MKxwelllowr., WnitoUnk 


207 


lalanilB 


a7S 


IlKyfieUI. Wniteuiat* .. 


111 


OkaJii'K Bay, Akaroa .. 


S7> 


Meansf, Hawke's Bay 


68 


OkariC), Weitland 


« 


^m Medbiiry ViIIa^v Settloment, 




Okabo, Tamiiaki .. 


98 


^B Aahloy 


ISO 


Okoroiro. Piako 


3U 


^H UenxiuH' Perry, Southland 


91 


Omaliu. Tham«a 


aw 


^m M«Toer (and vJcinitY). Mftnukan 


308 


Omata, Taran*kl 


41 


^H M«rri jigH. Innngtthuft . . 


GS 


Ongaonsa, Waipana .. 
Opiiir. Vinocnl 


lOT 


^H MorUiii, Wailcoiithiti 


no 


133 


^H Mtttljveii, AA>iburt<»n ., 


296 


0)>iioniti. CoromaD(l«l 


«T 


^H Middlsinarcb. Taisri .. 


S26 


Opua, Bav o! Islands . . 


es ^ 


^H Midfairst. Sirattord 


880 


Opuriao, Whakatantt.. 


161 ^H 


^H Mtllord, Caraldmo 


1£7 


Oraka. Wallaco 


166 ^V 


^1 UUIwood. Southland .. 


75 


Orail, Gttratditiu 


118 1 


^H Mohaha. Wairoa 


U9 


Onnond (and vicinity), Cook .. 


48« I 


^H Mokkii, Kawhia 


70 


Oropi, Tauianga , . . . 


88 I 


^H Moktiiiniii, Bullor 


2U 


Orwdii Orrnk, (iroy 


S» J 


^H UokuratH. SuuiIlUqcI .. 


47 


OtaliuliM, Maiiukau .. 


1,3U ^M 


^M Morloy, Wallace 


70 


Otaki (and vtoiAily), Horonbenoa 


eaa ^H 


^H Moriinaville, Piako 


SOO 


Olakia. Taiori 


10« ^^ 


^H Moiiittaon, Waitotaca.. 


32A 


O'.ora, Opniiki .. 


150 


^H litotii. Cook ' . . 


64 


Oiara. Soutbland 


IM 


^H Moucen, Waimca 


120 


Otawn, Manukan 


68 


^H MtirAvat. Conk 


33 


Obekaikc. Wnitaki 


S4 


^H Murchiunn, Inniiitnhaa 


104 


Olinkn, WKitaki 


118 


^H Noavi^Brille, TSiatnoB .. 


itd 


OtornhanitA, Kawhia .. 


UO 


^H N»tli0ct<iii, Oliiivsmurl 


16a 


Owaka. ClulUa 


635 


^H N*«iB, Vmo^nt 


loe 


Owen Juiiciion, Inangahua 


SS 


^H Nowmaa, Kkatatiuna . . 


178 


Owharoa (and vioiuity), Obioe- 




Howport, Holiaon .. .. 


1S9 


»uri 


488 


1 N|;aliu.uran|i;a, Hull 


168 


Oifoid Eaat. Aoblcy . . 


811 


^K Hgah«ie. Gray 


133 


Oxiord West, Ashley .. 


176 


^B Hgain. Suaiford 


81 


Paeroa, Oliiiiemuri 


1,604 


^^ HipUran-avi^ Htill«r 


19 


Pahia. Wnllaro 


161 


NRik{>nra, Wait&ki 


2U1 


Pahaiitaiiiii. Hutl ,, 


KM 


^^ Niagara, Suuthlaiid 


97 


Paikakariki, RuU 


180 


^H Nig1lC<^aps, Wallaoo 


373 


Pakawnu, CoDingwood 


M 


^H Nikan land <rinlniiy), Pabiatua 


114 


PibkingCon, Manukau .. 


09 


^H NdkoHiAL, Rauthintid .. 


Its 


Panmticu, Kdnn .. 


369 


^B Holan, Hawoia 


139 


Papauui, Stilwyn 


sen 


^^ Motnianby, Ldveln 


ISO 


Papamla, Manukaa .. 


180 


SJorHwood (and vieiatCy)) Wai- 




FapaloiCoi (and vicinity], Maou- 




^— |>a<tta 


gu 


kavi 


ai9 ^ 


^B Noitlicote. Waiiomauk 


767 


PaiauK&haiu, Akitio .. 


6S ^^B 


^M North Taicri (and vieinity). Taiari 


mi 


Paraparanmii, Hutt .. 


196 ^^1 


' Ko Town. Grey 


CG 


Parkville, Kkatahiina. . 


90i V 


1 Niikiimarii, Waitotara 


01 


PatumahO'S, Manukaii 


118 1 


^K Oakland^, PuiiioAula . ■ 


76 


Patutahi (and vioioitv), Cunk .. 


9&8 ^^M 


^B Oakura. Taranakl 


41 


Peel (and vinlnliy), Cificalduie .. 


^^1 


^^^ OImw, StcwAti lalniid . . 


SO 


Punibroliu, Lake 


180 ^^^ 


^H Obatacai, Bay ol Istandc 


113 


Piflean B^w Akaroa . . 


Uf 1 


^H Obaa (and vicinily). Uoronhonna 


80"J 


Piliama, Hanora 


87 1 


^H Ohaupo, Waipa 


35(1 


Pin« Hill.Waikoiiaitt.. 


41 1 


^H Ohinamutn, Rotoiua .. 


107 


Pipidki (mid vtoinity), Waogaoui 


383 J 


^B Ohingaili (atid vloialiy). Rangi- 




Pintarau, Woiapu 


164 ^^M 


^B tikei 


461 ' Pirougia Emg. Waipa.. 


12 



MBW 2BALAND OFKIOIAL TGAH-BOOK. 



Plaassjit I'oint, LqvpIb 
PieiLwitit Vtvilry, WnikoUAiti 

Pieckvilla, EketntlUIin 

PlimDiettoD, Huit 

roli4[igm», PohftnRmft 

foheito (knd vicinity), M&nukfta 

PoriniA, HuU 

I'omng&linu, pAtungaM 

Poro-D-Uiran, Cliltou .. 

Port Aihart. llofinoy .. 

Pjft AwKDUi, WAJBpu.. 

Port MooKki, W*lt«.l{i 

Port Waikhlo, KsKlAn 

Portob«)io Towu, P«ninsulK 

Puargi. Clilton 

I'lihoi, ftodtiflj 

Pulcekiiiie Kiiiit, Monukku 

Puk«koliv, M&ntibau . . 

Putierau, SotitbUcid . . 

Pungoreliu, T&r4ti*ki . . 

Puni, Muniikau 

Punkkaiiul. WalkaunUi 

Puriii, TLiairiM 

PiilB.rfv. Ekatnbuiift 

Putiki, WnnRnnui 

Quvotifibiiry, VlcioenC .. 

Raetihi (And^iclnit.v), Wang&nu 

Raglan, Kkglan 

Bnhotii. Tumnnkl 

Hftknia, Asbburton 

Rakkia VilliLgo SBtUenient. Aab 

Rnkaunui, Akitia 
il&niA ItAinn. MftittikftU 
Ruigiriii, Wiiik*to 
Ri^ii8i"fthi<< (Penibertoii). RiKlto« 
R»ta Ssulamunt, H&ogiuk«i 

Iteupo, OtAiTintrft 

Rk«r»aB. MiiliiiKnRK 
Rodolidv. VVaiirinte 
Redwood Tann. Mailbcrougb 
R*i?fton, luAiiMbaft 
Rfidiiloii. Watiivki 
R«nwirktiOwu. Martltorougli 
Iteynolds, Wftikouaitl . . 
ItircarUiii, Spl«]rn 
Iliclunond, Sfllwyn 
Rk'itmi.Ktd Gfove. Soucbt&nd 
Rikiomnci, HuU 
Uiinu. Weollhnil 
Itluiit. H •uctil.iii<] 
Rivenduli-. Suiicltlftud 
Itiwaku, Wdimoji . . 

U"<?kvillo, GulliDgarood 
Kt'lk"ton> Solwjn 
K 'iiBoleib, MivnaMiitu .. 
RutliorliKrii, Atnuri 
ItilaruA, Kitiira** 
Rouad Hill DitiRinft*. WbII»c« 



rii|> Ilia Hon. 
74a I 



187 
46 

aoi 

76 

BS 
SIO 

loa 

103 

66 

143 

1.732 

«) 
203 

3fi 
818 
9.'.2 
101 
138 
US 

S6 

8ia 

6»7 
89 

iaa 

146 

750 
178 



ropalfeUaa. 

RiiapakapckB, Bfty otlKlftoda .. 119 

Hiinnlmivit, MannkAO .. .. 90 

Kuwell, Buy of Inland* . . 346 

SandymoUDt. P«uinHuJK ■ ■ 17T 

SBnson. MikDAniitu .. 210 

S»wjer'» lUy, Wiiikou»iti . . SOS 

S'arlioruiifili, LcveU M 
Soarboroiigli (aod vieiaJty), 

PitliiuLuA .. .. 19S 

Scf'tBl'Urn, (.i»rnldina . . 94 

Suftun («nd vicinity), Aabley 6J0 

Bolwya. Selwyn .. ' 35 

Scrp«ntiiio, Msiiiototo 44 

tjliafLBaburv. Piakn .. BS 
SaknnoD. llorowbenua 
ShAwfidd, Wsikouftiii 
Bh«ffield. SQlwyn 
Sbiel Hill, PanJDSul* .. 
ShirUy, S«lwyn 
Sbiirtland, ThAm«i 

SilvArHtreaui, MocksoEia ._ 

Skippcre, ].Kk« OS* 

Soutbbrook (uid viQtnity), Aahloy 1 ,070 
iSpmr.gOeck (anil vicinity), MaiI- 

boruuglt 
Spripgfi^ld, SelnyD .. 
Spring Grove, WftimeA 
SprtiigKlan, Selwyn . . 
Stnllutt), WDBbla.nd 
St. Andrew's. WainiRto 
St. Biblbii.n'(i, MBDiotfilo 
St. Holl^r'a ttnv, Kdvll 
St. Kildd. itulltr 
Stirling |u.[id vJcinUy), Braes .. 
Stoke, VV&iiueft 
Strnthmora, Siratloril.. 

Studliulme JiiuctiuD, WAiaftto 1! 

SwAnnuioA, Aah}cy luO' 

SuvAnaoii. WftiUimalA .. 147 

Tab«kp, HokiFLDsit 21 

Taiarofk H«ad«, Pruins^ta 4& 

TAlhap' (Add rtciiillyj, Haagitlkd 461 

Taipa, MiLUKonui ^ 

Tairiia, Tb«niPii 360 

TftitApxi, S«lw)a .. 066 

TitkApan (And violnity), WaipAwa 131 

Tamaki Wesi (And vtciuityj, Edon MI 

I'arras, Vincent -. .- IM 

TavArArKki, Uobioa .. 346 

Tftiu-rii, MAttertAn 139 

Tauberttuikau. WoiirUApA Boutli 118 

Taupitki, WMiPinatA .. 181 

TAnpiri, VVAikato .. .. 1S6 

TAUpo, Kikut TAHpo .. 79 

TAviaiuok, WaiiuAM . . S8 

TAylorrilt*. WaagAnni . . 33 

T« Adui, Wailoco 16 

To Aroha Wr-t, Piako . . IAS 

Te Aute, WatpawA .. 190 



'SpaclalTowo DlatrlcB undat "TliaThwrmal Siirlnga Divtriot Aol, UtL 




^^Hj^^V POPUItATlOH OP TOWKSniPS, VILLAQSS, BTO. 


221 1 


^H Pop ul* linn. Po)>uUtlon. | 


^H Tcdilington. Akftrok . . 


ti'J 


Waipari, Tuapaka 


211 ■ 


^H To Hoto, HorowheoUK 


98 


Waipu Goiiiml (and vioiDity), 


1 


^V Te Kopiiro, Uob»oQ 


. S35 


Whacgarei.. 


461 M 


Te Kiiili. K&nbia 


. ISi 


Waipukiir»u. Waipaw» 


565 ^H 


Ten)pl«u>n, Selwyn 


67 


Wairaki, Knut Taiipo . . 


as ^H 


T«Dij«roa, Fiord 


37 


Wairtu (uud vluiiiity), Wallace. . 


371 H 


T« I'uka (ftnd vlclnlby}, T&ur&Df 


a 4T7 


WaiuliUDS, Tuapeka . . 


801 ^H 


Te Teko, Whftk*tftn8 .. 


SO 


Wailati (and viomit;), Wat- 


^™ 


Tbornbiirv, Wnllao* ,. 


. 262 


knuaili 


>J72 


Thcir|>o, XVainion 


. 300 


Waitukaiiri, Oliinemuri 


441 


Tikcr&nKl, CtKton 


W 


Waitotara. Patea 


173 


Tinlrutu, Cook 


62 


Waituiia, Kiwitoa 


58 


Tinui, Ciutlepuint 


29ri 


Wai'cra, Wnilpmata .. 


59 


Tokft&nu. EuiTaupo 


55 


Waiwera, Clutlia 


167 


TokK-Ttik&, Oi&mktea. . 


36 


Waiuku, Ktanukau 


90S 


Toko, 8tmHti.rd 


mo 


Wakefk-ld, Waintea .. 


479 


Tokomaru, ilorowhenuft 


116 


Waltacotown, Southland 


160 


Tokoniiini (uiiij vicinity). Wblap 


a 106 


Wallinitford, Painni{atu 


90 


Totarik, VVIi»ngiiro& .. 


ISS 


Wangaehu, Wan^aiati 


19 


Totam, Waiuki 


na 


WanKiinc">"utt. Btrxtford 


23 


Totarft Ewt, Grey 


. 188 


Wanslearl, i'aCaugata 


111 


Tnakku, Uannkuu 


418 


Waolu, West Taupo . . 


71 


Tii&RiuinA, Mivrlbarough 


44 


War6pa. GluLha 


SIT 


Tumai, Wa.ikoiiaiti 


23 


Wurkwurtb, itiMlaay .. 


579 


Tutacbftia, Pitliiatufr .. 


na 


WA«hd\ke, 1>ovc-1b .. . . 


217 


Tuniu, Tliainos 


. 214 


Watatford, Tauranga .. 


SO 


Upper Huit, Hutt 


aou 


\Vai«t-toD (and vloliilly), Aih> 




1 I'riuiui, ClifUiii 


1(15 


button 


197 


^^ Utiku. Hungiiikei 


297 


Wayne's, Waihomo .. 
\V«ber, tat;i[>l{ata 


Si 


^H Vftitxiiftll. L^cniiiBulA .. 


6% 


159 


^^ YogAltowii, TnriLiinki ,. 


176 


Waodnn'ii, Salwyn 


IOC 




134 


Waiofxin, HucowliciLUA .. 


50 


239 


W«Ht Clive. Hi\wk6'i ha.y 


883 


Waiftmna, Soubltland 


m 


West Mi>lton, SeLw^u . . 


980 ■ 


Waiau, Amtiti 


. 15» 


Waaton, Wnitnki 


987 


Waiaii, MutKikau 


6a 


Whakaidkl, Cn^tkpuint 


50 


Wailii, OhinAiuuri 


. 3,^13 


WliakAFQwarowa. Kulocua 


48 


W&iLola. Uruce 


I'JIJ 


WliakaCiine, Wliakatans 


989 


Waihnii (niid vicinitjr), Piako . 


410 


WhaiLgapuiia, Ooromandel .. 


ei 


Waikma. Suuctiland .. 


. 230 


WliaiigaroiL, WhaiiftaraA 


100 


WaiKaka. Soiilblaiid .. 


lis 


Wliare Flat. Talnri 


as 


Waikanae, Horowlienna 


149 


Whei.urtkiti, Coruinandel 


40 


Wnikarp, AsUlav .. . 


. 417 


Whit«olilli, Selwya .. 


98 


NVnikawa, Southland .. 


44 


Whitmoie, Qroua 


80 


Waikiwi, Southland .. 


16S 


Wliicatnnfr, WaiLaki .. 


51 


Waikoikoi. CluDia 


18 


Wirkliflu Biiv. Ftitiiifula 


SO 


Waitnallgarnn. Uutlat 


. 153 


Wimbledon, I'Htangata 


90 


Watina, HokiaDRii 


43 


WinoliaNior, Cicraldioo 


170 


Walmaift. Ci^Ak 


. 117 


Wind-or, Wiiitakl 


ISO 


Waimata. Bar of Ulanda 


105 


Woodbury, Goiatdiue .. 


111 


Wairosiukii, Wallscn .. 


. lUO 


Woodend, A*hley ., 


865 


Waioiaa Wa»t, VVaiuioa 


S21 


WoodoQd, Soucblond .. 


115 


Walnulomata. Hiitt . . 


48 


WoodHeld, Hnuttilaod . . 


» 


Waiotnto. Bny of Inland! 


74 


Woodlamlii, Southland 


207 


Watarongofiiai, Piako. . 


. 154 


Woodtide, Taiori 


93dl 


^^ Waiotahi. OpntikJ 


. 117 


Woodside, Wnirarapa South 


93 


^K Wai}iahi, Clutlia 


. ISO 


Wuodnlock, WntUrid.. 


189 


^f Walpara, Southlaud . . 


. ' 17 


WoorfKtoek Vlllaiiu Soltlemoal, 




' Waiparft. Asblav 


. 141 


A-ibley 


SO 


\Vaipi|<i, Mannkau 


180 


Wrev'aBuih. WallaoA 


989 


^^B Waipini {and Tiamiijr), Waiapu 


118 


Valdbui'xt, Solw^D 


143 



NEW ZB&LAND OmciAL TBAB-BDOK. 



PoPULAWOS OF Adjacent Islandb. 

The Damas and populations of the islands adjacent to and in- 
cluded in the colony wsre, in March, 1901 : — 

Mokohinan Ligfathome . . 

Tirttirl Llghtboase 

Motnbota 

Qreftt Barrier 

Little BuTier 

Kkwsu . . 

Ponui .. 

FoQui LigbtbouM 

Ratbs'B 

P&kfttoft 

P»bfki 

Waibeka 

Week's (Puketnto) 

Motuibi 

Bean Rook Lighthoaie 

Motutapu 

Raklno 

RaDgttoto 

Brown •> 

Uercnrr 

Cuviei and LighthouBe 

Slipper .. 

Motiti . . 

Eant Island Lightbouse . . 

Portland and Lighthouie . . 

Kapiti .. 

Somee and LlgtatfaoQBe 

Stephen's 

Brothera Lighthousa 

Quarantine 

Ruapuke 

Dog Island and Lightbonse 

Centre and LightbouBe .. 

Resolution 

Chatham Inlands 

Kermadeo Islands 

Total -.1,158 706 452 

The islands which are not included within the boundaries of 
the counties had in 1901 a population of 1,158 persons (exclusive of 
Maoris), against 950 in 1896. Only three of the islands had a popu- 
lation over 100 persons at last census. The population of the Great 
Barrier increased since 1896 from 307 to 510 persons ; Waiheke 
showed a decrease from 166 to 162 persons. Europeans at the 
Chatham Islands decreased from 234 to 207. 



Total. 


M. 


F. 


B 


6 


S 


S 


2 




7 


4 


8 


510 


367 


153 


11 


1 


10 


31 


7 


14 


27 


11 


IB 


3 


1 


1 


16 


9 


6 


S 


3 


3 


4 


3 


1 


163 


81 


81 


6 


8 


8 


11 


9 


2 


1 


1 


• ■• 


11 


7 


4 


4 


3 


2 


3 


3 




8 


4 


4 


14 


5 


» 


7 


4 


3 


3 


3 




2 


2 




6 


5 


1 


21 


IS 


6 


3 


1 


2 


7 


5 


2 


18 


9 


9 


3 


3 




2 


1 


1 


9 


9 


, , 


16 


9 


7 


9 


5 


4 


2 


2 




207 


112 


96 


8 


5 


3 



FOFUItATION OF AUBTBAI^BU. 



223 



Population of Aubtbalabia. 
The growth of population in Auetralaaia over a period of forty 
years is shown in a oomparative table. The total for March, 1901, 
being 4,557,323 persons, is greater than the population of Ireland 
or Scotland for 1900, and one-seventh part of the population of 
England and Wales for that year. Australasia has now twice the 
population of Denmark, over one-third more than Switzerland, and 
nearly that of the Netherlands. 





PonoQi. 


P«noiw. 


Feraone. 


Fenooi, 


Cfliuiii, 




laeo. 


IBTO. 


1860. 


1800. 


UKTOta, 1901. 


New South WolM . 


318,546 


4d8,66d 


747,950 


1,121,860 


1,362,200 


Vfotoria .. 


587, S47 


736,599 


860,067 


1,188,266 


1,201,606 


Qaeanalasd 


88,056 


115,567 


226.077 


893,966 


503,266 


SoQtii A(utr»llR 


124,112 


188,797 


267,673 


319,414 


862.604 


Western AaatnJJR . 


16,327 


25,084 


29,019 


46,390 


182,558 


TniQiftaiH . . 


87,776 


100,765 


114,762 


145,290 


172,475 


New Zealand 


79,711 
1,221.274 


248,400 
1,898,871 


484,864 


625,608 


772,719 


Acatriduia . 


2,780,812 


8,784,593 


4,557.333 



SECTION v.— BELIGION. 

Of the various religious denominationa, the Church of England 
has most adherents in the colony. They numbered 314,024 at the 
date of the census ; or, including 1,239 Protestants not more speci- 
fically described, 315,263 persons, being 40-84 out of every 100 of 
population. The Presbyterians numbered 176,503 persons, or 
22-87 per cent., and the Roman Cathoiics came next with 108,960, 
or, including Catholics not further defined, 109,822, which gives a 
proportion of 1423 per cent. The Metbodists were 83,802. or 10-86 
in every 100 persons. Of other denominations, the Baptists, of 
whom there were 16,035, and the Salvation Army, 7,999 persons, 
were those returning more than 1 per cent, of the total popnlation, 
the proportions being 3-03 and 1-04 respectively. 18,295 persons 
objected to state their religious belief, or 2-38 in every 100. 

The numbers and percentages for five censuses are given in 
tabular form, so as to allow of the degree of increase relatively to 
the population being observed : — 





Number ol 


Proportion p«r CaoL oi 


Pc^ol* 


tioa. 


DaaomiDatioiu. 


Adhcrvnta 












lesi. 


laes. 


ISBL 


WB&. 


ISQL 


Charrh of England uid Pro- 












tcsunta (uadefined) 


. 315.263 


41-50 


40-17 


40 51 


40-27 


40 84 


PrMbf teriuiB 


176,503 


23-06 


23-59 


2*63 


33 7S 


32 87 


U«lhod its 


Sa.SM 


953 


9-55 


1014 


K>^M 


10 S6 


BapbSM 


16.035 


^34 


346 


3 37 


3iS 


3-oe 


Coa^re^asiocftUsU . . 


6.693 


137 


1 35 


1-07 


0^ 


037 


L3 ceikos 


4. 813 


lis 


103 


090 


79 


0-63 


SiiuTAiion ArniT 


7.9» 




91 


150 


ISO 


1-Oi 


S^ieiT o! Fr;eadi . . 


313 


<H» 


005 


»05 


tK« 


004 


Ui;i;Ar*ns 


4e.$ 


010 


Olie 


0*6 


0-.^ 


I.V06 


Oicer Fret<«t»rSi ,. 


1C.S77 


1-26 


\55 


iS3 


3 16 


3 19 


Romui C.&-i'oi:^^$ knd Cftlho- 














i;.-s 1 icdetiaeii) .. 


KM v-T> 


14 06 


1394 


l>-i* 


14 VT 


:4 23 


Ore*« C-.aica 


1S» 


01 


01 


OvI 


o:^ 


ooa 


U«i>r*ws , , 


:.on 


<.>oI 


OiT 


Oi3 


C'il 


0-21 


BaoiEifn, Cv-cfseiAE* 


:!.4:J3 


iOl 


fr77 


63 


v"-*S 


30 


0;::«r IViiomit *;Lcs 


I,:?(7 


o-ii 


0-10 


i>13 


O-lT 


0-17 


N,« r^;E.'ii;iL*uon .. 


?.iu> 


0*i 


1-ce 


: Si 


-^"IS^ 


i<r 


N.- R* ^iua 


l.K^ 


006 


o:: 


t>i5 


C-3T 


014 


l'rs|«*c;nei 


S--SJ 


l.-i7 


OcO 


• 


• 


" 


O^jtCl lO $IAJ« 


:;.23J 


3S.5 


344 


3- 4? 


*iT 


ass 




—J -.J 


IvXKJO 


i:ooo 


lAHW 


:-V~,v 


:.voo 


Hen? ;he rrorvr:i?" 




lO XZ 


e Chsr.-h of 


E=^I*::d is 


show:: ;o hive been 40 : 


>?r cec:. ;, 


r.ce IsSo. (.-31 


a liii-e 


" '-'. '-^ 


r i»re- 


viously, Prssbywriius 


nave peen 


22 or 


'23 per 


ce-i cc lb? 


wEcOe 



' <.S4$>«i.-^ 



=o« Skken :=.lo b».i»:£L 



BELIOION. ^^^^T 336 

at each enumeration, but the proportion of Methodists rose steadily 
from 9 63 to 10 SG. CougregatioDalistti deciiued from 1*37 pur cent. 
ill 1881 to 0*87 per cent, in 1901. Lutherans are fewer id propor- 
tion to the total at each succeeding cen&us, while the Salvation 
Army increaaGd from 091 in 1886 to 1-50 ia 1691 nod 1896, de- 
creasing again to 104 in 1901. 

Boman Catholics ant) Cntholics undefined rormed practically 
14 per cent, of the people at each of the census yearB, The pro- 
portion of Buddliisis and Confucians diraioiahoa with the number of 
Chinese in the colony. In 3S86 the percentage of persona objecting 
to state their religion was 3-44, which fell to 245 in lfe91, and, 
further, to *2-97 in 1896, rising slightly in 1901 to 9-38 per cent. 

A fuU statement of the particulars for all denominationn, as at 
the census of lb96 and 1901, is given, with the numerica) and 
centesimal increase or decrease in each case. Amongst 1,093 given 
ae "Other Protestants," 247 described themselves as "Church of 
God." 201 as "Chiistiane of no D«iiomin«,iion," 145 as "lode* 
pendents," 41 as " Our Father's Church," 33 as " Conditional Im- 

Iinortiiiists," 31 as " Gospel Mission," 29 as " Forward Movement," 
26 as " Central Mission,' and tho remaindor varioutily in very small 
numbers. 
NUHBBBS roB BACU DkXOHIKATIOM, AVV iHCliai^K. 
B«ll|loiM Danoailnktioaii. 
Tola! poputfttioD 



Kpl iico pft] iftna — 
Ohntch of Bngland, And 

L QtbvFwi>« defined 

P ProiCEtKnu. undeiicrlh«d 

MathndiKt* — 

W«Io<ftn Mothodiets .. 

PrimltiTe &lElhaili«ts .. 

H«thodiiti (uudefiued) 

Oib*n 
BKrtirti 

C'lnf!r''(|)lti<^n»H*tll 
Lutl>rr»ps, Gcrinu) Pro- 

t«Btaiiu 

S)cietT ol Krieod« 
Ohurahof CbiUc (Ghrblian 

Diaciplea, Dfidplea ul 

Chtiat. Diaeule»> .. 6,105 ^,860 3,245 5,^0 S<6 4-30 

Biethien (GtirUlinu Jlra- 

thno, Eiclu»ivo Bra- 

ttarnn. Open Hrethrtn, 

PJjmoulh B«threri) .. 7,484 3.4fiO 4.0»1 5.0S8 '2.U0 18-64 





Ceiuiu. IWt. 


Cvn Dua, 


liior««M or P««reue. 








IRM. 
I'enons. 






P«inaofl. 


MnlM. 


PonikUs. 


NurotncAl. 


CenitsimAl 


772,710 


405, 0U3 


306.-37 


703,360 


CI9,3&0 


9-86 


771.837 


406,372 


36G,4G5 


70a,i38 


69,599 


9-91 


814,024 


165,100 


148,024 


SSI, ICC 


32.858 


1 

ll-<69 


l.lLli) 


74a 


497 


1.G48 


-4W 


-21-69 


17G.«J3 


&2.40G 


84,007 


1S0,9&3 


16.551 


10-36 


71 .034 


85.362 


85,672 


63.373 


7. 061 


1309 


ICl.lia 


5,04E> 


fi.097 


7.0-11 


8.103 


44-06 


d,S96 


1.183 


1,213 


2.893 


-497 


-17-18 


339 


IM 


107 


60 


169 


,, 


16,035 


7,874 


8,4Q1 


16.037 


-2 


-O-Ol 


6, 60S 


8,154 


■3,545 


6.777 


-78 


-wa 


1.833 


8.0C3 


1,770 


5.539 


-705 


-13-73 


408 


S83 


185 


375 


93 


24-80 


318 


195 


IIS 


331 


-8 


-2-49 




J 



226 HKW 


ZIULAKD OrVlOUL YBAtt-BOOK. 


■ 


■ 


KVHBKBa POB lAOa I>BNOMtSATIOS, 


AHD ISDBBfcSB- 


eoMimtiMi. 


^1 


Hollgioui D«DomlnBlloDS. 




OwmkUOI. 




Por»oo*. 


locrvM* or DaenaM. 


pmmbi. 


ltiJ«a. FAtndM.' 


Suinvrlckl. OtaualaaL 


Hnliavars id Cbrisc 


ai 


14 


17 


77 


-46 


-69-74 


F-vATiKclisw (I-JvftngoliacJ 














Union, PjvnnttttLical 














Obureb. Kvkiigclioftl 














Cbristtuit, KnogvUokl 














Brvibren) 

KonoonfarcnUia 


21 
61 


16 
36 


5 

9S 


SS 

06 


^12 
-84 


ms 


Stlvfttion Army 


7.OT9 


3.ftOT 


i,lM 


10,882 


-t,nm 


-M'Ot 


ChrjMadelphl&nn 


9B9 


48T 


49S 


0&3 


87 


am 


8w6dsiiborgiana (N«N 












J^H 


Ohuroh, New Jcriuwlim 












^^H 


Churcbl 


1S9 


72 


87 


101 


-W 


-iCT^" 


•Snvorth Any A.dvciitiBlR .. 
Sludenl.- of Truth 


864 


857 


507 


T7fl 


68 


11-94 


33 


17 


IG 


340 


-a07 


-90-tt 


I>lM«ater* 


9 


a 


, ^ 


05 


-ea 


-B6-8B 


OtiliRltUI iKUliMS, Ul«»l' 














iiM .. 


Si 


19 


IS 


61 


-9T 


-44-96 


Other ProtwUnU 


1.093 


577 


910 


1.710 


-617 




KomRn CftltaoliiM 


ioe.900 


06.490 


53.470 


07,A36 


11, 436 


iV-7a 


Cuhnlloa (oDdsdaad) 


&6i 


4HU 


*ia 


1.379 


-417 


-S2'60 


UnekCh>ireb .. 


laa 


1»1 


55 


lie 


73 


69-M 


CuboLio Apcwtolic 


am 


140 


IttC 


247 


79 


31-96 


Olbor BflcH— 














Hobreirs 


L,«ll 


Bli& 


78fi 


1.649 


89 


401 


MonnODt. lACler-dAy 














Stints 


272 


I4IS 


137 


380 


-17 


-6-86 


Spiriluali^U .. 


4fl3 


MO 


953 


378 


128 


82'Tl 


BuddhiulM, CoD/aoi*i», 














kc. 


a. 492 


3.413 


10 


a. 301 


-939 


-2818 


Otbcn 


940 


108 


ad 


187 


63 




No DenominAtioD— 














pMethnnkcr* , . 


S,8SG 


9.345 


(111 


3.993 


-1.127 


-38-90 


AgnotticR 


a&2 


413 


139 


663 


-10 


-l-7« 


Deittn, TbeitiU 


50 


01 


8 


46 


18 


88-S6 


No DanomiDAtiOD 


4,7W 


S.006 


1.734 


3,898 


84S 


SI -60 


Drnibtful 


8S 


14 


19 


46 


-13 


-»-9« 


Ko Religion — 












No IlnliglOD .. 


1.013 


752 


360 


1,605 


-698 


-36-06 ! 


AtViamLK . • 


80 


67 


13 


117 


-37 


-31-6S 


SaeulattsW 


17 


IS 


5 


153 


-IW 


-88'8a 


Objtc-t lOBtftU .. 


18. SM 


11,827 


C.I68 


15.067 


S,a28 


14-58 


ilnipMified 


e,m 


620 


362 


1.122 


-940 


-2130 


N(IT£ 


— The niisua ■IKO (-1 lodjcalM deoroMB. 






It will t>e seen 


by the 


table th&l 


. of the lai-frer Protectant de- 


noininatioub. ihe Wesleyan 


Methodists increased since 1896 from 1 


63,373 to 71,034 persom, being at. the rate o( 1209 per 


cent. ; 


Preitbyteriiins frojii 169,952 to 176.503 


or 10-35 pec 


cent. ; and the 


Cburcli of EtiK')tt>^ 


from 2Bl,16(; bo 


314,024. or 11-69 per 


cent. 


Baptists returned j^racticallv the same nuni 


ber of adlierents 


as in 


1496. The KKlvaliun Army. 


whic}t itjcrease 


1 Its nunihera by 


1.149 


persoas between 1891 and 1H96, being 


at the rate of 12-25 per 


cent., 


now ghow a decren-sc of 2,533 persons, or 


24'Ofl per cent. 


The 


numbers of the lirethren show ao incrwue of 48-6-1 


per cent 


., and 

J 



REIjIOION. 



227 



the Seventh-day Adventists 11*34 per cent, increase ; but the Con- 
gregational ists have decreased 1-15 per cent, and Lutherans 12-73 
per cent. Of the Proteetant bodies having but few members in the 
colony, the Unitarians increased from 375 to 468, and the Society 
of Friends fell in number from 321 to 313. 

Roman Catholics added 11,436 to their number, being 11'73 per 
cent., a rate similar to that obtained by the Church of England. 

Hebrews were 1,549 in 1896, and 1,611 in 1901, a difference of 
62. Spiritualists progressed considerably, their numbers rising from 
376 to 499, an increase of 32-71 per cent. Freethinkers decreased 
from 3,983 to 2,856, or 28'30 per cent., which is worthy of remark 
when contrasted wich the increase of 14-01 per cent, gained between 
1886 and 1891 ; and Agnostics, who numbered 562 in 1896, now 
show a decrease of 10. 

Proportions of the Sexes in the Yarious Denominations. 
While the number of males is found to be greater than that of 
the females in the Church of England, Presbyterian, Roman Catho- 
lic, and sundry other religious denominations, the contrary result is 
found in the following oases, the proportion per cent, being — 

WuleyftQ Metfaodiits 
Primitive liethodlata 
Bftpiieti . . 
OonRiegattoo&Iist 
Chaioh of Cbcist 
Bntbrsa .. 
Salv&tioQ Aimy 
Sanath-dAy AdTCnUsts 

Amongst those persons grouped as of " No Denomination," " No 
Beligion,' and " Object to state," the proportion of females is very 
smaJl, OS will be seen by the next figures : — 

Ifo Denomioation — 
Fleet hioken 

AgDOStiOB 

DsUtB, ThelBti . . 

No Deoomlnatlon 
No Religion— 

No BaligioQ 

AtboiBta 

SsoalftristB 
Object to staM 

Sunday-schools. 
The attendance at Sunday-schools, with remarks thereon, is 
given in Section IX., under the heading of " Education." 





H^ee. 


Femklea. 


. . 49-7B 


5023 




. 49-75 


50-35 




. 47-23 


52-77 




. 4708 


52 92 




. 46 65 


53-15 




. 46-10 


53-90 




. 4S-84 


51-16 




. 41-32 


58 68 



bUlea. 


Femklea. 


78 60 


21-40 


74-82 


2518 


86-44 


W-56 


63-42 


36-56 


7431 


25 69 


8375 


16-26 


70-59 


29-41 


64-70 


35-30 



SECTION VI.— BIBTHPLACE. 

Or the popalatioD, exclasive of Maoris (772,719 persons), all bat 
443 Tvere described as to birthplace on the censas schedules. The 
number of the New Zealand-bom was 516,106, and of those bom 
in Australia, Tasmania, and Fiji, 37,215, making 513,321 born in 
Aostralasia. The New-Zealand-bom increase in proportion to the 
whole with every successive census. In 1886, 51-89 per cent, of 
the population were bom in this colony ; in 1891, the percentage 
was 58-61 ; in 1896 it was 62-8o ; and in 1901 it had reached 66 S3, 
adding to which 3-52 per cent, bom in Australia, kc, makes 70-35 
out of every 100 persons living in New Zealand who were bom in 
Australasia. 

205,111 persons, or 26-56 psr cent, of the population, were bom 
in the United Kiugdom, which number was divided as under : — 

Bom in United Kingdom- 
England 
Wa.lu .. 
Ssotlftod 
Itflftod .. 

205,111 2656 

Besi'ies thfcse, there were 4,049 persons bom in other British 
possessions. 

Surninarising these results, it is found that 752,481 of the popula- 
tion, or 97-43 per cent., were born in the British possessions, made 
up as follows : — 

Hnrn In Number ot Per Cent. 

PeriODB. of PopnUtioD. 

AhiitralftHia .. 543,321 70-35 

United Kingdom 205,111 26 56 

Other ItTitish Pos^esRionB i,049 0-52 

752,481 97 43 

There remained 18,593 persons bom in foreign countries, or 2-41 
per cent, of population; 1,203 born at sea; and 442 whose birth- 
places were not specified. 

The New Zealand-bom population increased from 441,661 in 1896 
to 516,106, or at the rate ot 16 86 per cent., between 1896 and 
1901, the numerical increase being 74,445 persons. The numbers 
born in the United Kingdom decreased altogether by 10,050 in the 
quinquennium. 



Nomberof 
Peraon*. 

111,964 


Par Cent 

ot PopalktioD. 

14-50 


1.765 


0-22 


47,858 


6 20 


43,524 


5-64 




1881 



tssc 



1801 



1896 



1901 







KEW-ZEAUINO-BORK 


AU8TRILI1H-B0HN 


CtMSUB 


IOT*l POPUUnOH 


ilNCLUOED IN 


<INCiyOEQ IN FIRBT 


HiU. 


OF HEW ZEAUMD, 


nvtmi COLUMN). 


COLIMM'. 


1871 


380,309 


93,474 


12,426 


1874- 


299 514 


122,635 


i3,eoi 


1878 


4I4-,412 


174.126 


16.091 


1881 


489,933 


223,404 


17,277 


1866 


578.482 


300.I90 


17.245 


189t 


626,058 


366,716 


16,943 


1896 


703.360 


441.661 


21,631 


1901 


772,719 


&16,106 


26.991 



[To bu ftgv aas. 



Naw-Zuland-bori), ihown that : C 



M utir*Ua a-born, 



***9 * «« Ml 




Bontio 



SUtTHFLACB. 


DtttreMealiMA UWI. 


ISOl. 

111,964 

1.7C6 
47,858 
43.524 


NoniDrlcaJ. 

4,ST7 

883 

2,5T7 

2,513 


ConiMimoJ. 

3fla 

17-88 

511 

5- AG 



299 



EoglMid . . 

Will.. 

Sooilaod . . 
Ixvluicl 

The numbers of Australian-bom ai-p found to have increased for 
each State. The miinber born in New Ronth Wales, living ju New 
Zealand, was 4,536 in the year 1896, and 6,430 in 1^01, an iucreasa 
of 41-75 per cent. There were 10.471 peraona in thi« colony in 1896' 
bora in Victoria, and 12,583 at last census, or an increase oi 2017 

Kr cent, in five years. New Zealand, also gained on the number 
m in Queenslaud, there beiny 1,271 in 1901, H^ainat 930 in 189G, 
or 363G per cent, increase. And Biinilarly on the Bouth Australian, 
Wostora Auatraliao, and Tasmnnian-bom. 

Tbe number of the people born in foreign countries was found (o 
be 18,593, bein|i|; 2-41 per cent, of tbe whole. Uesides these, 1,203 
pereiODB were returned as born at sea. The greatest tiuinber of 
foreigners wero Geriu&us {4, 217). Next come persous born in China 
(2,902). Swedes and Norwegians numbered 3.927. There were 
3,120 persons from Denmark and her posse&ioue, and 1,874 persous 
from Austrin-nungary. 

The numbers of those bom in France, Germany, the Netherlands, 
BelRium, Denmark. Poland, Switzerland, Spain. Portugal. Greece, 
China, Africa, and North (so deGiiribed) America all decreased since 
1896. 

The following; table gives full details, and exhibits under tbe head 
of " AJle^ance " the number of British and foreign subjects in New 
Zealand : — 



NmtBKRfl or EACH Natiokal-ity, a!(D Ikoreasx, 1890 to 1901. 



Wtaaro boTD, 

TotAl populktiou 
Total for »p«citiad biitb- 
plaoit 



C«a>.ij*, lOOl. 



CeaiuB, ISK, 
F»none. 



Inare«»n or DwoToua.' 



reTKinB. UaloB. F^in*laa. ' ■<>*>»<b. Kuioerlok], Canta«itUBl. 
772.719 405,993 36C.727 703,900 09,350 3-88 



772,277 405,690 866.587 702,756 69.521 



Britiih :— 

UoiUd KiDgjotD, — 

^ Wales 
SootUnd .. 
I(«Uod 
AiHtialasia and Fiji,— 
New ZealiLml 
QuMDklaiid.. 
Nawfioath Walaa 
Tietoria 
Somtli AustritliK 




111,%4 61,216 47,746 116.511 

1,765 1,076 6H9 2.149 

47.8&S 27.516 30,342 60,435 

ii,&2i 23,490 W,094 40,037 



,116,106 

1,371 

6.430 

12,aS3 

1,575 



2.'i7,H28 
3,S95 

e.fiao 

807 



2St4.27B 

626 

3.03S 

C.0&3 
7C8 



441,601 

980 

4,696 

10,471 

1.2S3 



-4.677 

-388 

-2,577 

-2,513 

74,445 

841 

1,894 

a. 112 

333 



0-U9 



-a-93 

-17-83 

-511 

-5-46 




HOTK.^Tha miDUK BJga {—) indicaba decrea>». 



16— TMr-beok 



^M 330 NBW 7.RALAHD OFFICIAL YBAUBOOK. 


■ 


■ 


^H Ktnuns or B&oa 


^XZioKAIATX, XXD 


InCKSAKE, I&9& TO 


1901— conluuwtf. ^^1 


^^1 Wbarehorn. 




COM", iwi. census, im. 
Mai«i. l-«»i»i«*: P'"*"-"- 


Incrouaos 


Dwariawu 


PenopH. 


NumerfcaL 


CnnWitmaL 


Anstralm Boa Fiji — contd. 














Wesient Au»K»lia .. 


190 


103 


87 


112 


78 


6£h64 


^m Tuunftnia .. 


8,720 


3,064 


1,636 


3.160 


560 


17 79 


^k Aaitralia (State not 














^H DKm»d^ .. 


1,122 


669 


5&S 


l,3t00 


22 


1-8S 


■ Fiji 


22 i 


38 


136 


161 


78 


48-34 


^H OLbor Btiiiih PoMeiaions 


^~ 












^m Otbtaltar 


48 


» 


S4 


49 


--1 


-244 


■ Malta 


56 


87 


18 


71 


-16 


-22-54 


^H India and CcyloD 


1,256 


722 


5G4 


1,341 


-56 


-4i 


^H CApe of Uond Uope . . 


141 


72 


C9 


•lifi 


-lOS 


-49-68 


^^ St. Hvlema .. 


d3 


25 


16 


50 


-7 


-14«) 


^M British NctthAmerioft 














^1 (Ganftdft) . . 


1.U4 


947 


597 


1.41S 


132 


9-35 


^M W«ei IndigH 


208 


144 


64 


247 


-39 


-1&79 


V OthfiTs 


721 


408 


816 


334 


390 


116-76 


To ret go :— 














AuBttih Htmgftry 


1,874 


1.718 


161 


881 


993 


112-71 


Belgium 


117 


84 


39 


138 


-31 


-15 22 


Daam&rk and PosHaai&Di 


a, 120 


Las'! 


736 


2,120 


-e 


-0-»4 


^^ frAnoe nod PouMsiooi 


6og 


409 


200 


6ltH 


-89 


-12 75 


^K GutniiLDy 


i.S17 


2.743 


1,474 


4,596 


-378 


-8-93 


^V Oreaoa 


133 


94 


39 


127 


-4 


-315 


. ItaJT 


428 


356 


73 


423 


6 


1-18 


N«tiietlaniia nnd ('ok- 














Koceione 


116 


lOK 


11 


132 


.16 


-12-13 


PoUnd 


07 


GS 


32 


101 


-4 


-a-«e 


Pottugftl &nd PoBBeeaioiu 


m 


Ifil 


ai 


178 


-1 


-0-66 


Ru*Biftand Poflsemiiona 


887 


339 


48 


866 


22 


G-03 


1 Spain and roKBOtiiioitl.. 


59 


41 


19 


88 


-39 


-sa-90 


^K Sweden 


1,548 


1.337 


211 


1.514 


84 


3-26 


^H Uamaj 


1,G19 


931 


348 


1,2G1 


18 


1-43 


^ Switzerland .. 


893 


251 


82 


343 


-9 


-2-63 


Other European Coun tries 


80 


20 


10 


80 


, , 


» , 


China 


a.9oa 


2.806 


36 


3,719 


-S17 


-21-97 


Africa 


108 


£4 


49 


134 


-81 


- 23-ia 


America. North Amorioa 


77G 


501 


275 


969 


-198 


- 19-92 


United States of Amurioa 


881 


S93 


S80 


780 


101 


13-96 


Other FuruiRQ CounlneB 


i&2 


289 


13.3 


485 


-63 


- 12-99 


At eea 


1,303 


590 


613 


1,S22 


-119 


-9-00 


UoBpaoiflcd . . 


as 


302 


140 


604 


-163 


-96-82 


AlU^act. 














nritlNh BQbjeetB 


761,101 


&06.D6a 


865. 05S 


600.003 


71.101 


10-aO 


Forsigu iubjects . . 


11,615 


9,940 


1,675 


18.357 


-1,742 


-13-04 


^^ KOT«^ 


—The ratnos sign ) 


— } indioataa dtcraat 


le. 


J 











SECTION Vn.— CONJUGAL CONDITION OP THE 

PEOPLE. 

Of 403,167 ranles, oxcluaive of Chinese, 273,113 were returned as 
uninarriei], im^TS as busbauds. 10,633 as widowers, and 9&6 wece 
UDspecided as to conjugal con<lition. 

Tbese figares show a proportion of 67'90 per cent, of males to 
have been UDmarried, 2945 as husbanda, and 2-60 as widowers, or, 
eliwiaatlDg all males under 14 yearB who were uecoBsarUy uu- 
inarricd, 5391 per oeai. nob married, 42*29 per cent. buBbonde, and 
8-80 widowers. 

or females, nutaberiog altogetber 366,695. there wore 230.510 
unmarried, 117,821 wives, 17.902 widows, and 4G2 not Hpecitied as 
to condirion. Or. represented proportionaLy, of femalejfl at all nges, 
62'y4 pe!" cent, were not murried, 8a-17 wore wives, and i-89 
vridowB. Shutlinf* off thosa under 14 yeare, the proportions stand 
as 4518 unmarried. 47"59 wivee. ami 7-23 widows. 

The proportions for suceesHive census periods exhibit on the 
male side a rise in the percentage of the married men and a steady 
increase in regard to widowers since the year 1878. On the female 
side the percentage of the unmarried rose with regularity until the 
year 1891, while the married diminished; but since that date there 
has been a marked increase in the percentage of the married. The 
percentage of widoxvs increased steadily. Chinese are excluded 
irojn the calculations. 

MklM. FeinnlcB. 



year. 

187B 
1881 
1888 

1891 
3896 
1901 



VAninnlod. UmvIwI. WMowoO. LninKlriiKl. MurloO. Widowed. 



.. w-oo 

.. 70-39 

.. 70-85 

.. Tooa 

.. 69-48 

.. 67-fiO 



■28 06 
27 73 
27-61 
27-61 
27 97 
29 ■« 



res 

1-88 
2-04 
2-.17 

2-55 
2M 



G2-59 
630i 
64-59 
fi4-&5 
64-87 
03-94 



34-32 
33-00 
81-74 
30-91 
31-10 
32-17 



3-91 

3-67 
411 

4-58 



I 



The proportions at different age-perioda show, for males, that 
the unmarried decrease from 99 per cent, at the period 17-20 to S5 
per cent, at the period 25-30 years. At 30-36 years the hubands, 
who were only 34-61 per cent, at the previous period, exceeded the 
uniuarriud, the proportion being of Imsbaods 5iioi, uuniarried, 
40"30, divorced 008, and widowers 108 per ceot. At 60-85 years 
the widowers were iu the highest proportion per cent., the figures 
being I5'71 unmarried, 3935 husbands, 019 divorced, and 44-25 
widowers. 

Of the females, 99 per cent, were spinsters at the period H-18 
years ; thence onwards the proportion diminished and the wives and 
■widows increased, until at 2.&-30 years the wives were in the bighesc 




232 



NEW ZBAXAHD OFFICIAL YBAK-BOOK. 



proponion — i.e., 6407 per cent,, against 45-01 of unmarried femftles. 
005 o! divorced, and 0-87 widows. At 7ft-75 years the widows hadj 
incveastd so as to exceed the wivo&, being 63-31 per cent, ogainsl 
4:1 u3, whilst the spinaterK had dinimished to 4-16 per cent. At 65j 
and upwards the widows were SiOl per cent, of the whole uumber ' 
of females. 

The pcoportion of married women under 20 years of age is still 
Btfcadily diminishing, whilu the proportion from 35 to 4-5 years bos 
an iueroaaing tondoncy. Women in New Zealand are therefore not 
now marrying ab aucli early at^os aa they did in former years. The 
procuBs brtnga the relatiro proporiioua closer to those that obtain in 
England ; — 

PnoPOBTiOKS FOB 100 Makhikd Wokbx at thi Aoeb 15 TO iS. 



Agoa. 

Under 20 ywirs 

30 auil uiictuT 35 ye&K. 

85 , 43 , . 


P.ngluid. 

1-10 

. 39 58 






Kbw ZoiliuiiJ. 




1 


ism. 

2-45 
61 HO 
35-65 


IflSi. 
9 16 

CO-53 
3T-31 


1-81 
GO OS 
9916 


1-1'J 
0O12 

9809 


1 13 
M87 
39-31 


1901. 

0-98 
39-08 



100-00 100-00 lOO-OO 100 00 100-00 lOOflO 100-00 
The numhi^rB and propurtiona according to conjugal condition for 
each age-period are exhibited in full detail : — 

NtTMBKTIS LrTITIO, 

MaU». 

AgM- Totkl. UnuinrriMl. HuBliitnd«. Wldoffsn. Dlvorottil. «^^| 

AlIagM .. .. 40S,167 a72,8I>8 lL8,47fi 10,&68 HA 936 



Spa 


ears 


nffos 


• ■ 


402.760 


972,085 


U6.401 


10.641 


S55 
906 


778 


14) 


and upward! 


280.786 


160,711 


118,401 


10,641 


778 


Uudor \A 


years 


1-ai .974 


121,974 


.. 


„ 


77 


~ 


14 yennt 


to 15 yeatH.. 


6.717 


8.747 


'.. 


., 


,. 


.. 


IS 




16 , .. 


B,456 


B.4M 






_ . 




16 




n . 




B,568 


8,560 




, . 


. . 


9 


17 




L8 




8,488 


8.448 


4 


, , 


, , 


A 


IB 




19 . 




S,5&6 


8,508 


16 


, , 


, , 


la 


19 




2" . 




8,489 


8,402 


33 




, , 


e 


SO 




SI . 




e.S51 


8.440 


94 


1 


, , 


19 


SI 




3& . 




33.607 


20.482 


9,063 


84 


4 


134 


as 




30 , 




35.145 


33,780 


12,131 


156 


10 


198 


>& 




3S , 




29.483 


11.845 


17,206 


317 


34 


71 


Ss 




40 




38.983 


6,854 


16,577 


445 


41 


66 


40 




4A 




ai.iss 


4,898 


16,484 


70G 


96 


64 


M' 




60 




18.647 


8,780 


18.960 


869 


47 


06 


60 




65 




14,948 


S.788 


11.098 


970 


34 


38 


66 




60 




18,450 


9.423 


9,69!J 


1,269 


94 


45 


60 




69 




13.671 


2.S:iO 


8.711 


1,484 


17 


39 


65 




70 




10.074 


9,347 


6,927 


1.766 


15 


99 


70 




75 




5,317 


1,094 


2.981 


1.367 


7 


18 


75 




80 




2.277 


444 


1,105 


709 


3 


IS 


80 




86 




1,048 


164 


416 


469 


2 


4 


85 




und apwardi 


375 


30 


125 


216 


1 


3 


Dn 


ipwii 


tfld 




407 


178 


74 


IS 


, , 


llfi 





OONJtiaAIi CONDITION OF THB PSOFLK. 



S88 



Asm. 



AllAgM .. 

Specified Agee 



Tot&l. UnmurtML Wives. Widowi. DlTorced. 
866,695 280,861 117,821 17,903 149 



866,487 230,284 117,746 17,881 



14 jeuB uid opwuda 347,838 111,625 117,746 17,881 



149 
149 



Under 14 yean 
14 jeftra to 15 years 



16 
16 
17 
16 
19 
SO 
31 
25 
80 
35 
40 
45 
50 
55 
60 
65 
70 
75 
80 



16 
17 
18 

la 

20 
21 
25 
30 
95 
40 
45 
50 
65 
60 
65 
70 
75 
80 
65 



85 years and apwaxd 
Unspeoifled 



118,658 

8,858 

8,376 

8,669 

8,480 

6,485 

8,438 

6.588 

83,369 

33,227 

27,271 

21,316 

17,347 

13,995 

11,990 

9,963 

8,017 

6,027 

3,236 

1,679 

863 

340 

208 



116,659 

8,358 

8,376 

8,677 

8,352 

8,216 

7,924 

7,593 

34,114 

14,918 

6,986 

3,373 

1,783 

966 

665 

467 

847 

253 

184 

86 

26 

13 

77 



1 

10 

73 

193 

501 

963 

9,090 

17,923 

19,617 

16,864 

14,182 

11,309 

9,239 

7,144 

6,222 

3,383 

1,404 

515 

173 

61 

76 



5 

67 

290 

593 

939 

1,342 

1,683 

2,068 

2,330 

2,432 

3,468 

1,687 

1,074 

649 

273 

21 



PbOPOBTIOMS to BVBBY 100 LITIK0 AT BACH AGE. 

Malta, 
A^M. Unm&rried. HasbandB. 'Widowers. 



All AgM . . 

tipeoifiod ages 

14 years and upwards 

Undar 14 years 
14 years to 17 years 



17 


18 


18 


19 


19 


20 


30 


81 


21 


35 


35 


SO 


30 


85 


85 


40 


40 


45 


46 


60 


50 


65 


65 


60 


60 


65 


65 


70 


70 


75 


75 


80 


60 


86 



85 yean and upwards 



67-84 



29-45 



2-65 



8 

16 

S5 

33 

31 

17 

5 

6 

6 

3 



Not 
Stated. 

462 

437 
427 



3 

6 

16 

IS 

32 

90 

80 

40 

27 

19 

20 

13 

16 

20 

21 

11 

4 

4 

8 

35 



Divorced. 
0-06 



67-84 


29-45 
43-29 


3-66 


0-06 


53-83 


3-80 


0-09 


99'95 


o'os 


■• 


■• 


99-81 


0-19 


_ , 


. . 


99 67 


0-33 


, , 


. , 


98-89 


1-10 


001 


. , 


90-79 


909 


Oil 


0-01 


64-91 


34-61 


0'45 


0-03 


40-30 


58 54 


108 


0-08 


28 66 


6931 


1-86 


017 


3325 


73-37 


3-35 


013 


2006 


75-07 


4-63 


0-25 


18-72 


7453 


6'53 


0-23 


1808 


72-35 


939 


0-18 


18-51 


69-51 


1184 


014 


23-37 


69-00 


17-48 


0-15 


2065 


55-31 


23-91 


0-13 


1964 


48'87 


31-36 


0-13 


15-71 


89 85 


44-25 


019 


806 


33-60 


58-07 


0-27 



334 



HKW EBALAND OFFIOUL YEAB-BOOK. 









. 


Frrna^M, 






1 






A«M. 




CnmuTlcd. 


WiTO*. 


Widows, 


DlvorMd. 


All 


Mei 




.. 


GiiM 


32-17 


4-S9 


o-ot 


specified 


agaii 


.. 


6li-91 


8317 


4-8$ 


oot 


11 


F«an 


anil apWKidt 


«12 


47-W 


7-28 


0^ 


VndtT U 


y*iira 


,. 


. 


.. 


,. 


~ 


li 


yvATt 


tu 15 yeus 


• • • 


, , 


, , 


,* 


la 




It! 




99-99 


0-01 


,, 


■ • 


16 




17 




WBS 


O'lfi 


^, 


, ^ 


17 




18 




9916 


0-86 


,, 


. , 


18 




1» 




97-69 


3M 


o-oi 


, , 


lU 




SO 




94-OB 


5-B5 


, , 


. _ 


20 




«1 




88-63 


11-S6 


0-06 




21 




% 




72'4G 


27-3-3 


030 


002 


35 




8D 




45-01 


54-07 


087 


<K0 


su 




aa 




»5r>5 


72-(H 


a-18 


018 


85 




4(1 




15^2 


7U-M 


4-SS 


0-16 


40 




i& 




1029 


SI -64 


7-75 


0-U 


45 




so 




C-91 


80-ga 


IS'OI 


0-18 


60 




v> 




s-sr. 


77- U 


17-27 


0<H 


K 




fll 




4-70 


71-8S 


33-12 


IM» 


So 




d& 




4 3d 


Cfi>90 


30-39 


<K>7 


&a 




YO 




4-£l 


M'fie 


41-09 


o-oc 


70 




75 




4-10 


435» 


52-81 


_ , 


76 




BO 




513 


30-75 


W12 


, _ 


eo 




8Ci 




8-07 


20 40 


70-03 


_ , 


esi 


nan 


Lnd ui 


WRrffl 


3-80 


1&13 


81 -01 


, , 



Conjugal CoNoiTiotr of Chinese. 
Of 2,825 male Cbiueso living in the colociy. 61 were atabed ac] 
uian-jod and 13 widowed. The instructioa on the census sobedol*' 
WBB that CbiuBse uot having wives' id thia colony or any An&traliaa ' 
State should be returned ils unmarried. Of 32 Chiucso fouiaLes^j 
18 were returned as married, 12 of the rest being youiiK people 
UDder 11 yeasts of age. and 2 from 2o to 29 years old. The huf- 
eafita Chinese are refRri-ed to on pa^a 2'A6. 

BaCHELOKS and SriNHTKRS. 

0[ 273,68S unmarried males of specified ages, 99,844 were over 
30 year^ of age, and, of 230.284 unmarried females. 103,410 wero 
found to be over 12 years ; the excess of spinsters over bachelors 
was therefore 3,572. Accepting the above as the mnrriagoable ages, 
the Dumber of bachelors to every 100 spinsters was 97 (nearly). 

That a procesa of equalisation in the numbers of bachelors and 
spiosters has been going on steadily during past years is proved by 
the results of previous censuses. 

KfUBBB OF BAOaBU)ttS KIGD 20 YkARS XSU UFWAHPS TO RVSaT 100 OP 

SpinaTRBa Ansa 16 axd cpwabds. 

O«osui 1874 

1978 

. IHBX 

1886 

, 1891 

. ISM 

. 1001 




BIRTB RATES. 



286 



HrHBANns AND Wives. 
The number of Uuabanda of epecified ages was 118,-iOi, and of 
wives 117,746, giving an exeoss of husbands over wivoa amounting 
to 655. This Bxcess of husbands is almost entirely aocounted for 
by the airiv&l during tbe last few years o( a niiraber of AiistriftTi 
gam-diggers in the Auckland Provincial rHstrtct — mai-ried men, 
who did not bring their wives with them. 

WlDOWRBS AND WlDOWS. 

The mdowers of specified ages numbered 10,641. and the widows 
17.881, beiug a proportion of 60 widowura to every 100 widows. 
Ai the census of 1S9G tha proporLiou was 62 to every 100 widows. 

DivoKcicD Pkbhons. 
Four hundred fljid four pcrfions — namely, 255 men and 149 
women — were entered on the cenaua schedules as being divorced. 
These numbera are not likely to representi fully the actual facta, but 
are intertttttuig as, no doubt, an approximation to the truth. 

Mahbuqb Rates in AusTRADiSU. 
It was remarked in the report on the oensuB of 1896 that the 
marriage rate in New Zealand, from being the hijghost in Austral- 
asia, had fallen among the lowest, and that the same proccEts had 
been goini^ on in regard to birth rates. The lapse of five years 
places New Zealand in a much better position, the marriage rate 
being only slightly lower than in Tasmania and Western Aus- 
tralia, but higher than in Victoria, New South Wales, South Aos- 
tralia, and Queensland, 



Mabhiaqr Batks pbr 1,000 ov Popni.aTioil. 

18M. iB», laei. iBSfr. 

Qasemluid . . . . 6-63 6 67 7- 18 6-23 

New South Wal« . . T-70 7-99 7-39' 6-36 

Victoria .. .. 6-38 784 7Gtl 6-00 

bouth Aimtrrtlift .. .. B'OO 024 7-31 5'8S 

Wettetu AuBUalla .. 6-06 7-98 B-OO 6-83 

Tssmania .. .. 6'83 7-36 6-G3 S-82 



K«w Zualand 
In the year 18B0, 
Australasia, but since 
site. 

BiBm 

Qaeenaland .. 
Horn South Wftles 
VloCoria 
i^outh AuBtnvlin 
Western Australia 

Now Zetvlani] 



8'81 6-&Q 6-01 6-9* 



mo. 

6-88 
7-88 
6-96 
6«> 
10>S7 
7-71 

7-67 



New Zealand had the highest birth rate i 
1837 the position has been exactlly the oppo- 

Rates rxu 1,000 op PopoLitTiax. 

iwrr. iKu. iHSfi. ism. 

38-09 afi'36 32-m 30-21 

36 42 34'fiO 80 60 2743 

8230 33-57 98-67 25-82 

84'63 98-93 30-a3 35-78 

87-34 34-85 2!i-S2 31-46 

3397 3337 3010 M-M 

23-60 



3209 



2901 36-73 



.886 NEW ZBAI.AND OFFIOUIi YBAB-BOOK. 

HaLF-OASTB CHINEaB. 

The schedulea showed that at the time of the census 43 European 
women were married to Chinese, the result of such anions being 106 
children (60 males and 46 females). If these half-caste children be 
added to the number of pare-bred Chinese in the colony the result 
would be, — 

PeraoDB. Mftles. Femalem. 

Chinese .. .. 2,857 2,825 S2 

Obinese half-oastefl 106 60 46 

3,963 2,885 76 



SECTION Vlir.— AGES : MINORS, ADULTS, AND OLD 

PEOPLE. 

The number of persons under 21 years in March, 1901, was 369,723, 
and over 21 years 412,356, besides 640 unspecified as Co age, bat 
nearly all adults. 

Comparison of the population under and over 21 years for 1886, 
1891, 1896, and 1901, shows that the number over 21 years is 
increasing in proportion to the population at all ages. 

PBOPOBnONB P«B CbNT. OF PKB80N8— AlL AqBS. 

188S. 1891. 1896. 1001. 

Undoc 21 years .. .. 53-47 52-46 49-94 46-59 

Over21;«ara .. .. 46-53 4754 50-06 53-41 

100-00 100-00 100-00 100-00 

The males under 21 years in 1901 were 181,753, and the adults 
223,807, leaving 432 unspecified as to age, but of whom few were 
children. The females under 21 numbered 177,970, and adalts 
188,549, leaving 208 unspecified. The proportions per cent, of 
population over 21 years of age of each sex are higher for 1901 than 
for 1896. 

PBOPOBTIOKS FEB CeHT. 

Ualea. FemiJeB. 

ISOe. 1901. 1896. 1901. 

DaderSlyeare .. .. 47-72 44 77 62-39 43-53 

Over 31 reus .. .. 52-28 6523 47-61 5147 



100-00 10000 10000 100-00 



The proportion of aged people in the colony increases with time, 
and the progression is very important to notice. The figures for 
nine census years, extending from 1867 to 1901 are quoted : — 



PXBSONS 65 Yb&BS AHD CFWABD8 PER CbKT. OF POPULATIOK. 


1867 .. 0-86 


1878 .. 1-29 1 1891 .. 2-29 


1871 ., 108 


1881 .. 1-41 1896 .. 2 9£ 


1874 . . 1-22 


1886 .. 1-81 1901 .. 4-06 



The numbers at the age-periods most often in request may be 
■doBcribed thus : Infancy and extreme youth (under 5 years) — males 
44,324 ; females, 42,482 : School age (5 to 15 years)— males, 86,414 ; 



988 



NBW EKALAND OITIOIAZ. TBAB-BOOS 



femalGS, 84,547 : Women at the reproductive age (16 to 45 years) — 
183.887 : The athletic age (21 io 40 years)— males, 121,939 ; females, 
115.099: The militia age (17 to 55 years) — males only. 212,065: 
The elderly period of life (Sfl to 66 yean) — malea. 26.514 ; femaiea, 
17,980: Old-age (65 vears and upwardsj^males, 19,219; females. 
12.135. 

The total number of males liable to be called out for ser^ico in 
the niilititk in March. 1901, was, in round numbora, 129.000. consisting 
of all moles between 17 and 10 years, with the unmarriod between 
40 and 55 years, less the cxempiioDS, nambcring about 37.880 
persons. They are classified as under: — 



CIub I. Unniamed. betwoon 17 and 30 yoius . 
Claw II. Married, beKrcon 17 ftn<I HO y*»ri 

UnmKriii^, between 'M and 40 yaui . . 
OlsM III. Married, bctwDeo ;(0 aQ'd 40 yoarM 

Unmftrri«d, bcbwscn 10 and 56 ye»n . . 



Doduot vxwDpciona . . 



86.837 
15,407 
18,001 
U.U6 
11.700 

leo.sso 

S7.S80 



199,000 
Of married men between 40 and 55, tbero were 4.S,1S0. 



Age, and Lenotft of Residence. 

For a peniou not bom in New Zealand, the householder was 
required to state on the census schedule the length of his or her 
reitidence therein in years, and from the information thus obtained, 
a table has been compiled showing the number of pcrgous ai each 
yoar of a«e, and the leugth of their residence in the colouy, aud from 
this the following figwee, which will do doubt bo found iutureating, 
arc taken : — 

On the 31st March, 1901, there were in New Zealand 26.568 
I>ersoiJS of 05 years of age and upwards who hod been twenty-fiTe 
years and over resident in the colony, and, at the same time, do less 
than 

pononi 04 jt%t% of ago and over, tnideot 31 >osrs and upwnrdB. 

S8 
SS 
SI 

90 
19 

IS 
17 
16 
15 

In addition to the above, there were 925 persona of 65 years and 
over wtio8e length of tceidence was not specified, 71 persona who 



a, £37 pononi 04 


8.603 


. 69 


8,831 


. 02 


S.58S 


. CI 


B,B7H 


. 60 


i.180 


. 09 


4.076 


. 58 


4.fl67 


. 37 


a.arz 


. 36 


6,030 


, 55 



AOB, AND IiEKOTH OF BZBIDENOE. 239 

had resided twenty-five years and over in the colony whose ages 
were not stated, and 273 adults unspecified both as to age and length 
of residence, aa well as 163 adults bom in New Zealand whose ages 
were not given. 

Aliens are included in the foregoing figures, but Maoris are 
excluded. There were 11,615 foreign subjects (of all ages) in New 
Zealand on the Slet March, 1901. 

Of the New Zealand bom, 171 had reached or passed the age of 
65 years at the time of the census ; 22 were 64 years old ; 43 were 
63 ; 42 were 62 ; 43 were 61 ; 130 were said to be 60 ; 167 were 
69; 243 were 58; 331 were 57; 386 were 56; and 410 were 55 years 
old. These have been included in the figures previously given. 



SECTION IX.— EDUCATTON OF THE PEOPLE, 

The replies given at the Census by househoMerB showed that, in 
every 100 p«reoDa Uviug (excluding Chiaeae). y2-78 per ceni. could 
r«ad anil wiite, 1-95 could read only, and 15-27 were unable to read. 
The proportion per ceot. unable to read fell from 2372 in 1378 to 
21-19 in 1886, to 1C51 in 189G, and. further, to 1527 in 1901. Of 
those who could read only, the proportion diminished from 6'76 
in 1378 bill in 1901 it Gtood at 1-95 per cent. The following shows 
the perceiUa^ee at each cuubus period : — 



■ 


IVrwDB 


HklM. PmtikliM. 


1*0 ream. 


Ifolnii. 


FoDiiJaii 


PorwJCB, 


UbJbh. FemaloB. 


tSTS 


. . 60-6a 


73-11 


66-SS 


6-76 


fi-91 


7'80 


23-72 


arus 


■i.'VST 


lasi 


.. 71-82 


73-81 


0894 


6C8 


6 01 


G'.?9 


2805 


21-08 


34 07 


1SB6 


.. 7101 


75-40 


73-41 


4-80 


J-3ti 


5-31 


■2119 


a0 34 


Qiasi 


1801 


. . 77-27 


77-97 


76-48 


8-97 


3 71 


4-24 


18-70 


le-so 


19-36 


1806 


.. SO-BQ 


ai06 


SO-09 


i-m 


2-71 


30B 


16-51 


1EJ'2» 


10-K3 


1901 


. . 82 78 


B308 


83 44 


135 


1'81 


310 


15-27 


1511 


1546 



Besides tho improvement in the degrco of education shown above, 
which is observed in respect of females as well as males, it will be 
noticed that whereas the difference in the percentage able co read 
and write in very considerably in favour of the male sex for the year 
1878, the proportions approxinaate more closely at each successive 
oensus year, until in 1901 there are found to have been 83-44 per ceut. 
of the female sex who could read and write, against 83 06 of mates. 
The education of the females, taking as a standard the knowledge oE 
reading and writing, is thus almost equal to that of the males. But 
wiili a system of free and compulsory education this would be 
o:ipected m liino, and the census results have no longer the degree 
of iuiporlauce or interest they had yciars ago. 

li is in considering the proportions of iho population at differeat 
age-periods lliac the improvement in education is even mare clearly 
proved, as seen by reference to the table dealing with those subjects. 

Here it is found thai in 1901, of persons at the age-period 10-15 
years, 99-24 per cent, were able to read and write, while 0-34 per 
cam. could merely read, and 0-42 per cent, were unable to read. 
The proportion who could not read increased slowly with each 
saceeeding quinquennial period of age, until at 50—55 years it stood 
at 3-23 per cent. At 76-80 years the proportion was 6-45, and at 
80 and upwards it had wlvauced lo 7-68. Similarly, the proportion 
of persons who could read only increased from 0-34 at 10-15 years 
to 1 86 at the period 50~5i5, and again to 7 75 at 80 and upwards. 
The better education of the people at the earlier ages is thus ex- 
hibited. The Qumbccs upoD which the above proportions are based 
are:— 




SDUOATIOH or THZ FXOFLE.— Sbowlng the Fercentage of th« 
ToUl Population able to read and write, to read only, and unable to 
read, as aaoertalned at the Cennuee of 1881, 1891, and 1901. 



Btid uid writ* 

1 





1001. 


tBQl. 


lesi. 




% 


% 


% 


Bead and writ* 


... 8218 


77-37 


71-a 


Bead only 


1-95 


3-W 


5-63 


Cannot read — 


... 15-27 


18'76 


S1£ 



Cannot road 



10O1 1601 1881 1901 1891 1881 1&01 1891 1881 



It fir J ffs 9tM 



ETo &«« piga 340, 



XDUCATION OF THE PBOFI.BI. 



241 



'-aMon^im £ 



■pwa 



iCloopwa - 



S 






8S52SgffS8SS£5ISS8S"" 

wo" 

t-F4(0o3c0e0C1r4O-HO&-mO rH 



l< 



H 
K 

n 
o 

o 

Q 

a 

a 
PS 

H 



D 



-DMomtim a 






'<iaop«BH 



pn»pwa « 



00 

nonvoDpn . 
•o 



Si 



-pwa 

ton mo *S 



■iino p«»tt - 



■3* MM 



oJc-cQrH'acoKiiSSoSS'-iSSeqn 9 

t-T-lrHl-tlHlHrHi-llSlHl-lrH i-l 



QOcoo<x>cs'a<ot-iHa)(&eorH'«icDcoiacO'<ft 

id 

OCOiOAa>ec<<-4it-'E~A'«iHAAt> 
iHOOi-l iH— IrHi-IiHWO^OSi-l 



00 CO -« o 
a 3 2 t- 

>a lA o >o 



t- ■* en 

© W 



g 5 SI s s s a S 5 3 3 3 °" " "^ -■ 

■Hcoujmeot-<-<t-«g<Or^t-«t~Oa3to 



eDt-t-i-««IC0P>^tDOOQlf3^'-'M0D^« 

^wini(;abc-£aas4X9oa4oiou}o>.H-H 

^coa9S'«i^'9<cc>t-Sooa90-«e4^ 

S5J" 



3 


1 







t-r^t-E-tPopt-c-t-i-iiooiT-tt-^iaioase- 

t-aooooaw>Qe-c-^to05"-i<otO(0'fl'0 



ssBSssa 

■• m rt IN V c- o 



gi o <-i ;o 01 
i> c- t~ la o 

C4 CO CO ■-• in 



OJ OS C9 o« -H ^ 



■^ - 



s 



E O o 







O 


(»> 




s 


to 


E O 




e 


« 


Sf fH 




BO 


oe 


cS 


• 


a 


ct 




I 

ST 

5 




01 


« fi 


CB 


<a 


h d 


OQ 







S 2 s a g S 3 3 g g s s e e S ;5 D 



2i2 



NEW ZBAXuLim OFFlGUIi VBAK-bOOE. 



Statistics sbowiug the proportion of perAons nmrrJed ni differeot 
yean;, aud who Higoed the register with & mark, corroborate the 
ceusus reeulis an to aclvRiice in education. In the year Ibfii, 33 
luaLeG and 6B females jji^r 1,000 of either wx wera (ouiiJ to be, 
illiterato. as being not alJLu to isi^ti iboir names. TheHB proportions 
fell to 19-21 iniiies per l.OOO and 28-96 [enialaB per 1,000 of each 
sex in 18S6. ami ji^ain to 16-83 and 19-23 in 1890; in 1895 the 
proportions Htood fit 9-4>H for tnalet^ and the same for females, and ia 
1900 only 5-29 for lunlcs and 5'12 for females. 

A tablo ia next given to show particniars iu respect of the 
various principal religious denominations, and of marriages by 
Registrars: — 



PxBSOifS at «vsaY 1.000 Marribd who siokkd bt Uabx. 



ml. 



188R 



ISOU. 



IBBfl. 



IMK 



DenomuUrtlOQ. 


M. 


P. 


M. 


p. 


M. 


P. 


M. 


P. 


u. 


F. 


Cliureh ot Eog- 






















laiid 


16-59 


27-] 5 


9 8.1 


124X1 


COS 


4-aB 


3-21 


3-21 


8-01 


5-27 


PrmbyterianB .. 


10 '35 


29&1 


979 


7-62 


8 59 


15-27 


5 00 


l-OO 


•2'5Q 


3'23 


W«fil«yRns and 






















othec Methodiits 


82-41 


41-79 


G-33 


14-78 


1520 


10-14 


4-GS 


4-65 


ane 


3« 


ItomkD CnCholiaa 


117-78 


133 33 


4615 


65-57 


35 26 


43-83 


17-89 


28-20 


9-4Q 


&-U 


0(tiai dfiDgaiiiiik- 






















llana 


10-36 


ao-7a 


11-49 


32 99 


lS-00 


0-00 


lOOO 


1000 


0-tX) 


000 


By HeKiitnUi .. 


89-33 


ya.ii 


3!>m 


G3-08 


2977 


tOGO 


22-02 


-207.3 la i» lo-aa 



Tola) marri!>«e« !i2<H 157-98 1»'21 3896 IG'33 19-29 9-16 0-4d 5 2d 5-18 

In all the preceding proportions and numbers the Chinese haTe 
been excluded. 

Occupiers of housea were directed, in filling up censuB sehodulos, 
to see that Chinese should be set down as unable to road or write 
unless they conld read and write English. Out of a total of 2,857 
Chinese, 386 were returned in conformity with these instructions as 
capable of reading and writing English, 20 as ahle to read only, and 
2,452 M not able to read or write ; but of these 2,452, no less tban 
823 are stated to be able to read and write Chinese, and 17 to read 
only in 6bat language. 

AT-rBKDANOE AT SCHOOL (A8 SHOWN FOR MaROH, 1901, BY CsSBt 

BEHUI.T8.) 

An inqiiiry was made as to the number of children attending 
schools of various kinds, buBidos those receiving tuition at home ; 
also, as to the number of Sunday-school scholars aud teachers. 
While information is always obtainable from the Educational De- 
partment as to children attending public schools, the number at 
priTate schools can only he got at by means of the census, or by 
special applications ma^le for the purpose to the proprietors, which is 
done once a year. The census hgures serve to check the returns 
received from private schools ; while for Hunday-schools and tuition 
at home there is no other source of information. 





TotU, 


B«rB- 


GiHB. 


193.911 


6B.3C0 


64,551 


1»,S3T 


fi^l 


10.848 


&.055 


9.315 


2,840 



Comparison with former cenBuaes shows increasing numbers at 
the Bcboob, btu latterly a declioe in tho home tuition. Possibly s. 
gradually advancing density of population in the country districts 
accounts for the diiniuution in the children taught at home. The 
figores at last five successive censuses are : — 



or 



Prliimry 

Sclin-olii. 



April, 1881 
M«nh, 1886 
April, 1691 
April. 1696 
Mu-ch, 1901 



S7.B11 
110,644 

134 .oca 

183,364 
132,911 



PiJ»te Boboola. 
1!).538 
14,&iS 
17,047 

17,000 
19,837 



T Hi Una 

»l 

7.34H 
7^7 
8,178 

6.0G5 



to attendance at Siintlay-achoolg, a comparison can only b« 
< if the teachers he included wiih the scholars. Proceuiiiug on 
thesa lines a large developiueut is found since 1478 ; — 

CMiraaTMr. 

1878.. 
1886.. 
1896.. 
1901.. 

The excess ot females over males would seem to grow preater, 
considered Dumcrically. as well a» in proportion to the aumbecs. 
with time. 

Comparing the results as to tesKzhers and pupils separately for 
1901 and 18%, an increase of 188 is found in the Sunday-school 
teachers, and of 2.179 in the number of scholars, the increase being 
more marked in the female than in the male sex. 



ToMla. 


MkIm. 


Faitiate* 


63,373 


30.707 


81.666 


99,384 


48,609 


61,375 


116,045 


54,063 


01,982 


ltB,413 


54,894 


03.578 



CeDBUsyoar. 

1901 
1806 



InchiMs . . 




11,299 
11.111 



I'npitf. 



188 



50.096 
8SG 



Femnlea. 
56,181 
54,A38 

1.849 



lOtkl. 

107,118 
104.934 

3,179 



School Statistics to SIst Dbcbmbeb. 1900. 

It has h&vn found impossible to collect the full statistics relating 
to schooling for the yc'ar 1901 in time tor this work, aud the figures 
for the previous year are accordingly given. 



^H 944 HXW ZEALAND OFKICUL IBAU-UOOK. ^^| 

^^^^ The number of schools, teachers, and scholaiB, aa in December, 1 
^^^^ 1900. are shonn in the foUowiDg sammary : — i 


^^^^^b D«ecTlpUeD at SetiMlt. 


Kuifibar 

ot 
ScliPOla. 


Taaaliere. HohielaTi. 1 


^H EUBOFSAK. 

^^M Public (OoTdmment] ecbAols (scholon other 

^^H iban Mitorix and hkll-'CaAten) 

^^1 Pobtic (Gove til me 111) tcbouU (biilf-Pa«t«s living 

^^M among Europc&Dia} 

^H Oollegea. grammar, and high scbooLs (aidod or 

^^M enaovred) 

^^^ Piivate and d^nomiasiional vaboolB (excladiog 

^^1 Maori schol&ra) 

^H laduetrial schaola and orphana^AS 

^^M l^Ktive viLlFig« ccbnols, Kuro^ioan children at- 

^^B Hnilicg .. 

^H Private Natire bo&rding -sobools, European 

^^1 cbiLdr«ii atl«udiug 

^^1 School for r>eaf-[nui0K 

^^M Jnbilea InflttCuto foT blind 

^H Tobali — Buropoao 


) 
1,674 

as 

804 

1 

1 


3,566' 
150 

'* 1 


138,903 
1,086 

a.TW 

Ifl.SSfi 
717 

MT 

20 
45 

18 


3,006 


4,566 


148,T8Sf 


^^^^^H DaaeriptioD ot Bcliool*. 


Natober 

of Teaehen. 

BebooJa. 


Sebolan. 


^K, Hati've Tillage schools aiipportnd by GovcmmeDt 

^^B foxolndinR Kuiopean cliildri:ii >t«t«d above) . . 

^^1 Ptivat« KniivQ (loariling'SohooU jcnami^iiaiice 

^H ol ecbolats pftid by Ogvuiuuool) 

^H Priv-ftCc NMIt* boatding-wbool* (maiattnaDce 

^H of ■oholart paid trom cndowmenU) . . 

^^1 Private Native day-scbooia 

^^1 Public (Govcrtuncnt) ficbuoU, Maoris &tt«odiDg 

^H Publto (GeTemiuenl) ichools. half-cMtee liring 

^H ae Uaorii aUeadlng 

^H Piivate and denominational sohoola for Euio- 

^^M pcauB, MoohK alteudius •• 

^^^^L ToCa]»— Kative 


89 
4 

8 

• • 


151t 

IS 

6 


Tl 

181 

98 
l,ti88 

flbe 

47 


96 


lfl» 


i.S88 A 


^^^ *And 181 ■awlng'iniatrvBMS. H 
^^h^ 'Id aildlllon to tb* abore.lb* eenma rentia aboKml t)tatn'm«fandrwn(1,aiAbeML m 
^^^^LtJM flirla) vora beinK Uin^l ak bona la lUrch. iflO). Altendaaoo at SDnday-aebMla (a W 
^^^^M ^vau oo p. M5. ■ 
^^^^^^F ; And B Murinc-iulilreaBaa. ■ 

^H Thus at the enil of 1900 there were 3,100 schools of all claascs 1 
^H at which menilwrs of the EuropeaTi and Maori races were being 
^^^^ edacated. This was an increase ot 91 on the number in 1899. The 
^^^^ public primary schools numbered 1.671 in 1900, against 1,&45 in i 
^^^Vl899. The number of aided or endowed colleges, grammar, and 1 
^V high schools was 26, one more than in the previous year. The 1 



SCHOOLS. 



240 



nunibcr of private schools from which returns were received by the 
Registrar- General wag 304, & rtecrease of 3. There were also ten 
indtistrial schools and orphana,ge8, pnblic and private, as well ilb a 
school for deaf-mutes suDsidised by Government, and a sohool for 
the blind, which have not been included in the inoreatte showu for 
tbc year. 

The number of schools established for the education of the 
Native or Mauri race was 96, five nioru tbau in IB99. 

Education at the public schoolB is free (except that, at such as 
are also district high schools, fees are charged tor the teaching of 
the higher branches) and purely secular. The attendance of all 
children between the ages of 7 and 13 is compulsory, except when 
special exemptions are granted, or a child \b beinf; otherwise suffi- 
ciently educated. 

The subjects of instruction at the prinjary schools are required 
by the Education Act to be the following : Reading, writing, arith- 
metic, Knglish grammar and composition , geogiaphy, history, 
elementary science and drawing, object'leaaons, vocal inusic. and (in 
the caao of girla) sawing and needioworJt, and the principles of 
domestic economy. Provision must also bo made for the instruction 
iu military drill of all boys in these schools. 

"The Manual and Technical Instruction Act, l&OO," provides 
for manual and such subjects of technical instruction as are pre- 
scribed by rvgulationx uudur this statute beitig inc[ud>ed in the list 
of subjects named in the Education Act. Thus manual instruction 
may be given in ordinary school-hours. 

Pttblic (Govemnunt) Schools. 

Compared with 1899 there was in 1900 a further fftUing-off in the 
number of pupils belonging to the public schools at the end of the 
year, although the average attendance shows an increase of 1,431 for 
the whole year and 2.448 for the fourth quarter, which is thus com- 
mented upon in the report of the Minister of Education : — 

Ttaero ba^e b«eu sinoa 1893 t^o methoda ot OAloatating Vav average atteod- 

Dce ai anj givtn aohool. To lind th« one, oiilled tUo " Strict average," aooount 

h&s baon takoD ol all tb« halt-dnya oa wbicb lbs aobuol ba» b«eo opeu ; ibe otfaor, 

the " working av«ra||e," has been FouDd by omibting from the caloulstioa all 

ihoM faall-daya on whicb Ium tban ball ibo namber on cfa« roll are present. 

For tba last oight years the capitatlcio graiiU biive baen paid bo EducalioD 
Boaidfl on thtt working average, the Orijet In Council aulbnriiiing Huob |>aymflDt 
having b«en ron«<wsd from tiin« Ln tima. It bas now b<ea Anally decided to 
adopt ibe working averago ai the basis ol paym«DtH to IJnard« and of all tables 
aod renuu»; tbe workitig average, in [aat, booomes benuslortb tbu only avara^a 
(•oognlsad, and tba atrict average diBapp«ani. 

Tha worlctDg avaraffti for 1900 wai 111,747, an inoreaae of 1,431 on tbat of 
189», whiob wai 110.316. In 189B th« avorage wan lll,6a6. and In 1897, 
112^28. 

The following table shows the attendances from 1877 to 1900 : — 

7 — Veairbook 




i 




» 



UTT 
UN 

ism 

18K1 
IMS 

v*a 
urn 

IBM 
IMV 

WW 

ttm 

lam 

IHBl 

InU 

IHXI 
IWI 

iMd 
ins 
iwi 

MM 
UIM 
1900 



n.Ba 
n.TOT 

W.IM 
TI,3S0 

T9.4IS 

sa,nD 
M.aos 

IM.VIU 
lOV.IM 

110, us 
]ii.«n> 
iii.atH 

lll.IIQD 
1<1,&9S 

W.tM 



S6,Bm 
IB.IMO 
TS.SM 

M.M1 

a.ato 

H.ITP 

ffT.IM> 

us.«r 
iM.awi 
ii&.tse ■ 
IID.20 

iM.eai 

IM.«« 

iflr.fl(K) 
iai.au 

ISI,OST 
UB,1S7 

ist.eai 

UO.TM 



4»,iW 
ST.VOl 
H.HS 
u.oa» 
W.4M 
70.0TT 
7*.»WI 
M.US 

«i.aoi 

W.RM 
•1.309 

loo.m? 

n.872 
ldT.aK 

IIQ.tT4 
lIl.Kt) 

^K.aa^ 









(9.801 


>■■ 


■.. 


ea.oai 


TTB 


B.an 


aa.aiB 


ua 


it.ti? 


ei.oaa 


ri-8 


t.t» 


w.mo 


Ta-6 


i.eiD 


C7.»73 


7M 


9,107 


Jl.OftT 


K-l 


».i9r 


n.nr 


7ft-6 


ft, NT 


BO.TW 


78-1 


4.10: 


W.83T 


I7D 


S.HB 


B0.I08 


TH-S 


4.3aB 


m.ni 


Hra 


l.HW 


M.aH 


TM 


3.tW 


irt.oea 


8D^ 


S,SOT 


W.OTO 


A0« 


l.OU 


I8,fil5 


prs 


s.oas 


IM.OM 


Hl-8 


3,314 


l(».Wl 


K^el 


S.>«1 


II0.91T 


fi3-.1 


9. sua 


]]8.iai 


ra« 


I.IDB 


iii.eM 


ea-4 


8M 


I10.S1A 


SM 


i-wn 


Ul.7*T 


M-1 


9W 



•jn 

W,BK 

ft.na 

1,1N 
3,619 
6,flDT 

4.na 
ft.i» 

3.09 L 
«,»1 
I.TH 

a,Tn 

2.41A 

L.nn 

X,(VT 

2.iea 

i.BH 
2.565 
I.IU 
I.IM 

US! 

l-BWl 



• Prom IBTT to 1803 (inelnuvcl lh« 
ibo " worklni" KTflrac«. 

t PruTn 1RT7 to IBM (IncluaWnl tha liun'CAAB on tb 

Htibtwiiieiit ypftriHiKioatlio'-worklns'kTnrNt'- 



Blrioi " ftt«r>Ae U kItact. Bud for mlnaqaem j«*n 
■ttid " at«rsga U gif era, uul for 



Tbo n.v(tr»K^ '^^ ^^*< <"eekl.v roll-riiiinb*n throughout itie f«ar sbowa • 
further f&lUiig-olI [rom thnc ol 161K>, which wafl leis than the ye«r betore, tta« 
li^rea bein; 133.897 for 1900. m agftinst 133,540 loc 1R9Q, iv dcarease u( G13. 
If vre attfinpt t<i diannvcr thn rnKson (or thia fnlling-nlT in th« roll-ni)nibi>r hj an 
czftmln&tioD of Ltie roll ouiu^tra m the tai of iha year, wc (!u<l th«; it in not 
da» to *nj diminutinn In the namber ol yonTig ohitdreii entering the achools, 
imtamuch &■ th« nunibeir of uliildroti under niue yekifl ol «g« waji 235 more at 
Lbe end of 1000 tlivn in Donocnbnr, 1899. Oo tb* other hitnd, tha number of 
nhildran ovor louitoen yoara of kko wm iOT Ivus ibao in tho pruviouB year, n (act 
that ieeniA to khow chat a alighbl j greater namber obtained emploTment a* toon 
aa lh« labuiir ftg* was rtuubad. It i* uot, Bo eaay bo explain thu [alling-ofl of 419 
in tb« nniubnr nl children on the roll bi^t^Hin th« ag«« ol ning aod fouiteen, It 
nii^ht, for inittKiicia, bo du« to an incrcue in tbo number of thoM who an- 
fortiinfttdlf etic&jM i;Atiifi tn sehoi^l alto^ji^ih'Or. or to An innrtfaso in th« number 
on the rolitt of privftte McbuuU. lu any oa.«e, tba ducreiLie la not auoh a« la ' 
a single year aeod caiase alarm. It ir, however, tslr^ihing to DOt« that ifaa 
average attendanoo for the wholo jear ti greater than in nny previous year 
■«>ciipt IRilT. Eiprcititcd aa a pcroeutftga of the avern^* woRkly mil-number, it 
gIvQi 941 pet oeiit. as r<>pr«'Mnting the regularity of attendunoe during tbo yoar. 
Thin IB higher tbao the corroepoiidinK peroBntage fur anr previouR year. In 
1BI)7 the average attendaneo raaahed 63-9 per oent. ot tba rollj but in 1609 it fall 
to 82't) percent. 




As stated praviousty, tho new Maauftl and TocUuical Instruction 
Act of 1900 providoB for manual and such subjects of tocbnicjftl 
instruction, aa are prescribed by rogulationn under this statute 
being included in the list of Bubjocts named in the Rdupation Act ; 
and tho same Act allows part of the ordinary school-time to be 
given to elementary manual in^itrnf^tion. During 1900, subsidy was 
paid on classes in fiefihand drawing ((rom flat and round), shading, 
drawing from nature, paiotiiii^, modelling, mechanical drawing, 
engineering and inacln'nc construction, geometry and perspective, 
design ftnd ornament, architecture and building couatruction, 
mathematics, natural and wxperinmntal science [botany, choini&try, 
and pbyaics), woodwork, plumbing (tlmorettcaJ and practical), 
doiuestic instructiou, Kn^jlisii and commercial subjects, and sing- 
ing. 

There are eight fully- equipped Technical or Arc Schools, the 
classes in which during 19CK) were attended by about 3,000. 
students. 

In connection with the Canterbury College there is an endowed 
School of Engineering and Technical Science, the Btudents in which 
work for tho university degree of D.Sc. in enf^ineenng. One huQ- 
dred and twenty-sovcn students attended in 1900. 

The Canterbury Agricultural College has an endowment of over 
€0.000 acres of land, and possestsoa extcoaive buildings, and an 
eiporimental farm of a very complete character. The students work 
for the university dogrun o( B.Sc. in agriculture. There were 
iweuty-^ve students in 1900. 

There are several Schools of Mines located in districts in 
which mining is actively carried on, and the Otagn University 
maintains a professoriEkl chair oE mining and metallurgy, to which 
the Government makes an annual grant of £500. Tlie number of 
students in mining in 1900 was 326, fifty-nine of whom wers 
at the Otago University. 

With the view of encouraging attendance at technical schools 
and classes, arrangements have been made with the Railway De- 
paiiment by which teachers of classes rejpstcrcd with the Minister 
of Bdncation may give certi&cateK to their pupils which will enable 
them to obtain railway tickets at special rates. 

The following table shows the results of exaioinations conducted 
in the colony on behalf of the Science and Art Departtneut, Loudon, 
And of the City and Guilds of London Institute ;— 




PtmUbaI vUaa mad tolid MMMOmtrr 
MMhtttiaflM, Wmm i. «■ ». fcitil I 
Hadiln* UUIWU uulfci a wad diavtaa 
BHildtag 

IlinwiBli chwnutry .. 
Apofiad machkoicB 
llinnitlwn and •iKmcUy 

CITT AMD OriLIM or LOMDOX 

NkTrtVTR. 

Tal««*«p>iy *aA tol«plMBr 
n«ctrlc Iii(tit a^ poir«r (pnlimlaur) 
SIccUlcliicht ami tnnw 
a«i* itMiiuiBCturD 
MoM plate worn IhOOOTinl ... 
Qujmattj aiul joinery ((trdiuaryl 
(boommi 
Woodwotk, nr«t ]r««r .. 

anal 
Book bind I Qg ... 
Cookarr 

Madianktal •nctaaartng 
nnBbinc [proUnilnam 

. iprMtlmll 

Total* 



Tota]ofpap«n.8M: total of paaaaa. Stt. 
• FaUatua and Ha*i«Etoa. * iDotoilMa haolL prlM and a ptua. 

The twenty •fourth amiuai report of the Minister of Bdac&tioo gave 
the foUowiog remarks on iimnual traimog and technical JnstructioD : — 

LmI J9U «M markod hj t)i« moat importanl «tep Lhat baa j-at been t&ken 
in thil colony (or the adfaocerasnt of manual and Mohnicat inatmctloD — namalT, 
tha paasiDgof tba Manual and T»ahDlcal laatruelion Act. Already aooD8id«mbl« 
impetoa Uprogrsuin IhU direction n raanifrnt, but the biutor; ol it twlonga 
almoit •ntirely to tta« proaenl ymt (1901), and aol to th« jm at which thii 
niMit ti«at*. Orftanising loipMlon faava be«D app'^iotsd. and tfao raKUlBtfaitt 
nquired to give «ftect lu tbo Act have baeo inoed. Tho Actaod n^laiionB will. 
It (• baltBvad, oSar a degree of onoourag«ni«Qt to manaal and technical edocation 
M liboral M i» oBnted by the Stata In any part o( the world. The Inspectora 






h»»9 already {Aaguit, 1901), vislMd o«fttlT vrtry part of the colony, have met 
tMcbora ani olbcn intcroMied, giving moaAl 1«biodi kod sucb inlarmslion Kod 
advice fts will enable loctU conlit^lllng katharillea to begin votk on Cbe bot llnea 
Of «iteti(] the work ib&t hai Already bnau b«KUn. Tbo Ina^ototi bftve &1ho in 
)>At)d a MrieE a( smaU manu&le auggeatitig BuU&blc prograintaw at work in 
cunual nod tcohnicM ol&aeet. One ot tbeaeF on " ModoUlng." hes already 
>pp«»f<<l, And ttta otbrni, nn " WoodMork " Kiid " OnrdboMtd-tnticlclling *' ic- 
•pCQlifoIy, nill b« to«dy tbortly Oiiw ot tba uiait NttUtaotory foalureH of lh« 
UMvement li tfae degree of intereat that » beiitg ro&Dlfeated la ngard bo the 
inlrodnatioo of buid-ftnd-eye treiaing into tbe achoots ol tbe colony, which I*, it 
i* ■ftbufkatory to note, itiohI mnrked in tho mMtvi of thn increMiing udopllon of 
klndcrtjtrteo metbode into tbe toaoliiuR of the Lofant o1iuitu>. . . . 

The oontrolKng hulhoritlot rocogniead Are Bcftrds of EducAlton, governing 
bodlu of HftDOndury iiabonis, uoircrjiity coilt^a, ibn<]. in Itao ciue of certain 
(•liMMs in «xi»tenoe before the pnioing of the Act. the maiiiigerf of thn<i« olauea. 
Sohool cluBtB, or olasHw held in conacction M,'itb primary or Boooodary schoola, 
Me under tbc contrnl of tbe Bn«rda of Kducivtton or of the govornlnq bodiei 
reepaollvely. "Special ulKcaeji" — tliAt is. continaation oIhmn, or ctii«Meii tor 
ttuuiaal or Kcfauioal ioalruatioii— eaialilialied by lh« came bodiea are aluo uodar 
their oontro]. "Oollegs cljuau" are olossee ter higher teohnia&l instruction 
eMahliiihed and controlled by a tiDiv*rsity coUe/<e. Cta«acs may alao bo 
Mtabtinhed by any iiiiitabls piiblio a«Hr^cMntion or onrporalion autiof] j 'liitly 
wlih a Board of ^dueation or uDicerxfiy i]d1I*r«; Ibeiie are called " asaooLated 
olMeae," and all the conirlbuting bodiee may have a voioe, aooordtog to the 
ahare of the cost of maiatciiftuca borne by them, lu the eltctiou of tbo manaeors 
ol tbe olaaaea. The gmtitK for onpitaiion on tho average aUondnnoe ara twice, 
Of nearly iwioe, ai liberal &■ under the former Act, and many olu■s^K that eould 
not be rocogniaed before may be reaogiUiied noiv. Sabnidiea are payable u^on 
bequBf ts and od voluntary co'othbutioria. QranU are alio made, on certain con- 
ditiona, towards llie coal of batldioRs, apparatus, and material ; and a Bystom of 
acboiarahlpa will be inktatc^ abnrtly, to load (rnm the day ac.laoolH to the 
teebnlcalaobooU, aai to aHord to t)io \ieiil atTidaiitn in the taller oppurtunitiea for 
obtaining higher t'chnii^al inatruc^tion, II la wotlliy of Dot«, but not yet p«rbapa 
generatly undorstood, thai the Act and regulalioiiB oiler juet ac great iuducDmenta 
tor dairy olanbioa and loi' agricultural inatraction fta tat otber Eorma ot tDohnioal 
aducatian ; even mora, perhaps, far in coitain camou capitation may be paid to 
ooGOtry claasBi at one and a half tiiii«« the rate paid to town clasHen. 

It ia bcped that, eapeciatly In iho sehoola. Lbs fact wjII not bo loat sight of 
Lbat manual training ahoLild nut be treated as a subjtot apart from the rest of 
rduoation. but that it iihniild he co-ordinated with the atbni anbjnctii of inntruc- 
tion, and that ila iniroduotiou «houUl have a marked influeiioe in making all 
method* of teaching more concrete, more direct, and mrrre natural. T)ie ir&iniog 
■ol the pcrcaptive potiera by ob^orratiuu and altcntiun, tlie d-evelopment of tho 
reasoning powfrv, the training in thri ready and clear expronaion ol thnnght. tbo 
growth ot literary and artislio taato, and of a atiudy manly morality, all taken 
Cogeihar — not any one ot them separately — will make goad oltiKen* and good 
workmen. 

It !h for the local ooatroHing aulhorilteii in all parta ot the oolouy to take up 
the work that it is now made poHSible for them to do ; It is (or tbo virions public 
aaaoeialiona and corporate bodies to do their ubmoal to cncouragn tboxe depart- 
inenta ot the work in whioh thay are moat intciMtnd \ and it may nut, [veiliapa, 
be too much to hope that there may be found pnvaiii douota to whom, as e1ae> 
where, mnreeapedally in Qreai Britain and the United StatOF, the endowment 
ot teobmual eduoaiioo may aeem an object northv ol lb«ir geuoroilty. 

Tbo total OTpendlttira under the bead of technical iiiatruotion, oxolaBive ol 
iranta for building, fur tbe year 1900 waa £2,HS, as follotia: Capitation. £1.55S 
5a. 3d, : epecial grants under Aot ol 1895, £400; snbaidies on volimtary ooutrlbo* 
tiona under section 17 of the Act of 1900. £335 it lid. ; moldeotals, £433 7a. 6d. 
Uetalla tor capitation and gtaata are given lo tbo next table. 




350 



XEW ZEALiAXD OmcUI* TKAB-BOOK. 









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o 










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«o 


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i 

s 




=*s " * " 






• 










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3 


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— 


ei 33 ec c-O 


iss 3t--»t-?i^K^«si 




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va 


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-nanMUHin *n**nu>a 


; 


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; '" 




1 

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03 


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a 
o 


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ti< 


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3inpTli>a pa« ""njoeiTtp^ 


*i4 


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IdRtmwuo P^* nVlwa 


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32 


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noiino 11 «□(>:> HDiijj 


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7. 


09 


■a4.at«tij ni"Mi lufaiajcf 




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BBC! — 










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a u c «^ 
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H 







TECHNICAL EDUCATION. 



S61 



o 



o 
o 



o 






b> o d> to a (O lo (O ci> (0 03(0 i-toos uac- 

OtOOO 6- e- r- E-W 1ft C«C0C4 « ^ ■* <0 t- 

eo>oc« lo ct oD ■* -J t- goo<o m c^ eo ■* to 



n 



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rH eis -( 



m > la* 41 






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2 i o,£ g <; 

i ^ d Q o *i 

g Ta '^ '■*' 4|13 



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gffl-S 

= « c o 

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3.2-3 



252 HBW ZEAEAND OPFIOIAL yBAH-UOOK. 

New Zealand University. 

The introduction of university education into New Zealand was 
effected by the Superintendent and Provincial Council of Otago, 
who in 1869 passed an Ordinance under which the University of 
Ota^o was established. Followiog closely on the founding of this 
institution was the establishment of the University of New Zealand 
under an Act of the General Assembly, "The New Zealand Uni- 
versity Act, 1870." This University subsequently received a Royal 
charter, whereby the degrees which it confers are declared entitled 
to "rank, precedence, and consideration" throughout the British 
Empire " as fully as if the said degrees had been conferred by any 
university of the United Kiagdom." It was apparently contem- 
plated by ParUanient {vide section 19 of the Act last quoted) that 
the New Zealand University and the Otago University should be 
amalgamated ; but the negotiations for this purpose having failed 
the two institutions remained for some time distinct bodies. In the 
year 1874, however, the University of Otago surrendered or put in 
abeyance its power of conferring degrees, and became affiliated to 
the University of New Zealand, and at the same time it was stipu- 
lated that the University of New Zealand should not directly 
exercise functions of teaching. 

In the year 1873 the Superintendent and Provincial Council of 
Canterbury passed an Ordinance for founding "The Canterbury 
College," and the college was accordingly established with the 
same standard of university education as that of the University 
of Otago, but without the power of conferring degrees. 

In Becember, 1878. a Royal Commission on University and 
Secondary Education was appointed by the Governor, which mec in 
July, 1879, and reported that two colleges, with an income of £4,000 
each, ought to be established in Auckland and Wellington, and that 
suitable buildings, at a cost of £12,500 each, should be erected in 
those cities. In ihe following year the Royal Commission repeated 
these recommendations. 

"The Auckland University College Act, 1882," which became 
law on the 13tli September in that year, definitely established the 
collejie. and endowed it with a statutory ijrant of £4,000 per annum. 
By " The Auckland University College Resers'es Act, 1885," three 
blocks of land, containing about 10,000 acres each, and a block 
containing about 354 acres, which had been devoted to the purpose 
of promoting higher education in tiie Province of Auckland, became 
vested in the C'Ouncil of University College. 

The Auckland University College was affiliated to the University 
of New Zealand by the Senate of the university on the 6th March, 
1S83. and on the '2lst May in the same year the college was opened 
i>y the Governor. 

Nothing was done for Wellington until the year 1894, when an 
Act was passed entitled " The Middle District of New Zealand 



NEW KEALAKD CNIVUISITT. 

University College Act, 1894," which aaid "There (hall be eata- 
bli»becl in the City of Wellington « college to be connecteii with the 
University of New Zealand," and provision wb8 made for a Rovemmg 
body to be c&llcd the Couuc-ii, but no provision wae ms-da for any 
(lecauiary grant nor any uudowuitint, and. though certain uiembers 
uf the Council were uppoinced, nothing could be done for want oi 
funds. 

Not antil lfl97 were the needa of Wellington actually attend^l to. 
In the Bfission of Parliament that year the Right Hon. Mr. Seddon, 
P.C.. Premier of the colony, introduced the Victoria College Act : an 
Act, as stated in the preamble, "to promote higher education by 
the estabhshtnent of a College at Wellington in commemorauon of the 
sixtieth year of the reign of Her Majesty Qitt^en Victoria," the college 
being intended to embrace in its work the Provincial Districts of 
■WelllDgton, Taranaki, Hawke's Bay, Nelson, Marlborough, and West- 
land. The Act was passed on the 22nd December, 1S97, and the 
Council was formed as provided in the Act, and the work of organiza- 
tion was begun. The Act provides for the payment out of the Con- 
solidated Fund of ft grant of £4,000 a year, and also requires the 
Council to give six scholarships each year, called " Queen's Scholar- 
ships." to persons of either sex under the ago of fourteen years, upon 
the results of an examination under such conditions as the Council 
inay provide, The Act further sets apart a parcel of land 4,000 
acres in extent in the Nukuinaru Hurvey District (Wellington Pro- 
vincial District) as tin enilownient for the college. 

The Council of the college has established four chairs : classics, 
English, raathcinaticB and mathematical pliysicw, and chemistry 
and phyftioji ; and Iccinreahips in French. German, mcntdl science, 
jurisprudence and constitutional history, general history, and 
political economy and law. It is intended ba funds allow to add 
other subjects. 

The New Zealand University is not a teaching body, as above 
explained, undergraduates hitherto for the most part keeping their 
terms at one or other of the affiliated institutions : the Auckland 
University College, the Victoria College, the Canterbury College, 
and the University of OtRf;o, each of uhicli hax now a staB' of 
professors and lecturers. On the 1st June, 1901, tlie number of 
graduates who biul obtained direct degree's was 757. 

The number of nndergrafSnatea on the roll of the University 
at that date w*as 2,4U1 (exclusive of snch as had not performed 
any academical act for a p«riod of ten years), but only 1,J7& 
were keeping terms (not including undergrurhmtes wlio had 
uot, in the last two yeai-s. entered at a college or come up for 
any college or university vxaujination), of whom 776 were males 
and S99 leniatos. Ninety-nine of ihe males and twenty-two of the 
females were medical Mtudents, The nnmbtirK of stuiJuntH attend- 
ing lectures at the atliliati^t institutions during the year 1900-1901 
'Were as follow : At the Auckland Unirersity College. 100 matrica- 




354 



HBW ZB&LAKD OPriClAC YBAB-HOOK. 



lated and 91 non-matriculated; at CanWrbury College. 125 matri- 
culated and 93 non- matriculated ; at the Otago University, 917 
matriculated and 40 non- matriculated. The Victoria College, 
before-mencioDed, affords further facilities for university students, 
and ID Juue, 11>01, had a total of 139 students on the roll — 94' 
matriculated and 46 non-matriculated. 

Private and Denominational Sohooia. 

There were 804 private schools in the colony at the end of 1900, 
a Secreaa& of 3 on the number in 1A99 ; 28 were for boys. 51 for 
girls, and 996 for children of both sexes. The nunibei- of pupils at- 
tending them was 15,S66 — namely. 5.152 boys and 9,403 RirU, not 
counting Maoris, 23 hoys and 24 p^irU. The number of European 
pupils at these schcols was more than iu 1399 by 260. Of the 
private schools, 132 were Homou Catholic, with an attendance of 
10,697 pupils. 

The following gives, for the post ten years, the number of private 
schools and of EumpiJans attending them, the number of Koman 
Catholic schools and pupils being also shown separately: — 



I 













lacladod 1 


n Pr«v]oD» 


p 


Hnmber 




IMpUk. 




Hvaaban. 


[ T«W. 


KOBMUI 


rii|>iiB *t 


1 


Bobooli. 








Oktballe 


Komu 






Bort- 


Olda. 


Totala. 


BsbDote. 


Catliolle 
Behooli. 


1891 .. 


9S1 


6,384 


7,909 


14,143 


110 


10,144 


18» .. 


274 


6.331 


8.I3S 


14,456 


105 


10.111 


1008 .. 


999 


6,431 


8.491 


U.OIJS 


111 


10,^3 


38H . . 


ao2 


6,117 


8,810 


14,687 


117 


9,058 


1896 .. 


298 


6.187 


8,473 


14.659 


lU 


10,458 


1886 .. 


983 


5,845 


s.ioa 


13.947 


115 


9,600 


1S97 .. 


978 


5.U74 


8,473 


14,447 


190 


9,643 


1896 .. 


904 


6.043 


8.739 


14,789 


li!4 


10.176 


1899 . . 


807 


C,319 


9,07C 


1S,39A 


133 


10,336 


1000 .. 


8(M 


6,153 


9,40d 


».&» 


laa 


10.687 



The total mimber of children of European descent (inclirfing 
such half-caHtes as Hvc among Europeans) known to bo receiving 
education at school at the end of 1900 was 148,782 ; of these, 
140,796 were from o to 15 years of age. The census showed also 
5.055 children receiving tuition at home in 1901, against 6,3&2 
in 1896. ^o doubt iucreas&d school accommodation in country 
plfKos does away with the need for tutors and governesses to a 
certain extent. 

The distribution of the private schools in the various provincial 
districts of the colony is shown in tho two following tables: — 




PRIVATB AND DKKOUINATIONAL BOHOOLH. 



2C5 



ll 



R ai «iM 



gSSISSgSs 



iSSSS»SSS 



■g tin e»«if 






isSbSia^i § 



ss53=sasft 



g«as=s5i3g 



S~*T i*''2SJ 



a!SS8<»S=8S 



PS'-S-»'2«S[ 



«oa«a -w :ea 




• ;««Mdi-iB-a 



! I ? t 1 : t : ! ! 






i i ! i < n ! i I 






I 

ja 

i 

3 






If 

k '3 

o a 

9 * 



S, c 

M -J. 

• _•□ 

II 
11 

So 



^1^ 

^ a 



issssssm 



SSS§§sS8§ I 






5532?2sS5 



gaiSSSSSE 



S:!tS8*-SISS3 



ssss^aase 



; ="»3 



dta^cinttdkC 



a'*»'a»'""*aa 



I 



I I I : 1 i : I I 1 

i i i E i i i t i i 

iii Win I : 

3l5ll§l Is 




256 



NHW KEAUANU OVFIUIAL TSAK-BOOK. 



Schools for Natives. 

The number of Nattvo village echoola at the end of 1900 «ithar 
suppoctecl or subsidiiied by the Goveruuiuut was 89. or cue more 
than at the end of tlio previona year. In addition, there were four 
boarding-schools for Native children, the coet of whose tnainbenance 
was pitrLly paid either by the Governinent or from endowinentw. and 
thrno private Katlvo dav-schoola. The number of Maori childreo 
atu-nding achoola during the fonrth qnarccr of 1900 was 4.539 — 
natiicly. 2.610 males and 1,039 females. Theso included 380 half- 
castes at the Native village schools who vraro living as mombors of 
Maori tribes, and *i03 at public European schools. 

The nuiDberg at the several schools id 1399 and 1900 were u 
follow :— 





Maori CbUdna fttMniUnt Sebootc 


^K &otUM)l«. 


B«yii. Olrli. 


Totklotbotk 


w 


i«Mi iiKn. ues. 1 1900. 


uaa 1 uoa 


At public ICuropMH ^cboola 

Ab Nntivo vi1lftg« HohooU 

At tutxidUtid or vmlonod boicd- 

ing-HdhfloU 
At priVAlo Earopean or Nativa 

tcboola . . 


9U 
1.867 

U2 

111 


S89 
1.976 

111 

B4 


6-17 
1.186 

80 

40 


697 
1,186 

91 

K 


1,661 
».75S 

193 

IH 


1,06 
S.78S 

90S 

189 


Tot&ls 


2.707 


5, Gin 1 1.9fi3 


l.92» 


4,6(U 


4,fia9 



There was thus, iu 19D0, a decrease of 97 iu the number of Maori 
boys, and 34 in the number of Maori ^irlB, attending Kchool. 

Seveuty-ooe out of the eiahty-oine Native village schools in 
operation on 3lBt Decembei*. L900, were under the chartie of master* 
and seventeen under mistresses, and one under the joint contiol of 
a master and mistress ; there were besides forty-ono assistants, 
and eight sewing* mistresses. Tho salaries paid to the head-teachen 
range from £G1 to £280, and those for assistants and fiewtng- 
mistrcssc« from a nominal sum to £50. 

The expenditure on Native achooU for 1900 wis as follows: 
Teachers' salaries and allowances, £13,206 9a. Od. ; books aad 
school requisites, £492 3b. 3d. ; repairs and small works. £476 
6b. lid. ; inspection, £960 lOs. lOrl. ; boarding-schools and sohotar- 
ships, £1,846 ISs. 6d. ; buildings, fencing, furniture, iee., £2,748 
3b.; technical instruction elassoB, £ltl l4s. 6d. ; Bondries, £143 
17b. 6d. : total, £19.986 12«. Id. 

Income and Expenditure of Ediusation Board*. 
The total income of the various Bducation Boards for the year 
1900 was £496,423. Tho graota by Government amountetl to 
£447,375, an increase of £11,323 on the grants in 1899. These 
grants consist of (a) a statutory allowance of £3 15s. per child 
in daily average attendance, {h) a further capitation allowance of 
Is. 6d. for scholarships, (c) a varjnng sura for school buildings, and 




(<2) gmnts for technic&l education. The income from reservQs 
•mOQnted to £41,361, and that from local receipts, &c., lo £7,067. 

The total expenditure in lUOO amounted to £4''J0,37B, of which 
the sum of £101,977 wu laid out on the maiuteQaucts of tho Hchools. 

Ther«caipb6 aud oxp<9odituro of tho Jjilduc-utiou Boardtt. tiumbtiriuK 
thirtoeo alMgethei-, ara taljulatud below, wIlIj furlhur parlioulars : — 

I RaCRIPTS ADD BXPSHOITDBE OF BdUCATIOK BOkBSS. 



Jf«e«ip(«. 


< •. d. 


ifxti«ndinir#. 


£ <t. d. 


To Bal&Dce. tst Jabuai;. IMO 


S.BJBD 13 10 


by BoktOh' a.dtalnJHtralloD ,,. 


u,aa t a 


O0"n-rnQj*int Hr»nw— 




liiBpDCtian •adoXKDDiuKiPCi 


liSK le t 


UalDfalDkOCB ... 


aeT.G9T ]0 8 


TuKli-on' BklAnBH And 




KDlidJns* 


»,7«l IS e 


kJIOWUtOM. Uld irWsllLB 
lacldaDUl oxp«inua oi 


saCTM 9 


T»cbutMJ 


9M IS 




Bw«r««« twsDaH 


41JS1 1 e 


•ehoola... 


8X,RiB IT & 


LoobI leceiptn — 




Sollolurahlpa 


fi;«S IT 


F«iw, dinallODii, Ac. 


AXIG4 3 B 


ManukJ anil laobnlaal !&■ 




Reola. ■&]«•. Ao- 


Lian IB 1 


«l.ruotii>ii 


B,7ia 18 a 


laUTMt ... 


6G IS 7 


iDtMMt ... 


3«? » 11 


Bafanda, ilapcajta, Ao. 


1,1M 1 1) 


Handlnjpi, lilMi, ijIkqi, Ac. 


alJNC IN .1 






RaCuDds uid lunilrtM ... 


lr'115 13 1 






Kiil&iiooa ... 

i 


Hfiti N It 




SMM3 10 10 


uoi,Ma in 10 



Particulars of tho acholarships and the expenditure of the Boards 
thereon in 1900 are given in dL'lail. The only inHtitulions for the 
Graining of teachers are in Nortii Canterbury and Ocago. These 
two institutions have received grants-in-aid of £500 each. 



■ 






Schola&ships. 




■ 


1'! 






"^i 


Boaida* 




■ ysssisa 


Boya. 


QlrU. 


1 


GziWDdltiirn 
on ScbotaT' 


AnauaJValuo, Ac. 


w 






l^ 


■hlpa ]d IttU 




■ 








VMn. 


< a. d. 




AtiokUnd 


n 


a 


ss 


3 


t.eiL 6 fi 


i At £.10, 9) AI £05. ID kt 


1 Ttktimuki 


u 


9 


7 


S 


aev e 5 


Sat JUS. iatXlU,la.tiiI. 
1 at fie, 9 al £14, Ta.1 

£lD.laL J7to. 


^H W«n0uia] 
^B WalUiutoii 


ifl 


fl 


C 


Tftriea 


sn T 


tIatitCi. lat£.t%aatiiy 


ii 


»7 


IT 


s 


Wl 


1) XK at. :Q %l £li. 


^^ft Eavko'a 1)*J 


ee 


1( 


19 


s 


4U1S a 


1 R.% ac A%. 3 at flS 4a., 

16at ^mia. 


^^ Wailborougb 


3 


1 


4 


i 


iM la 4 


S »t <ICi. 


NalaoD ... 


e 


1 


e 


VariM 


SIT 1 6 


B kt MO IQb., 1 1.1 £a&. -1 ftt 
4 &t gSi, 4 al £10. 


any 


8 


3 


e 


S 


iia 10 


WMdui4 


7 


a 


4 


S 


M a fl 


3 at f£l. 1 aclHIfla., 4al 

xa 

18 ■[ £40. A) al £«). 


Karth CanMrbu<7 


aa 


i« 


IS 


9 


1,BM & 


Beotb Cftstarbut]- 


•M 


IS 


H 


a 


wa IT e 


V&rl<>) from £i 10a. I« 
8 at XWl 4 al £». 1 al 


OM|t« 


«i 


as 


IG 


VurtM 


1.U3 3 4 














£U. 1 at iSS. 90al4jO, 














InEXlT. 13a1£lA, 


Bouibluid 
, ToteU, IWl .. 


n 


13 


e 


Variea 


Bie i« 3 


ISat jas.SaiXW. 


34B 


IW 


us 


fl.]4a Id G 




^m TouJi. itfiv ... 


W 


am 


lU 1 ... 


S.4a4 4 9 





IiKome and Expenditure of Secondary or Superior Schools. 

A summary of the accounts of income and expenditure for the 
tyear 1900, as furnished by the governing bodies of tho secondary or 
i superior schools in the colony, show^ the total receipts lo have beea 




MBW ZBAUAHD OfPlCIAL VBAH-BOOK. 



JiG&ASO. To this total, reals &nd sales of reservoa cootfibotod 
£26,745; interest on iDvestiiionta, and other recoipts from endow- 
tiientB, £4.875; fees, £31,067 ; unil iiiiscellaiiP^ua. £3,743. 

TKb total expnnditure amounted to £76,561, of which sum office 
rnanageuieot and expenses ahgorbed £'2,648 ; teachers' salaries, 
£33,5Ho ; scliolarshipa and prizes, £2.670 ; buildings, furniture, in- 
(turancti, rates, and rent, &c., £8,153 ; and other expenditure, 
£39,605. Included in the ta«t item is a sum of £ld,661, capital 
ii)ve»tHcl, wliich cannot bft classed as ordinary expenditure. 

A nummary of the accounts for tb& yuar 1900, exhibiting focthet 
details, is given below : — ~ 

Sbookqast OB BorcaiOB Sohoou, 190O. 

C I. d. Kap«tiditurt. £ t. a. 



To Credit bit)uio«» on lit 
Juiuary. IVOO ... 
RuilDwuisnt rMSTTBiioid 
MoitiB8« mootja ropud 
B«oIb of n-asrvnt 
InMnei on lovo'imenta 
B«i«r*Ba Coiiiiu»Bioutiri' 

Sihool (■«• 

Bo4rd>af-Mliool Mm ». 
Booka. Ac. void. And ro 

toodi... 
fhindTJen nol claaslfleil ... 
l>ebli t}alKne«>. 31» D*- 

Q am bar. I ODD 



ig.aso a g 

3.901 B 

a.t66 D 6 

l.blU 1 

a.oss 1 V 

M.TH 9 1 

e.STi IB 9 

ISO 9 S 

1.083 ID ID 

S.OtB IT 8 



m.318 a 



K » pturlilurt. 
B* IilaliiHtim an lat January, 

1900 - >,9m( 

Kxiwaaaaot nianafninDDt S.MT IS 

HcboolaftlariM iS.SM tS 

I)()ardliic.*ohaol acvontnU 4.79S I 

ExamioaUoti «xpati(«* ... MU s 

Scliolaralifinatitl )irit«*... i.SOt U 
PrlDiiujE. tiMion»<y. Kd- 

venivLuii.lucl.llKi-t.A''.. 8.UM SU 
Bnlldiiiiii. rumiturv, jn- 

*iir«iic«. c«iii.anil t«t«a S.ISS IS B 
Kipeoditurc oa Midow- 

uicuia ... ... ... S.eOB IS 11 

CaplullDrMlxl... .. lA.«n 8 I 

Ichtrnt l.filO U 

KuDdrloa not cluilllDd ... l.mwu 
Credit balBDMi, dial I>»- 

ODinbcr, 1900 tS.SM g 

m.SI8 B 



itidttstrial SchooU. 
The coat of the Governinent schools and the amount recovered 
{from Charitiible Ai.i Boards, from parents, from sale of farm pro- 
duco, Ac.) arc next shown ; — 

Gon or QuvsaKMBirT Imuustuiai. Schools, 1900. 



Sebool 


Oro«» Cost of 
tiehaol. 


Hoordlu* out, Jl!,?^f ^ri 


ttaMTMtM. 


N«»C«M, 


Auckland 
Bumhttim 

Ctvonfaau) 

Ta Orange Hams 

H(icitt«iiig'faoirio, 

Wallinf^tDTi 
Rcoeirlns home. 

Curiaicliuich 
TotaU 


J a. d. 

9,184 17 B 

7,132 3 S 

7.257 17 i 

yib IS 6 

4«8 8 9 

a& 18 e 


1 a. d. 

712 16 11 
9,941 1 
e.8S9 g Q 

64*10 8 


4 a. d. 
103 17 7 

1,405 a 11 

OTS 3 3 

130 € S 

18 17 4 

sua 


# * d. < s. 4. 

m» a u 1.806 a s 

l.OM I'J IC.476 3 1 

2.S<J8 8 104.959 8 8 

S61 9 8 714 3 10 

100 r> 3 36S S 

aa IB 9 


17.991 17 8 




G.fi.'ja 3 


2.783 S 1 


5,54.1 IS 10 


13.446 4 to 



Salarjr und oxponiiea ol Viitlitig Oftic«n 
TraroUliiR-«xp«aseB ot oUier offloen 
CoatingfliioioB 

Total . . 



536 10 3 

8t) 16 

10 7 

£18,06317 1 




■NDUSTBIAL SCHOOLS. 



35c 



The next table shows payments made by the Government on 

account o( inmates in private industrial schools, the recoveries, and 

the net expenditure by the Government. The contributions from 

^Chft^itable Aid Boards to these sichools, being me^e directly to the 

niaiiBgers, are not included in the recoveries shown. 

OOVKItXltEHT EXPSMDITBMK OS PRIVATE IXDUSTRUI, SCBOOLS (R.C.), 1900. 



SdlWOl. 



i>i.vm«l.. aooo«rl«. ""J'JS^ri."" 



8l. MaryV, Auckland .. 
h &t. Jotteph'ii. Wellicgton 
''St. M&ry'*, N«Uon 
I Si. VtnoeDt d« Paai's, Dunedin 

TattUi 



t «. d. 

1,4-23 4 

31L 11 

1,684 18 10 

53 17 



S,»72 10 10 



( I. i. 

1S8 4 

U i 

SIT 9 U 

4 



373 II) 7 



< 1. d. 

1,'2«5 S 8 

367 10 8 

1,807 8 il 

48 17 



3,9S9 8 



During 1900, inmates were maintained in five other institutions, 

fxad the expenditure on this account was as follows : Mission Home, 

[Jerusalem, WouKanui (Mothi-r .Vuhert'sl, £124 168. ; St. Mary's, 

^Bicbraoud. Chrislchurcli, £^4 Is. r>«^. ; Sauiaritan House, Christ- 

cburoh, £3 10s. , Mount Maydala, Chri»tchurch, £214 7b. 9d. ; 

Levin Meniorial liotue, WeiUni;tou, £27 l^s. Id. 

The total number of inmates of the two kinds of industrial 
schools is given fo^r the years 1S99 and 1900, and the variations in 
the numbers boarded out, in roBidence. or at service :■ — 

iTtlUTES, 1899 AND 1900. 



Bojuded out 



lani School* — 
AMkland .. 

Bamhain . . 

OftTercham 

T« 0»jiK* llome, 

Ctiriflt cburoh 
FrivaiD Scl)Oaia— 

St. M&ry's, Auckland 
St. JoiMtpb's, Walling- 

lOD 
St. MsryX NeliiQa . . 
St. Vitic«ntde PaqI'b, 

Snuth DunadiD 



Id BiOiddenM. 



417 



12 



U 



409fiW 



903)101 



IB 



598 



39!.. 

38 



9 5 



B61 



Totali. 



396 



1,663 



13 



2 . .1 127 
62 



..|29| 307 
34 



GS 



301,703 



* iDclddins ••V4II cUOdnu in 
raeaivins-bcmiB. 



tlte r«ecivl&R-bomM. 



I liveltidinii on* cUUd in « 





3S0 MBW ZXAIsiXO OmOlAL TKAB-BOOK. 

In the GoTemment schools the policy is to board out all children 
of suitable age and character. The aathorities of the prirtu 
schools do not adopt the boarding-oat srstem. 

Institute for the Blind. 

The Jubilee Institate for the Btind is a prirate institation, and a 
not in anT way under Gorenuuent control, although it has received, 
grants from time to time out of the Consolidated Berenue, and 
leeeiTes payment from the Education Department on account d 
pupils for whose tuition the department is responsible. 

The payments made on behalf of sach pupils to the Institate 
during the year amoanied to £:)3d los. 5a..\owards which the 
paieni5 conuibuied £31 $s. The number of paculs at the end of 
IVO) was fifteen. 

Sciuol for Deaf-f»»us. 

The lo'J of this school includes, with one or two exceptions. aD 
the known deaf-mutes of school age and <^ sound in;«Uect in the 
colony who havie beea brosgfat under the notice of the EducatiiHi 
Depannient. Tb# meihod o. icsuuciion used at Sumner is the oral 
method, in ^^our of which there is a vast predomiT:ance of expert 




tH 



m 




I 

i 



An instruction wae given in the census bousehold schedule that 
iQ regard to all persons " laid up or unable to (ollow their usqu.! 
ocoupatiOD," by reusou of illuess or accideut. the fact wa» to bo 
staled when the form was twiu^ tilled up. And by mecius of the ' 
inforiuBrtiou thus obtaiuud the proportion of persons iticapuuitated 
(roui work ou thu day of the cqhsub has b@ua uactirtained, aud is 
shown in the tables according to age-periods. 

Bosides persons suffering from sickness or accident, those afflicted 
with certain infirmitieff are also distinguished. Thesu iaolude the 
"deaf-and-dumb," "blind," "lunatics," "idiots," " epileptics," 
" paratytio," "crippled and deformed," "debilitated and iDfirm," 
and " deaf only." 

The result of the investigation under this head shows that 9'33 
persona in every 1.000 veeia suffuriiig from sickness or accident on 
the 31et March, 1901, using the word " KicknesB " to mean inability to 
work on that day , and that, hBsidea these, there were 720 persona 
in every 1,000 who were either affected with blindness, or deaf- 
and-dumb, lunatic, idiot, epileptic, fee, the proportion per 1,000 
persons hving stated to be suffering from BickneBt^, arcideni, and 
inGnnities being 16-48 : (or males, 2009 per 1,000 living, and for 
females, 12-49. 

The sickness and infirmity of the males is thus found to be higher 
than that of the fomalos, a» wus the case in 1896, when the propor* 
tion was 2092 for males and 14-S6 for females. 

The DUmberB and proportions of males and females sufforinf; 
from Hiokaess, accident, or specified infirmity in this colony, accord- 
ing lo age-periods, wilt be found tabulated in the Report on the 
Census. In regard to males, after the period 35-40 the proportion 
of sickness rises steadily at each qaiuquennium of age ; while under 
accident the proportion is highest at the period of 70-76 years. 
The rate of sickness per 1,000 males living at 35-40 years was 
6-68, and this increased lo 18'3e at 65-60, to 54-62 at 65-70. and lo 
70' 19 at 80 and upwards. In regard to females, the sickness is not 
so great at 40-45 years as at 35-40, but from this point it increases, 
and from 50-55 very rapidly, though the numbers on which the piO' 

18— Yeftr-book 




S62 



NEW EB&LAHD OFFIOUL TBAR-BODK. 



portionB are based are admitt>edly sraaJ) frora this age onwards. Tha 
rates per I.OOO were 6-97 at 3&-40 years, 13-95 at 55-60, and 47-82 
at 80 years and upwards. 

Females are proved to be very much lea^ liable to accident than 
.males, the proportions being 63 per 1,000 of females, and 3'03 per 
[1,000 of males; or better stated for tKJg purpose. 6*97 per 10,000 
females and 30-98 per 10,000 msJes. As willi sickness, the pro- 
portions increase with advancing age : for Instance, araotig males, 
3*37 per 1,000 were Buffering from accident nt the group 20-25 
years, 375 per 1,000 al 40-45, 1024 at 65-70. and 12-90 at the 
group 70-75 years. Among females the highest proportion per 1,000 
is found at 75-30 years, being a rate of 6-36, or 53-60 per 10,000 
living. 

Sickness and iDfirmity oau be compared for New Zealand, in; 
respect of persona over 15 years ol age, with the results of the 
cenBQB ot 1896 and previously. The proportioaa are ; — 



PueFOBnou pku 1,000 Prrsoks ovib IS Hm^at 


. 




HleliB«Ka nmd 


tnAruiiUea. 


Total mett 




Accidanti. 


uidJnfiTUi 


Ctiosas 1S74 


12'61 


5-32 


17-96 


18TB 


11-16 


6-TO 


16-85 


1881 


uao 


739 


18-43 


ies6 .. 


l'2-6l 


7-8fl 


ao-48 


I . 1891 


18-78 


11-oe 


98-86 


1896 


H-aa 


IWl 


9fi-69 


1901 


ia-72 


10 as 


3.1-01 



Specified InJirmitiM. 

The total of these under the various heads amounted to 5,574 of 
both sexes aud all ages. The ciaL&s were 3,46fj, and the females 
2.108, the proportions (or every 10.000 persons being 71'98; for 
males 8521, and for females 57-35 pi:r 10,000 of each sex ruspec- 
tively. These tulirmiLies are specially treated of one by cue iu llie 
succeeding paragraphs. 

Dm/ and Dumb. 
There were 226 persons— 134 males and 92 females^ returned 
deaf and dumb, or dunib only : of these 45 were inmates of the 
'Bumner Instiiution, leaving 181 deaf-mutes who were living at 
home or in some other private residence. The total shows a pro- 
portion of 2'91 persons per 10,000 living, against 2-86 ascertained 
in 1896. The proportions of the deaf and dumb taken according 
to the sexes did not differ much. The figures are given for six 
census years. 

DlAT A»D DVM.h {Ut Scxit].— PHOI-OBTIOBS VEH 10,000 Or TOPULATIOS. 





lUlM. 


Famalaa. 






UaJ«>. 


Femftln. 


Ceoiuf 1878 


3-25 


a 19 


CeDBiM 1691 


4* 


380 


2-49 


. 1881 


3-2S 


3-45 


. 1896 


.. 


3-99 


2 71 


. 1886 


3-37 


9-23 , 


. ,. 1901 


,. 


8-28 


a-ai 



BLIND. 



268 



are: 



The numbers at the ceoBQS of 1901 for quinqnennial agerpariods 
Ndmbbbs o¥ thb Ds&v aitd DmcB at Last Otobub, 







H. 


p. 










H. 


F. 


AllagM 


.. 


134 


92 


40 yeus 


to 45 yeus % 


6 


5 









— 


16 


m 


50 




6 


1 


Uodar 5 


yeus .. 


.. 


.. 


50 


. 


56 




8 


6 


5 jean 


to 10 yean 


18 


16 


65 


. 


60 




5 


1 


10 


16 , 


82 


14 


GO 


^ 


66 




3 


1 


18 


30 „ 


18 


10 


65 


, 


70 




■ . 


1 


20 


26 , 


16 


. 8 


70 


„ 


75 




• • 


,, 


26 


30 , 


8 


12 


75 


. 


80 


■■ . 


1 


2 


80 


85 . 


12 


8 


80 


. 


■ad apwftrds 


• 


.. 


85 


40 , 


6 


8 


Ud specified 


■ . 


I 


■ • 


The 


hiehest nambere 


are t 


)how 


n at the 


aeOB 


10 to! 16 







The occapationB (past or present) of the deaf and dumb were 
retomed in 1901 as under : — 



OCCDPATIOVB (put OB PBESBIIT) OT THB DbAF ASD DdXB. 
M. F. M. 



Draaghtamui 
Hotel tarvant 
Domettio serruit 
Obaiwoman 
Milknuui 
Btorekeepec's as- 

■iatant 
PrintM'aasdstaDt 
Saddler 
Tanner 
Cabinetmaket 
Tailor.. 
Dresaiaakei 
Bootmaker 
Ziaboarerat freez- 

■ jng-works 
Brewer'saatUUnt 
FellmoDger 
OarpenUt 
Zjabonrar 
Fanner 
Qardener 
Tacm-laboarer 



3 
13 



^ 



1 
1 
3 
3 
4 
3 
12 



Sheep-farmer . . 
Sbepnerd 
Dairy-tanner , . 
Indepesdent 

meana 
No oGonpaUon . . 
Domestio dtitifis 
Sofaolar, private 

sohooi 
Scholar, govern - 

ment aobool . . 
BeoelTtDg tuition 

at home 
Dependent on re- 
latives 
I Inmate of deaf 

and dumb in- 

atitution 
Indostrial school 
Oocupation not 

atated 



p. 
1 
1 
i 

a 

-8 
88 



41 



45 
1 

18 



1 

6 

2 

20 

34 

8 



o 
1 
1 

4 

2 
8 



F. 



1 
1 
2 
1 
11 



20 
1 



^ 



8? 



68 66 40 63 



Blitid. 

There were 297 males and 156 females, making a total of 453 
persons returned as bUnd, including 63 who were given in the 
schedules as " nearly " or " partly " bUnd. Of the above total 



S6i 



SEW ZBAIi&ND oe^lOLAL TB&B-BOOK. 



iinmber, 15 were inmatee of the Jubilee Institute (or the Blind at 
Auckland. It woald thua appear that only one out at every thirty 
persons in the colony who siiffered from blindness had been received 
into the institution. The number of blind persons in 1896 was 344. 
The proportions in every 10,000 of population show a continuous 
rise at suocessive censuses, and that there is more blindness amongst 
males than females. 





X>B0POBTX0f(S 


OF fiblKD TO 


srutY 10,000 pKOPUE. 












ramoBi. Halei. 


Fematni. 


18T4 




• • 


, , 


a-M 9-45 


3-18 


1 978 




. if 


. *• 


9-S6 9-41 


9-78 


IBBl 








S-83 9-98 


ft^ 


38B6. 








a*S9 8-66 


8-70 


IHIi! 








487 4-91 


&-74 


1896 








4-90 S-69 


4-01 


1901 








6-87 V-8B 


406 



The proportion of the blind per 10,000 persons living in the past 
has been: for England, about 6'79; for Ireland, 11*30; for Scot- 
land, 6-95 ; for Germany, 7*93 ; for France, 8-37 ; and for Italy, 
7B3. For the Australian States the figures are: Victoria, 8-73 ; 
New Bouth Walf^, 6-69; Australian Continent, 7-38. 

Thfl number of the blind in quinquenniftl periods of a^e is stated 
for each sex. Of 397 males, 100 were under and 197 upwards of 50 
years old. Of 156 (emates, 63 were under 50, and 93 over that age. 

NlTUBBtlS OF TMEL BLtim kt AOK-l>£BlOD)( 









Pclaons, 


M. 


V. 










Paraout. 


M. 


P. 


Alll^SB 


.. 


. 


463 


207 


loti 


40 yeKrn 


to 45 years 


18 


11 


7 











— 


— 


45 




50 




93 


10 


12 


Coder 5 


years 


. 


3 


, . 


3 


50 




55 




as 


IG 


7 


H jeara 


to 10) 


«ftrs 


16 


g 


7 


55 




«0 




45 


32 


13 


10 


lA 




17 


11 


6 


GO 




OS 




37 


2ii 


15 


15 


90 




16 


11 


4 


es 




70 




74 


&a 


21 


20 . 


25 




90 


10 


10 


70 




75 




46 


98 


18 


i& 


30 




14 


9 


S 


75 




80 




36 


95 


11 


M . 


Aft 




17 


13 


4 


80 nnd upwards 




29 


91 


B 


BS 


40 




91 


16 


5 

















Of the total number o£ the blind, 153 persoDs, there were 43 in 
regard to whom no iuforuiation as to occapation is given on tbe 
household schedule, 71 (females] were returned as eugaged in 
douiustic duties, 15 persons as ininates of tbe blind iustitute, 10 aa 
dependent relatives, 132 as of no occupation, 21 as labourers, 21 as 
farmers, 9 as farm labourers, G as dairy farmers, 5 as sheep- tarmens, 
8 as carpenters, 10 as pensioners, G of independent means, and the 
rest (96) of various occupations in small numbers each. A complete 
statement is added, in regard to which it must be remarked that 
many of tbo occupations are evidently the past occupations of per- 
sons whom blindness ha.<t prevented from continning to work at their 
ntual calling. 










f 


IiVMACr. ^^H 


t 


1 


26S 1 


^^^^^^^^^^ OOOVPATIOKS (fast OB PXEBBtn) OF TUB BU5St 








1 






Male. 


F(im&1«. 


H&lo. 


FdHi^D. 1 


^^^^^^^^Bl 




. ■ 


— 


. — • — 




. — 


■ — 


^~-> 


— . 




d 
a 


^ 

k 


si 


t a 


1 




Si 




St 




1 


a 


£ 


1 t 


£ 




t 


1 






S 


P 


o 


a O h 


P 


o 


P 


o 


^H B«imtar (not to 








Carpenter . , 8 




8 


,, 




^V pnwUM) 


1 




1 


, . ... Pluinbei , . 1 




1 


. , 




8ni;geoa 


I 




1 


,. .. Puawr ... 1 




1 


, , 




Toftolwc of lh« 








GonKftctor ... 1 




1 


,. 




blind 


2 




3 


Lubourer .. 21 




■21 


, , 




Scbool-toftchoi . . 


1 




1 


Ffttiner .. 31 




■Xl 


^ ^ 




Uattetiui 


8 




3 


,. ... Fftrm In.baurfl( ,, 9 




9 


, J 




Btnel muftlciui 


J 




1 


,. . . , .3ftrd«[]i^r . . I 




1 


_, 




Org«n>(tnDi3«i . . 


3 




3 


,. . . IVUrketgAidamei i 




3 


_ , 




Commodlan 


1 




1 


.. .. SoUtor . . , . 1 




1 


, , 




^^ Hoiurdiag - honaa 








()alr)'.f&rmer .. 




a 


, , 




^H k««por 
^M Uotellieepfli 


S 




S 


,. .. Shaep-fariner .. 5 
.. .. Shepherd .t 1 




4 


^ ^ 




1 




1 




I 


, , 




^M I>amwttc Mrvant 


1 




,. 


., 1 1 FJBlierniaa .. 1 




1 


, , 




■ Cook .. 


1 




1 


,. ,. Buthmiin .... X 




1 


, , 




^ Cftpttalidt 


2 




s 


.. Gum-digger .. 8 




8 


, , 




Iiisuruioe ogtoC 


t 




1 


.. .. Miner .. ., 1 




1 


, , 




^^ Proprietor ol 








Miner, coal . . 1 




1 


, , 




^ft hOQMl 


4 




A 


. . . . Miner, qiutrti . . 8 




8 


, , 




^f NowKv»Dd6t 


9 




9 


. . 


Ulnar, alluvlkl .. 4 




4 


, J 




^^ Botcher 


1 




1 


. , . . 


lospector of laiD- 










Aaaiitant baC^ubei: 


3 




2 


. « . . 


<ra.U.. 1 




1 


, , 




Fi*h'hikwk»r 


1 




I 


. . . . 


NooooQpatioa . . 133 


ii 


80 


2 


39 


Ftutt«rer 


a 




a 


.. .. iDdepondvnt 










Groeoc . . 


3 




a 


.. .. ' meitne .. B 


, , 


4 


J , 


S 


Soed metebAnt . . 


1 




1 


-- .. I'Biisiouer .. 10 


, , 


9 


^ , 


1 


^^ Hftwkec 


J 




1 


, , .. Annuilant . . 3 


, , 


8 


^ ^ 




^K Storekeflinr 


3 




3 


. . Doia€Hiic dutios 71 


^ , 


, , 


3 


68 


^B CommcTeiD^ tnt- 








Sobolor, OoTora- 










^^ veller 


S 




j 


meol aohool . . 2 


4 






■- ^ 


C*b pioprieC&r . . 


t 




1 


,. .. 1 SobolKr, private 








■ 


^_ Uai)D«t 


1 




1 


.. .. < eahoDl .. 1 


I 


, J 


, , 


■■ ^^ 


^B W&term&n 


i 




1 


.. .. Kflcolving tuittfto 








1 


^V Lump«r 


:-i 




S 


...... nl borne ... 3 


I 




1 


J 


' Compoiitor 


1 




1 


,. .. DependeQt on le 








■ 


Piuio-tnner 


3 




3 


.. .. I&tlva ,. 10 


s 


, , 


7 


•• H 


BMketiQAkAr 


4 




4 


IniDAta of Blind 








T 


8«ddl«r 


1 




1 


. - 


liiNtilule 15 


8 




7 


1 


Sblpwrisbl 
Oftmnetm&ker . . 


2 




i 


. - ... 


OooupaUon noc 








1 


1 




1 


. * « . 


a»Ma .. 43 


6 


16 


, , 


ast 1 


Boo^ ftod atioe* 










- — 


— 


— 


— 


— 1 


1 iD«k*r 


4 




4 


. . ■ . . 


Totals .. 463 


31 306 


30 196 1 


1 StoaiBMon 


i 




a 


.. ..1 
LCNAOT. 










^B The lunatics enuraerated were 2,67 li i>er8on8, 1.599 umloB and | 


^M 1,076 females, nearly all of 


whom were inmates ol c>lie asylu 


UlS 


for 1 


^1 the insane id th« 


colony. 


Departtnental returns show 2,QT2, persons 1 


^m (including 31 Maoi 


is) 


OS 


Lhe total nuiuber of imnates on tiie 81st | 


■ December, 1900 


■ 


L 












i 



£60 



NKW ZBALAKD'OmCUL YXAH-BOOK. 



Ccmp&riaqa wilb the results of previona oensusos shows a coa- 
tiDuaUy increasing prDporlion of luoalics lo ibe poputation to 
respect of either box, and thai, there is coasiderably more lunacy 
•moiig the men than women. 

Ldsatics.— Pbopobtioks per 10,000 or Potolxtiov. 



C«tuu« 1874 .. .. 


,, 




19-98 


2338 


Ifi'tS 


L878 . .. 


^, 




,90-95 


96-07 


16M 


. ... 1881 .. 


, 




.S3-S6 


S7-80 


17-43 


... 1886 


,_ 




96-50 


8108 


21-18 


. 1S91 


, 




37 83 


3128 


23-92 


. 1600 . .. 


, 




M-18 


8fi70 


26-03 


1901 


. 




S4'47 


39 28 


39 19 



The number of males who were lonatics was highest at the 

ijeriod 45-50 years, and the femalos at 4CM6, as will be found by the 
oUowing slacement : — 

LuKATics. — NcMBKBs AT QntKQoenBiAi. Aob-PerIodb. 

pBraoBA. U. S, 

AliagM.. .. .. .. a,G73 l.a99 1.076.- 

Under f^ ye&n 

GyearB to 10 >otui 



3 


1 


1 


6 


8 


S 


19 


It 


8 


iS 


89 


91 


U4 


68 


51 


188 


106 


78 


atfi 


141 


104 


957 


145 


119 


ai9 


176 


136 


888 


ai8 


130 


306 


177 


IIM 


SOB 


101 


107 


344 


139 


105 


163 


109 


58 


88 


60 


38 


86 


31 


14 


SS 


11 


11 


14 


8 


6 



80 yokrit iknd upwardi 
Unspeoiflcd 

The proportion of lunaiics per 10,000 nialos living at the above 
age-poriods was on3y S-I8 at 15-20 years, but bad advanocd to 59*67. 
at 85-iO years, and rcochod iLs inaxiinum at th» period 55-60, whec ' 
the proportion was 189'30. In the corSe of females, the proportion 
rose to a maximum of 130*97 at 60-65. 

In 1!K}0 one person in every 388, exclusive of Moon's, in New 
Zealand was aOlicted with lunacy. 

Idiocy. 
The nuinber of idiots of both sexes enumerated in the censui 
was 106, against 144 in 1896 ; the proportion to 10.000 of popula- 
tion being 1 36 against 202 at the previous census. As M-ith lunacy, 
the proportion of idiocy umongst the males (liS per 10.000)]is 
higher than amongst the females (1*28). 




SECTION XI.— METEOBOLOGY. 



Tbupbbattjbb, Bainfai^, Atuospherio Fbessube, and Wihd, 

TBBonoHouT Nbw Zbaland, as obsebved at Eioht 

Stations, fob thb Year 1901. 



[From TabUa pn\ 
The Obsbstatiob 


^ared by Bv 


r JomM Bector.) 

UH AT 9.80 &.H. 




B WSBB TA] 






Temperfttnre 
InBbMle. 


BalnfaJt. 






Statlona knd UoaUu. 


1 


1 

3 




Fall. 


PnraUliu 
Wind. 


AaoUud (l*t- 86° 60' S. ; 


»F»hr. 


-Fahr. 


No. 


InohM. 


Inolia*. 




long. 1T4<' 60' 40" E. ; alt. 














lS6f(.). 














Janoftty 


790 


48-0 


16 


8-220 


29-960 


3W. 


February 




76-6 


60-5 


13 


3-980 


29-990 


SW. 


Marob 




740 


53-0 


16 


5110 


30-004 


SW. 


April 
1&7 




72-6 


46-5 


10 


1-120 


30-070 


NE, BW, SS. 




66-5 


420 


18 


0-980 


30100 


8W. 


Jane 




640 


370 


18 


2-750 


80 090 


NE, BE. 


Jnl7 




590 


380 


26 


9-140 


29-790 


NE, SW. 


Aogait 


'. 620 


39-6 


13 


S-220 


80130 


SW, NE. 


SepMmber . 


. . 64 0. 


460 


12 


0-850 


30-170 


SW, NE. 


OotoboT 




72 


440 


10 


8-110 


30-130 


NE, 8W, BE. 


N<ivamber . 




700 


48-0 


11 


1.440 


80-080 


SW.S. 


December 




750 


510 


14 


8-570 


29-820 


SW. NW. NE 


Botoma (lat. 38° 9' 8.; 
long, lit' 15' E.; alt. 


























SBOft.). 














Jannary 


910 


350 


12 


8-610 


30-060 


W, N, SW. 


February 






850 


41-5 


10 


6-690 


80-310 


N. NW. 


Maroh 






80-0 


37-5 


10 


8-780 


30-150 


SW. 


April 
Hay 






76-0 


81-5 


12 


1-240 


30-260 


SW, 8. 






70-0 


28-0 


5 


0-680 


30190 


SW, W. 


Jose 






610 


39-0 


17 


6-280 


80-300 


N, SW. 


July 






610 


26-0 


16 


6-920 


29-820 


SW, W. 


Angaet 






66-0 


27-0 


12 


8-220 


30-370 


SW. 


September . 






66 


330 


13 


3060 


80-310 


N, SW, W. 


Ootober 






77-0 


29-0 


8 


2-980 


30-290 


N, NW. 


HoTember 






78-6 


84-0 


6 


1-200 


30-280 


SW, W. 


December 






800 


38-0 


15 


8-040 


29-960 


SW, W. 



H fi68 KIIW ZBAI^ND OFPIUIAL VRAK-BDOK. 


^^^^ SlKtlODS Hd UomtlR, 


■"isessfri JW"«"- 


^1 
^1 


Pra*klllBi 


s 


1 '•' 
1 *3 






« 


Fall. 


sl 






n 




31% 




V Haw I'lymouth |Ul. 39° 3' 


"Fthi. 


-Mbr. 


Kd. 


lasiiM. 


lasbea. 




■ 35" S.; ng. 17*= *' Sif 

■ B. ; ftlk. lOOft. 












,, 


1 ■ 






■ "' 


- - ,- 




^H Jknuiuy 


S40 


ja-c 


IB 


3-740 


29-990 


W. NB. 


^H PutiEuaty 


81-0 


47 


IT 


4-550 


30110 


W. 3W. 


^H llfLTC^h 


60-0 


45-0 


SI 


2-840 


30103 


SS. H. 


■ Mity 


87>0 


800 


15 


3-510 


50' 3 10 


NW, SB. 


ea-0 


84 


35 


3 415 


30160 


8W, NW. 


^H Juno 


Bi'O 


320 


39 


7440 


30'210 


NE, S, 


H Jul;r 


8*0 


SO-0 


36 


H-390 


3iK840 


SE. 


^H AngUBt 


340 


310 


19 


3-820 


30210 


SE. SW. 


^V SapLcmbet 


8ft-0 


970 


20 


4-850 


30-250 


NE, 8W. 


^H Oou>b«r 


9i'0 


82-0 


17 


S930 


80 340 


NE. SW. 


^B Noreinber .. 


gs-0 


86-0 


19 


3850 


30-150 


SW. NW. 


^M DtfMiobor 


80'O 


400 


25 


B'G05 


30-860 


SW. NW, NE. 


H WvlUngUiD |lat. 41° IC 9fi" 














■ 8.: long. 174° 47' 25" E.; 














■ Alt. uuri). 














^1 Jftsuai? 


79 '0 


41-0 


la 


4143 


29-651 


NW. 


^B Februftty 






7E-0 


460 


IS 


8-650 


30-963 


NW, N. SB. 


^H MftToh 




' 


78 ■« 


450 


ifi 


S046 


39-997 8, NW. 


^H April 






74-0 


87-0 


11 


9-346 


80-059 


NW. j^^ 






6fi0 


86-0 


11 


1-U43 


29-977 


NW. ^H 


^H June 






68'0 


32-0 


17 


4-470 


30-042 


NW, S. ^H 


^1 ^tily 






aao 


300 


30 


5 496 


29 -763 


8, NW. ^H 


^1 August 






S9-3 


8S-0 


13 


8-550 


80-085 


NW, S. ^H 


&8pUiiib«t 






M-5 


39-0 


17 


5-319 


30-081 


NW. 8. ^1 


OoCobw 






6r.u 


iOK 


14 


a-4fi0 


80053 


NW. 1 


Norember 






786 


38-0 


15. 


S180 


29 965 


NW, N, 8. 1 


Doooiaber 






755 


44-0 


IS 


8iJ36 


29-480 


NW. N. 8. I 


EoUlika fl&t. 43° 41' 30* S. ; 












m 


tang. 170° 49' B.; all. 












^M 


12 a.). 












■ 


JaouMy 


88 


41-6 


la 


10 490 


39841 


SW. NW. ^1 


Fftbrau; 


BO 5 


48-0 


11 


8-flUO 


29-984 


SW. 


UAnh 


C9 


41-0 


11 


9-500 


29-960 


SW.NW. 


AptU 


790 


31-0 


16 


12-100 


S0-06« 


SW. NW. 


e7 


32-0 


19 


I42r>0 


30 022 


SW. NW. B. 


iOD* 


fi50 


39-0 


16 


15-790 


30 022 


NW. E. 


JuJ/ 


670 


ae-o 


10 


8-WO 


29-727 


E. 


AOfU*! 


600 


as-o 


18 


9-490 


30-106 


SW, B- 1 


September . . 


64S 


350 


19 


LI 340 


30104 


SW. NW. ^m 


0<»ob«r 


64 


83-0 


18 


12C30 


80-050 


SW, NW. ^H 


Kovuaber .. 


£60 


a»« 


ao HO 


30 003 


iSW. NW. ^H 


DHoraWr . . 


76-0 41*6 1 18 I6'f/J() : 89'710 1 8W, »W. ^H 



■■P 


HBTBObOXiOQV. 


m ^J 


^1 BUttoaa aad HodUib. 


Ampeimttire 

to ttbwdo. 


fUlotell- 




Wind. ^^M 


8 

iF 

R 


1 


si 

H 


Fkll. 


^H Uaoola College, O&ater- 


"Pfthr, 


•F»hr. 


No. 


I&eht*. 


iDOltM, 


m 


H bory (lAt- 4^° ^''i' 16" S> : 














H loeg. 172° 88' CiT B. : ait, 












^^^H 


■ GSft.) 












■ 


^H JftBU&ry 


Hi-fi 


«B0 


11 


3 -870 


29-787 


NE, SW. ^H 


^^^ Fobrukry 


83-0 


390 


11 


1-MS 


29 911 


NB, 8W. ^^1 


^^^^B Hvoh 


tus 


388 


IS 


1-470 


39-967 


NB, 8W. ^^1 


^^^B ApHl 


81 -G 


26-G 


11 


9-000 


29-977 


HB.SW. ^H 


^^^V Hft7 


75-2 


23-8 


6 


1-031 


30 892 


NB. SW. ^^1 


^H Jun« 


73-9 


Sl'l 


7 


0660 


30 070 


NE. RW. ^^1 


H July 


Sii 


3S-0 


31 


6-345 


30 '838 


SW.XE. ^H 


^H Augnfli 


71-0 


S3' 6 


9 


0-835 


SO'OSl 


NR. SW. ^H 


^H S«pU>mb»r 


72-6 


290 


9 


0-455 


30-003 


SW, NE. ^H 


^^B Octobar 


85-1 


32-4 


4 


0-910 


29S&1 


NK. NW, ^^ 


^H Kov^mbsr 


ai-9 


34-9 


10 


1-430 


29 837 


NW, K£. BB, 1 
SW. ■ 


^H DeoembAf 


81*0 


«l-8 


17 


3-745 


29 657 


SW. NE. NW, ■ 


^B Doawdin {Ist. 4A° 53' 11" S. : 












M 


^1 long. 170° 81' 7" E. ; alt. 














■ SOUfM. 












■ 


^1 JaDDary 


82-0 


38-0 


16 


7-640 


29-718 


SW, w. ^H 


^H Pebniikry 


6»-0 


43-0 


16 


4>642 


23-Ra5 


w, SW. ^H 


^^ft U&rcln 


750 


380 


14 


1-758 


L'9-8'.l^ ' ME, B.Vi. ^H 


^1 ApiiJ 


75-0 


33-0 


14 


S'SOO 


29-873 SW. ^H 


61-0 


80 


16 


4-804 


20-782 


SW. ^m 


^H Jtuui 


66-0 


sa-o 


5 


1-456 


39-509 


N. NIC, SW. ^H 


^1 Jul; 


fiO« 


250 


14 


8-eoti 


29-27M 


^H 


^^B Auguiil 


600 


30 


10 


S9Ga 


39'944 


SW, NE. 


^H September . . 


670 


31-0 


1-3 


1-29(3 


29-8&4 


NE. W. 


^^F OotDboT 


lS-0 


320 


10 


1884 


29-701 


W, NE. 


^^1 NoTi^mber 


76-0 


.44 


16 


2(>42 


a9-711 


SW. w. 


^^^^^ I>EioembeE 


70-0 


38-0 


24 


3'7« 


29-625 


N. WE, SW. 


^^^iftlhun iRl&nJa (tat. 43°SS' 














■ S. : long. 170" 12' W.; alt. 














■ lOOft.). 














^H Januftry 


71-0 


40-0 


14 


C-S40 


29-680 


NW. SE. SW. 


^H February 


68-0 


43 


9 


1-610 


29-TdO 


NW. SW. 


^B M»rch 


86-0 


89-0 


16 


3170 


29-450 


HE. SW, 


^H April 


66-0 


39-0 . 


14 


2-&70 


29B50 


N. SW. ^H 


63-0 


3fiO 


17 


1-690 


29-640 


■SW. N. ^H 


^^1 June 


69-0 


31-0 


16 


L-$80 


99060 


N, SE. ^H 


^M 


6S-0 


81-0 


24 


2-740 


99-520 


^H 


^^M AiigUNt 


06-0 


31-0 


-21 


3950 


S0'7GO 


gW. S, ^^ 


^^M Scptomb«r 


S8-0 


320 


15 


2-820 


29880 


SW. N. NW. 1 


^H October 


63-0 


3fi-0 


10 


O-RUO 


29830 


SW, N, NW. 1 


^^M Novembei 


670 


84-0 


18 


2-2G0 


29 680 


aw.NW. ^H 


^^B Decemb«E 


7O-0 400 


17 


3-770 


29 580 


NW. ^^^H 



870 



SKW CBAikUm omout txab-book. 



EiGEa SunoBB : CoMPAE&Tmt Table ; Tbab 1901. 



auUoaa. 



Tmn 

tD 



Rainfall 



3 

K 



3. 

Il 



s „ • FkU. 
udOMa. 



PranillBc 
Wlad. 



Botortw 

Jf ew PI jnuMrth 

WfllUagioo ... 

Uneoln 
Donedln 



"Fkhr. 

eJuk 
si-o. 

SJu. 

WD. 
UNor. 

19 Jul 
83-Ot 

aj*a. 
ws, 

9JU. 

ss-o. 

14 Feb. 

71-0, 
6 Jui. 



■Pkbr. 

»ro. 

8S.9GJ1UW 


i No.1 
. in 

: 


TJnlr 


ua 


TJulj 


! ats 


90111 
SJatr 


' 175 


980, 
7 July 


UB 


flSJiUM 


184 


2SA 
tJnlT 


173 


SI* 

lS.83JalT 
SAng. 


160 



ladiw. IiMllMa. i 
IWa. afrHOB i8W.NB,NW. 



8W. N. W. 
SE, SW, KB. 
NW.8. 
aw. HW. 

mtiBw.irw. 

SW, NS, W. 
8W, K, NW. 



llAoc. 


atm 


3«|. 
19 Deo. 


ao-iii 


27B«pt. 


9Mn 


8Dw9. 


anT4 


l-flBO. 
MJnly 


»m 


1-71* 
9SJM1. 


flBT44 


IKH 
ISJmi. 


»T18 






iJ 



\s 



5| 



I' 
<^ 

IS 

11 

Is I. 



n 



1'-^ 



^ fc a e a •¥^7'?'? ?st b s gs| 



8x^28 5:?= s s aa 



?■* S S a 8 8 S 3 g 3 



TST"- 



S £ 



3 S 



a e a 3 sssss «3s s e: 



^S&SS333&33;:S S;:S5lS SRS g S fej 



?S S 6^ S 8 a_8 S_a jE S g 38S3S SSS 3 



:.SS 



^b 3 3 :S 3 



3 S S 8 S P 8 3S&8S SSa El 



sa 



?S3CEeSf!SSS3t: SSE^SS S^S £ « 



^S 


3 


oi 


S 


?7 


s 


3 


2 


F> 


»* 


5 


S 


i-ofc nra 


;;;3 




s 


ea 


S^S 


IS 


9 


S 


■* 
t- 


at 


s 


s 




a 


S 


■a 

t- 


S o&^sF 




^ 


a 


as 


fS 


R 


R 


» 


« 


fc 


IS 


X 


^ 




s 


3 
S 


«S3S9 


355 


e 


e 


di: 


g:a 


e 


3 


3 


S 


e 


a 


s 


s 


SSs:zS 


£63 


3 


s 


88 


^s 


9! 


^ 

* 


K 


s 


fi 






s 




f! 


3 


:s3st9 


ssi; 


s 


e 


ilEl 


^a 


e 


% 


3 


& 


E 


ie 


s 


E 


5> 


8 


P 


sssec 


ggg 


s 


s 


«8 



^sssftsssaaass sngaas sss b a ee 



^s^l!sell^ss^s^ P£E?^ sc;: 2 a sa 



^3 s 



3 B S« 



5 3 f^ £ 3s?ias "'as S 8 3S 



^f. s 



s s 



3 S S 5 S SSSSS S^S 3 3 3S 



t-3 3 8 3 S 



a SEE •*-'S"» j^s;] a & aa 



^g 



XS8S82Sl:i!3 S3!;S!: 3SS 



8X 



3 S ? S 3 S 



s " 3 



S e. C '?2T?'? BflT 6 8 



^SSSSSSSSSSSS SSSS^ S?3S 3 S S& 





t 



SECTION XU.— THE MAORI POPCLATION. 

The cenatu of the Maori popnUtion — that is, (nll-blooded Uaoril^ 
with a.11 haJf<cMtes living as membera of a Kative tribe-~was tAfces 
tinrler the flopenrisjon of the officerti of the Jofttioe Department in 
the Utter pan of Pebrnary, 1901. The eatimeratioD of the Kafcirei 
cannot b« effected for one particalar night, as is done with £aro- 
peaos, bat it is done as quickly and thoroughly as is possible onder 
the circtunstances existing. 

The enumeration was made to state the names of the Natives lo 
the Sub- Enumerator's books, besides iaformatran as to sex, a^, 
phn«ip«l tribe, sab-tribe, or hapu to which belonging, and particolan 
as to extent of oultiTations owned itMUviduailj or communally, ynth 
live stock. 

Enumerators for the Maori censaa were directed to report on the 
health of the Natirea, which is stated to have been generally good — 
that is, no epidemic dtSBaae was observed, though occasioD&l out- 
breaks of influenaa, fevers, Sec., had happened since 1896. 

The departmental rfiport of 1st June. 1901. comments thus : — 

As » knowledge of uoiitu? lam iocKuei &tiion(; tb« Msori* It may b« 
ezpMt«d Ibat certain oaium oI diseua will gr&du^lj dUappeai. Bat it ii lue- 
IsM to •xpeot tb« aociftl h«bit« of a people t» conform to Miotbcr nbuidard all at 
oaoo. Wbiltitit tni* that social oonaition* Brn ■tiscaptibta of fttmost inHnita 
osoilf flealion, it » oqnalljr iraa that suoh mod location can oecnr onljr kft«r lon^ 
pennd* ol time. 

Tbe di0u«h>a ot koowledgt^ miui. Mud to upUd tba Hawia. Tb« tcamlooB- 
lag powcn o( edacation and uficciaiion an ai work, and must in tim« bav* tbati 
tBtcl. Tbo villiigo ccbools are sicadity improTin^ tbc Kcn«ral atandard el know- 
tcdgti unong tba Miuih people m* * whoSe, while th« higher sclioolg turn out a 
namber of lnt«lli(i«Dt voun^ fellow* who w«Dt oaly the oppoitnnfty to chow tba 
valuo of tba irsiniiig t^oy hara reoeind. SoltabU oponiDgE \a tbo public tarrioa 
ate limited, hot tb<r Qovorcinorit bos displitjed a cTinpathetic regard for da- 
kvrving Majan jouth* wharjvRr poiiatbla- Thare »te uow two Nttitive meidlcal 
•tudtnta attondiag the Otaso Oninniily. and the receut &ppointiD»Dt ol Dr. 
Ponan as Nati*e Health Offloer is «xpc«lfrd to do mueb ^ood in tba diraotloa ol 
•aaitary and social reform, ftfuch alto is hnpod from tbo MMri CoanoiU AeS o( 
U«t •omIod, which confer! on tho Sativr.a a limitod moKsura of local aelf-KOverti. 
tneot, and eDabios tfaom to rcgiilat« mud couttol babiu and cuitomi whi^jb aie 
barmtiil alike to the individual and the commanitj. Many of tbe older ohiab, 
as well Mi the eduoled vbungpr gcDer&tioo, a,c« nhowiog » vrry intalli|^t 
iatareat in the reform movement, but they w&ot to ho Bhown whkt to do and 
bow 10 do It. . . . 

Tbc tepotte of the Ennraaralora and Bab.enumeratora contain mttob of' 
ialarcftt. Ciime doea not ptevail Jd Any marked degree. The Mativca ae awhola 
are bacomiog more aod more letnpeiate every ycnt. The drunken otgi«a that 
won once common are lu a groat meaeure tbingv of the pact. In several ot the 
reports raferenoe is made to their ado^iion of the Kuropean style of living ; some 
are abeep-larmera, othera cultivate ttietr land, while otbere again engsco in 
various focms of reuiuerative labour. Every year tbe episad of sstusmeok 
brings tb«m into olosor toucb with tboir pakeba neighbour, and tnbjscu tbem 
to the inlluancn of Karopean axampls. Their ultimate deatinj uuil remaio a 
maCtor ol tjrooulatioD. 

Tbe proportion of the Maori population to tbat of European 



1 

-* 

^ 



••Ill 



MAORI POPCL&TIO}). 



273 



descent was iu tbe yearH 1396 aQd 1901 oue Maori tc every eighteen 
Europeanii. It is in the North Island that the proportioo ol Maoris 
to EuropeaDB is by lar the bigbeat, being one iu every tun, againtii 
one in one humired and eighty-nine £or the South and Stewart 
Islands. 

The percentage of each race to the population was: — 

Bnropo&n 

Pw Cent. 

90-50 



Nritth Iiland 
Middle IsJhdcI .. 
Suioftrt Itlftnd .. 



93-50 
70-83 
49-S2 



Maarl 
Per Cent. 

an 

0-50 

29-n 

60-4a 



In February, 1901, the nnmbar of Maoris on the principal islands 
of New Zealand was as shown hereunder: — 



HKorii. 



North Island .. 
MiddlcUI&nd.. 
Steviatt I&hLTid 
Ch&tb&m Isluidfl — 

Mkoiiti .. 

Morioriit 
M«ori wiroi living wUh 

Eiuropeaa tauibfuids .. 



Hall-«utea llvliiA »■ Uem- 
bora of MbotI Trlbai |Ib- 
cludtd In ths prsMdiuK 
Hu ui bsri )■ 



1,9U9 

112 

180 
31 

196 



1,022 
6C 

90 
15 



18,790 
887 
16 

90 
Itt 

196 



3,617 

651 

13 

84 
18 



1,879 
5 

14 

8 



1.138 

969 

S 

SO 
10 



TolAli .. 43,148 23,112 20,031 8,198 1.694 1,489 

Besides the half-castes included in the above table, there n-cre 
2,407 balf-costeB (males, 1,188 : females, 1,319) living with and 
enumerated as Europeans at the time of the census. 

The above total of 43,143 ebowa an increase on the population as 
enumerated in 1806 of 3,289 pcreons. But the figures for 1896 
showed a largo decrease, and the increase for the period 1896-1901 
19 too great to be taken as an absolate fact — at least to the full 
extent shown. That some degree of increase has recently taken 
place is highly probable, although averaging the results of the 
different eiiunierations of Maoris made since 1878 conreys the idea 
ol a stfttionavy population. 



Ijft . 1681 .. .. .. 44,007 
^B 1886 .... .. 41.91)9 
Wm 1691 ... .. 41,903 
T,- 1896 39,854 

1901 .. .. .. ' .. ti,143 

Half-castbb. 
The haU-oaste population couaistft of tboso who live as members 
of Maori tribes, oud othcru iiviu^ with aud couaced as Europeans in 
the ceiisus. Adding the numbers of the two kiuds gives the foUow- 
iug figures for tbrue censuses : — 



HaO&E POFOI>iiTlaK AS BMimERATBD, 1874 TO 1901. 

Parnoni. iDoraaan, BacraMe. 
1871 (Bril oeoaai) .. « 15,470 

1879 .. .. 43,595 

1881 
1886 
1691 
1896 
1901 



fioa. 

^4 
8,SS9 



1.S76 
2,128 
2^189 





I 



un a,6ai a,i$< 4.b6« 

UM 3.S08 t.S» S.Ttt 

1901 .. 3.ISS i,i01 S,HO 

U«re the half-caat«« who were living as membets of cribeB are 
thowo M decreMing ia Dumber since 1896, while tboM liriDg as 
EanpeUH inerMMd at both periods iiader review. 

PSOPOitTIOKfl AT DIPrKKENT AOB-OROCPS. 
ft hM been aca^ed ;hat the incidase shown by the cenaos of 1901 
in Ui0 Maori popul&tioD can scarcely be considered a c«rtainty (o 
th« full degree exhibited. The proportions of the people under and 
over fifteen ye\n are now given (or six successive census years, and 
the Sgures for 1896 and 1901 tend to show a growing proportioD at 
the earlier ages. 

PBOrOBTIOKS FEB lOO pEBSONS IjimiO. — MaORII. 




Fan^M. 



Cater u Tme«. 


OwlSTwn 


37-89 


<a-u 


36-da 


68'U_ 


as-as 


M-TM 


as-M 


flS^ 


a4«i 


6sse 


81-6S 


68 87 



DndarlS Tcv«. Onr IS Y««r«. 

85-75 &i%'> 

»■» ^-li 

88'9S fi£-7a 

ai-M 68 36 

98-«5 ee 35 

8900 6frO0 

The proportioDB per cent, under 15 years of the young p««op]e of 
-either sex are somewhat different from those found in the Kuropeaa 
populaliciu, vii;.: Males under 15, 32 '24 ; over 15 years, 67*76 ; 
tad females under 15. 3466; and over 15 years, 65-34. 

Tbibbs. 
Of the pnucipaJ tribes residing in the North Island, the Ngapohi 
again shows the greatest number of persons, and the next in im- 
portsnce was Ngaiii£&bunt;uiiu. Waikato and Ngatiporou had over 
four thousand pemonH Uviug. The Arawa bad over three thousand, 
Ngatiraulcawa, Karawa, and Wanganui between two and three 
thousand each. A complete statement is given : — 



^nncipai TnbM tit fA« Sorth Isbimd. 



Hgapohi 

HcUlkahungana . . 
WikUtsto 
NB"t'poroti 
Arawa . . 
Bar^wa .. 
I'Whangftnai 
Hgalinokavra 
Ngkttana 

Hgk.ttmaniftpoto . . 
HgiitluiarD 




POfWun. 
«,&«) 
fi.OU 
4,457 
4.158 
8,547 

a.e4S 

2.337 

3,064 
1,701 
1,570 
1.350 



UrQw«ra 
N|!aiterangi 

NflAtlfUkDUi 

Wbanftu-a-Apanui 

Tacaaakl 

Whakatobta 

Ngatiwhataa 




HAOBI POPULATION. 



370 



Principal Tribes in the Sottth Island. 



Ngatikahacgonii 

Waikftto .. 
Otfaen 



Principal Tribe in Stewart Island, 

Kgfttikahnagonn 

Principal Tribes in Chatham Islands, 

NgfttiAwa 

Moriorl . . . . . . . . 



Penoni. 

1,549 

311 

86 

64 



1,909 



P«noDi. 

. lis 



Psnosa. 
. 180 
. 81 

311 



The total number of Maoris enamerated in each county is added, 
as showing the localisation of the Natives throughout the colony. 
Farther particulars as to sex, age, Ac, will be found in the complete 
tables belonging to Appendix B of the Census volume :~~ 

ConntlM. Perrcna. 

HoQgonai .. .. 3,093 

Whftngaroa 743 

Hokiacgft .. 3,830 

BkyodsIaodB .. .. 3.3Sfi 

Hobton .. 984 

Wbanguei 739 

OtUDfttM 186 

Bodne; .. .. 173 

Waitemfttft 171 

Bden .. 323 

' Onat Baxrier Isluid . . 37 

WaiheksIflUnd .. 70 

ManukftQ 734 

Ooromftndfll 665 

ThameH .. 774 

Ohinamtul 630 

Pisko 409 

Wftikftto 963 

. Wftlpft .. 336 

B«gUn .. .. 1,499 

Eswbift .. .. 1,649 

WMtTftupo .. 1.130 

EutTaapo 651 

Rotoraa . . 971 

Tftonuiga .. 1,301 

Wbftkfttana .. 3,170 

Waiapa .. .. 3,474 

Cook .. .. .. 1,803 

Clifton .. 420 

TaraDkU .. 1,030 

Stratford 43 

Hawen .. 853 

Patoa 274 

Waitotara and Wanganal.. 1,689 



ConntiM. 


Fenoni. 


Rangitikei 


459 


Oroua 


. .. 433 


PohaDgioa 


a 


Man a w At u 


353 


HoTOwhenua 


.. 1,036 


Wftiroa .. 


.. 1,991 


Hawke's Bay 


.. 1,605 


Wftipawa 


403 


PaCftDgata 


181 


Fabiataa 


31 


Wairuapa North 


337 


Watrarapa Soath 


476 


Hatt 


364 


SoandB .. 


363 


MarlbotODgh 


79 


Kalkouca 


78 


Col ling wood 


33 


Waimea . . 


107 


BuUsr . . 


23 


WeBtland 


60 


Ashley . . 


. . 188 


Selvyn . . 


56 


Akaroa . . 


393 


LevelB and Oerald 


ine . . 134 


Waimate 


65 


Waitaki .. 


117 


Waikouaiti 


168 


PeniDBiila 


93 


Taieri . . 


43 


Olutha .. 


23 


Southland 


a 


Wallaca . . 


98 


Stewart Island 


113 


Chatham lalanda . 


311 



SECTION XUI.— LAW AND CRIME. 
Cmt, Cases. 

SiTTiKOa of the Supreme Court are held for trial of civil cams 
at Auckland, Qisborne, New Plymouth, Napier, Welliagton, and 
Wanganoi, in the North Island ; and at Blenheim, Nelson, Hokitika, 
C^uistchurch, Timani, Oamaru, Dunedin, and Invercargill, in the 
Middle Island. 

The number of writs of snraraona issned in the Supreme Coart in 
1900 wa« 414, against 511 in 1899, 426 in 1898, 460 in 1897, 629 in 
1896, and 511 in 1695. The number of civil eases tried decreaa«l 
from 157 in 1899 to 145 in 1900. Of these last, 39 were tried Lwfore 
common juries, 10 by special jury, and 96 by Judge without jury. 
The total of amounta for which judgments were recorded in 1900 
was £31,435. There were 42 vrrita of execution issued during the 
year. 

Thirty-four cases were commenced at seventeen District Coarte 
in 1900. Four of these casea were tried before juries, and 15 before 
a Jadge only, making a total of 19 cases tried. Fifteen casea 
lapsed or were iliscontiuued. The total of amounts sued for waa 
£6,269, and judgments were rucordod for £1,291. Before the 
HagJBtrateB' Courts 19,816 cases w^re tried, against 28,095 in 1899; 
the aggregate sum sued for during 1900 being £286,719, and the 
total for which judgment was given £167,224. 

CoTTET OF Appeal. 
Throe Crown (criminal) cases were reserved from the Buperior 
Courts to bo brought before the Court of Appeal in 1900. In two 
caMM the oonvicuons were aflirmed. and in one tbo conTiclton wma 
quashed. There were appeals from 'Zl civil cases, of which 13 were 
allowed and 14 dismissed. Judgments were given on 5 othar cases 
removed to the Court of Appeal. 

Bankuuptot. 

Thtt petitions in bankinptcy durmg 1900 numbered 304, of which 
268 were' made by debtors and 3i) by creditors. Tliis number is 
85 fewer thau the number of petitions for the preceding year. 

Of the. tatikruptdes in 1900: in 11 cases the liabilities were 
under £50; iu 73. from £50 to £100; in 84, from £100 to £350; 
in 70. from £250 to £500; in 41, from £500 to £1,000; in 13. from 
£1.000 to ;£2,00O ; iu 9. from £2,000 to £5,000 ; in 3, £5,000 and 
upwards. 



DIVORCB. 



277 



Tbe following gives the numhttr of petitiona, the tota.1 amount 
of the uu»ecured assets, the amount of ^eblH proved, and the 
ainouDt paid in dividends and prelereutial claims (or the year» 
1896 10 1900 :— 



I 



^ 




D*bl0r*' 




1 






No. of 


State menu of 
Auau, 

AtnoitDU 
tAonrad M 


ADiunnM 




AmoniiUpAlil 


J 


Pnililona 


rcRJIOBd by 


Amoitat of 


^^^M^fr 


jn B»nk- 


OH)«iHl 


Debt* proved- 


null Preterutt- 


^^^^^^ 


ruptor. 


JlHiBiioi.'*. 




cUl Claliuk- 


^^^^ 




OMdIion. 












< 


J 


< 


J 


1896 


•113 


ii&.iAe 


7l,71S 


356, (no 


3T.«tt 


ISO? 


•IIS 


73,4BB 


40,943 


138,344 


46,0X6 


189B 


407 


90,06R 


4A,474 


aafl.iM 


30,994 


IBM 


aeo 


fig.id4 


S4,363 


i6S,d3i 


SO, 084 


iflon 


804 


77.699 


S».413 


141.600 


37,411 



A special ariiclii on the proseiit haiikniptcy law of New Zcjalaiid 
wasprinCcil in the YBar-hook of IH'94. Reference is tnnHo in it to n 
mode of private assignment, which has come into such frequent 
use as to militate against conclusions betog drawn from a com- 
parisoo of the fibres above given. 

DiVOttCE. 

In 1698 the Legislature of Nqw ^^Baland passed a Divorce Act, 
and the signification of Her Majesty's aS!U3nt thereto was duly 
notified by His Excellency the Governor in a Proclamation dated 
the Iflt April, IflOD. 

This Act places persona of either sex practically on an equality 
fts rcRards petitions for dissolution of marriage; Uit- saiiif; grounds. 
Id substance, for a decree of divorce applyiug to umu or wauian. 

Beaide* this important alteratiou of the law, the grounds for 
divorce aru extended as under ; — 

1. Adultery, on either side. 

2. Wilful desertion continuously during 6ve years or more. 

3. Qabiiual drunkenness on the part of husbaud, along with 

failing to support wife, ordrunkenneBs and neglect, withuD- 
QtQGss to discharge household duties ou the part of the wife. 

4. Conviction, with sentence of imprisonment or penal servitude 

for aevcD ycara or upwards, for attemptiug to take life of 

petitioner. 

Every decree for dissolution of marriage is in the first hi^stance to 

be a ducree nut, not to bo made absolute till after the expiration of 

such tinio, bein^ not less than throe months from the pronouncing 

thereof, as the Court shall by order from time to time direct. 

The petitioner netid not neceasarily move to make absolute any 
decree mti that may be pronounced. 

A decree for a judicial separation may be obtained either by the 
husband or wife on the ground of adultery, or of cruelty, or of deser- 
tion without cause for a period of two years. 
19— Y«ar-book 





srta 



NBW ZEALAND OTVtOUX YKAK-ROOK. 



The petitions in 1900 under "The Djvoroe and Malrimooial 
'Ouues Act, 1B67," were 116 in numberi being 3 iu excess of those 
(or 1899: 111 were for dissolution of marriage, and 5 for judicial 
■ep&ratioD ; 85 decrees for dissolution oE inaniage wuru granted. 
mad 3 for judicial etiparaiion. Tim proceedings under the Act for 
the years 16^6 to IIKX), were as follows : — 





PadlioDs lor 


DvcrNiftr 


riMT. 










DlnplaU«ii of JmUoia] 


Dltaolnttoa of 


JuiieUl 




MmtI^^ 


a*p*a.aaa. 


Uaniic*. 


8<f tarioM 


1886 


sa 


6 


90 


3 


UOT 


IS 


10 


S3 


1 


1898 


51 


18 


83 


8 


1B99 


iia 


1 


M 


10 


MOO 


lU 


4 


65 


8 



Tile new Act has evidently operated in the direction of inoreaaiiiR 
largely (but probably in the main temporarily) the number m 
petitions and decreen for dissolution of marriage or jadknal sepank 
tioa. 

The proportion of petitions and decrees for dissolation of marriage 
to the number of marriages was np till 1898 b^her in New Zcal&ra 
than in England and Wales, but lower than in New South Wales 
or Victoria. The full effect of the operation of the new law io 
New Zealand ha« now, however, to be experienced. 

As early as 1889 an Act was passed in Victoria to allow of 
divorces being grtiMtvd for wilful desertion, habitual drankenoess 
with cruelty or neglect, iinpmonmeut under certain circuinstauces 
of either party, and adultery on the part of the husband. This 
multiplication of the causes for divorce has largely iacrcased the 
proportion of decrees in that State. 

An Act of a similar tenor was passed in New South Wales tD 
189"^, and brought into working* in August of that year, under 
which, and an aineudiug Act of 1H93, in ailiiition to adultery since 
marriAge on the part of the wift?, and adultery and cruelty on the 
part of the husband, putitions for divorce can now be graaied in 
shat State on any of the following grounds: — 

Husband r. wife : Desertion for not less than three years ; 
habitual drunkenness for a similar period ; refusing to obey 
an order for restitution of conjugal rights ; benig imprisoned 
under a sentence of three years or upwards ; attempt to mur- 
der or inflict grievous bodily barm, or repeated assaults on 
him within one year previously. 
Wife V. husband : Adultery, provided that at the time of ihe 
institution of the suit the husband is domiciled in New South 
Wales ; desertion for not less thau three years ; habitual 
druukenness for the same period ; refusing to obey an ordet 



OBUflNAIi OABBS. 



379 



for restitation of conjugal rights ; being imprisoned for three 

years or upwards, or having within five years undergone 

various sentences amounting in all to not less than three 

years; attempt to murder, or assault with intent to inflict 

grievous bodily harm, or repeated assaults within one year 

previously. 

To entitle either party to seek relief on these grounds, he or she 

must have been domiciled in the State at the time of institutine 

the suit for three years or upwards, and should not have resorted 

to the State for the purpose of the suit. When a wife seeks for a 

decree on the wound of three years' desertion, if she was domiciled 

in New South Wales when the desertion commenced, she shall not 

be deemed to have lost her domicile by reason of her husband 

having thereafter acquired a foreign domicile. 

The divorces and separations in New South Wales and Victoria 
since the divorce law has been altered in the direction of increasing 
the grounds for decrees are as under. With these are given the 
figures for New Zealand under the old law up to 1898, and according 
to the new Act for 1899 and 1900. The figures for New South 
Wales tend to show that on altering the law there was a large 
accumulation of cases to get rid of, which increased the number 
of decrees to a degree which was not subsequently maintained. 





New Bontta W«lea. 


VIctorlK. 

1 ^ 


New Zealand. 


Tmt. 


DivoioM 


Judfoial 
BepaiatlonB. 


DiToroM. 


Judicial 
Separations. 


Dlvoraee 


Judicial 
Separations. 


1693 . 


306 


9 


85 


7 


25 


1 


1691 . 


313 


14 


81 


2 


20 


4 


1895 . 


301 


11 


85 


■ f 


18 


5 


1896 . 


234 


8 


106 


2 


36 


2 


1897 . 


246 


13 


117 


. . 


33 


1 


1898 . 


247 


17 


87 


.. 


32 


2 


1899* . 


. . 


. - 


, , 


. . 


46 


16 


1900' . 


. 




. , 


. . 


85 


3 






*AotofI89Bl 

Cbis 


n force in New Zealand. 

HNAL Cases. 







Charges before Magistrates. 

The number of charges heard before the Magistrates' Courts in 
1900 was 25,015. Repeated charges against the same person are 
counted as distinct. Of the charges in l!K)0, 355 were against 
persons of the aboriginal native race, a decrease of 66 on the 
number for the previous year. 

If the Maoris be excluded, the number of charges in 1900 is 
found to have been 24,690, an increase of 2,016 upon the number 
for 1899; and the proportion per 1,000 of population was 32-34, 
against 30-23 in 1899. 

The figures, both numerical and proportional, covering a period 
of nineteen years are subjoined : — 



280 



NBW ZXA[<A1ID OFFIOIAIj TBAB-BOOK. 



Ohabgbs BBroRB Maqibtb&tbb. 







Proportion 


Twr. 


Hamber. 


per 1,000 of 

Meui 
Population. 


lesa 


22,108 


48-41 


1885 


22,709 


39-61 


1888 


18,629 


30-88 


IBBl 


17,189 


27-29 


1694 


17,353 


25-55 



Tau. 



1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 



Number. 

19,949 
22,234 
22,671 
24,690 



Proportloa 

par 1,0)0 of 

Ueui 
Popnlatloii 

27-66 
3019 
30-23 
32-34 



Summary Convictions, and GonvictioTis in Superior Courts. 

The summary coDvictions in 1900 numbered 19,242, including 
263 Maoris. 773 persona, 27 of whom were Maoris, were committed 
for trial at the Supreme and District Courts, an increase of 63 od 
the number committed in 1899. 

Dealing with the summary convictions, and convictions in the 
superior Courts, for all offences, the figures for 1891 and onwards 
(excluding the Maoris) are : — 



YeuB. 

1891- 
Offenoes against tba penon 
OSences against property . . 
Other offonoes 

Totals . . 

1894— 
Uflenoes against the person 

ORences Kgaiost property .. 
Other ofisDces 

Totals . . 

1697— 
OfTeaoes against the person 
ORenocH afiainBC property .. 
Other ofleaoes 

Totals . . 

1899— 
Offences against the person 
Offences against property . . 
Other ofiunce^ 

Totals.. 

1900- 
Oflenoes against the penon 
Oflenoea against pniperty . . 
Other ofieiiccB 



Nnmber. 

751 

1,312 

10,988 



SOIOUBT 
CONTIOTIONS. 

Proportloa 
per 1.000 of 

Mean 

Population, 

1-19 

208 

17-45 



CoRvicmoKa ik 

BCrPBBlOB COUBTS. 

Proportion 

per ijaoa ot 

Ueoo 
PopalatioD 
005 
0-23 
0-07 



Nnmber. 

31 

141 

42 



18,051 



724 

1,284 

10,605 

12,613 



781 

1,412 

12,682 

14,875 



20-72 



1-07 

1-B9 

1561 

1867 



108 

1-96 

17-57 

20-Gl 



214 



0-8ft 



36 


006 


199 


0-29 


65 


010 



300 



0-44 



49 


OCT 


240 


0-33 


14 


003 



30S 



0-42 



678 

1 ,549 

15,069 


0-90 

2-07 

2008 


79 

273 

24 

376 

79 

271 

19 


Oil 
0-36 
0-03 


17,286 


23-06 


0-50 


724 

1,476 

16,789 


0-95 

193 

21-99 


0-10 
0-36 
0-02 



Totals . . 



18.989 



24-87 



369 



0-47 



DBUNKBNNBB8. 



281 



Inolnding 22 Maoris, the convictions in the superior Courts 
numbered 391 (persons). Particulars of sentences for these higher 
Courts, and of the punishments consequent on summary convictions 
in the lower Courts, are appended in two tables : — 

Tablb Bhowing the SentenaoB of CriminalB Tried and Oonvioted in the 
Sapisme uid DUtriot CourU daring Five Years. 



PuaUhmsnta. 


18W. 


1S97. 


1896. 


iQtfB. 


leoo. 


Death .. 

ImpriaonineDt with or withont hard labour. . 

Fined .. .. .. .. ' 

Impriaonment with whipping 
Bflteoeed under " The First Offendera' Proba- 
tion Act, 1886 " 
Held to bail, or awaiting pleasure of Court . . 
Sent to lunatic asylum 
Sent to indostris! sohool . . 


253 

1 

43 
13 

1 


2 

235 

3 

63 

12 

1 


3 

286 

19 

2 

50 

21 

3 

2 


306 
2 
2 

61 

12 


1 

266 
2 
2 

U 
25 

"l 


Totals .. 


•311 


+316 


:386 


g383 


11391 



* Including 10 Maorio. \ Inolnding IS Haorls. ] Inclnding 35 Maoris. J Inoluding 
7 Maoris. U Including 93 MaoTia. 



TiBUt showing the Punishments inflioted Doneequeat 

during Five Years. 


on Summary Oonviotions 


Punlahmeate. 


1896. 


I89T. 


1896. 


1899. 


1900. 


Pine 

Fine and imprisonment . . 
Fine and order made 
Pine and reoognisaooe .. 
ImpriBonment in lieu of fine 
Imprieonmeat and whipping 
Peremptory imprisonment 
Becognisanoe . . 
Whipping 
Other . . 


6,425 

"' 8 

4 

1,553 

li534 

7 
4,619 


6,821 
5 

li409 

1 

1,579 

123 

28 

4,909 


8,149 

1)410 

l[616 

111 

18 

5,336 


8,229 

1,762 

1,683 

118 

28 

5,466 


9,206 

i|895 

1^723 

121 

15 

6,029 


Totals .. 


14,149 


14,875 


16,642 


17,286 


18,989 



N.B.— Maoris have been excluded tram this (able. 

Drunkenness. 

During the five years, 1896 to 1900 inclusive, the consumption of 
beer in the colony per inhabitant would seem to have increased, 
the proportion having been 7*5 gallons in the earlier year, against 
8'7 gallons in the later one. Excluding the Maoris, the same 
result is found to obtain, the figures being 79 for the year 1896 
and 9-2 for 1900. Wine and spirits also show an increase in the 
consumption per head of population. 



282 



NSW ZEALAND OVVIOIAI. YBAB-BOOK. . 



The foUowiDg calcalatioQs ore made to show the resoltB, in- 
cluding and excluding MaoriB : — 

COBSUHPTIOB OF BSEB, WiMB, AHD SPIBITS PXB HkAD OF POPDLUIOH 
(tNCLDDIHO iSa BZCLDDIHO UaOBIS). 



IfiClUi 



^iM 



MurlB. 



Bzcladlng Mkoria. 



1896 
1897 
1896 
1899 
1900 



Be«r. 
Oftl. 
7-463 
7-790 
7-995 
8'150 
8-696 



Wine. 
Q&I. 

0-133 

0-138 

0139 

0141 

0-145 



BplrltB. 
Gal. 
0-605 
0-6!i8 
0-684 
0-653 
d-684 



B«Br. 

Qal. 
7-873 
8-320 
8-427 
8-563 
9-150 



Win*. 
Qal. 

0141 

0146 

0-146 

0-148 

0-163 



Spiiita. 

0-639 
0-663 
0-668 
0-687 
0-720 



The actual quantities of beer, wine, and spirits used in the 
colony were, for the fire years : — 



1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 



Boar lor 

ConsumptioQ. 

Gftla. 

5,565,040 

5,931.550 

6,204,700 

6,437,140 

6,936,900 



Wins (or 

OoaiumptloD. 

G&ls. 

99,473 

105,060 

107,695 

111,049 

116,188 



Spinto for 
Cotuamptlon. 

OklB. 

461,679 
478,136 
491 .846 
515,384 
649,933 



Excluding Maoris, the proportion of convictions for drunkenness 
per 1,000 of population was 9-18 in 1890, diminishing to G-60 in 
1895, 6-82 in 1896, 7-01 in 1897, 7-41 in 1898, and 8-26 in 1899, 
but increasing to 9-50 in 1900. The number of convictions to 
which the proportions for the years 1896 to 1900 relate were as 
under : — 

N amber. 



YBar. 
169C 

1897 
1698 



N amber. 
4,822 
5,060 
5,458 



Yoar. 
1899 
1900 



6,194 
7,S6S 



The totals of charges for drunkenness for the same years 
were : — 

Tear. Number. Year. Nam bar. 



1896 
1897 
1898 



4,916 


1699 


5,15G 


1900 


5.569 





6,979 
7,319 



Among the New - Zealand - born population of European de- 
scent there is evidence of less drunkenness than among persons 
who have come to the colony from abroad. At the census of 1901, 
out of the total population of New Zealand over 15 years of age, 
61-85 per cent, were found to have been born here; while the pro- 
portion of the convictions for drunkenness of New-Zealand-bom 
Europeans to the total convictions was in the year 1900 about 17 
per cent. only. 



DBONEEHKB8B. 



28a. 



The prison statistice show for some years back the namber of dio- 
tinct prisoners received into gaol after being convicted of drunkenneBS.. 
The figures for the years 1889-1900 are as follow (readmissions of 
the same person not counted) : — 

DiSTtscT F&isoMKaB UoRnoTsD or Dbumkbnhess received into Gaou 

Nmnber. 
. 469 
. 615 
. 486 
. 530 
. 610 
. 674 

Here the decrease proceeds rapidly and aniformly from year to 
year until the year 1895, after which the figures rise somewhat. 
But conclusions cannot be drawn so safely from these prisons 
statistics as from the convictions for drunkenness previously stated, 
because the punishment is more often by fine than imprisonment. 
The convictions showed numbers rising from year to year, but along 
with the increase in the population of the colony. 

In Austraha the consumption per head of alcoholic liquors is 
greater than it is here. The average for three years, according to 
Mr. Coghlan, is given in the " Seven Colonies of Australasia," and 
quoted below : — 



Teu. 

1889 


Number. 
.. 803 


Tew. 
1895 


1890 


.. 808 


1896 


1891 


.. 694 


1897 


1892 


.. 638 


1896 


1893 


.. 619 


1899 


1894 


.. 457 


1900 





Bpirits. 

GbJ. 

Per Head. 


Wioe. 

Gal. 

Per Head. 


Be«r. 

GaL 

Per Head. 


New Ssabh Walei.. 


0-73 


0'66 


9-58 


Viotoria ., .% 


0-72 


1-94 


11-76 


Quveual&nd 


0-98 


0-55 


11-58 


8aatb Australia . . 


0-39 


2-26 


8-95 


Western Australia 


165 


107 


S3-84 


Taeinaaia 


0-39 


009 


7-35 


New Zealand 


0-65 


014 


818 



In each of these States, with the except^ion of Tasmania and 
South Australia, charges for drunkenness are, in proportion to 
population, far more numerous than in New Zealand. The order of 
the States for the year 1898 in this respect is, to quote from ths 
same authority, as under : — 

ChABOES of DltONKENNESS IN PbOPOBTIOH TO POPCL&TtOK. 

Western Australia .. lB-79 per 1,000 

Queensland .. .. .. .. 15-28 

New South Wales . . . . 14 67 

Victoria . . .. 1182 

New Zealand . . . . 7-55 

"The Inebriates Institutions Act, 1898." 
Under this law, the Governor in Council may direct that any 
building or establishment which is the property of the Crown shall 
be an institution for inebriates ; and he may appoint superiiitendentfi, 
-with other officers. 



284 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOS. 



Power is also given to make regulations for the management, 
supervision, and inspection of these institutions, any of which may 
be separated into two divisions, with differeut scales of accommoda- 
tion, and fees to be paid by patients. 

An inebriate may himself make application to a Judge or Magis- 
trate for an order committing hiui to an institution. Or, if the 
husband, wife, or any relation or friend of any inebriate applies, the 
Judge or Magistrate may summon the inebriate to show cause why 
he should not be committed ; when, if necessary, he may be com- 
pulsorily dealt with. 

There are penalties for improper treatment of patients, and a 
patient is also liable if misconducting himself. It is also enacted 
that, during the continuance of an order, an escaped inebriate may 
be retaken. 

A home has been established at Waitati, near Seacli£F. 



Crime amongst Maoris. 

The Native population of the colony has hitherto been regarded 
as stationary, and comparisons of the numbers of summary convic- 
tions by the higher and lower Courts ard given. The number for 1897 
is swelled by 108- persons convicted of trespass. The figures relating 
to the convictions by the superior Courts are small and fluctuating, 
the proportionately large increase in 1898 being caused by the inclu- 
eion of sixteen convicted of conspiring to prevent the collection 
of taxes. 

SOMMARY Convictions of Maobis. 



Year. 


Number. 


Year. 


Namber 


1391 .. 


.. 298 


1896 


.. 332 


1892 . . 


.. 293 


1897 


.. 450 


1893 . . 


.. 253 


1898 


. . 849 


1894 . . 


.. 321 


1899 


.. 300 


1895 . . 


.. 316 


1900 


.. 253 


COSVICTION 


a OP Maoris in Superior Cou 


UTS. 


Year. 


CODTiCtiODC. 


imber ot Penooa 
convicted. 


1891 


.. 7 .. 


7 


18U2 


16 


15 


1893 


13 


12 


1894 


25 


34 


1895 


17 


15 


1896 


19 


19 


1897 


16 


12 


1898 


21 


35 


1899 


8 


7 


1300 




32 


23 




te lotftl number ol prisoners received in the different gaols of 
the colony during the year 1900 was 3,911, including persons await- 
ing trial but not convicted within the y«ar, and eoutttin(;r as distinct 
persons ne'pea.ted admissions of tiio same pursou, as well aa tmnslurs 
from gaol U> gaol of convicts uuderfjoing seututice. Id 1899 the 
number received was 3,774, so thai the figures for 1900 show an 
increase ol 137. OF 3,911 aduiissions for 1900. 54 were for debt, 
and 51 on account o[ lunacy ; while 130 were Maoris imprisoned 
for various offences. If the debtors, luDatics, and Maoris be 
excluded, the aumber of persoos received into gaol is reduced to 
3,673. against 3,534 iu 1899. 

I The nuifiher of persons in gaol (including Maoris) at the end of 
the year 1900 was only 2 more than in 1899, notwithstanding the 
increase of population r— 

FmuoKEBS in Qaol (31ht Dkcbmuier). 

ISSt) 
IS91 
1893 
1695 
IBS? 
1B99 
1900 

Of the prisoners previously convicted received in 1900. 3-54 men 
[and 38 women had been conviccod ouco ; 217 men and 26 women 
.twice; 1,018 men and 458 womun three or moro times; making a 
i total of 1.589 men and 632 womon. 

Besides the i-p.tnrns from the PriBoua Department, a separate 
card for each admissiou is furuiished for evvry yaol. Such cards 
as show convictions are arratiyed alphabet icaily according to name 
of priaoaer. and wlit-ro Bevural are found referring to the ttauits 
petitou, all aru thruwu out but one ; then the number of cards 
retained equals the actual Dumber of diatiTicb convicted prisoners 
received in tlie various gaols during the year. In 1900 this number 
(excluding Maoris) was 2.116, a decrease of 9 on iho number 
io 1899. These figures do not include children committed to the 
industrial schools simply on the ground that they are neglected or 
destitute. 

The following table shows the nnmber of distinct persons 
(exclusive of Maoris) received into gaol after conviction during 
i9'00, classified according to nature of ofifenco, religion, birthplace, 
and Age : — 



8euU>D0«. 


O«blora 

n-tid 
Luuk.tias 


On R«tukDd 

Kiiil aani.lt.itlg 

Trial. 


Tdtel 


.. 6LI 


S 


19 


^3 


4M 


4 


96 


sn 


.. 463 


ft 


aa 


MM 


681 


ff 


40 


raa 


.. Gas 


.. 


&1 


074 


fioe 


.. 


66 


896 


fi27 


. . 


41 


H8 




286 



NEW ZBAI.AND OFFICIAL ZBAB-BOOK. 



fcSSa- 



jig||S8 



S38SS* :" 



JggSgSSS 



; : rSasassss 



■ rg£SS£S3 



si 



li, 



Ob 
o 



^!S 



■u-qiom ;n :<H 



:-Hia<>a«i 



9i88saa 



25SS8ia"« 



=SSS88Sa 






11 

9 a 
a o 
on ti 



■a A 
Ji-eo 

> □ CI 

o o 



f'sas'"" a 



SS3S 



nn««o< ;-■ 



'«?$' 



^ggass 



hSi3!S° 



assa-a 






>«SS'"** i 



9«e;?soi 



2 :S 



-ss&ssz 



s-as"" ;' 



n-Hi-Dxa-* 



's'-sa 



sas3"-<"s 



:*3a«sss 



I— ! ;oiot 1 



!-• a O F- « -ri IQ 



e-at-oin : ;m 



.iggesa 



»•:"::: 






assss^"! 






■-. :i-iO«« - 



aSS2-"" S 2 



aiotDn i^m 



T-io ooioe 



i-aieatMieMM 



:<°3Se:SS3S 



: I'sasaa- 



r4CI93ei40tt-eo 



li 



si! 






^ ^ 



.■c 



Is 

ji - 

= ^5 



» :5 



151 = 









_.S= 5 



>, is >% >i >.>,>.>. g 



CBIUB AMONQHT THB NBW-2BALAKD-B0I1N. 



I 



The nuirlwr of distinct persons (exclusive of Maoris) imprisoned 
after conviction, in the past eleven years, counting one offence only 
when the s&tne person was impriscned more thaji once, with, the 
proportion per 10,000 persons living, is added: — 

Dutinet Peraons imprisoned afUr Convietion. 



I 



fui. 


i'rtlO0«TB. 


Proportion poi lO.OOO 
ol Popnl Button. 


Ifi90 


.. 9.997 


»8-61 


1891 


.. 3.118 


S3'6A 


1893 


.. 3. 164 


33 00 


laas 


.. 3, lit 


8L-92 


ISM 


.. 1.9S5 


2rt-78 


1895 


.. 1,980 


27-87 



Ywr. 



i>ri.»..». Pro|iortloti jH'r 10.000 



169G 


. 1,986 


37 11 


1897 . 


. 1,891 


36-81 


1888 . 


. 1,963 


86 93 


1809 . 


. a,iss 


38-88 


1900 


. 8,116 


s7-n 



I 



There has been since 1890 a decrease ol 11-79 per cent, in the 
number of distinct convicted prisoners, and a reduction of 1090 per 
10,000 in thu proportion to population. In New South Walts the 
proportion for 1898 was 66 per 10,000 personft. 

It must be und^rtitood tha^t the actual numbar of imprisonments 
was much in excess of the tigures given, as many persons were 
several times imprisoned, either for offences differing in kind or for 
repetitions of the same offence. Thus, persons returned as im> 
prisoned for larceny underwent other imprisonments for drunken- 
ness, Ac. Some returned us convicted of drunkenness were several 
tames iu gaol during tlie year for tlie same offence, or for another, 
.yucb as a&sauU, riotous or indoccut conduct. &c. Often there 
were several cliar|L;es preferred against the same pHrsuii at thu 
one time, of winch Uie most serious followed by conviction has been 
selected. 

The proportions in every 100 distinct convicted prisoners belonff- 
ing to each of the four principal religious denominations, witn 
proportions of prisoners at each a^e-poriod, and particulars as to 
birtnplacoa and ages, will be found in the Statistical Volume for 1900, 

Ion pages 447 and 419. 
I Cost of Prisoners. 

The prisoners in gaols during the year 1900 were maintained al 
a net cost to the Stale of £29 Is. &d. per head, agaiuiit £30 16a. 4d. 
in 1S99. 
Crime amomjst the New-Zeatarul-hom. 
While the New-Zealand-born formed at the last census 67 per 
cent, ot the whole population of the colony, they contributed in 
1900 only 28 per cent, of the prisoners received in gaol. Of the 

IKew-ZoaJand-born population, however, a largo numlier are under 
15 years of age, a period of life at which there are very few 
prisoners; and, therefore, another comparison is necoss&ry. It is 
found that the New-Zcalaod-born over 15 vears formed 52 per 
cent, of the total population above that age ; \)ut, as before stated, 
Now-Zealandors constituted only 28 per cent, of the total number 
received iu gaols. 




d 




3BS 



HRW SKAI.AND OVFlCtAL YIIAH-BOOK. 



The total number of New-Zealand-born distinct prinoners (ex- 
cludinf; Mftoria) received (or the year 1IK)0 — 597 persons — is toanA 
to be 34 iu eicesB of tlie number for 189y. Of thoRe received in 
1900, 94 were uuder twenty years ot age. As before stated, the pUo 
adopted iu preparini; tlie Cortt^oitig tabltis is to couut each prisooei 
only ouce, and to exclude lUl who ura not convicted prisoners, busides 
dealing only with the number received during the year, instead of 
with tiie full number in gaol, which would, of course, include thoeB 
brought forward from the previous your. The comparaiive resuits 
for a aeries of yoars given by this method are held lo be more 
valuable Ihun thoBO brought out by ope which Includes prisonuB 
merely awaiting trial, and continual rcpotitioiis of the aamo in- 
dividuals. 

Btmarks by tht Inspector of Prisons. 

In his report for the year 1901, the Inspector of PriRons thus 
cotntnents on the work of the tree-plan tin 2 prison at Waiotapu, the 
establtghnient of wliic-b was iiieutioned in the last Year-book : — 

A naff departure has thU ye^r bAon mads by the ontnbliibneal o( a iM*- 
planting priN-'ii »( Wtinlbpii, ttrrnt; tbrce nilles from It-itaroft nn tiie Oklat«a 
(Old Tetupo iioadx. The pttiuDvnt aelactitd (or tblH wurk Kr« all Mtviug tbtir 
Ant HQtoJiQes, and iiuiie have beoa convioisd of immoral or iadeo«nc offvaow- 
Of coane, the experiment hai not yoi baan Riiffioifnlly long nlabliib»d to 
aay how it ivitl work out, but so Iftr tbo oondticc nt iha prisooera hM been 
exom pleirjr, und the ForrHt Oopikclmanl, lor wkoin the mou %ro working, report 
that thn prl*ftnDrR are working quite an nell an tree men. They are actsom- 
modaied lu huii almilrir lo those vised by the railway gangeie—lour irt a hot. 
Th«ra ura s total ul ttreiuy.flva prisormm iiniJ four oRiottr*. Thu eo»t of main- 
Waaac* wiil, of coursv, be cuo^iUtrably lilKbtT tiiau iu tbe tuivnt, bui tf tfav 
desired etfuet of keeping thc«e better claaa o( priHooerH away Irom trie haMtutl 
crimiu&U, aud tberub^ endeavouring to giro ihem & oha.Dce of retortnmg, U 
taken advantaga of by them, tbe axlrK coat will be money well oxpendad. 

First Offuniiinrs' Probalitm Act. 

One hundred and twelve pcraons wore placed on probation in the 
year 19lX», an against 117 in 1899. Of these, 33 were discharged 
aiter satisfactorily carrying out the conditions of their licenoea, 3 
were rearrested, and 77 remained under the supervision of Proba- 
tion Officers. 

Of the 1,232 persons placed on probation since the introduction of 
the Act iu Octobcxr, 1H8G, no less than l,021 had. by the end of the 
year lyOO, been disohargoil after satisfaclorily carrying out the con- 
ditions of iheir liccmies, 73 have been rearrested and sentenced to 
various terms of impriBuuxneut, I coiiiinitted suicide. 2 died, 29 
abscondet), 1 was sent to a lunatic asylum, and 105 remuiiaed ful- 
filling the conditions of their terms of probation. Tbe Inspector of 
Prisons, in his report tor the year 1900. made the following remarks, 
which will well boar repeating: — 

From tlio (oregoiug it will be earn cbat a peroontngQ at 98 liave done well, 
«hile only a neroentage fif HI have eluded the vlftilanee of the Probatrou 
OfHor'ni &t:d ubacuuded. Theee ftt&tUtJca epeak for tbemavlves, Mid hIiow tbat 




I 



the Probation Offloors, vho do tbo work Rr&tnltoutl;, havt eiuvdill; inquinid 
into end mAile judicious TftoommendaCioca ia tbe mikjnriLy of omm, 4Did u» 
deMrving of cummviidAtiou. 

Tbe Kbov«-quoied r«sult6 prnvo beyond doubt thnt tli8 Piwt Offeodere* 
FfobftUoa Aot, which wm pluco4 on tha ecktutobook of tho colon; to pui first 
offcndani undor K totm of aurvoillanua ihnt i« iiii.li;iil>t«d to givn iham kr sxirn 
inoDutivn lo Rooil bchA<iotir, iirid Co ohcuk (irodiluclioni tlint inii^ht cud in s 
OBrecc of crime, is salitfaoiorUy nttaining tta&t end. A probationer >iu ever 
belOTA hit taloi tbo ineviCftbLe conMqaonct whi«h vill odeuo sbould be deviate 
from *tricl»«t ractituilB nl cnii<liiol during hiii pmbntton, whilo h« ia nol in ft. 
po'iliun U> bo contftCDiniittsd by tbu evil a^xociutioua wbich aca iilaiost iuiopaiabla 
from ft priron life. Ttiii Htate ia rdiuved ot the rspeoBe of biH suppott, and Itiorr. 
is much more iuduocm^Dt to ruiuni to tbo patba of honesty ftod iiiduHtry Ih&u 
th«ta would bo were h« nndor hue and holu initd« the wn.lUi of a felon's oell; 
KoA, Iwtly. Ii« !• DoC bmndcd it* a " Kaol-J>ird." 

The amount of costH which tbe variouB Courts diructed to be paid 
during the year 1900 was £015 9s. Id., of which £242 33. lOd. has 
been nciiially paid. The approximnto cost of keeping thoBc first 
offenders had ihey been sent to prisan 'would have amounted to 
£5,029, which sum, added to tbe amount of ooets, &c., actually 
paid, gives a saving of £5,271 3s. lOd. 

Inquests. 

The number of bodios on which iiiquoBts wero hold in 1900 was 
9B7, ineluiling 3*3 Maoris. In 735 cases tbe bodies were of iiialeSr 
and in 2.S^ of feiiiuleti. 

Tbe inquests on sniddal deaths in 1900 sliow a d«!OiTft!ie on the 
number tor the previous year. The figures (or each of the Ust fiv» 
years were :— 

Iniji]*ali> OD Rulcldcii. 

Ualot. F«ma.leB. Tout. 

OS 12 70 




4a 



n 



6S 

11 



lew. 
1809 
190U 



Ini]UfMiM on Riiiotiles. 

UftJe*. Pom ft] el. Total. 

Gl IH 1i 

52 11 C3 



The verdicts given at tiie inquests held ia 19O0 may be classified 
Fas under ; — 



.Natwreol Vordlcl. 
Accident 

DlMW and-nn.tiiial oaaime 
IntsmperaDcn .. 
Homieidfl 
Suicide 
Not claMod 



InquMii on Parvont. 



BI&Ibb, 


Pemalos. 


Totol. 


!I^M 


m 


403 


827 


IM 


473 


3 


2 


6 


a 


1 


IS 


69 


11 


OS 


11 


_ , 


11 



785 



289 



067 



Of the accidental deaths, drowning is the most fatal form. 
iThe verdicts show that 130 bodies wore found drowned, giving a 
srcentagc of 32-2C on tbe accidental deaths from all causes. 

fire jTiqiiests. 
The inquests on fires held during 1900 nuinberod S9. In seven 
cases tho verdict was incfindiarifitn ; in (our, accident : and in 
t twenty-eight no evidBnco was forthcoming. 




U 



SECTION XIV.— LOCAL GOVEBNING BODIES. 

COUNTEBB, BOROUQHB, ETO. 

For purposes of local goTernment New Zealand is divided into 
coanties and boroughs. Although the boroughs, of which there wars 
101 Id March, 1901, lie geographically within the counties, yet by the 
law they are not considered as part of them. On the 31st March, 
1901, the counties numbered 86. The number is increased from 
time to time as need is found for further division. In the year 
1878 there were only 63 counties. Interior to the counties 
are the road and town districts, but much of the country is out- 
lying, many road districts having been merged, especially on gold- 
fields territory. 

There were, however, 227 road districts (three without Boards) 
in existence in March, 1901, and 35 town districts. One of these 
latter is the special Town District of Botorua, constituted under 
"The Thermal-Springs Districts Act, 1881." Besides the above 
there were 29 river protective districts (excluding Inch Clutha, 
in Bruce County, which is also a road district), 1 drainage distriot 
(Christchurch), 2 water-supply districts, and 17 land drainage dis- 
tricts under the Land Drainage Act of 1893 (two without Boards). 
The Harbour Boards numbered 26. 

These bodies levied rates in the financial year 1900-1901 to the 
amount of £73i,023, of which £■190,789 consisted of general rates, 
and £243,234 special and separate rates. The sum of £81,561 was 
raised by licenses, and £17,553 by other taxes, , making £833,138 
altogether, which sum is equivalent to £1 Is. 9d. per head of the 
mean European population. In the year 1899-1900 the local taxa- 
tion was £1 Is. 7d. per head, or 2d. less than in 1900-1901. 

It will be seen from the table on the next page that since 1881 
revenue derived from rates has nearlv trebled itself, having increased 
from £249,087 in 1880-81 to £734,023 in 1900-1901. Revenue from 
Government and other sources has, on the other hand, decreased 
in the same perio<l, twenty-one years, from £352,540 to less than 
one-half, viz., £168,785. Receipts which cannot be classed as 
"revenue" were £889.705 in 1880-81, against £825,039 in 1900- 
1901 ; but these figures vary from year to year according to circum- 
stances, such AS large operations by way of construction of works, for 
which money has to be specially raised. 



LOCAL OOTEBNIHa BODIBB. 



291 



•a-s 




■^1 




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3 **H 




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2 s 


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1-a 


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... a 


.^ 


u% 





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IS 

w 
H 
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tS-s 


14 


CO o 


n 


fl^ 


t4 


a <«£ 


■4 


^-^"^ 


1 


-3 *= 




g=3 d 
ft " * 


H 

a 


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i 


ngnis 
int 
ears, 


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O 

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;a 9 2 

S,3 d 


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£ ft ■« 








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|2|| i'll^ 



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I 5 







I ■* « u - 



I CO Q oj (_ _ 



io>co^oi^osoaa^-«i 



oo«mSmonoooSbCTiooS<oSt-t-aoSO'C 



O>COMCr3^^t<3U^k£^O<O(0COOtOO^tO^Cot- 



•Si; 



^5 



t-aico"-it-L-oc-(Oioo5vini-iioot-o>oou5 

?6iiSQO)ioo5eO(eiio'»>a'.-<— •m-fl'CNcs'WrHcc 
■aCViHOkf^mt^<0Oc0^cn<oar<0^OOC^--'4<aD 

£Oi — --jQ^cji-notptg »o"cn eooTto'a u; ciio' 

w-t rH*-lrH>-**Hi-l*-^^H>-HtH^^^*-<*-lp-IT-< i-T*-* 

O Oi HI (5"m~^ cM~t^ tn'o IS wio^oootEtoooifift 

m^i-*C40^C07^0^^— i'-<r-1>-tiHpH>-*'Hr-<<-ii-t<-^ 

Wcr3O^CCI:-»^HOO»Dt^^i-<OOC00it00acDtD 
„iSwaoCTODa3tO<Nrtii-t-(N^OtoS>0-iiSSciO 

Sc- a) m Ol C!>~m"i;^rc5lji~co --■ ■*"t^ in c6~cn~to c^ m .-• co 
(N(Nin3)n503«*lQCO(Nir)—OOT>iOOO<N 
w^wmtDiNoociSincc — ^cDSinoKrH& 

**«OC^O^O'-'COCO^COCOCDO*OtCC>a^-1'<C-H^ 



■-I (D « 
CO OS W I 
CO CO GO 1 



SV1/ UV ^J-l >v' k^if U« t.4 ^^ VJ W kf' ^J 1 
cooomcDcococoaocococoaoi 



-ss 



■aS 



Si" 

1-: 



SI 






a9s 



NBW Z&A1.AHD OITFICIAL VEAB-tlOOI. 



The indebtedness of local governitig bodlOB on account of oat- 
Btaodiog loans has increased Jn twenty-one vears by neArly 149 per 
cent., from £3,039,907 to £7.5(53.069. axclusivo of moneys borrowed 
from Government under " Tiio Rouda and Bridges Construction Act, 
1682," and " The Government Loans to Loral Bodies Act, 1886," 
which represoutod a further indebtedness of £902,769 at the end c( 
March, 1901. 

Taxatton by LocAi. Bodies. 

Tabu ahowiog tba Btvanue vt iMcal OoTsming Bodias {l«riro4 (com BalM, 

LiMnata, Mid oikisr Tuoa during lfa« Ytttr 1900-iaOl. 



LoetaBodlM. 



Rkit*. 



Q«awmL 



BumUIAW 
MpWKM. 



Md 



Umum. Ottaw TUm. tou). 



IBoftrds* ... 
f XlT«r B(«nU • „. 

Bovd> • 

Bur BovnU t 
' Cbnatchoic)) 
DruDkco IkmlM I 

Wkiiuakariri- A>]i> 
)•}' W*ur-«upplT 
Boud* 

TottI* 



M 1.1. 
1M.0H1S a 
its.ue 19 3 

i.«a ft 1 
oi.Toe 7 s 

s.ns s 4 

t.(noi0 T 

S.IM fi 8 
90.901 10 ]l> 



i{9,fln -r 

lU ) 4 

la.fm i« a 
1. Stall 1 

1,(W 10 10 



S.t4S « U 



fli.Me « » 

ss.eti IL a 

S.M1 s 9 

s,i» 1 



«o,rs8 19 e au.si u 9 w.seo 19 b ii.hs 1 u ESB.m u i| 



I •. d. 

».«M 11 9 

4.001 a T 

m 10 » 

i.sw e i 



t u » 



1 «.«: 

fiM.on 9 « 
aeo.fnt i 1 

t.ISD 8 T 
UB.IA » 1 



a.m 
38. i« 



aD.BI LO w 



3.119 e 10 



■ For Twu* andMi Xt*% Hajeb, im. t Par yaai andad 31(4 D«eMDb«r, UXKk 

: niuurU«* dOM. obMRM, 1«M, lolk. rHU, Acl. unciUBllix %a Sanjm Tf. td^ hsve 

nai l>M>B cUMwd u I*x*ti0ii. 

1 EqiMl to II l«. 9d. i>«r b«Ml of Uit mma BarapMB popnlftUoD of UM Mloar lor 

lb*4lialMl>l Tskr lS(Xy-tO(n. 

RBCEtPTS AND EXPESDITURE, 1900-1901. 

A Bominary of all the transactions for the year 1900-1901 is 

t^TeD on pafies 293 to 296. The total revenue of the local bodies for 

i-the Qnaucial year was £1,653,851, and they further received a sum 

of £825,039 which could not properly bo termed "rerooue," making 

altogether a grand total of recotpis amounting to £2.478,893. The 

[>rates formed 44 per cent, of the rovonuc proper. liceneea, rents. 

and other soarces yielded 46 per cent., and 10 per cent, was granted 

by the General Goremment. 

While the revenue proper of the eoonties amounted to £380,683, 
of which these bodies raised £220,937 by vay of rales, the Bead 
Boards' revenue was only £158,578. out of which £104,485 repre- 
sented the result of their rating. Thn boroughs had the far larger 
revenue of £604,820, including £332.135 of rales, and their receipts 
under ih« heading of licenses, rents, and other sources atnouuted to 
the considerable sum of £265.282. In the matter of receipts from 
Government, of which ti table is printed on the uext page, tbo 
counties received the bulk of the money. 




BIOBIFTS FBOM QOVBBNHBNT. 



293 



3 



Q 
c 

I 

O 

bo 

n 



£ 
u 

s 












i1 



S -5" g" "3 



ss 

■=•3 

8« 



"w 



s IIS 



*«3 i i^ s "i 






s s- 



-e 



■W ID -^^ 

P4 4 r-T 

»|n ■•■ (DO 



'5 3 






ow 

0401 



003 
t-t- 



ge 




S i i 



= 1 



no o 









m 



so— Yur-book 



3&i 



XBW ZBU.JLKD OFPIOIAI. ISAK-BOOE. 



S 3 

K <o 






§ 

I 



o 



•5 I 




H 2 1 
oi.O So 



ilill! 

*:s*-o 1.5 









LOANS OF IX)CA.I< BODIBB. 295 

IjOOAXi QovxBiniia BoDtsa. — Receipts, Bxpenditcire, ajto liOAna— continued. 



• 


Flnmclal Year ended 
31at December, 1900. 


Totals— aU 
Local Bodlea. 




Bacboai 
Boarda. 


Drainage 
Board. 


B«oalpU;— 
Beveotie from — 

BftMB 

LioanMB. riinta, (.ud otber •onroea ,.. 

Oovemment* ... 

County 


£ B. d. 

38,1M e 8 

414,111 8 11 

6.880 B 3 


£ e. d. 

90,991 10 10 

937 11 9 

176 10 


£ a-d. 

734.09S S 5 

712. 51S 11 1 

16e.7K; 4 

8.597 16 11 


Tot«l revenae 
B«oaipu not raven ne ... 


138,605 10 
911,352 5 1 


20,705 15 7 
1,122 S 9 


1.653.851 13 9 
SiS.OSB IS 7 


TotAl reeeipta 


690.967 G 3 


91,827 IS 4 


2.4T8,t93 9 4 


Expenditure: — 
Pabllo works ... 
Chaxitable ^d and ho«plt*la... 
Management ... 
Other expendltora 


9CS,B62 12 9 

13,771 1 3 
9U9.413 B 1 


4,805 4 

8S3" 7 1 
16,021 1 11 


1.954.589 1 8 
71 ,876 16 7 

ua.^i 8 9 

774,791 la 3 


Total expenditure 


671.777 4 


91.7ES 9 7 


2,950.671 18 8 


Ua.bllitlei (inolnding loans) 


4.186.056 7 11 


203.663 11 11 


9,274.606 14 7 


Iioasit 


1,035.331 


SOO.OOO 


7,663,069 



* t See notes to table on previous page. 

The expeaditure of the local bodies amounted to £2,250,572. 
la the coQDties the cost of management, including ealaries, travel- 
ling-expenses, rent, printing and advertising, collection of rates or 
tolls, legal expenses, and sundries, was £48,977. The Borough 
OoanciU expended in the same way £55,784, and the Boad Boards 
£15.795. 

The percentages borne by the cost of management to the total 
receipts and total expenditure were : — 
Oast of HaDBgement per Cent, of Total Receipts Total Expenditura. 

Counties .. .. .. .. 92 9-1 

Boroughs . . . . . . . . 6-6 6-2 

Road Bofirds . . . . . . 6-9 8-8 

Loans op Local Bodies. 

The outstanding loans of local governing bodies form the subject- 
matter dealt with in the two next tables. From them it will be seen 
that the total amount owing was, on the Slst March, 1901, £7,563,069. 
But against this accrued sinking funds to the value of £786,818 were 
held, leaving a net debt of £6,776,251, exclusive of moneys borrowed 
from the General Government and repaid by annual instalments. 

The total annual charge (excluding exchange and commission) 
stood at £422,578, of which £385,959 was for interest, and the re- 
mainder, £36,619, contributions to sinking fund accounts. 

Of the total net indebtedness in 1900-1901 the debt of the 
Harbour Boards, £3,664,380, formed the largest item, while the 
Borough Councils owed £2,881,653. 



a% 



MBW ZBUi&ND OFTIOUL TSAB-BOOK. 



•^ .J3 it} 4^ A 



-s 



IB S tn 



a,j3 



O S "S a> 

• n ffl « J3 




,8 5o ^ > 

3 is -^ a) 3 
S «>::««- » 

cq.S ^ ¥ ^ 
V:3 ^ 2 cq- 

« *=■ ^ 

C u = Ci - 

(D en ^ 01 P< 
» 2 J^O 
« £ -73 3 

^ ^ o — o 

O O "'3 



n 

c : 

H I 



8 



a . 

n 

sa 

-3 



'I 



t3 



^! 



£1. 






-=■2 -3 

"<6go 



.-^o iH a> C4 •« 00 






SO) 10 



A ob t- 10 -^ O < 






«««^ 



Sm S to S 
to i-« 



O ■* t~ — • .-1 rH ■*! 
It- CO 03 t~ » lA 00 
t- >-< B) t- O — 



'«r- o« 00 •-•' 
-Hrt B« t- o « I 
t- w 3 c- to « 03 I 



s 







SEsM 



S^% 



IJOAMB or LOCAL BODIBB. 



297 



•H fH 591 fr-QBQ 






■« :"* ; ; ; ; : 



*■ 

T 



ssss s 



* 






a? 












O 03 



#- 
r 



■ .8 



3 

:§ >§ 

sis 



■ 2 o S o = i^ 



Si 






iS I 



8 



ill 
1^1 1 



O 0. ■ 






t-flOl 









CO 9> I I •-' e« O 

ft 0*.H rt 

0> CO 



"l^T 



.g . . 



« 2 5 5 5 



S 









5 S 



KBW ZBAI^ARD OFTICIAXi TBAB-BOOK. 



Od referring to tbo comparative table on page 291, a pnat 
advancti iu ilio outstanding loans of local i^OTerniTif; bodies wUl be 
not,icH;<1. Between 1891 and 1901 ibe ^'''^^r indebtedness JncreMed 
(rora £6,042,6<I3 to £7.568,069. an aHdiiion of £1.520.376 or 26 pcTj 
cent, during the ten years. During thtt «aino puriod the population' 
advanced at the rate of 22 per cent., and the value of land and 
improvements from £122,000.000 to £147,000,000, or at the rate of 
90 ^r cent. 

The aggregate interest-charge (or the year under rdview wac 
£380.969, Hud £393,7d6 of this was payable oo loans raised outaide 
the colony. The average rate of interest payable to bondholder* 
was rather more than £6 2s. &d. per cent., ae sUovru bereninlor: — 



I 



lx«n« niMd by Lm«I BodlM. 

Id tbaooloD/ 
OnUtda tbe colony 

TdulI («xcludiiig loAinl 



Dftbonturos Mid 

CireutMioa. 

J &5.490 

\S,096.81« 

&.M0.800 



7,568, 069* 



tnWTMt- 

£ 
»il. 

999,786 
335,959 



Inlamvt. 



4-.%50t 
53190 



from Gareminent) 

While the average rate of interest on tbe above-Tnentioned debfc 
is found to be more than 5-12 |>er cent., over two millions and three^ 
qnart4-rs were raised at 5 per cent., and opvrards of two and a h&lf 
millions at 6 per cent, or over. 






" Ths Local Bodihs' Loanb Act. 1901." 
The above Act consolidates c^rt&iu measures dealing with 
to local bodies. As lo Oov«mmeut loans, it contains the same pro- 
vision as the Amendment Act of IH99 in respect of the debencurea 
of any (umre loan, and offers, instead of interest payable at 5 per 
cent, for a term of twenty-stx years, one or other of the followmg 
alternatives : — 

Four and a half per oeot. per annum for a term of twenty 

six years ; 
Pour per cent, per annitm (or thirty-two years; or 
Three and a haJf per cent, per annnm for fony-oce yeara. 

"The Mcsicipal Fbanchisb Bsroiut Act, 1998. "" 

This is a law extending and amemlint; the franchise in the 
of boroughs, and provides that, in addition to tbe porsons who 
Already entitled to be enroUed* every person shall be so entitled who 
poBSesaea the freehold or residential qualifications stated in the Aet. 

The posaeesioQ of the freehold qualification is defined oh being 
the beneficial owner of a freehold estate in land of the capital valuo< 
of not less than £'25. sttaaied in tbe borough. noiwithstaniUng that 
the person may be already enrolled, or entitled so to be, as a ra: 
payer of the borough. 

■TiM t&tao M wbich 110 tut«nM U p4M bMM Doi bMB UKm uio •eeotmi ta ooM' 
patlai lb« kVMBta nU* of lutocMi. 





KATIVO ON PHIMPROVBD VALUB. 



a9» 



Every person is deemed to possess a residenliial qualification 
within a borough if he ie. and for at leiLtit tiirue months la^^t past 
has been, a resitlenlial occuptint wiliiio sucii borough. 

No person may be cntorod in the burgess lists in respect of more 
lUf^itications than one ; but (f^xcept in the an-se of a ratepayer) any 
rson who has more than one quahfioaEion may select the one in 
'respect of which he wishes to be eniered. 

1n the case of hubbaod and wife, any quaiilicatiou possessed by 
one of tbetn is deemed to be possenaed by each. 

No person enrolled on a burgeas roil has more than one vote, and 
no person enrolled by virtue of the residenlial qnalificatioii ran vote 
on any proposal relating to loanB or rates; and persons failing to 
record tlieir votes at any poll taken in the borough are liable to 
have their names removed from the roll of burgesses. 



Batiko on Ukiupkoved Value. 

The Bating on Unimproved Value Act, 1896," gives power to 
governinff bodies to levy ratpi* upon the unimproved instead of 
jn the capital (or annual) value of real property; and "The 
>ca[ Uoveruuient Voting Kefonu Act, 1H99 " (section 2) providos 
that if any proposal is eubuiitlud bo the votes of the ratepayers or bur* 
geeses of ihe disirict or of any subciivision of the districi of a local 
authority, such jiroposal shall ht) deemed to be carried if at the poll 
taken on such proposal the nunihp.r of valid vntps recorded in favour 
of it exceeds the nuuiber recorded against it, each ratepayer having 
one vote and no more. And it is further provided by " The Rating 

Ion Unimproved Value Act Amendment Act, ISOO," that in tiic locali- 
tieB where a poll had been previously taken and the proposal 
affirmed by a majority, but rejected b&caufia the majority was loss 
than two-thirds, as was rcquii-ed by "The Eating on Unimproved 
Value Act, 1896," the proposal may again he submitted to the rate* 
payers. 
Xtfttes made and levied under this Act must be so adjusted as to 
■equal as nearly as may be. but not exceed, in their produciDg 
capacity, rates made and levied ou the capital (or aunual) value 

Bunder " The Hating Act, 1394," see special article in Part III. 
Up to the end of March, 1002. fi>rty-three local governing bodies 
(Iwontyfonr borough'*, pjfven countiRS. one town district, and seven 
road districts) had notified in the Nt^to Zealand Gaietle that the 
proposal to levj- rates on the unimproved value of land had been 

I carried, while in seven cases (six boroughs and one county) the pro- 
posal had been rejected. 
The amount of rates levied by tha varioufi Borough CouociU, 
<kiunty Councils, Town Boards, and KoEtd Boanis. vvitli other par- 
tioular-t, as returned by these bodies for the Slat March, 1901, will 
bo found ou the following pageii: — 




300 



NEW ZBALAND OFFICIAL YBAB-BOOS. 



JO 



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1061 'qa-i'M 
oiq«»)«HJO»ni*A 



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ni^t't-no-KB'n ■vcooitnooto mot-oot-fflt-o neon's 
IN 31 1- o CD CO t- o o m n iH o A ■« ■-■ o co ^-i ei ci co t- t--«t-n 






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306 



NEW fBALAHO OFTlOLUi IHABrBOOK. 



1 



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•a 



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LOCAL aoVBBNlMO BODIBB. 



307 



TOWH DiSTEIOTB, 1900-1901. 
Nora.— For nJan of Und ud tmprovem«titB Bsa BtfttiBtieal Volmna (or ItOO, pp. 4Se-<6S. 







Nnmberol ' 


AmouDt of Ha1« 




i 








lav lad 








^ 


In tljo Pound o& 


ToiPD Disl(l«U. 


1 




t 


4 

•2 


tho dpi to.) 
lor Aiiuukl) 




B. 


•o 






Valae 
of 




Oi 


a 


^ 
£ 


i^ 


Pro[Kirty. 










8. <]. 


Kamo 


SCO 


60 


75 


S4 


01 


EelenBVi]l6 




S31 


97 


101 


124 


4 


FapKliur& 




2B6 


08 


154 


202 


04 
Oj 


Ta Awninutii 




355 


07 


65 


76 


Kthtkihi 




, 2^-2 


60 


97 


140 


0| 


NgttruawEhbi« 




1 345 


57 


110 


146 


04 


liotoTua. 




914 


60 






-■ 


Opotilci 




6^7 


139 


20d 


280 


OJ 




765 


lea 


li73 




OS 


Opuo&ko 




46C 


m 


103 


478 


Oi 


Itig!|«iv<icHi 




Tia 


153 


1D6 


ii07 


01(1) 


Nurmatib^ 




370 


m 


lill 


ISll 


5 


MdJlAlA 




447 


109 


153 


341 


U 0|('} 


Ws.vtrley 




416 


108 


lie 


11(3 


01 


Lelbbridga (TurakinBl 




230 


51 


43 


67 


8 • 


Ball's .. 




1 501 


1^7 


130 


171J 


I ■ 


Uftloombe 




1336 


81 


145 


730 


1 • 


Civiv (Wnirgft) ., 




6sa 


128 


100 


^6 


D} 


Tarftdaie 




7&3 


148 


188 


isy 


0) 


Ormond villa 




459 


101 


1H3 


215 


iiiJ 


Wkip&na 




6G9 


157 


135 


Idl 


1J(») t 


Kaikora MortFi ., 




2£8 


T2 


102 


lilQ 


3 * 


Fa&tlierehJIi 




Ga9 


120 


150 


100 


m*) 


Jot) nsa II villa 




502 


l-M 


112 


167 


04 


H^velcjok 




316 


76 


79 


ISS 


1 


Ambarlej 




417 


07 


flO 


lao 


U 0} 


Souttibiidge 




396 


106 


2.W 




01 


H&mpstea.^ 




I, lis 


234 


270 


320 


01 


TinwalJ 




b&l 


111 


175 


231 


t) 09 
0| 


Ger&Jdine 




869 


19! 


205 


315 


Grey town ( Allan tgn), (IMO 




a-27 


51 


74 


114 


Oi 


Oiilcun 




420 


87 


CG 


110 


Oi 


Clinton (I90O) .. 




431 


102 


121 


lS-3 


6' 


WjndhaJD . . 




417 


111 


105 


35 1 


1 • 


0;»ai-&a. 




4i3 


98 


lU 


156 


Of 



(i}Sp»cUl rata, id. (i) County rate. )d. (>) Special rato, |d. 

rato, Id. ; separate, ^d. 

* On the annual valua. i On the unimproTed value. 



[«J Special 



308 



NBW SBAIiAMD OVFlOIAIi yBAB-lK>OE. 



Road Distbicts, 1900-1901. 

NOTK.— For Tftlna of land Ktid impiOTemeuti bm Sutistioal Volume for 1900, t>P> iSS-lBS. 



— ' — — .^^ ' 










■3 








KntBbc'Pof 


2 §3 




i 








3£|. 


Ooimtj uiil Diriiict, 




a 


4 


S 






£ 


P 


S 

s 


3£ 




Mongcmui ^ 












0. 


WhaBg&roa 














Bny af luE&tidB 


(Mo road diBtrioU.) 












Hoki&Tiga 














aobaoQ 














WhangftFei — 












Hi ku rang! 






495 


60 


120 


147 




KaurilioliDia 






191 


51 


£G 


66 




KensLiigian 






i9 


g 


la 


18 




Mauug&karatii'0& . 






s&a 


60 


131 






MaruA 






271 


&3 


85 


112 




Mkuhu 






SB4 


150 


142 


154 




OU>Elg& 






300 


52 


57 


59 




PB.ru& Bay 






2IS 


150 


300 


255 




Ru&ro-ngi ■■ 






103 


27 


65 


6S 




Wuttieliie .. 






205 


27 


92 


an 




Waipu. North 






2ii 


SI 


79 


88 


1 


WbucBora, . . 






92 


63 


63 


80 


* 


OtiHnfttea— 












MangAwai . . .. ■ ■ 


368 


50 


90 


90 


i 


Klalakohe - . 


423 


7'J 


. , 


331 


i- 


Wb&kBpirnu [ao Bo&rd) 


264 


■■ 


-• 


-* 




Hodney — 












AlbertlB,[id North . 






65 


11 


45 


45 


i 


Allfenl&Bd SouiJi ■ 






322 


75 


145 


190 


t 


AhUT(i!k 






i\ 


13 


51 


71 


I 


Kaniokoiiki 






62 


11 


46 


4a 


i 


M&liurHngi EbjI 






151 


34 


74 


97 


i 


Maliiiriiiigi UppcE . 






947 


195 


320 


431 


i 


Maint^QA 






T4 


11 


27 


55 


i 


MH.tH.kaiiH Koal 






132 


18 


30 


3S 




l[p.LB,kBJia Went 






173 


Gl 


70 


150 


1 


Om&hiL 






357 


91 


141 


301 


i 


Pulioi 






596 


76 


12& 


, . 


i 


TB.utioa 






371 


SQ 


93 


■ ■ 


t 


WliatchiDB 






96 


20 


32 


35 


f 


Wnilcmata — 












KiV'ikAp&kapa 


543 


100 






J 


fulCE-alUEL . . 


560 




218 


Sfi6 


i 


Wlmngap&ruft 


GG 


23 


30 


49 


J 



LOCAL QOVSHNINQ BODIES. 

Road Dibtriots, 1900-1901— coB*in««i. 



809 













^ 








Kumbir of 


So-3 


Off lints' >Mi DUtrlst. 


i, 

m 


i 

1 


S 

s'i 
1^ 


lli 


tBAta— 










d. 


AvondBite 


l,07fi 


230 


864 


446 


!(•> 


Aioti Hill . . 


■ > p 


1,671 


960 


986 


466 


U>) 


■ Bden TarrftoB 




1 8,011 


409 


SlO 


433 


|t«> 


Ep«OI91 




1 750 


135 


129 


146 




Mount Albert 




1 9,065 


330 


466 


692 


1 <} 

3"^ 


Mount £den 




6.129 


1050 


^46 


1.120 


Mfmnt Rosktll 




581 


115 


179 


247 


1 


Mount Wellington .. 




gS4 1 180 


aoa 


574 


1 


One tree Hill 




1,983 


180 


174 


2S4 


i 


P&ninun Townahip 




350 


70 


73 


00 


i 


Paint Chevalier 




GS4 


33 


34 


46 


i 


ReniuGra .. 




9,186 


480 


393 


511 


i 


T&maki West 




1 373 


100 


110 


14S 


t 


U&III]1CB.I1 \ 










Awhitu .. .. .. 1 413 


100 


156 


157 


! 


Drury (1900^ 


Sfi9 


y7 


163 


21 1 


! 


HoHiok To*fl 




924 


71 


ISO 


laa 


1 


Hunua 




366 


6i 


116 


332 


>a|(*> 


Karaka 




IBB 


10 


147 


ise 


Mangere 




703 


W-i 


lAB 


206 


i 


M&nurevra 




J S€0 


5S 


82 


341 


i 


il»r»et«i . . 




1 ^^ 


20 


30 


36 


i 


UftBkQ 




' 880 


HB 


145 


, , 


m 


MbungKtu whirl 




J 87ei 


48 


62 


95 




\ 


Mercer Tawiiship . , 




■ 339 


3a 


50 


75 






Opatielce .. 




369 


32 


116 


365 




■ 


Otahuhu . . 




i,aii 


825 


279 


354 


: 


! 


FakuTiknga 




271 


04 


TO 


94 


i 


PapakurH , . 




37S 


83 


106 


127 


I*; 


Paparata ., 




873. 


37 


114 


160 


PaparoK . . 




166 


45 


70 


93 




P&pBtoitoi 
FoLeno 




i 176 


37 


39 


49 






1 3^8 


72 


S4 


136 


l"> 


Pollok Settlement .. 




B8 


20 


26 


30 




Pukekohe East 




1 942 


2L4 


254 


376 




Ptikekolie West 




1 1.153 


220 


353 


631 




Tftoiftki EftBt 




, 5S0 


U8 


IIB 


142 




Turikngtk 




2a7 


44 


68 


75 


(*1 


Wupipi 




] 905 


310 


330 


soo 


{'"> 


W«trqft 




792 


SO? 


20S 


304 




Wftioka , . 


493 


lao 


SlO 


sso 




1 
Coromandell 










Thames I (Wo road districta.) 










Ohinemiin f 











(1) Ifi. wparate. (i) On annaftl vklue; HA. speoial. (■! id. speolkl. (•) HospiUl 

ttDd ebvltable aid rate. id. («| |d. speoUl. i<} Ijgd. ■peolal. (') A^. aiia (d. 

•pMlal. («) id. ■pedal. (■)ld.«pw)lal. (lO) Jd apeoial. 

31— Ye«-book 



310 



MBW ZB&LAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOS. 

Road Districts, 1900-1901 — continued. 













■c 








Number 


ol 


S^-i 




a 
o 








t of 


Dauntfutd Dlftbtldt. 


a 
o 


a 

% 

a 


1! 

c 

S 

i 


S 

St 


ill 


Viftko— 










d. 


MatunikCa.. 


36S 


50 


39 


52 


i 


Waibuft 


1,829 


240 


344 


Sfil 


* 


"Waiknio— 












OAmliridge 


063 


M 


123 


123 






KirikiriroA . . 


964 


1S3 


261 


2fil 






l^xnithsre . . 


248 


96 


59 


52 






WtjaDjoDiAriiio 


449 


SO 


9DS 


421 






Huiitly 


QG6 


ISO 


106 


•■ 






Waipft— 












NewofWtle.. 


391 


es 


IGl 


135 


i 


Pukekur& . . 


eio 


18B 


3B6 


394 


i 


RtLiigiuiS'liia 


507 


85 


111 


lao 


1 


TuhiknruneK 


9B 


32 


56 


56 


1 


Kagla-n — 












Kur^mu (no Etovrd] 


TB 


., 


.. 


<F 




OnewlioKJ 


1»7 


44 


5S 


60 





Te Akbu (no Botird) 


SS 


-■ 


-■ 


■- 




Eawbia. 1 












West Taiipo 
Kast Taupo 


[No roHul ijiBt-riDU.] 












Hotorua 














Taur^nga — 












Katikati .. 


im 


S2 


lil 


259 


9 

1 


Tg Puko ., 


All 


190 


m 


171 


Te Tuna .. 


itiy 


35 


135 


140 


■ P) 


'Wbitkntans 












Waiapu (Ko rcftd diaGricts.) 












Opoiiki 












Oook— 












Aro)ia. 


&3 


11 


10 


9 


I' 


Kftili 


700 


140 


JM 


WO 


J(* 


Ngn.ta.pa 


489 


no 


94 


101 


M 


■Ormpiid 


4S:^ 


107 


110 


160 


') 


JPftCutKhi .. 


638 


75 


101 


aw 





Poun.vir& 


sa 


4S 


7fi 


110 


(V 


Powerlj' Bay 


1,050 


129 


131 


131 


(•> 



(1) .No nte atruok. (I) jd. ipeclal. {)) No geperal nte; (d. apMlsl. («) Nosenenl 
XAte 1 4d.. id., S^., uid 2id. Bpeofal. (S) No geuerkl rate ; ftd. separate. 



LOCAL OOTBBNINa BODIES. 

BoAD DiBTEiora, 1900-1901 — continued. 



311 













S« 




1 




Number of 


5|1 

^ Si* ■ 
O n ig o 

II § 
• 


CouDty ftnd DUtrlot. 


a 


□ 
Q 


i 

s 


S 

P 


Cook —cont intud. 










d. 


Tsruhetu . . 


225 


45 


53 


S3 


CI 


Te Arai 


294 


54 


57 


188 


C) 


TitJFADgi . . 


44 


10 


19 


30 


i") 


Waikoba 


S28 


56 


76 


78 


(') 


Wftimata . . 


264 


47 


47 


50 


CI 


Waipooa . . 


80 


9 


9 


16 


(') 


Whataupoko 


1,14B 


200 


250 


310 


m 


Oifton. (No rokd districts.) 












Taraaaki — 












Barrett 


439 


77 


77 


125 


i 


Carrington 


341 


66 


85 


85 


h 


Egmont 


635 


156 


157 


301 


Elliot 


235 


43 


51 


60 


g 


Frankley . . 


231 


60 


67 


67 


S 


Henui 


893 


80 


100 


133 


J 


Hurford, Upper 


56 


17 


17 


17 


\ 


Mangorei . . 


276 


47 


66 


68 


Moa 


2,836 


470 


550 


600 


80 


Oakura 


333 


100 


102 


404 


iC) 


Okato 


345 


61 


80 


137 


i 


Omata 


294 


62 


57 


70 


i 


Parihaka .. 


1,614 


251 


352 


820 


i 


Tataraimaka 


152 


26 


38 


38 


i 


Waitara Weat 


814 


170 


170 


475 


JO 


Waiwakaiho 


350 


75 


99 


18d 


i 


Stratford— 












Manganai . . 


1,734 


350 


•■ 


680 


10 


Hawera — 












Waimato . . 


2,619 


475 


512 


700 


10 


Fatea— 












Eohi 


166 


32 


30 


30 


1 


Motoroa 


60 


18 


20 


20 


i 


Okotnku . . 


134 


24 


29 


33 


i 


Patea East 


401 


70 


84 


355 


•') 


Pat«a West 


777 


180 


200 


630 


(') 


Wairoa 


106 


22 


30 


33 


J 


Waitotata-MomoliaW 


496 


U5 


113 


169 


) 


When u&kura- Wai to Lor a 


313 


40 


42 


42 


i 


Waitotara. {Ho road diatcicbB), 













(UNar&UiHtriick. <<)NoBBtiBralrate; id. special. (■) No general rate ; id. Bpeaia]. 
(•I ^d «p«j;ikl (^')id. apeolar {*) i J. ipeolal ; id. ^., and Id •ep.rate. (T) ^d. ■peclat. 
<■) )d. ipaeial mw ipeetal-ratliig area. («) Special, variooa 



312 



NBW ZEALAND OFFIOUL YBAB-BOOK. 



BOAD DiBTRIOTS, 1900-1901— COflHttWid. 







H amber ol 


sl^ 




1 








SU 


Ccmnty tud Dlilrlct, 


1 


1 


■a a 


ill' 






» 


s 


J *■ 


<'S° 


~" 


_ 


a 


K 


3*^ 


« 


Wonifuiiui — 








d. 


Kftnkatm 


198 


45 


41 


108 


1 


Eaitoke 


606 


120 


100 


ISO 


Hangawhero 


973 


450 


630 


490 


} 


Puma 


904 


170 


160 


245 


Wajigaeba Upper . . 


695 


100 


151 


833 


m 


Rangitikei. (No road dialriots.) 












Oroua — 












Manawatu 


2,405 


450 


519 


731 


1 
I') 


HanchMtec 


3,813 


760 


682 


3,147 


Fitaherbert 


724 


136 


278 


405 


i 


Pohangina 












Ktwitea (No road distriots.) 












Manawatu 












Hotowhenua — 












Otaki 


1,280 


270 


802 


1,171 




Te Horo 


612 


100 


183 


S09 


Wirokino . , 


S,862 


760 


720 


1,060 


\'y 


HaJke'a Bay (^^ '"** 'J«tri«='«-) 












Waipawa — 












Kumeroa . . 


334 


100 


120 


238 


i<'> 


Maungaatua 


244 


, , 


65 


188 


i, 


Norsewood 


1,206 


200 


270 


290 


i 


Ruataninha North 


661 


112 


82 


115 


Takapau 


608 


110 


62 


77 


W&ipawa . , 


274 


58 


64 


78 


1 


Waipukurau 


741 


178 


128 


188 


Ik 


Woodville . . 


817 


176 


240 


818 


1 


PalaDgata^ 












Oero 


306 




., 




i 


Patangata . . 


294 


46 


46 


99 


Porangahau 


433 


90 


78 


153 


ii'f 


Taumumu 


185 


20 


18 


18 


1" 


Wftlliagford 


192 


25 


22 


64 


W&nstead .. 


143 


16 


61 


77 


Weber 


556 


84 


126 


166 


Pahi&tua. (No ro^d dintriohi,) 













(i)SpecUI, rariom. l*) Special, ftd.; separate, ^d., ^d.. Ad., and |d. (*)I|d.and 
gjd.. special. («) ^d. ipeolal. t^i No rale stroek. (■) |^. •iweial. 



LOOAL OOTSBMIHO BODIBB. 

BoAD DiBTBiOTB, 1900-1901— conftnuAJ. 



County uid Dlrtrlot. 



CKstle point 

Wairarapa South — 
Feathenton 
TamUlii-CartertOD 

Butt— 
Makara 
PlimmertoD 
Seatoun 

Sounds. (Ko road diBtriota.) 



Marlborough — 
Awatere 
Omaka 
PeloruB 
Pioton 
Spring Onsk 
Wairau 



Kaikonra. (Mo road dlitriota.) 

OoUingwood — 
Collingwood 
Takaka 



Walmea— 

Dovedal« . . 
M out ere Upper 
Kmaka 
Stoke 

Suhnrban North 
Waimea West 



Batler 

Inangahna 

Orey 

WesUand 

Amori 



(No road diBtrioti.) 



Cheviot (no Board). 



I 



Hnmbetof 



B8 



3,367 ! 4S0 
3,538 ' 560 



357 ' 55 

84 25 

483 120 



1.078 
1,S42 



286 
397 
687 
1,183 
559 
460 



1 

I 



i 

II 



65 



400 
478 



40 

43 

198 



834 


311 


338 


821 


48 


73 


100 


110 


U5 




310 




125 




84 


78 



785 


200 


j 
1 
1 

210 


1,603 


336 


456 


1,218 


380 


263 


847 


165 


160 


819 


134 


153 


930 


160 


190 1 

i 



86 



600 
633 



62 

50 

138 



237 
456 
429 
253 
167 
313 



541 
763 



73 
110 



75 



SIS 



111. 



d. 

AC) 



lAC) 



SO 



i 

i 

e 
i 

9 



("1 
("I 



(1) ^. ipeolal. m Special, varioni. (■) id. epeolat. 

(•) |d. epeolal. (•} No rate rtraok. 



(•)|d.ii>«)la]. 



3L4 



NEW ZEALAND OFPIOIAL TBAB'BOOE. 

Road Distriotb, 1900-1901 — continued. 













1 v 








Number of 


s§s 












* oi 




g 

3 
§■ 








aa.^ 


Couuty and District. 


S 

a 


i 
« 
>> 

a, 
S 

« 


S 

St 

tf a. 

1* 


Ojayo 

i||g 


Ashley— 


1 






d. 


Ashley 


726 170 


220 


230 


1 


Oust 


713 1 161 


144 


191 


s 


Eyreton ' .. 


1,666 , 334 


269 


269 




F.yreton West 


401 1 65 


77 


77 


1 


KowEli 


1,851 ! 540 


660 


753 


1 


MaitHeviUe e,nd R«ngio» 


2,267 ! 524 


427 


592 


} 


Oxford 


1,973 463 


475 


684 


Waipora 


1,695 1 320 


300 


634 


k 


Selwyn — 


1 








Avon 


3,889 ,1126 


862 


1.097 


!,.[>} 


Coiirtensiy 


2,560 428 


480 


754 


i 


Elieiimere .. 


3,497 1 .. 


604 


909 


i 


Hftlswell .. 


1,278 ; 220 


200 


239 


I 


Hi*aClicote 


2,996 ' 690 


844 


683 


am 


Lake Coleridge 


177 


27 


30 


75 





Lincoln 


1,213 


370 


240 


316 


j(*) 


Malvern 


965 


162 


166 


309 


1 


Malvern East 


626 


140 


169 


290 


i 


Malvern South 


428 


82 


211 


340 


i 


Rnkaia 


825 1 200 


184 


838 




Riccarton . . 


5,713 [ .. 


1,011 


1,304 


i 


Spreydon . , 


1,457 ; 293 


374 


415 


1 


Springs 


1,872 ! 460 


406 


632 


ii'> 


Taitftpu 


324 1 80 


67 


78 


'b 


TempletoB 


2,336 498 


645 


645 


AW 


Waimftkariri Upper 


235 21 


18 


41 


(V 


Akaroa — 










Ak&roa and Wainui 


1,308 


230 


266 


266 


$ 


Le Boh'h Bay 


316 


66 


91 


91 


m 


Little River 


816 


260 


160 


150 




Ukatn's Bay 


520 


103 


97 


127 


m 


Pigeon Bay 


258 


57 


68 


60 


f) 


Port Levy 


169 


26 


48 


56 




Port Victoria 


292 


55 


51 


67 


. 


Asb burton — 












Anama 


72 


14 


20 


23 


m 


Aahburton Upper 


2.002 


380 


600 


680 


Coldstream 


319 


61 


70 


88 


i 


Longbeach 


1,336 


. , 


262 


231 


i 


Mount Hutt 


1,500 


270 


280 


389 


? 



(1) On the atrnu*] Vklue ; aepkrate. various. i*] Jd, fi. and G.A rate, fd- dralnai*, 

^d. Walmakarirt. I') No rate struck. (') Id. separate. [•} jlA. separate. 

(B) JL6. separate, Bonth Walmakarlrl Blver. (T) Id- speoial. (■) id. i 

<■] ^<^- spBcial. l>0) |d. separate In five wards. 



. sepNiste. 



IiOCAL QOVEHNINQ BODIBS. 



315 



— 


BoAD DiSTRiOTS, 1900-1901 — continued 


■ 










HniulMr of 


•a' 

5= * 




1 

I 








^£ 1 


County IMS Diitig\at. 


1^ 








h 


^ 




Ej a 






a 


S 


a-^ 


9 


Ash but ton — conl tnutd. 










d. 


Uouiit Somera , . 


928 


IBG 


598 


280 




Rangil&Ca . . 


797 


164 


ISO 


281 


t 


Soutlfi RAkaia 


1.480 


8S0 


945 


500 


1 


Waka.DLti . , 


1,230 


234 


S80 


S24 


ie> 


Gerald ioa^ 












GierftldJQe 


S,SH) 


480 


5!1 


683 


i 


Mount. Peel , . >^ 


493 


119 


e? 


lUS 




Temuk& .. .. .. .t.t. 


.S,S80 


512 


496 


■■ 


1 


Levels \ 












M&ckenKJ^ 
















■ (No road diatiioba.) 












Waihenio 














WKtkotiB.iti J 












Peninsula — 












Otagci Heads 


aoi 


62 


71 


96 


!(^ 


FcDinaulu . . 


1,8:^4 


219 


333 


S93 


! 


Portobelio 


796 


.. 


859 


3a^ 


1 


Tom&h&wlc 


137 


99 


■ii 


44 


1 


Taisri. (Ko roiid diBtriots.) 












Brace — 












BBrlmora! .. 


<76 


62 


86 


9S 


n 


iDoh-OluthB. (RoAd And River) 


344 


80 


68 


72 


4 


Mount SLuart 


618 


110 


196 


185 


i 


CluLba \ 












TaastekA 














Haniototo 


' (No road digtnott.) 












Yiaoont 














I^e J 














Southland — 












EoapdAlfi . . 


1,596 


293 


83« 


a96 


i 


Oteramilcft 


2,249 


»6S 


461 


461 


i 


TutumD 


T38 


118 


121 


156 


A 


WKllnce 1 












Fiotd ' (No rood distriotd.) 












Stawu-t Island 













(ij Id. ■eparata. (i) Half-rate* on Nattva land 



(■) No rate itroeh. 



SECTION XV.— LICENSES AND LICENSED HOUSES. Etc. 

LlOBKSBB AND LiCENBED HoUSBS. 

DuBiNo the year ended the 31st March, 1901, 2,391 licenseB for 
the sale of intoxicating liquors were granted. Of these, 1,523 wen 
publicana' and accommodation licenses, 6 New Zealand wine, 69 
packet, 114 wholesale, and 653 conditional licenses. The fees paid 
amounted to £53,617, and formed part of the revenae of the local 

foveming bodies of the districts in which the licenses were issued. 
'articulars are given in the following table : — 

NOMBER OF LICE58B8 OBAHTBD DUBINQ THE YbAB I900-I901, AMD TRS AhODKI 

or Fbb8 paid to Loau> Bodibs tbebbtob. 

LloeuaM. In Countlea. In Boroagba. ToUl 

Pubtiouis' lioenaeB 613 690 1,901 

Aooommodation lioensoR 330 . . S90 



Totft] licensed houses 

New Zeftl&Qd wine UoenaeB 
Fkoket lioenaes 
Wholesale licenses 
Conditional lioensee 

Total licenses granted 



Amountof license-fees paid to looal bodies £19,610 £31,007 £53,61 

The average number of persons to each licensed house in 
counties and boroughs respectively, for 1900-1901, is next shown :— 



833 


690 


1,639 


, , 


6 


« 


10 


59 


« 


9 


185 


lU 


511 


143 


6fiS 


1,363 


1,032 


S,SM 



Oounties 
Boroughs 



Number 

of Licensed 

Houees.* 

882 

690 



CeniUB 
PopulAtloa. 

417,596 
360,303 



Average Namber of 

Persone to 

each Iiloensed House. 

fioe 



Totals .. I,fi22 767,798t 504 

In 1899-1900 the number of licensed houses m counties was 836, 
and those in boroughs 690, giving a total of 1,526 houses, or 4 more 
than in 1900-1901. The average number of persons to a licensed 
house increased from 482 in 1899-1900 to 602 in 1900-1901 in 
counties, and in boroughs the average apparently decreased from 
510 to 508, but this decline is probably due to the population in the 
earlier years having been estimated too high. 

* I.e., hoaaes holding publioaus' or accommodation lloenaes. 
I Excluding penon* ou shipboard and adjsoent Islands. 



LICBNSB8 AND LI0BN8BD HOUSES. 



317 



The aDDual fees paid for licenses are— 

(1.) For a publioan's lioense — £ 

(a.l Within the limits of % borongh or town dixtriot . . 40* 

(ft.) OatBide the aforesaid limits .. ..25 

Foe a New Zealand wine lioenaa .. .. 1 

For an accommodation lioenae, a aum to be determined by 

the Licensiog Committee, not exceeding.. .. ..20 

(4.) For a packet lioenie — 

(a.) For a Teasel exceeding 60 tons register 10 

ib.) For a Teasel not exoeeding 60 tons register 5 

For a wholesale license . . . . . . . . . . 20 

For a aonditional license, accordiog to duration of license, a 

sum not exceeding . . 30 



<2-: 

<8. 



The approximate capital value of the liceused houses in the 
counties was stated at £752,015, aud the same for certain of the 
boronghB at £325,242. There was, hesides, an annual value of 
£127,000 for other licensed houses in the boroughs, which, capitalised 
at 6 per cent., would represent £2,116,666. The capital value of 
all hcensed houses would therefore be about £3,093,923. 

The total number of persons eugageti in or connected with the 
sale or manufacture of wine, spirits, beer, cordials, &c., was re- 
turned at the census of 1696 as under : — 





UsiM. 


Fanifcles, 


Persons 


fiotelkeeper 


1,384 


204 


1,638 


Relative asaistlng 


167 


348 


605 


Manager, olerk 


67 


11 


78 


Hotel, club, &o„ servant ... 


1,136 


2,075 


S,2ll 


Manager, seoratary, steward of olub-house 


32 


3 


35 


Baiman, barmaid 


196 


210 


406 


'Wine, spirit, ale merchant 


43 


J . 


48 


Assistant 


5 


I 


6 


Clerk, boak-keeper, accountant, traveller. 








storeman . . 


44 




44 


Cordial, &o., merchant, salesman 


6 




5 


Brewer, bottler . . 


334 


i 


238 


Manager, clerk, traveller 


53 




53 


Relative assisting, apprentice . . 


16 




18 


Oellarmaa, assistant, carter, do. . . 


151 


] 


152 


Maltster and assistants .. 


118 




118 


Distiller, bottler 


2 




2 


Wine-maker, bottler 


9 




9 


<k>rdial, &o., maker 


293 


6 


299 


Clerk, book-keeper, traveller 


6 




6 


Totals 


3,903 


2,663 


6,706 



Local Option PoijL. 

Under "The Alcoholic Liquors Sale Control Act, 1893," each 
electoral district constituted for the election of a member of the 
House of Bepresentatives is a licensing district, and electors for 
^he House of Representatives are also electors under the Licensing 
Acts. 



* Between Ibe bours ot six in tfao mornlag and ten at olgUt. For an eleven o'clock 
lloenee an additional AS must be paid. 



S16 



NEW ZBAI.AND OKPICIAL YBAR-»O0K. 



Under the Aineudment Act of 1805 the licensing poll ia tiAeo 

a1> the aarne time as the KP"en»l election of members of the Hooae 
of iBepresentalives, The questions for the deciwon of the votere 
wo, — 

(1.) Whether tlio uuinbur of Licences existing in the district 

shall continue? 
(2.) Whether the number nha-U be reduced? 
(3.) Whether any licetiies whatever shall be granted? 

The voter may vote for one or two of these propo«i^s, but do 
more. 

The method of determining the result of the poll in each dietnct 
by the Returning Olhcev is as follows :■ — 

(1.) If the number of votes I'ccorded in favour of the continuanoe 
of existitiK licenses is au absolute majority of all the voters whose 
votes were recorded, the propoBal is to ha deemed to be carried, and 
the licenses continue until the next poll, subject to certain provisions 
in special (laKeti. 

(S.) If the Tiiimher of votes reeordeil in favour of a reduction in 
the iininber of licences is an absolute majority of alt the voters 
whose votes were recorded, the proposal is deeniftd to be earned, 
and supersedes tho proposal for continuance of licenses. The 
Licensinf; Committee then reduces publicans' licenses by not len 
than 5 per cent, or more than 26 per cent, of the total number existing, 
excluding forfeitures. Provision is made that when a reduction 
vote is carried the licentit^ij Hliall be reduced by one at least when the 
total number does not exceed t«ii, two when not over tVEeuty, and 
three at least when the licenses exceed thirty. 

(3.) If the number of votes recorded in favour of the proposal 
that no license shall be granted is not less than tbree-Bfchs of all 
the voters whose votes were recorded, the proposal is declared to 
be carried, and supersedes the proposal for reduotioo and for con- 
tinuance, aud no hceuses can be granted. 

(4.» If none of the proposals respectiog licenses are carried by 
the prescribed majority the Uceuses continue as they are until next 
poll, subject to certain provitiion^ in special cases. 

The result of the poll taken on 6th Dnceinber, 1699, for each 
licensing district has been given in the Year-hook for ItiOl and pro- 
viously. 

On the 31st December, 1901. there were ninetv fire brigades 
in tho colony, with a total strength of 1,663 (2S2 officers and 1,411 
men). Compared with the numlx^rs in 19CX), these figures show a 
decrease of oub brigade and 8 otticora. but an increaBc of 238 men. 
There is also a salvage corps in Auckland, consisting of one captain 
and six men. not included in the figures given above, which WM'kft 
in conjunction with the city and suburban fire brigades. 





I SECTION XVI.— REPKE3ENTATI0N. AND THE GENERAL 
L ELECTION OF 1899. 



RKPRT!8KyT\TIOH. 



I^HE colony is at pre&ent (June 1902) divided in accordance with 
the Representation Act Amendment Aclfi, 1887 and 1889. into- 
aixcy-two diiithctfi for purpos<>s of European represivntation — 
fifty-eight rural districts liaviini one member each, and four city 
electorates three niemberB esich- Thi« division whs made on the 
basis of the resuU>) of I he census of lti9(j. The Act of 1889 
dirucled that iu computinu for electoraL purposes the population of 
' the colouy 2b per ctinl. sfiaii be added to llie couutry pupulutioii — 
^■'t.tf., all pvreomj livitig outsidu towu» of '2,000 luimbilantii artd over. 
^rTbe total population of the colony (uthur lliau Maoriii), with the 
addition aforesaid, having been ascertoiued, waii then divided by the 
number of inembeis (70), and the quotient thus obtained formed the 
quota. The four city electoral districts (which have cbree members 
each) are bo delined in extent that the population shall be three 
times the quota. Inaatnuch aa it would be impossible to divide the 
country into a given number of districts all having exactiy the 
pjrcciae quota of population, the law permitted the Conitmssionors to 
make an allowance of 750 peisons by way oi addition to or deduction 
from the population of rural districts, and of 100 in case of city 
electoratea, with special provision tor diatricta where the population 
is partly city and partly rural. 

But, although the above describes the existing state of affairs, 

^ •' The Representation .■\ct, 1900," provides that when the present 

^■General Assembly expires by effluxion of time (Deceniher], or other 

™ sooner determination, the number of members to be thereafter 

elected to the House of Representatives shall be seventy-six, iuetead 

of seventy, and for »lx new districts, one for eacli additional member. 

It &tKO incre&ses the aliowauce of 7^0 peraons within or outside the 

quota to 1,250 pereons in the foniiatioti of rural di«trict«. Thus, 

more consideration can be given to community of interest, faciiitieB 

o( communieaiioQ, and topographical featurei, in constructing the 

districts. 

»" The Representation Act .Amendment Act. 189C." provides for 
two permanent CommiBsions. called the " North *' and "Middle" 
Island Representation CoinmiBsions. These sit together as a joint 
ComnuBsion for the purpose of fixing the naraber of districts for the 
North and Middle Islands respectively, bat afterwords act separately 
and independently of one another, the duties and functions of each 
being confined to their respective island. 




^ 



320 MEW ZEALAND OPFlOIAIt YEAU-UOOK. 

The North Island with its adjacent islands includes at the 
present time 30 electoral districts, having 34 members ; the Middle 
and Stewart Islands having 32 districts and 36 members. In 1693 
the North Island returned 31 and the Middle Island 39 members. 
But movement of population between 1891 and 1696 has resulted 
in the addition of three members to the North, and a correspoDding 
reduction in the Middle Island. 

These districts are, as above stated, for purposes of European 
representation. But the colony is again divided into four districts 
for purposes of Maori representation, under the electoral law, each 
district having one Native member elected by the Maoris ; makisg; 
the House of Bepresentatives consist of 74 members altogether— 
70 Europeans and i Maoris. After the next general election the 
number will be 80 members in full. 

The Electoral Acts. 

By the principal Act, which came into force in 1893, the great 
step was taken of admitting women to the francliise. The Amend* 
ment Act of 1896 abolished the non -residential or property qualifi- 
cation, with a saving clause in favour of then-existing registrations 
in respect of such qualification. 

[ElectoiB are enrolled od unding to the Ragintr&r a elaim and declaration 
aooonling to a presoribad form. Tbere are no fixed periods tor making ap treeh 
eleotoral rolls, but the rolU ate reTtsed and printed before a general eleotioa, and 
also for any district in which a bye-eleotion is to take place. Not are then ta.j 
fixed peiioda for the revising and purifying of the tolls. It is ib» duty of the 
Begiitrar of each eleotoral distttot to keep the rolls lerlsed and oomplete.] 

The General Election op 1899. 
Bemarks on the General Election of 1899, with the result ex- 
hibited in tabular form and particulars of the polling, were given in 
detail iu the Year-book for 1901, pp. 320 to 328. 



OCCUPATION OF LAND. 
OCCUPATTOM OF Lamd : Temdre. 



Prorinoial 
DittricU. 


Total 

Area 

of 

Holdinga. 


Freehold. 




Leased 

from 

Natives. 


Held from 

Crowo 

under 

Dlffereut 

Tunures. 


Held under 

Pasioral 
Lieaae 


ADcklftDd 


Aarec. 
6,077,445 


Acres. 
3,897,198 


Acres. 
495,243 


Acres. 
378,271 


Acres. 
851,710 


Acres. , 
55,028 


Taranaki 


1,039,723 


654,024 


216,718 


81,672 


179,824 


485 


Hawke'H B&7 . . 


8,836,744 


1,789,457 


333,621 


895,194 


243.012 


75,460 


Wellington . . 


3,844,677 


2,432,528 


494,844 


374,296 


519,795 


3,114 


Uatlboroagh . . 


2,278,946 


820,866 


67,441 


20,515 


795,815 


574,309 


Mslson 


2,025,307 


1,007,017 


312,941 


20,468 


216,945 


467,936 


Westl^od 


498,498 


62,984 


28,516 


2,191 


242,255 


167,552 


-OaDtetbnry 


6,493,592 


2,723,369 


1,047,958 


11,929 


479,893 


2,230,443 


-Olago 


10,313,057 


2,923,473 


1,161,030 


10,899 


1,611,901 


4,599,754 


Totali . . 


35,507.889 


16,236,911 


4,153,312 


1,802,435 


5,141,150 

* 


3,174,081 



' For remarks as to the aoonrscy of the figures in the oolumnt see previous pase. 

It would appear that holders of their lands from the Crowa do 
not return to collectora so much as the quantity on which they pay 
xent to Government. The acreages stated to be held under Crown 
jMtstoral lease do not agree with the tables of the Lands Department. 

Arranged according to the number of holdings, the provincial 
■dtBtricts stand in order as under: — 



Aackland 
Otago .. 
Canterbury 
WellicgtoD 
Taranaki 
Hawke's Bay 
N el BOO 
Marl bo rough 
WoBtland 



15,994 holdings. 
13,833 
10,853 
10,537 

4,389 

3.153 

3,102 

1,438 
688 



The occupied holdings of the North Island now considerably 
•outnumber those of the Middle Island, the numbers being: North 
Island, 34,073 : Middle Island, 29,909. For the year 1896-97 the 
returDS showed 29,535 holdings for the Middle Island, against 
'29,369 for the North, besides 36 holdings at the Chatham Islands, 
•of which no account was taken for the last five years. 

The full details of holdings and acreages, classified according 
.to size, for the year 1901-1902 will he found in the table on the 
JoUowing page. 



S-24 



iXKVf ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAH- BOOK. 



30 

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LIVB-8TOOE. 



835 



LiVB-STOOK. 

A comparative table is presented showing the increase in live- 
stock since the year 1858. The figures are taken from the census 
as far as 1891, but for 1895-96 and following years the results of 
the enumeration made annually by the Department of Agriculture 
under "The Agricultural and Pastoral Statistics Act, 1895," have 
been made use of. 







A9IM 












Teu. 


HorMB. 


and 
HuIm. 


Cattle. 


Bheep. 


Ooata. 


PlgB. 


Ponltry. 


1858 .. 


14,912 


122 


137,204 


1,523,324 


11,797 


40,734 


« 


1861 .. 


28,276 


153 


193,286 


2,761,383 


12,191 


43,270 


236, og& 


1864 .. 


49.409 


339 


249,760 


4,987,273 


12,005 


61,276 


378,414 


1867 .. 


65,715 


323 


312,835 


8,418,579 


11,964 


115,104 


676, 065. 


1871 . . 


81,038 


397 


486,592 


9,700,629 


12,434 


151,460 


872,174 


1874 .. 


99,859 


267 


494.917 


11,704,853 


14,276 


123,921 


1,058,198 


1878 . . 


187,768 


241 


578,430 


13,069,338 


14,243 


207,337 


1,323,542 


1881 .. 


161,736 


362 


698,637 


12,985,085 


11,223 


200,083 


1,566,111 


1886 .. 


187,882 


297 


853,368 


16,564,596 


10,220 


277,901 


1,679,021 


1891 .. 


211,040 


348 


631,831 


18,128,186 


9,055 


308,812 


1,790,070 


1895-96 


287,418 


426 


1,047,901 


19,826,604t 


■ 


239,778 




1896~97 


249,813 


434 


1.138,067 


19,138,493t 


« 


209,834 




1897-98 


252,884 


S93 


1,209,165 19,687.954t 


• 


186,027 




1898-99 


258,116 


534 


1,203,024 


19.673, 725t 


■ 


193,612 




1899-1900 


261,931 


459 


1,223,139 


19,348,506t 


• 


249.751 




1900-1901 


266,245 


480 


1,256,680 


19,355.195t 


* 


250,975 




1901-1902 


279.672 


406 


1.361,784 


20,233,099t 


- 


224.024 





* Not «namerated. f Numbers tor April, 1H95, 1996, 1897, 189B, 1899, 190U, aud iOOl. 

The stock owned by Maoris in the year 1901, which is included 
above, comprised 317,436 aheep, and 36,943 head of cattle. The 
nomberof horses is not specified, but is known to be large. 

TABI.X SHowma fob baoh Coukty ik New Zealand the Khuber of Horsbb, 
CattiiB, Sheep, and Piob in 1901. 



GoDntr. 


HoFBes, 

November, 

1901. 


Cattle, 
iDcluding 

CalTBB, 

November, 

ISOl. 


Dairy Cows, 
Included 

In 
foregolDg. 


Bbeep, 

lucludlag 

Lambs, 

April. 1901. 


PigB. 

November, 

1901. 


MoQgODUi 


1,95B 


8,045 


1,287 


27,466 


3,573 


Wbangaroa 


790 


1,687 


107 


7,425 


1,293 


Bftj of Isl&nds 


2,436 


10,523 


1,814 


36,493 


1,757 


Hokianga 


2,102 


4,949 


1,190 


9,698 


1.866 


Rodney . . 


1,951 


12,451 


2,820 


78,585 


590 


Whaagarei 


4,245 


26,155 


7,263 


36,784 


1,722 


Otamatea 


1,631 


13,628 


2,119 


51,518 


868 


Hobaon . . 


3,023 


20,G94 


3,263 


18,455 


3,613 


Waitemata 


2,345 


11,517 , 


3,651 


38,412 


1,249 


Kden 


5,997 


6,561 


3,683 


2.882 


2,483 


MaDukau 


8,218 


48,143 , 


17,071 


94,933 


6,166 


Coromandel 


717 


3,072 ; 


819 


13,378 


526 


Thames 


1,861 


4,728 1 


1,749 


7,455 


1,362 


Ohinemari 


2,0-25 


5,897 , 


1,613 


4,2SG 


3,029 


Waikato 


3,190 


21,409 1 


5,417 


72,822 


3,101 



22— Tear.book 



324 



NBW ZBAIiAND OFFICIAL YBAB-BOOE. 




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MEW 28AIJU4D OFFICIAL VSAH-HOOS. 



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827 




continutd. 




Plgi. 




November 




1901. 


■5 


3,400 


J7 


447 


<I3 


4,114 


:» 


575 


i77 


1.963 


196 


1,061 


i90 


4.735 


059 


1,716 


.144 


3,321 


.176 


1,06^ 


.165 


539 


:,628 


903 


'),85l 


462 


»,{M3 


S,725 


1^,406 


1,410 


868 


16 


^33,0<J0 


2-24.034 


tor dftlrylDg. 



■ipal kinda of live- 



tl 
16 

s* 

(86 
666 
,118 



Ronea. 
4S6.7BB 
481 .417 
302,237 
179,352 
68,231 
31,607 



PIgi. 

122,187 

356,577 

350,370 

91,164 

61,696 

68,391 



.una Nov., 1900. Nov.. 1900. 
•6.680 266,245 250,975 

in order for Dumber of 
.ttle and horses. 



lent of Agricultur 

1886 and 1891 than 

iie account was takeu 

jr sixteen years, disting 

a the Middle Island. 

d flocks of the North II 

••w 1886 to 10,21B,94to 



^H S26 NEW ZEALAND OPFIOIAL TDAK-BtKIK. 


■ 


^^1 T4SIX IIHOWmO THK HUUBBR 


or HoKilKB, 


OaTTLR, SmXP, KTC.— <Q>W*NltMl. 1 


^^^^^ County. 


Nttvwnbcr. 
1901. 


Oatlla. 

luoladlDii 

OalvM. 

Kovetuber, 
1001. 


Dairy Cowi. 
laoiitded 

Id 
m«8oisg. 


Sbani. 1 
laeludiiit . 
Lbo) I». 

Ai>m. ISO J. 


Hovembar. ■ 

1901. I 


^H lURlAn 


S.O^S 


M,887 


8.992 


84,904 


3,144 


■ Waipft .. 


3,159 


ia.l34 


8.714 


87.397 


1.860 J 


H Ptaka 


3,916 


31.764 


4.S7B 


170.519 


3.058 I 


^H Weat Taupa and 


4.8G8 


18.144 


1,884 


34,870 


8.196 ■ 


^H KawhU 


, 








1 


^H Ewt TnupQ nnj 


3.067 


2,413 


341 


29, Ml 


1,950 I 


^H Houruft 










1 


^^^^ Taurajigi\ 


a. WO 


14.604 


S,3U 


8.5fi5 


1.700 M 


^^^^^ IVhdkaiano 


1.307 


4,331 


1.080 


32.064 


877 ^m 




l,t&5 


6,4a7 


1.53S 


18.737 


876 ^H 


3,H13 


15,019 


3H1 


327.039 


6,410 ^^ 


^^^^vCook 


6,993 


40.007 


S.48<J 


887.066 


3,570 1 


^^^B^Oii'toii 


1,30& 


17.947 


4.-22fi 


36. 103 


l,Li4 1 


^^f Tftraaaki 


3,809 


7o,asi 


28,666 


80.806 


6,617 


^H KtTKLrord 


s.fiaft 


35.759 


14,743 


'.f7.5l3 


3.060 


^H H*wei& 


6,310 


74,388 


29.044 


168,714 


7.677 


^1 Fatea .. 


i.944, 


36.040 


C,587 


341,257 


1.816 


^1 WatToa.. 


8,237 


0,916 


76S> 


543.413 


739 


^^1 Bawrkn'w Kiiy 


8,()4S 


83, SIS 


4,135 


1,293.393 


4,467 


^^1 PatunfCKto. 


2,781 


30. '231 


614 


763.223 


647 


^^1 Waipawa 


S,4J1> 


41,533 


9,060 


699.452 


3,TS4 


^^B Waitciiura 


1,9'J4 


12,4117 


8.595 


171.189 


1,873 


^H Wniigiuiiii 
^H RatiRUikci 


4.776 


lH,:i-23 


4.466 


398, 92i 


8,665 


5,546 


31.610 


6,981 


560,566 


3,738 


^H Oeoua 


6,630 


36.694 


15,U3l> 


336,318 


6,288 


^^1 Kiwit«a.. 


8,18a 


18.119 


5.733 


278.038 


3.479 


^^B Pohangina 


•KH 


6,340 


a,G97 


120.171 


1,451 ^^M 


^H Hkoawatvi 


S.«7 


19,411 


5.840 


192.169 


3,563 ^H 


^H Horowtiflnua 


S,Td2 


90.336 


6. Ml 


151.852 


3,981 ^H 


^H Uutt 


4.877 


14.150 


7,7«1 


307.674 


3,273 1 


^^^^^ South Wairarapa.. 


S.Uti 


43.664 


8,043 


63)^.414 


4,757 ■ 




8.a59 


S2.480 


2,944 


560,040 


L,S48 I 


^^^H CuHlapolat 


«7S 


e.oyfi 


aus 


149,768 


71 I 


^^^^H Akiuo 


1,210 


11. 1-^6 


1,0'J6 


148.657 


486 ^^ 


^^^^p Paliiatua 


1.8W) 


■20. 7H 


7.298 


319,833 


3.379 ^H 


^^^^V Ekctahuna 


1.018 


3.865 


a,7sa 


71,629 


1.623 ^H 


^^f Maiiriceville 


Sbti 


3,385 


1.470 


63.949 


487 ^H 


^^H Marlborough 


a, 495 


4,687 


2.248 


515.022 


3,019 ^H 


^H Bouoda .. 


716 


4.453 


1.503 


149,543 


1,377 


^H Kaikoum 


1.052 


!l,7ait 


900 


157,^2 


404 


^H Cnlhngvtood 


1.173 


6,673 


2.270 


45,331 


1.997 


^^1 \Vn.iuir« 


4,756 


i:ii,»i8 


5,020 


213,037 


4,197 


^m Duller 


485 


3.667 


1.521 


3,1-16 


659 


^H laangahoa 


900 


6.4M 


1,486 


31,313 


1.077 


^^1 Amuri 


i.ssa 


8.877 


403 


391.718 


181 


^^1 CtiDviot 


866 


i.saa 


587 


106, a73 


706 


^H Woetiand 


1,4SU 


10,768 


9.417 


16,306 


710 


^M i,a]i]«r .. 


uai 


6.184 


I.BI3 


10.330 


958 


H,ai4 


16,114 


6,373 


BU.filS 


8,950 


^^^^H B«lwya .. 


15.437 


27.953 


14,461 


705,933 


33,400 


^^^^1 Akaro* .. 


3.631 


SS,169 


5.414 


244,594 


3.734 


^^^^V Aabburton 


9,aS7 


0.316 


3,568 


681,633 


7,939 


^^m fl«raldui« 


4,I3H 


6,619 


3.140 


674,400 


8,350 

l,7M 




8,401 


5,oei 


3.017 

m 



BHESP. 



827 



Taslb sdowiko tbb Mohiikb 


or HoRtiKg, 


OlTTLK, SuKip, rtc—contimud. 


Oeuntjr. 


Hor»e«, 
Nav ember. 


Oatllo. 
InrltidlnK 


Dairy CawB. 
in eluded 

In 


Slioap. 
laeludiag 
liuntn. 


Hovambar 




1901. 


Kovainber, 
IWL 


in 
fi>regoliiK- 


AprtJ, 
1901. 


1001. 


Waim&to 


fi.asc 


8,!)l<l 


S.163 


602,706 


8,409 


Mafkenita 


i.acM 


3.269 


«96 


394,927 


447 


Waitiikl.. 


6.094 


19.87i 


7.897 


S71,50a 


4.114 


Waihemo 


1.377 


S.SS3 


1.536 


183, 3»a 


575 


Wftihou&iti 


1,5^3 


ltl.090 


5.031 


77,077 


1,968 


Pnniniiulft 


8G6 


7.253 


4,404 


1,496 


1,061 


Tfticri .. 


7.141 


S4,4t^ 


9.427 


230,890 


4.788 


Bruoe 


3,519 


9.9'.19 


3,805 


in, 059 


1,716 


Cluthit ,. 


4,690 


17.968 


5,361 


814,144 


3,331 


TiiApiikit ,. 


8.788 


5,807 


2.179 


376. 176 


1.063 


Itlnuiutoto .. 


3,163 


6.ao7 


I,S7» 


830,169 


689 


Vineent.. .. 


a.asi 


l.&iO 


1,322 


803.638 


903 


LUa 


1,448 


3. 798 


90O 


150,851 


469 


Southland 


16.709 


CO. 653 


SO, 335 


890. 94a 


6,735 


WftUoc* MnH Fiord 


4.916 


19.774 


4,S46 


443.406 


1.410 


Slew&rt Island 


•J 


88S 


117 


858 


16 


To Mia 


S7d,6T2 


1,361,784 


SSI, 49a 


30,383.099 


324,034 



*N«e iDeludiaR 99,DU1 heifers over two reuv Aid iDtendCLd tor d&lrrins, 

lAve-stock in Australasia. 

The following Ki7e8 the iminber of the principal kiuds of Uve- 
Btock in AuBtralaaia for the yesur 1900-1901 : — 



JMlc or Oolooy. Sboep. 


Oaicle. 


BoiVM. 


an. 


QoMUfil&ni) 

New South Wales . 


10,889.185 


4,078,191 


456.768 


192.167 


40.030,606 


1.983.116 


481,417 


806.677 


Victoria . . 


1O.H-1I.790 


1,608.88* 


393.387 


880,870 


Soath AiiEtmliH. 


5,283.947 


3!Mi,»a(i 


ny.ssa 


91,184 


WMlBro AUHtralU . 


3.431.8G1 


338. G66 


68,381 


61.696 


Taamanin. . 


1,683.9A6 


134,118 


31,607 


68.391 




Hay. 1001. 


Nov., iflca 


Nciv„ia00. 


ICov.,19001 


New Zeal&nd 


20.283,099 


1.356,680 


266,3i)5 


390,076 



New Zealand thus takes second place in order (or number of 
aheep, and fourth for the number of her cattle and horses. 

The returnB made to the Department of Agriculture ahow a 
smaller number of sheep for tlie yettm 1896 and 1891 than the cau- 
8U8 figures fiiven previously, because the account was taken later in 
the year. The particulars are given for sixteen years, distinguishing 
the number for the North from that in the Middle Island. 

According to these returns, the flocks of the North lalaad 
inereaBod from 5.285,907 sheep in the year 1886 to 10,218.945 in 
1901, or at thu rate of over 93 per cent., wIuIq aVxtitrg \u 'Coa '^SA^'k 




S98 



mw BBU*AIfD OVTICIAE. YEAR-BOOK. 



leland increased from 9,S88,356 to 10.014,154, a gain o( 1-27 per 
cent, in the souic poriod. Fur tbe North Island the increase during 
the sixtecD years nas 4,933,U38 sheep, while in the Middle IsUna 
there was aa increase of 120,798. 



L886 
1887 
18B8 

isaa 

1890 

1891 
ISUS 
1808 
18(H 
1895 
18H6 
ISDT 
L893 
IBM 
1900 
1901 



tionh Ulknd. Uiddle UlMtd. 



Tata). 



6.a85.yo7 



,88S.S66 15,174.963 



6,S0&.4B5 9.M9,141 15,1U,G36 



5,069.996 
6,800,344 
6,&BB.346 



,S78.202 15,043,196 



9.433,084 
9.527,767 



15,438.838 
16,116,118 



7.159.927 9.593,845 16,733.752 



8,304.0ftS 10. 



,taa 



18.670.752 



8.G8^.361 10.61)5.008 1». 880, 869 



9,irv.),afi2 11,061,477 



aO,2'dO,83g 



8,9^4.646 10,881.958 19,836,604 



9,181,7.% 10.006.757 



19,138,498 



9,540,717 10.147.237 19,687.954 
9,864.946 9,808.780 19.678.735 
9.058.899 9.895. 107 19. 848.506 



9,998.178 



9, 8.17. 022 



19.855,195 



10.218.945 10.0)4. I5t SIO.3a3.099 



\ 



There was an increase of 877.904 in tbe total Dumber of aheep 
_.]ce April, 1900, by the above figures, aud &u iticraase b«iweoa 
1891 and 1901 amounting lo 3,479,.it47, or at a rate of 2077 per 
E<ceDt. The export and local conttutiiption of wool developed from 
flu, 537.646 lb, for the year ended September, lS9i, to U7,694,7131b. 
for the corrHspoudin),; year of 19DI. The export of sheepskins and 
pelt«, which iu 1H90 was 2,292,5-21 in number, rose to 4,001,531 \a 
1901. 

Over ft eeriee of years the number of sheep has been well main- 
taioed, althou(;h the slaughter needed fur tlie export of froxen 
multou increased to upwards of three niiliions and a quarter of 
sheep and lambs ia 1901. 

Tbe proportion of bdibH Socks of sheep, until 1901. Increased 
very considorably, and with soialier Socks the rabbit diffioolty is 
easier to master than with large onea. 

NuMBBB OP Flocks, 1686, 1891, 1896. 1900. and 1001. 



ftu« of Ploolu. 


18S6. 


IW]. 


ieP6. 


tfiOO. 


UU. 1 


CadwdOO 


. 6,0:M 


8,272 


12.028 


12,389 


U.TO*i 


500 and uiid«r 1 .000 


. 1.180 


l.Ctfl 


2,605 


2.810 • 


8.059 


1. 000 . 3,000 
2,000 . 5.OU0 


747 

532 


989 
666 


1.460 

893 


3,6!il* 


2.877» 


a. 000 . 10.000 


26a 


287 


340 


352 


avT 


10,000 . 30.000 


228 


3S9 


231 


196 


188 


aO.OOOani] upwards 


166 
9,149 


169 


147 


139 


138 




12,398 


17.703 


18.357 


18,800 








Mfe. 


an. 




• From 1.000 to 


uoo 


.*. 


... i.m 


^•IS 


J 


. «.ac» to t 


i.000 


"* 


osa 

1.081 


a.«TT 





SBBBP. 



339 



» 



The average aizo of the flocks is found to have been 1,6.59 Bheep 
for 1886. ].3fi3 for 1801. 1.081 in 18S6, 1,040 in 1899, 1,064 in 
1900. and 1,102 in 1901, 

Of the provincial districts, thai of Canterbury hac) iiiosl sh«»p 
in 1901, Weltingtoiii came next, and Otago occupied the third 
place. The full particul&ni, wtlii increases or decreases since 
1900, are :— 




PfovlDoikl Dl*tricu. 

Cantflrbary 
Wellington 
Otitgo 

Hawko'c Buy 
Auckland 

Mul borough 

Taranaki 

WMtland 



So. of Bhe»p 
UilWl. 

4.816.887 

3,97H.0n 
3,298.421 
2.I1&,A&< 

sdB.aoa 

621.812 

$84,892 

96.6S6 

20,833,099 



So. ol Sbeop 
In !«». 

3,951.00S 

4.083.416 

a. 746. 750 

3.327,364 

2,070.446 

841.513 

78y.218 

508.948 

28,533 



tnwMaa. 

367.679 
1G7.12B 
231,301 

37 i its 
27,295 
32,504 
56,441 



Dmn***. 



38,943 



I.B97 



19,355,195 877,904 Net inoreaM. 



en of the provincial districts show an increflJie in the number 
leep in 1901 when compared wilh the previous year's returns, 
aggruyatiuy 908,744, to which ^tn Cauierbury contributed 367,879, 
Otajjo 231.261, Welliogtou 157.123. Taranaki 65.444, Aucklai^ 
37,148, Marlborough .^2.594, and Nb1(=oii 27,295. The other two 
provincial districts show decreases (Hawke's Bay 28,943. and 
Weatland 1.807). and T.hu8 reduce the gain (or the whole colony 
to 877,904. as shown above. 

It has boon estimated that the annual consumption of mutton in 
New Zealand is equivalent to ^J-25 shoep per inhabitant, and that 
the number of nhcep required in the proBcnt year (1902) for food 
will be about 1,904,000. (Maoris, for the parposea of this calcula>> 
tion, have been includi^d.) 

Two important advantages that sheep-farming has in New Zea- 
land are mentioned by Mr. J. A. Johnstone in the Year-book for 1804. 
They are ; (i) the low cost of the production of mutton, (2) the high 
percente^e of natural increase. Kespectiuj>j the first point, it has 
oeen proved bttvond all doubt that, under ordinary conditions, the 
very choiceal of mutton can be *u produced a» to pay the grower 
bandioiuely when sold at 2d. per pound foe the carcase at the 
nearest shipping-port. To the i3titj»h sheep-faruier this statement, 
of course, is valueless by itself ; but, when told that this mutton 
would cost the Lo;idon butcher, delivered ex steamer at the dock, 
only 3^4. per pound, he will be able to realise in some measure 
what a wonderful ^azing-country New Zealand is. and to under- 
stand how it is that settlors of the right stump have done so well. 
Then, witli regard to the high percentage of increase, there need 
only be cited a few average returns from well-known flocks to 
show what excellent lambings New Zealand famicrft obtain under 
good management. 



I 



880 



HEW ZBAtAKD OmOIAb TBAH^UOOB. 



LAKUito RrrVKtra — Avkuor«. 



[•OMiitr. 



Hrwd of 

Fladl. 



Bre«d «l 



Br««d or 



Xo. ot 
Bwv*. 



Pvraant- 



B««llMkB. 



Norih Maod.. 


Ltnoobi 


i • •• 




. .. 


Remnej 


. 


Lincolo 


MiddlAleluid 


Uffriuo 


« •• 


- 


' * 


CroM-bved 


* • 


HftU-lmd 


» • • 


BLeia'str* 


■ 


IJocola 1 




B. Uhnfa 


V > • 


K. Leic'str 




8bnpi>liiire 
SouUid'a 



Iitnooln I Litteoln 

i LLiooln 
RomnAj Komn«7 
Soutbd'u Lincoln 



M«riD9 

B.L«io'itii 



Lincoln 

TtHusli 

E.Leic'str 

ShropihitD 

SouUid'D 



OmM'brad 
HiUt-brad 
B. Leic'itr 
Lincoln 
R. Uftnli 
E.Loic'BtT 
Shropshira 
Soutbd'n 



1M1 
5,301 
18,177 
1,141 
3,038 



81 -Oik 
85 (HJ 
100 00 
96-17 
y4 71 



M.7Ciy 


7&36 


4.SSS 


86-94 


B,CM 


80-83 


£.747 


8379 


778 


90-77 


4SS 


ssoe 


au 


nitt 


464 


asM 


166 


97-41 


114 


96-BT 



Land mtmly 
BorfaoA-Bown 
ID EngUBh- 

lure. 

Moniitainout 
CDuntr; in 
n'tivspwt'ra, 
^nifnprnTWi I 



In Kngliah 
gnupuiut«. 



The above returns are fair average ones, bnt tnnch higher might 
h&ve been ahoTCn if exceptional cases had been selected. 

As showing the actual cost of mnnaging two large estates m 
Mew Zealand (Middle Island), Ko. 1 carrying 20,000 cro&s-bred 
•beep, aud No. 2 caj-ryiug 40,000, the subjoined table may prove 
interesting : — 

No. L 
Pm-HMd 

d. 



N«. a. 

PtitHwuI. 



Coal at ihcftrinK. inoliiding scouring and 

putting nrool (u.b. .. 
MuugAmect. ahcphcrding, dipping, Ac. 
CMt of providing fip«cial Iced (tumipe, 

green u-cd, chnfT, Stc) 
Cknt of renewing Kuglijth grau 



65 
10 



d. 

6-8 
9-6 

6-8 



Total per baad 



4 S-S 



4 s-a 



Cattle. 



The increasE) of cattle Iwtweon 1H91 and 1806 waa 216.070, or afc 
the rate of 26-98 ])er cent. The rapid development of the butter 
and cheeee industry, represented in great part l>y the exfiort figures 
given in the comparative table on page 187, creat&d a requirement 
lor milch cows, which increased in number from 206,906 in 1891 to 
376,217 in 189G, or at the rate of 33-50 per cent. 

The cattle as enumerated in 1901-1902 for each provincial dis- 
trict are givea in the next table. Here is Bhown the substantial 
iDorease of 106.104 head of all clHBsea over the namber returned in 
ri900-1901, and of no less than 13,867 in the number of oows and 
'beifers for dairy purposes. 





Auckland ■ . 
Taraiiftki .. 
Banke's Bby 
Wellington 
Marlborough 
Nelito» 
WsHtluid .. 
OkDlerboi; 
OUgo 

ToUIb. 1-JU1-10O3.. [91,^88,902,810 
, 1900-1901 . . aO, IM 196,884 



iDQEeue. lOOI-lOOal 
I)eoreaae,liH)]-190!t' 



1,C»82 



I' 

^1 un< 

^P Oot of a total of 1,361,784 cattle in the colony, tlie North Islancl 

^^ is shown to have had 1,005,320, or 74 percent., while the Midflle 

Island had 366,464, or 26 per cent. Similarly, the <laivy cows 

and h^ifera intended (or dairying in the North Island numbered 

285.408, and in the Middle Island 1^6,085. 

Thus, the North Island, which now leads as regards number of 
sheep, eontainn more than twice as many dairy cows and other cattle 
as the Middle Inland. 

Of the total nuuiher of cattle (1,361,784) given above, 381,493 
were dairy cows. It is found iujpoasible to give a statement of the 
actual amount of butter and chi^osc made, even at the factories 
only. All that caii be said in that tliere were in October, 1901. 
254 cheese and butter factories and creainerieB, with 255 skiin- 



■Ineluilinii hoifeii over \,vo yean aid mteiiilei] roir alairyini;: IH.lWi m U)3[\ V.m ami 
AOOI Jn IMI-iaui. For Kotual iiiiiiib«r ol dklry vault, la twoli oouiiCy •«(• lalile uii |>iiiifi' &J^ 



Classified according to breod, the nambofB for the two yean 
under review are : — 

Pure b rod ^ 

Shnrtham . . 

Hercfofd 

Pollecl Angu« 

Ayrebice 

JerMf 

OLhet pure- brads 
CnwHQn 

ToUlB 



int-1908. 


iMO-noi. 


&S,4T« 


fia,ii7 


C,&8B 


5.619 


8.BJ36 


6,8S5 


4,705 


4.«ra 


4,536 


3,341 


9.101 


4.130 


l,a&4,4SS 


i.iG4,ddt> 


1.361.784 


i.2.w,6ao 




S3S 



MBW SBAIiANT} OFFlCIACi TSAR-BOOK. 



kpiing-fltntions, reported to the Department of Agriculture. . But very 
~feTC of thcsti factories made any return to the d(>pftrtiiieat of their 
output for the previous year, and it ia therefore iniposRihle to arrive 
at the total quantity ot cheese and butter uiade. Tho cciisuh re- 
turns for March, 1901 show there were Umu 247 factoriue and 202 
creameries, the aonual output during tho vear 1900 aiiiuunting *.o 
29.758.31016. of butter aud 13y,ea7 cwt. of eheeee. 



Rortes. 



Cmum* Vafto, 



The incroaBC ia borscB is showu for ihruc census years : — 

iDCrOWM 

1886 197 . asa L 23,858 13-68 

1891 .. ■■ 'ill, 040 

1806 .. .. 2a7.*I8 36,378 12-50 



riUtJllxTOf 

187. 382 L 
•ill, 040 



NuiuoricAl 

23.658 
36,378 



At the enumeration made in 1901-1902 {November to January), 
the number of horsca was found to have increased to 280,079 (in- 
cluding 406 mules and afisea), for which pariicniara are given. It 
will be seen that the Provincial Diiitrict of Auckland had by far 
the moat horses, Otago and CantFerbury following, Wellington taking 
fourth pU(ie. 









Mam 

ovar Two 
Y«ftn old 


UUMWlUl 


Oolto 




PravlD«4al DbtrloL 


Sntlrvc. 


Osldlngi. 


Fo*! at Foot, 
or to fMJ 


oadarTno 


ToMlt. 








ttlil SuMOQ. 


Yowa old. 




AuckliUM] 


780 


39,411 


S>S,S98 


7.406 


9.9S8 


73.883 


Tu'&Dll.lll 


Itf 


8,096 


6.4M 


1.990 


a.isi) 


I8,89i 


Ilkw)fc> Bay 


su 


9.306 


O.SKt 


1.800 


1,781 


19.686 


WeUiiikUxi 


4fi7 


13.979 


i&,iasi 


4.590 


4, SKI 


44.637 


MikH bo rough 


43 


2,349 


1,812 


«84 


578 


5,969 


I^elsDD .. 


m 


1,140 


3,368 


ua7 


991 


9.556 


WnMiiUlrf 


38 


1.09B 


701 


ao& 


226 


2.S66 


Oiiiiterliuey 


420 


23,169 


17, ATI 


4,644 


fi.I27 


49,791 


Ottigu . . 


984 


94,491 


19.532 


6,176 


6,868 


56.991 


ToUls, 1901-1902 


2,696 


] 24. 860 


03, I8B 


37.249 


32,176 


280, 078' 


1 WO- 1901 


2,4R5 


120,932 


y3.487 


22,017 


37.824 


266. 7*5* 


IncreaM 


IBl 


a.987 


, 


6,29a 


4,962 


13.958 


X>«croau 






999 




.. 


__ 



* iDelnltiifi 406 tnnUi nd arbm in ttxa, »nil ito In tool. 

Classified according to breed, the numbers for the two yean 
under review are :- — 





IMI-tSoa 


j«:o-i»i 


Tborougbbrod 


6.545 


6,118 


HuDi«c and hftcknoy 


■^.736 


26,917 


CarriftgL> ncd iroiting 


19,899 


18.999 


Light citdiii&iv . . 


114.821 


106,067 


Draught 


99.604 


97,469 


Ponio* DRdor 14 hands 


12.667 


10,675 


Ual«i) and auoa .. 


40B 


480 



Totals 



980,078 



9GG,7» 



PIQ8. 



333 



It has long been expected that the export of New Zealand horses 
to Australia and India would assume large proportions. So far, how- 
ever, the trade has not developed to the extent anticipated. The 
opinion has been often expressed that more might be done than has 
been in the past. The following figures will show the position for 
the years 1885, 1890, 1895, 1896, and 1898 to 1901 :— 



BtpottoHo 


188S. 


leeo. 


leee. 


1890. 


ISOB. 


I8B9. 


igoo. 


1901. 


Yiotoria 


133 


92 


10 


22 


41 


12 


29 


88 


Hew South Wibles 


2.6B7 


197 


53 


53 


39 


70 


19 


55 


■Qasanaluid 


, , 


, , 


, , 


, , 


, , 




2 


, , 


Tumania 


US 


37 


1 


1 


1 


16 


9 


6 


Fiji 


32 


57 


12 


2 


S 


4 


16 


60 


BaDgal 


34 


235 


94 


151 


116 


105 


69 


106 


BruU 




2 


, , 


, , 


, , 


, , 


, , 


, , 


South Sea lalandB 


IS 


18 


15 


14 


9 


6 


8 


8 


United Kingdom 


., 




5 


6 


1 


a 


3 


] 


United Stales of America (W. Coast) 


10 




8 


. . 


, . 


1 


1 


, , 


•Cape Colony 














600 


2 


Natal 






, , 


, _ 


, , 


2 


, , 


, , 


Singapon 


.. 






.. 


.. 


1 







3,022 628 193 249 210 219 766 266 

The military requirements for the Cape Ck>lony caused an in- 
•cre^e for the year :1900. 

Pigs. 
Pigs have decreased since 1891, when the number was 308,812, 
■against 224,024 in 1901-1902. The figures given in the accompanying 
table are those compiled by the Agricultural Department, and for 
1901-1902 show a decrease of 26,951 in the total number of pigs 
iiept in the previous year. The Auckland Provincial District has far 
more pigs than any other. 

Number of Piqb in each Pbovincial Dibtbict. 



Provincial 
District. 


Boars tor 

Stud 
PurpOBes. 


B&TTOwa and 

Sows over 

One Year old, 

for Fattening. 


Sows kept 
solely tor 
Breeding 
Purposes. 


Barrows and 

BowB under 

One Year 

old. 


Totals. 


Auckland 

Tarauaki 
Hawke's Bay 
Wellington 
Marlborough 
Nelson 
WeBtlacd 

■Canterbury 

-Otago 


■ 


1,483 

457 

219 

1,001 

96 

169 

46 

886 

626 


9,787 
2,363 
1,119 
2,440 

617 
1.023 

402 
1,735 
2,669 


8,985 
2,769 
1,363 
6,688 

504 
1,004 

187 
6,318 
3,332 


41,600 

14,705 

5,849 

29,432 

2,683 

6,620 

1,028 

42,044 

23,075 


61,855 

20,294 

8,550 

38,561 

3,700 

8,816 

1,663 

60,983 

29,602 


Totals, 1901-1902 
1900-1901 


4,983 
5,608 


21,955 
27,423 


30,150 
34,876 


166,936 224,024 
183,068 1 250,975 


Decrease 




625 


5,468 


4,726 


16.132 j 26,951 



331 VmVf ZBACAND OFPIOIAI. TBAB-BOOS. 

The ^proximate ouDibers of the different hreede were : 





laatrwm. 


vm-mn. 


Pure Berkshire 


.. 84,891 


S7,88S 


Pure Yorkshire 


.. 3,549 


5,635 


Other pnre-breds 


2,194 


1,272 


CroBseB 


.. 183,890 


206,186 


• ToUlh . . 


.. 224,024 


260,975 



Ostrich-farming. 

Ostrich farming has been attempted in New Zealand, both io 
Canterbury and Auckland. (See Year-book, 1897, page 313, and 
also special article in Part III. of Year-book of 1899, entitled " The 
Heir of the Moa.") 



SECTION XVIII.— VITAL STATISTICS. 
Births. 



The number of births registered in the colony during 1901 was 
20,491 or 26-34 in every 1,000 persons Uving. The rate is higher 
than those for the five preceding years, but from 1881 antil the 
year 1899 there was a regular fall. The number of births registered 
in a year reached 19,846 in 1884, after which it fell to 17,876 in 
1892, rising year by year to 18,955 in 1898, falling in 1899 to 18,835, 
but again rising to 19,546 in 1900, and 20,491 in 1901. 

The birth-rate for 1901 was a little higher than that for 
1896, but the rise over this period of six years is very slight. 
The recovery since 1899 ia, however, satisfactory (122 per 1,000 
persons) . 

The figures for each year are worthy of notice, especially in con- 
nection with the subsequent particulars given as to marriages solem- 
nised and the growth of population : — 



Te*r. 
1682 
1883 
1B64 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1689 
1690 
1891 



Number ol 
Births. 
19,009 
19,202 
19,646 
19,693 
19,299 
19,135 
18,902 
18,457 
18,278 
18,273 



lUte per 1,000 
of Populfttloii. 

37-32 

36-28 

35-91 

34-35 

33-16 

32 09 

31-22 

3007 

29-44 

2901 



1892 
1893 
1894 
169S 
1696 
1897 
1698 
1899 
1900 
1901 



Number of 
Blrtba. 
17,876 
18,187 
16,528 
16,646 
16,612 
18,737 
16,955 
18,835 
19,546 
20,491 



Bate per 1,000 
of Population. 

27-83 

27-50 

27-28 

26-78 

26-33 

25-96 

2S'74 

25-12 

25-60 

2634 



The marriages have increased numerically, and the population 
of the colony also. 



Vaar 


Number of 


IvmTm 


MftrriftgBH. 


1881 


3,277 


1682 


3,600 


1683 


3,612 


1684 


3,800 


1686 


3,813 


1666 


3.488 


1887 


3,563 


1668 


3,617 


1889 


3,682 


1690 


3,797 


1891 


3,805 



Meui Fopula- 
tion (excluding 
Uaoris). 
493,482 
509,309 
529,292 
662,590 
573,362 
582,117 
596,374 
605,371 
612,716 
620,780 
629,763 



Year. 

1692 
1893 
1894 
1896 
1896 
1897 
1696 
1899 
1900 
1901 



Number of 
Marrlagefl. 

4,002 
4,115 
4,176 
4.110 
4,843 
4,928 
6,091 
5,461 
5.860 
6,095 



Mean Popula- 
tion (excluding 
Uaoris). 
642,245 
661,349 
679,196 
692.417 
706,846 
721,609 
736,260 
749,984 
763,594 
777.968 



336 



HMW ZBKLAHD OFPIOUIi TBAR-BOOK. 



In the year 1881 tKero were in New Zealand 5-72 birth* to eTCi 
marriage in the previous year, and in 1901 the proportion had falleO'^ 
to 3'50 births to each marria(;e. 

Id the AuBtr&liau States a Bimilar decrease is Doticeable. Id 
Victoria the numher of children to a marriage for the vear 1880 wm 
4-99, but (ell to 406 in 189H, In New South Wales the figures are 
S'O and 4*11 for tha sunc years resp^^ctively. 

The avorafje number of children born to a marriage for tha d«- 
caniiial period 1H91*19<>0 was, in New South Wales, 4-79; Victoria, 
4-39; and in Now Zealand, SS7. In England and Waleii for the 
period 1990-99 the averags was 409, in Snotland 4-3B, and in 
Ireland 4 ri3. 

New Zealand had in 1880 the highest birth-rate (40-78); io 
1900 che case was reversed : but iu 1901 the New Zealand rate was 
higher than that of Victoria. 

The fall over ten veara is calculated &a under: — 



BrnTH-OATKB rK8 1,000 or PoPUUTtOH. 



Stata or Colony. 



UB& 1M9. im. IBK tWt. tSR- IRM IB»- 1«». 10M. 



QaeeDilaod 
New South Wilts 
Victoria 
South AutlMlia 
Weatsrn Australia 

N«wZ«itlRnd .. 



3CB4i33-7331-8C33 8e 
38'89 33'83ai-4S 80-66 

331131-76 90-49 SOaa 
:)S0!iai-ilSSS-S7Sti-a0 
32 47 88-9«,31-ll SO-09 
27-83|27-aO;27-98 3678 



30'Oq39 93'38-&8 27-31 8031 38-36 
27 8S|26-5912.'.T2|20-7I jaSSS 36-77 



28-46 96 &T 
;28-lRa7-78 



S4-&8 35-51 |»'7I» 

a9-saso6«ai-46 

96-34 flC-OS 88 
U5-74 25-13S3 60 



3638 



40 
96-94 



This table also shows that Although New Zealand had in 1900 
the lowest birth-rate in AustmlfLsia, the fall has been much less in 
this colony since 1892 than in tlie others. 

A declining birth-rate i« uotR-eable in many ciriliBed countries, 
and attention Has been drawn to the serious consequences that may 
result by statisticians and political economists. That the fertility 
of women in New Zealand is decreasing further facta will tend to 
how, 

Taking the number of married women in New Zealand at what 
may bu considered the child-bearing ogos (i.e., from fifteen to forty- 
five years, inclusive) as shown by eacli census since 1H78, and for 
tho satno ycais the number of Icgitiinato births (excluding plural) 
registered, the birth-rate pur 1,000 niarrieil women of the above- 
stated ages ia easily found, and i» »hown lo he siciEulilv dt^cliiiing. 
Iu 1878 the rale was 337 per 1 ,(X)0, in 1896 it had fallen "to 2/)2, and 
in 1901 to 244, or, in other words, in 18TB one married woman of 
the ages specified in every three gave birth to a child, -white in 1901 
the race was 1 in 4 only. The figures for each census year are given 
below, and are followed by a table showing the declining birth-rate, 
And tha increase in the marriage-rato, in the United Kingdom. 




BIRTHS. 



33T 



BiBTB-BATKS (LcOITUUTB) FBB 1,000 MaBBIED WOURK AT OhILD-BBABIHO 
AOBB FOB BACH GSHSUB YbAB, 1678 TO 1901. 



Tear (Ceuaua). 



1878 
1881 
1886 
1891 
1896 
1901 



Namber of 
Ukrried Women 

between 

ISkndUYeRT* 

of Age. 

60,995 
57,458 
62,701 
63,165 
69,807 
79,406 



Number 
of Ijeeitimftte 

BFrtbi 
(ConflaamaDtB). 

17,196 
18,003 
18,S32 
17,45fi 
17,596 
19,355 



BlrCh-TKte 

perl,000 

Murrled Womea 

of rrom 16 to u 

Tears of Age. 

3372 
313-3 
2955 
2768 
2521 
243-8 



BiBTB AKD UaBBIASB BaTBS IN THE UKITZD KlNODOK, 1886, 1891, 1896, 

ADD 1900. 



Btrthi. 



HarriKges. 



Ymt. 


Heui 
Population. 


Number. 


Bate per 

1.000 01 


Number. 


Rate per 
1,000 ot 






Population. 




Population 


1886 


. 86,313.682 


1,145,683 


31-55 


241,180 


6M 


1891 


. 37,796,390 


1,148.259 


30-38 


275,970 


7-30 


1896 


. 89,464,582 


1.162,122 


2919 


296,080 


750 


1900 


. 40,909,925 


1,158,921 


28-33 


310,770 


7-60 



The above figures are taken from the " Statistical Abstract for 
the United Kingdom, 1886 to 1900" (forty-eighth number), pub- 
lished in August, 1901. 

The birth-rates for ten years in Great Britain and certain coun- 
tries of the 'European Continent are given from the report of the- 
Begistrar- General of England. The rates in England and Wales,, 
and in Scotland, are higher than those in New Zealand, but the 
rate for Ireland is lower. For 1891 and following years France has- 
the lowest rate of all quoted ' — 

Bibxu-bates in Eubopeam Oouktbieb, 1891 TO 1899. 







Number ol Birthi per 1,000 ot Mean Population. 


rViiiDtridii 


















lA* ULA Ut JVV- 


1891. 


1892. 


18B», 


ia». 


1606. 


1896. 


IBDT. 


leOB. 


189D. 


Hungary 


423 


40-3 


425 


41-3 


41-5 


40-3 


401 


37-5 


390 


Austria 


38-1 


362 


87-9 


36-7 


38-6 


880 


37-5 


36-2 


37.1 


Italy . . 


37-3 


363 


366 


35-7 


351 


35-0 


35-0 


33-8 


34-2 


Oetman Empire 


37 


367 


36-7 


35-8 


361 


368 


360 


362 


35-9 


Nettaeitanda . . 


35-7 


32-0 


33-8 


327 


32-8 


32-7 


32-5 


31-9 


32 


Scotland 


31-2 


30-8 


31-0 


301 


30-4 


30-9 


80-6 


30-8 


30-5 


Hoi way. 


30-9 


29-6 


30-7 


29-7 


30-5 


30-4 


30-0 


30-3 


30-9 


Eofiland and 


31-4 


30-5 


30-8 


29-6 


30-4 


29-7 


29-7 


29-4 


29-3 


Wales 




















Belgium 


290 


28'9 


29-5 


290 


28-5 


290 


290 


280 


28-6 


Sweden 


28-3 


270 


27-4 


27-1 


27-5 


272 


26-7 


26-2 


27-1 


Switzerland . . 


27-8 


274 


27-7 


27-1 


27-1 


27-9 


28-1 


28-4 


28-9 


Ireland 


23-1 


22'5 


230 


22-9 


23-2 


23-6 


23-5 


23-2 


22-9 


Franoe 


22 'G 


22'3 


22-7 


22-8 


21-7 


22-5 


22-3 


21-8 


21-9 



338 



HBW KBALAMD OnriCIAL YBAR-BOOK. 



From the year 1895 marriages have shown a.n increase, the rate 
being tJien 5-^4 per 1,000 of population. Id 1901 che rate rose to 
7-83, the highest record aince 1879, wbea it was 7-97 per 1,000 of 
mean population. The number oi marriages solQumised in 1901 was 
6,095, an increase of 235 on the number for 1^00. 

KfAuauuK Ratbs tn AfSTnAiAsu rsn 1.000 or PorULATlos. 





ifffi. 


1880. 


IWl. 


IKM 


18%. 


1809. 


1900. 


Quariialuud 


. B-ea 


B-67 


7-lH 


6(16 


S-03 


6 78 


6-88 


Nfln South Wftlet 


. 7-70 


7-09 


7-sa 


fi-S9 


fi-66 


689 


7-88 


Victoila 


. 6-33 


7-ai 


7-69 


6-4ti 


6-53 


701 


6-96 


Sauib Aa»ua\ia. 


. 800 


C'24 


7-31 


6-20 


6-lU 


6 3i 


6-50 


Wofitcro Auitnlla . 


. 6« 


T-9e 


8-00 


S-45 


9-89 


9-69 


10'8T 


TaimauJa . . 


. 6 63 


7-20 


6 63 


5-88 


a-39 


6-37 


7-71 


}f«W ZpillKDd 


. a-Hi 


!5-99 


flW 


83 


6-91 


7 28 


7-fi7 



In April, 1896. New Zealand hitd 83,669 chihlren living under 
the age o( & years, and in March, 1901, the number was 86,806, an 
increase of 3,147. although the population at all afies increased in 
the quinquennium by 9'86 per cent. Between 18HC anil 1^91 the 
children living under ft yeara actually decreased in number by 3,624, 
the increase of population ol all a^^es (833 ptjr «ent.) bBin^ less 
than between 1891 and 1896 (1!224 per cwnt.l, or 1896 and 1901 
(9-86 pi^r ctrnt.). The number of children under one year to the 
total population at all ages, according to the results of four cea- 
fluaes, was : — 



Cen»UN. 1866 
1891 
1896 
1901 



CbiI4r«n undM TcvUl PopulMioa 
Oivip TMr. I*.!! AgM). 

.. lli,nM 578.483 

. . 16,143 626,658 

.. 17,070 708.880 

. . 18,981 772.710 



Thus, in 1886, with a population of 578,482 persons, ihero were 
18,356 children under one year, ai^ainst 18,381 children of Chat age 
in 1901, with a population of 779,719 persons. 

The births registered in 1885 were 19,693, against 13,646 in 1895, 
and 30,491 in 1901. The birth-rate fell from 34 36 per 1,000 of the 
population in 1885 to 26'78 in 1895, and to 26-34 in I90I. 

Deducting 1,469. the number of deaths of children under one 
year rvgiotered in 1900, from 19,546, the number of births for thi 
year, leaves 18,077, or witliin 304 of the living children under oi 
year at the time of the laat census. 

Twin Bihtks. 

There were 190 eattos of twin births (380 children), and triplets 
tvc* registered in three instances, in 1901. The number of children 
Iraro was 30,491; the number of mothers was 20.295: thus on an 
average one mother in everj- 107 gave birth bo twm.9, against 102 
in 1900, 106 in 1899, 97 in 1698. and 101 in 1897 and 1896. In 
'•9 £ij(» proportion was one in 93, and in 1894 one in 103. 



ILLUaiTIMACT. 



889 



iLLBOlTlU&Cr. 

The birtha 0/ 937 children were illegitimate : thus 46 in every 
1,000 chililren born were bora out of wedlock, the same □umber as 
in 1900. 

The following table gives the rales of illegitiinacy iu Australasia. 
The rate in New Zealiind is less thua in any of the Australian States 
except South Australia: — 

PbOKIUTIOH 01> iLbBOlTllUTB BlHTHS IM EVKllV lOU B1IITB8, 



Tmi. 




V«w Sontta 
W«Jm. 


Tlolorl*. 


South 
AniirftUa, 


W>»t«rD 

AiutrkUs. 


TaamuiU. 


New 

Zwiuxl. 


1B»0 


4 85 


626 


5-09 


2-50 




405 


S-90 


1B91 


46fi 


5-36 


5-36 


sys 




3-72 


3-49 


1602 


aon 


on 


&-&Q 


2fi3 


S'80 


4-75 


3-33 


leaj 


4y7 


tio 


A-46 


U-84 


417 


4-41 


8-70 


1894 


4 52 


ou 


6-50 


8 05 


4G6 


S-09 


860 


I8» 


4')3 


6-51 


5-83 


313 


4 47 


4 '97 


4-00 


IdtM 


saa 


571 


563 


3i5 


S61 


5-91 


446 


1897 


1)03 


(>m 


a-i'2 


a&a 


6-27 


a '74 


1-41 


1S93 


G04 


6 98 


5-29 


802 


499 


509 


4-aa 


1899 


5»7 


715 


5-4» 


3 35 


4-91 


fl-oe 


4-40 


ISOr> 


640 


7-01 


5-91 


iii 


i-Si 


6-48 


i-63 


1801 


sgs 


7- 16 


fi-58 


•■ 


•■ 


•• 


4-57 



These figures show a rise in the proportion of iUogitiuiato births 
to every lOU birtbu for this colony, aoiouDCiDg to 1-27 for the period 
1890-1901. 

The total number of births registered were 19,299 in 1836 and 
20.491 in 1!)01. while the illegitimate birlha rode from f>02 to 937. 
The caunea that led to the fall in the birch-rat« certainly did not 
greatly affect the number of illegitimate children. 

The •number of spinsters in the colony between 15 and 45 
increased during the ten years from 65.035 (census 1891} to 100,310 
(ceoBUS 1901). or at the rate of 55-9 per cent., while the illegitimate 
births increased from 638 to 937, or at the rate of 469 per cent. only. 

It would therefore appear that the larger proportion of illegiti- 
mate births now obtaining cannot with any certainty be taken as 
indicative of increased looseness of Uving on the pan of the people. 

The following tigurea, taken from " The Wealth and ProgrRss of 
New South Wales, 1900-1901," showmg the rate of illegitimacy per 
100 births in .\u8tratasia and in the United Kingdom, are based on 
statistics for a period of five years: — 





IlivKllimata 






Conner^. 


HirUm 


CoiiDtr7. 




1^1 Cant. 




pmOaac 


Ntw QoMh WsIh 


d-88 


TaamsDia 


8-ftS 


Vic tori* .. .. 


5-aa 


Now Z«aluid .. 


4-12 


Queen 111 antl 


5-94 


Bnglnnd t,ad Watai 


415 


SautK AuAtifttia 


8-76 


InUuil 


30$ 


WeaCera Auelr&liit 


ri-06 


Soothnd 


I ^"SX 



J 



S40 



NEW 2BAI*AND omOIAIi YBdJl-BOOK. 



Of the total Duober of cbildren bora in Australasia during the 
five yeare endei 1900. 5*75 per ceat. were iliegitiinace, as com- 
-pared with 442 per ceui. in the United Kingdom for the period 
H 895-99. 

The lj^re« in the next table, whkh give the percentages of 
illegitimate births in a Dumber of forcieo coautries, also cover ia 
most cases a period of five years, 1895-99. 





ai(«iUuu»la 




nindtlUMM 


OouDlrT- 


Blithi 


Cmiauy. 




p«r OeuL 




per Cent. 


OcnsoDv 
Pruuia 


9'Sl 


Franop 


B« 


784 


Belgiucii 


8-U 


B&Tftrl& 


14-00 


Nethorlands 


8T1 


SaxoDT 


ISOO 


Sweden 


1080 


AUHtTJa 


u-ss 


Nomny , , . . 


T» 


HuDguy .. ,. 


9-0 L 


lUly .. 


e-84 



For England and Waltta the proportion of illegitimate births to 
the total binhs id 1899 was 4 per cetit., having gradually dinii* 
nished from 7 per cent, in 1845. The uniniHium rate was 28 per 
cent., in Essex, aud the inaxiuium G'C per cent., id Herefordshire. 
Jt'or London the percentage was 3*(>. 

Tho average proportion of illegitinjale births in Scotland in 1697 
.■was 70 per cent., tlie rate varving from 3o per cetii.. iii iJuml 
^iotishire, lo 141 in Wif^tovrushire ; but in Ireland iii tliat year 
extrnijiely luvv average of 2*6 per cent, obtained, the rate varying 
from Q-7 in Counaught to SG iu Ulster. 

The Lkgitimaticn Act. 

An important Act was passed in 1894, entitled the Legitima- 
tion Act, which makes provision for the legitimation of ehildrci 
born before marriage on the Bubnoquent marriage of their parenta. 
Under ihis Act any child born out of wedlock, whose parents 
afterwiij-dK marry, is deemed to be legitimised by such marriage 
on the birth being registered in the manner prescribed by the 
Act. For iBgitimation purposes Registrars must register a birth 
when called upon to do so by any person cltLiming to be the father 
of an illegitimate child ; but such person ig required to make a 
solemn declaration that he is the father, and that at the time of the 
birth [here existed no If^ial impediuient to his marriage with the 
mother of the child. Ue ha» aUo to produce the evidence uf his 
marriage. It will thus be seen that in cases dealt with under the 
.Act registration lieconieK the test of legitimacy. In the December 
quarter of 1894, 11 children were legitimised; in 1895 the number 
wRft 68; in 1896, 56; in 1897, 48; in 1898, 59; iu 1899, 41 ; in 
I9CX). 62; and in 1901, 47: making altogether 302 legitimaCitms 
since the passing of the law. 




ULKTH-KATKB U( THE FOim CHUfF CITIES. 



" The Infant LfKE Protbctio« Act, lRf>6.'* 

By this statute it liaa been rendered unlawful for a person to 
take charge, for payment, of an infant to maintain or nurse (or 
Diore than three days without holding license zs an infaots' home 
keeper. The bouse of such a per&ou must be registered as an in- 
fants' home. 

Tbo au ministration of thiB law is a matt'^r t-ntirely managed by 
thti police, and the ConimiBeloner rpportn t>he working to l>i- satJB- 
factory. The licensed homes are peviodically inspocled by the 
police authoriLies, and the reBults have shown that licensees 
generally comply with i)ic required condiiions, the homes and 
infants being well looked after. 



BiJtTHS AND BiHTH-HATEB IN TBB FOUB CbIBP ClTrKfl. 

Tliv lulul number of births registered at: oc{:urriui; in the four 
chief centre!) and suburbs in 1901 was 5,334, as against 4,^70' for 
the previous year. 

The bircha in the four cities rose from 3,098 in 1900 to .S.161 in 
1901, ami in the suburban boroughs from 1,777 to 13,073. The 
birth-rates for 1901 were : — 



Auokluid Ciiy .. 

ftnd live Huburbaii baroughs 
Wellington City .. 

and three Euburbitn l>0T0URt)* 
ChriBtohurah Ciij 

and (our lubvtbau boroughs 
DiiQcdio Oilj 

o^d eight suburban borougbn 



Uaan PopaUllon, 
3000 

28-35 
S6'35 

2687 
3412 

261S 
9S-04 

34-3G 



Thus, by the inclusion of the suburbs the rate is raised at Wel- 
lington, Christcliurch and Dunedin, but lowered at .-Vnckiand, Ii 
will be observed that Auckland has the highest rate, Wellington 
next highest, Chriiitchurch and Dunediu following with intervals. 
The difTerencu between the Auckland rate (38-20) and thu Dunedia 
rate (24 26) js considerable. The birth-rate for the whole colony 
for lyOl was 26'31 per thousand. Auckland and Wellinuton are 
thus over the avenij^, Christchurch and Dunedin below it. 

Taking the births in the four central boroughtj willioui their 
suburbs, and comparing the numbers for 1001 and tflOO, an in- 
creaai! for 1001 is observed at Auckland of 9, at Wellington of 
28, ai Christchurch of 6, and at Dunedia of 35. The figures for the 
last five years ore : — 

MOT. UM. \ftS- tSOOL 1001. 

Auckland (mth&iit suburbs).. 906 916 988 1,0:3H 1,0.17 

W«IUngton . . . 1,0G7 1 ,OGA 1 ,OdC 1 . 1ST 1, l.'iO 

Obriotchuroh , .. 375 890 840 417 43^ 

Dunediti . . . 498 607 40U GSG A61 
3a— Y«at.book 



343 



KBW ZBAI.&BD OFFICIAL tUAK-BOOOL. 



The binh-raies lor three of tbe central borooghs in 1901 thow a 
(one a decrease) when compareri with 1900. Id Auckland the 
rose from 29-31 to 3000; in Wellington, from 25 76 to 2636,- 
in Christchorch, from 21-51 to 34-12; but fell in Dnnedin. from 
3907 to 2204. The rates for fire year«. 1B97 to 1901. an as 
follows : — 



AocIcUdiI («ritbi>ot uibarba) 
Wdlingtan 

Doaadin > 



Slrtfaa pv U» or PotNUuloa. 
IMT. USa IBM. UOa UOL 

SS-ra 26-96 aSTT 99^31 9000 
37-71 iS15 9424 2576 3635 
31-88 23<r7 ia-74 U 61 9119 

si'54 ai-61 ao-sa sso? aaxM 



N ATimALISATION . 

AUbns residing to the colony may, ou Caking the oath of alle- 
ince to Hia Majesty, obtain letters of naturalisation entitling 
to enjoy all the rights and privileges that a nalurai<boru 
fiubject of the United Kingdom can enjoy or transmit within this 
)lony. IVo hundred and thirty-eight aliens (2-20 men and 18 
womeu) were naturalised in 1901. 

The number belonging to uach nationaUty was as under : — 

KUHBBB or AUKXS I[ATVRAI.IIfKD l» 1901. 



NatiTes of— 


M. r. 


Mfttives ol — 


H. 


r. 


Osnnaa Empire.. 


46 10 


Xetherlaods 


« 





Horwfty ukI Sweden 


53 3 


Of Mae . . 


.. 7 





OeDmark 


36 i 


SwiL>«rlui4 


9 





RtMua, ['oland, ftad Pinlsod 14 1 


Belgium 


1 


s 


Fnuice *ti<l poassMMna . . 


18 


Portugal utd poMsulon* .. 1 





Italy 


11 


Turlcey and Syri* 


.. i 





Auntha-Ilunguy 


a 1 


Spain 


.. 1 





China .. 


» 


WxOielaluia 


1 





UolMd Siabea ol Amenoft 


13 


Cook Islands 


.. 1 





The number of natives of eac 


1 conntry natnrah'sod 


during 


i.be 


last twenty years is next 


shown, — 








N&BlfflB o( — 




M&tives ol — 






Otinnoay 


l.«51 


Franco . . 


,, 


119 


Swedso and Honray 


1,069 


Netherlajidn . . 


*■ 


BO 


Denmark 


776 


Urcoce 


, , 


43 


China 


M7 


Portugal .. 




46 


luly and Sicily . . 


180 


Unitad St&tea ol Amarioik . , 


63 


8wilzerl»od 


163 


Belgium . . 


, , 


87 


RttKUta 


ISO 


Other oounUiM 


, , 


84 


AuitriA Uuuguy . , 


1»0 


Total . .. 


.. 4, 


7»a 



By section 3 of " The Aliens Act AmeDdmeol Act, 1882." re- 
pealed and re-eoacted by section 2 of " The .\lieus Act Amendment 
Act. 139^," it is provided that when tUo faihor, or motUor being a 




UARRIAOBB. 



313 



widow, has ohtaineil naliiralisation in the colony, every child who 
during iiiftincy has become resilient with Ihom in New Zealand 
aball lie deemed to be natumliaed, and shall have the rights and 
privileges o( a natural-born subject. 

MARRIAaT:S. 

The mtirriftges for 1901 show an increase on the number for 
the previous yeiur. The number wfts 6.095, or 235 more than in 
1900. The inarnoge-rate roet' from 7-67 por 1,000 persona living in 
1900 to 7-83 in 1901, the rate for the latter year being the higheat 
obtained since 1878, when it stood at "DT per 1,000 persons. The 
improvement nhown during the last six years sets New Zealand 
in a good position relatively to the Australian f>tates. 

The rates for a eeries ol fourteen consecutive years were :— 





Mahiuaukm vmn 1,000 


?r THK PoruLA-noK. 




■ TMr. 


Qhmdi- 


NewSouUi 


Vlelcrl*. 


South wwtwn 


Tu- 


Now 


)»Dd. 


Walee. 


AustTBllk. AuMnlta. 

1 


IDMllft. 


ZealMid. 


Vtaas 


' B-63 


T-97 


8 OS 


B-70 


T-18 


658 


5-97 


^ ises 


8-87 


6-76 


8'1< 


fl-47 


6-90 


6-90 


S'94 


1800 


8-40 


7-H 


8S1 


7-06 


5-BO 


6-64 


B-ia 


1891 


7-lS 


7-89 


7 -OS 


7S1 


80O 


6G3 


0-04 


1893 .. 


6-67 


6-77 


6M 


«-5l 


7-39 


6-51 


fl-aa 


1803 


S-91 


6-40 


mm 


6-2(> 


6-84 


S-6I 


6-S8 


18H 


fi-70 


6-30 


698 


6-W 


6H4 


5-48 


6-15 


1899 


6-33 


6-SS 


600 


«-88 


6-83 


&<33 


J-M 


1809 .. 


6-05 


6-Dfl 


6-ie 


6-20 


8-4A 


S'B8 


fi*86 


1897 


6*05 


6' 72 


6-86 


5-46 


10' 78 


6- 88 


«-88 


1S98 


6'Oa 


6' 06 


6-68 


6- 18 


9-89 


639 


fl-91 


UM 


6'78 


6'39 


701 


6-34 


989 


6 87 


738 


1900 


6-88 


T'M 


6-Q6 


6-fiO 


10-27 


7-ri 


7-67 


1901 

1 


6-61 


7'68 


8-99 


6-4< 


0-&6 


768 


78» 



But the improved rate for this colony is sliU lower than the 
rate for some European countries. 



MAmaijLOKS IH KTKRT 1,000 OT TRB POI'DUTIOH. 



Genoao Empire 

Belgium 

Hnngary 

BiikUiiJ aitd 

Swritaerlaii'd 

Austria 

Spain 

Dftnmftik 

Soolluid 

Fnuio« 

NalherlandK 

Itat; 

Norway 

Sweden 

IreliiDd 



Wftleii 



1800 


e-« 


laoy 


8-a 


1R99 


90 


imt 


8-B 


1699 


7S 


1899 


8-3 


1S9+ 


7-& 


1699 


7-5 


1809 


7-7 


18'J'J 


7-6 


1899 


7-4 


1899 


7-4 


1H99 


T2 


1899 


6-8 


1B99 


49 



S44 



MBW ZHAhAttU OmCIAL XKAit-UOtiK. 






Of the aiairingeti solemniged Id 1901, 5,649 tvere between 
badielorb aud spiiibterB, 160 between bachelors tuid widows, 271 
between widowerB and EpuiBters. and 96 between widowers and 
widows. 

Divorced men and women have been clarified as bachelors or 
spinsters : 38 divorced men and 46 divorced women were married 
during the year. 

Included amongst spinBtcis are Qiue married women, and 
amongst tlie Lwcht-lois two married men, who cletti'd to go 
through ihu (orui of nian-iitge with other pcrgoiis under the pro- 
tection oi the proviiiioiJB of Beclion 204, sul&cction (&), of "The 
Criminal Code Act, IB93." which runs: " No one conimiiB bigamy 
by going through a form of marriage if lie or Hhe bai; been con- 
tinually ahiient from his or her wife or liu&band for Heven yeHTS 
then last past, and is noT proved to have kiionn that his wife or her 
hnsband war idive at any time dtirirg thoBe eeven years." 

The total number of luarria^biH boleumized (6,09'Sy does nol 
im'lude iiiarriugeis where botli piirtiiBB are of the aboriginal nativ 
race, such persons being exempted from the nccesbity of coniplyinfi 
xvith the provisions o[ the Marriage Act, although at Uberty to t 
advantage thereof. Fourteen inarriages in which both parties w 
Maoris were contracted in 1901 in terms of the Act: 12 by 
Kegistrars, 1 by a clergyman ol the Presbyterian Chuich, and 1 
by & Wesicyan minister. 

Bachelors and Splvsteks ik New Zeaij^nd. 

The results of three censuses in rospeci of the niinilier of 
bachelors of 20 years and upwaids, and spuislors of 15 yeais and 
upwards, in the colony show some iuturesiing features. In 1S9I 
there was an excess of bachelors over the ^pniiiterK amounting to 
3.497 uicu. But by m9ti not only had tim prepoudernnce of the 
male element been lout, but an BSL-eBK of spini^tcrA over bachelors 
was reported aiiiountnig to 1,786 wumcri, wiiile in 1^01 this excess 
had risen to 8,672 women. 

It ia noticeable bow difTerently the niunbers for the pro* 
vincial districts have been affected by the process in operation. An 
excess of bachelors was preserved in Auckland, Tarnnaki, Hawhe'a 
Bay. Wellington, Marlborough, Nelson, and Westland from 1891 to 
1901. In Canterburv. however, an excess of spinsters was found 
in 1891 of 2.51G. wh'icli increased to 3.997 in 1896 and to 4.918 
in 1901 ; while in Otago an cxeosa of 778 spinsters in 1S91 increased^ 
to 2,066 in 1896, and diiniinahu-d oiightly m 19UI whim there ven\ 
1.8^9 more spinsters thmi bm;helora. These two important district#J 
of the Mid<)le Island hn.ve lost large numbers of bachelors by 
departures to the North Island. 

The following table exhibits the particulars for uach provincial 
diathct ;— 






I 

I 



Aupkltind 
Tamnok) 
Hftwke's Ttfty 
Wnllinglon 
MarlborouNh 
NclBon .. 

Cftntetbury 
OUkRD .. 

Ch&th&m til And 



Marriages bt Ministerr of vaiuous Denominations. 

Of the niarriafies in the year 1901, 24yi percent, were solera uised 
by ministers of the Chuich of Enylaud, 2-1-4S jj«r ctjut. hy imui«teir« 
of the P]*OBbytenan Olmrchos, 1319 per cent, iiy iiiiiiiBtorfi of tha 
Wesieyan aiKl other Mi?thuiUsl Cliuruhija. lOS.S ner ceut. by ministers 
of the Roiiiaci Catliolii; (Hiurrh, 1020 per cnnb. Ijy tniiusterB of other 
detininiiiatiiHiH, ami lOfiO per cent, i>y Upf^filnu-s. 

Tlie foilowill^ hHovvb the proportinnB of rnHrriages by miiiistera 
of the pnnciprti clenoniiiiations in the piist eight years, and the 
percentages of these deoomiaations to the total population : — 



UADomJuatlon. 



PciMRkHffB of Hftrr)ft«M 



18M. I 1606. 



1BD6. lem. lags. 



Ohoroh of Engl&nd 
Pnabyteriana 
We«l*TiuwRnd othor 

MeuiodiHU 
RMn&n CitlholiM .. 
Oth et d oUuiiiiutLbioti a 

By UKgi»t(nn .. 



25-30 

10-08 
19-13 



22-74 

1569 

11-19 

7-29 

ie-77 



too 00 10000 



23-&6 
17-92 

10-26 

6-05 
17-90 



10000 



23-on 

1761 

10- IS 

5-S6 
1797 



10000 



iBog. 



2337 24-17 
'M,-C& S&'SO 
18-fla 12 91 



10-37 
17-01 



10-m 

934 
1741 



100-00 10000 



una. 190). 



ills 



^C8 
96 86 
1SS3 



S4 4e 
1819 



lo-aji io-fi3 
10 ao 10' ao 

16-fl9 16«9 



100-00 im-oo 



40-84 

i4-9a 

11-90 



100-00 



IMarriaae by the Begistrar is found to be Iubh fretjuuui than 
it was eit^nc veara ago, the i)ercentag8 falling from 19-12 in 1891 
to 16-69 in 1901. 



346 



KBV SBAI.AHD OFFI0I4I. TSAH-BOOK. 



MARRUdE ReaisTSB siqkbd by Mark. 
Of the men married Id 1901. 28, or 4-S9 in every 1.000. and of 
the women 38. or 6-23 per 1,000, signed the register by marks. 

Ttie illiteracy of the people, as moasurecl by the proportion of 
sarried persons who affix marks instead of signatures to the mar- 
riage register, has greatlv decreased of tatc, havinp fallen since 1881 
from 3204 per 1,000 among men to 4 59 per 1.000. and from 57-98 
per 1.000 to 6 93 per 1,000 among women. This is shown in a very 
atriking manner by the following table: — 

PElfloirs ts KvsBT 1,000 Mabhibo wbo siesui sv Uaml 





lasL 


un. 


190]. 


DeBowiiniiHpB- 


M. 


'■• 


H. 

64» 

8-93 
3133 

936 
27-42 


r. 


M. 


'■ 


Obordi ol EogluMl 
SPreibjrWh&ns . . 
wTfiftlAfftRi u)d other MHhodUu 
^Itonisn Cktliottcn 
Other denommaiiDQs .. .. 
By KegiBtran 


16-99 
1035 
3211 

117'73 
10-3« 
90-^ 


97-16 

t9-61 
41 -TO 

133 33 
»T-2 
98-51 


10^ 

6« 

10-71 

18 28 

43-06 


133 
3-68 

8-78 

6-38 

161 

18-77 


3» 

«-e0 

3-73 
779 

aM 

15-78 


Tot*l niArTiftgM' 


83-01 


57-96 


13-98 


1083 


4-30 


6SS 



The proportion of illiterates in 1901 wu greatest amonff those 
married before Begistrars. Proviouslv the proportioD wu largest 
amoDg Boman Catholics ; but since ihSl it lias, as shown by the 
table, most remarkably decreased. 



AoES or Person's Married. 

Of the persons married in 1901, 118 bridegrooms and 1,046 
brides wore under SI years of age— one of the bridegrooms was 
"' stween 16 and 17, two between 17 and 18. and eleven between 
18 and 19. Of the brides, three were under 16 years of age, three 
■were between 15 and 16. and thirty-one between 16 and 17 years 
of age. The proportion of men married is greatest at the ages of 
^ to 30, and of women at from 21 to 3A years. 

The following are the proportions of men and women married at 
each age-period to every 100 marriages in the years 18^1 and l'.*0I ; — 



IB I 





taSL 


UOI. 


A*^ 






H. 


r. 


If. 


r. 


Undar 31 ysais . . 


1 OS 


ao-78 


1-98 


1716 


fl Hid aDd«r9K .. 


9699 


43-99 


34-M 


89W 


» . SO 


86-19 


2^97 


87-06 


36-a», 


80 . 40 


96-94 


8-73 


27'19 


J3T» 


SO . 60 


644 


9-Tl 


C-M 


9^' 


60 • 60 


3 36 


006 


1-77 


o-af' 


ao . TO 


0-&S 


0-16 


0-93 


0-94r 


70 and upwards .. 


O08 


■■ 


0-90 





Begistrars of Marriages are prohibited by law from issuing oer- 
tifioatcs for the marriage of minors without the consent of their 



AOBS OP PEKSONB MARBIED. 

parcDtB OT lawful f^ardiana, if there be any in the colony. If a 
declaration be made in a.ny case that there ia no parent or law- 
ful guardian in the colony, then a certificate may be issued after 
the expiration of fourteen da^s following the date on which the 
notice of inteuded marriage is given. 

A m&rvia^o may Dot bo eoloniuiscd except after the doliTory U> 
the miutster or Bcgielrar who officiates of a. ccrtihcatu issued by a 
Begistrar authorising such maniutje, aiid if auy perBOUi; knowingly 
and wilfully tiittirinairy without euch certificiale the niarriaf^e is 
null and void; ami no L'lcr^yinari or minister of any denomination 
IK empowered to soleinniBe iiiarria;;i?» until hia name has been placed 
on the Registrar-General's list of oflicintin^ ministers for the year. 

MHiTia|4e %vith a deceased wife's sister in New Zealand was 
legalij^ed in the year 1880. and an Act wae paBsed in the year 19CX) 
which legalisod marriage with the broUier of a deceased hnshand. 
This Act is retrospective, including in its provisions marriages 
between soch parties which had previously been solenniiKed as well 
aB tho«o coDtrftCTcd after the statute was passed, and declaring all 
these to be valid, and the is-sue bom prior or subsequent to the 
passing of the Act to be deemed born m lawful %Yedlock. 

The measure was reserved for the signification of her late 
Majesty's pleasure. The Boyal assent has since been given, and 
the Act came into force in New Zealand bv Proclamation dated the 
2'2Qd May, 1901. 

The a^es at which persons way coatraet binding mai'rioges 
are the same as in England — 12 years for females and 14 Tor 
males. Marriage may be contracted at earlier a^cs thou those 
stated, but would be voidable at the discretion of either of the 
parties upon reaching the a^e of 12 or 14, a.s the cuae may he, and 
without the necessity of proceedings in Court. 

AltiiDugh in New Zealand the age at which girh may lagally 
marry in as above ; nevertheless, by the criminal law, to aulawfully 
carnally know a girl under the age of 16 yeara is now a punialiable 
offence, The age of consent was raised from 15 to 16 by statute 

■ poosed in 18%. 
The average age of the men married in thia colony in 1901 was 
29'7S years, and of the women, '25 bi years. In England the mean 
age of those whose ages were stated was (in the year 1899) 38-34 

■ years for men, and 26-21 years for women. Thus the average age 
at marriat^e in the colony is higher for men, but lower for women, 
than in England. 

Th« proportion of bridegrooms under 21 is much greater in Eng- 
land than in New Zealand ; but the proportion of brides under 21 ia 
■ greater in the colony. 
In Bngiaiid, iu 1891-95. of every 1.000 bridegrooms %vhose ages 
were statud, 5(5 weru under 21 years of a^o, aud of every 1,(KK> 
brides 183 were under 21 years of age. Iu Now Zealand, in 1901, 

kthe proportions were 19 bridegrooms and 172 brides of similar ogea 
in every 1,000 ruarried : — 



I 




348 



KBW KBAI.AMD OFPtCI&L TBAR-KOOS, 



Tmt. 

1888 



BrkUaaBdom 

In 

U» 
83-75 

ao-u 

19^58 I 
19-Sl 



1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 



. . 1 57 



BrldMWdvi 
In 
•nrrUR 
18 1$ 

16-81 
lT-34 
IT-lfi 



NL'UBBR of MiKlSTEES. 

"Hie Dumber of names oo the liftt of officiating nuaisters UDdoc 
the Marriage Act is (May, 1902) 1,001, and the denominations to 
which they belong are shown hereunder : — 



DnaoinLiittUoe . 
[Ohoreh of EoglMid 

.-kbrteriftn Cbunih o( Kew Zea> 

Dtnao Cubolic Chorcb 
IftUiodiBt Chanh cf Auiumlaiift 
Con srofi^ti Anal lodeptfiMieiiU 
Bft^'liaU 
PrimiUTt HstbodUt Conneiioc 
Lnibuao Ohaceh 
Hehrew OonjiT«catloni . . 
Ohorebol Ghrwt 
Freo Hathodlst ObuwfaM 



Aurktud C«qu*1 Mission 
Weliln^ton Central U1*mon 
Ind^peudenc \Vealcy*n 
Th9 FoiTMard Movement 
Satvftlioo Armjr 
Catbolio ApostDlu) Oburob 
Saveutt^day Ad««aUtaa 
Uaitariao Cbnioh 
Pilffrim* of Pmm« 
SfiAta Oboroh 

Toial 



l.( 



Deaths. 

The rieathg in 1901 numbered 7,634, b«ing equivalent Co & 
rate of 9-81 in ovory 1,000 persons living, aa agiinst 9-18 iti 1900. 
The lowest ratti experieuood since the voar 1887, when the deaths 
were 10 29 per 1.000 of the poputattOD. waa Uiat for 1896 (910). 

COMPAIUTirK DXATS-BA-nC FOB THX Peuod 1691 to 1901. 



Connvy 



MK-'uea. m. udlIims. uos. 



Kew ZealMid 

SUMn«l&nd 
•w So>ith WkIu 
Vietocift 

Sooib Aiutrali&' . . 
WmIafii AuBttftlia 
Tannania 
Bn^Uttd and Waica 

Ic«1u>d .. 
Dvnmark 
Norway .. 
Sweden . . 
Auatrift . . 
Uongary 
SwilzerUnd 
Oariiiui Kinpir* . . 
N«ihcrl»n>lii 
FraDoe . . 
Italv 



irni. 



. lO-a5Jl(HKll(MniO-lffl d-Dl' O-IOJ 9-14 
. 12 77 1-2 0>!l8 34 13-08911 38-13-1011 as' 



IW8.1UML 



lacxL ifioi. 



1424 
1634 



»B4llO-Mi 0-48 
ia-66|12tf?ll-73 II- 



12 an IB 2412 3*11 1 79 1330 10-88 IS 48 
13631411 131M3-25 13-45 12-9015-94 



11 83 11 IC 11 
II 38^ 13 7& 



13-3011 II 13 44;n-IH 1 1-25 ll-4Rll-i4 13-06 12-14 10' 

17 SS 16 67 I&3; 14 40,17 7H Ifl 45 l6 97'I6^M|la 76 13 9* 13-; 

IJflOia .W 13 47il3-42[ir38 n-<B 11 53 13-3l]l325 1106, 10 

aO-2 ItfU l\f2 16-6 ilS-T i;-l 17-7 .17'6 16-3 . 

307 18-6 ,19-5 17-2 ]19-7 ;16 9 il8-8 ;i8 4 166 ' 

184 l»'4 117-9 ia-» I18-4 164 :i84 '161 17-6' 

194 189 I7S 169 |l5 7 166 ,13-6 17-5 ' . 

17-8 16-3 [16-9 15-7 ilfl-S ,15-8 illI-2 IC-8 I . 

17-9 ;i6-« |16-4 '153 ll56 154 15-1 176 . 

98 8 137-3 137-8 -'JIT 3ti * 25 « 24-9 M 4 
83 1 350 ;3ll 130-4 39-6 ,28 8 iS-4 37-9 i»7-0 . 
aOB 19-3 130-4 :-^S 19-6 llB3 18-3 ltH-9 117-6 • . 
334 134-1 .346 :33 8 -231 ;308 313 30-6 31.5 i . 
ai>7 121 19-3 ,18-5 18-6 |17 i 160 ,170 ,17'1 ' . 
,336 '33C 33-8 ,31-4 323 !a0'3 19-6 31-3 :31-1 ' . 
llJB-S ISRS '36 8 [351 !3S-3 134 3 l33-| -aSI iU-1 | . 



* Esuludtag tba Nunborii Tvnltovj. 



HOBTAI/ITV AT POUR CBNTHSH. 



349 



Ab will be seen from the precediug table, coTcrin;; a series of 
years, the donth-mtc in New Zealaini oonirasts very favourably 
with tliat in the Australian Rtaius ani] in European countries. 

In this statement New Zealand is conspicuous as showing the 
lowest death-rate. The rates for th« principal Australian States 
are a little higher, but, fienerally speaking, Ear below those for the 
United Kingdoiu or the Buropeau Continental States mentioned 
ia iho table. 

Deaths and Dkath-batrr of the Four Phiscipal Cities and 

THEIR Suburbs. 

Id the earlier annual reports on the vital statistics of the four 
chief towns the central boroughs alone were dealt with, paiticutors 
respecting the suburbs not havinii; been obtained. Bui this omission 
was held to be a grave defect, as the suburban dtiath-rate niay 
differ much from the dL'ath-rate at the centre. Stops wore tlioro- 
fore taken early in 389S to collect statistics of tlio suburban bormi^lis 
as well as of the four chief cities. As roj^ards Auckland and Chnst- 
church, thti whole of the area uuually recognised an suburban lias 
not yet been brought under municipal f;ovemment. and the statistics 
given below do nob deal with such portions as still remain in road 
districts. The omission, however, ia not very important, for there 
are in either case quite enough suburbs included within borough 
boundaries to pive a fair idea of the death-rate of gi-eater Auckland 
and greater CliriHtchurcb. As further boroughs are formed tbe 
vital statistiL's will be nimiv to include theni. 

The total number of deaths registered for the four centres in 
1901 was 2, 27 5 — viz., 1,4G5 in the cities, and 810 in the Baburbs. 
Id 1900 the number was 2,104: 1,379 in the cities, and H^ in 
the suburbs. 

By including the suburbs the death-rate for last year is lowered 
ftt each of the four centres. The rates for the yoar are :— 



Auclcl&&d City 

And Ave suburbui boroughs 
WoHinKlcnCliy 

and three iiuburb&n boroiighs 
Chiisichutoli City 

, nnd tout tuburbnn boroughs 

DunGdlD Uity 

iind eight iiuhiii-biin boroiiKhs 



DoBtb-riLU'ii per L.DOO 

at lltfllLll 1'OJ-ulBtlOQ. 

. . laio 

n-60 

.. lO'SG 

10-ao 

.. 1811 

irea 



MOKTAHTY AT FoUR CKNTKKfi, INOLUnlNO SUBCIiBS. 

If the suburbs arc included, the death-rate ia found to be liishest 
in Christchuroh and lowest in Wellington ; Dunodin and Auckland 
taking second and third places respectively. The death-rate for 
the colony was 981 per 1,000 of mean population. The four 
centres might be expected to show a higher average ilian this. 

It the uuuiljer of deaths of iuhuits under one year bo excluded. 




SfiO 



HBW ZH&1.ANU OKPIOIAL VKAJt-BOOH. 



the moriality among the n>st of the populaciou ia found lo have been 
for 1900 and' 1901 in the roHovring ratio to the 1.000 living : — 

ia». lom. 

Auckland (inoluding BUbait»| .. .. 8-36 B'KS 

Wellington , .. .. 7M 7-60 

Ohriitvliuich , . . . . S'SO 9-W 

Dunedin , .. .. 9-58 9*70 

The dogreti of infantile monality ia perhaps best shown in the 
proponiou of deaths of children ander one ycai- of age to every 100 
biruis. For 1000 and 1001 the proportions at tbo chief conirea 
were, — nao. tooi. 

AocklftDd tiQcIudinK KuburU} .. .. 13'T8 fl-38 

WvLlmgUQ . .. .. 7-S2 10-06 

OhrlAUhurob . . . . . 10 sa 11-03 

Daaedin . .. 7-fl5 789 

Tha« the proportions for Auckland and Dunedin are lesa 
than ihal found at either of the other two chivf cities. Again, 
the perceutttjje of deathB of children under 6 years lo the total 
number of deaths in: in Aucklnnd, 30' J5; in Ctu-it>lcburch, 2704; 
in Welliuyton. 32-28; and in Dunedin, only 20 23. The total of 
deaths under 5 is 618, or 2716 per cent, of all deaths, as againsV 
674 and 27-28 per cent, for 1900. The deaths of persoos of 65 and 
upwards numbered 586 last year ; iu 1900 they were 505. 

Mortality at Foub Cbntrbs, excludino Scbubbs. 
Excluding euburhs, and deaUng with the deaths at all agea 
in the four cities or central boroughs only, the rates for 1901 are 
found to be lower in Auckland, but higher in WoHington. Christ- 
church, and Dnncdin, than in the previous year. The total number 
ot deaths, and the death-rateH, for four years ore given : — 



Suburbs >. 



Dmc1i>.1«K. 



OwUiB. 1»V. 



OMtlU,l»0. 



dmUii. i«n. 



No. 



PapalaUoa. 



"*'■ Popi»l«iion.| "* PopniiUoii. 



Ho. 



PwlJXSof 



AaokUad .. 4S3 14-SS 

WelUnRtcm . . l S16| 19-47 

Cbristchuroh.. ' 193 10-37 

Dunodin .. i X'JS ia-73 



499i 13'02 ' 480 13-69 

4771 11 16 401 fl-17 

asO 19-68 aJ6 1062 

817 19-47 -392 12 25 



4631 13'tO 

466; lO-W 

381, 1811 

816 I3-M 



By omittiug the deaths of infants under one year, and calcu- 

Iftiiug tliw rate ou the population of one year of age and upwards, 
the death rales for eacnuf the four principal boroughs are found tfr 
be higher in 1901 Ihan in the previous year. 



AuoklAnd t«xcludfngHuburba) 
Wolliiioton 
CI>riKtci!Urch . 

DiiDedin . 



D«altu |wr 1 .000 ot PopolkUaB. eielndiDf 
InlMita lunilcr OuaYvar ot As»U 

inn. itw, inxi. idol 

O-ae 9 68 73 9'3« 

9-ie 8-39 7-fiS 8-1 3 

8'8a 9-lB 8 93 10-fl9> 

10-87 11-59 1064 1089 




Subjoined is & table showing the rates of infant mortality in the 
four cities for etich of the paet five years, together with the mean 
rates for the period. 

DMiti* ot Clilldroa iin<i«r One Yvu tu oviit\ 100 ItlnliB. 
ll«7. Il#». IBUSI. lOOO. IMIi, pi^o"!"^, 

Auckland (oxclading suburbs) .. 13'80 17 14 14 4T 14 4D lL-57 14()9 

WellinRton . .. 10B9 13-71 12 3fi 6-65 lOMH 10 7a 

Chriatcluirch , .. 12 60 1000 lUTl 1193 11»6 1811 

Dun»lin , ,. G-22 9 06 10-20 8 37 «-07 S'TO 

Causes of Death at Four Centkt^s, includtno Scbcubb. 

While treating of the death-rates at the chief cities and surround- 
ings, it is desirable to refer to the causes of mortality, which is 
done in the remarks that follow. The deaths for the whole colonv, 
classified according to their cause, arc treated of at length a little 
hirther on. 

Specific Frhriie and Zymotic Diseases (at Four Chief Centns). 
The total niortalitv from the»ie diseases at the four centres, with 
their suburbs, was lower m 1901 than in IMOO. I«y9. and 1898. 
The total deaths in tliis claes for the four towns were 304 for 
1898, 360 for 1899, 214 for 1900, aud otily 209 for 1901. 

DoAihA rrom Febritu and Zynatttiz VimttMM. 

AnoJiluiH «ad Wallioirton ntii) Chrialir^linreh and Diiti*(Ila uid TniKl 

Bolxirlj*. Buburlie. »iil>iirt>a. guburtn. 'o«i. 

1901 . . 70 . . 46 . . S4 . . 39 . . '209 

1900 ..93 .. S7 43 41 .. au 

1809 .. 110 62 IU4 g4 afiO 

1898 . . 117 m 44 . . 44 . . 804 

Of the above, influenza caueed most deathB iu 1901 at the four 
centres taken tOKothtir, the total number bving 74. Diarrhcoal 
diseases eanie next, with 57 deathn, diphtheria 13, typhoid fever 
24. whoopiiiK-CDUg)i i, measles and scarlet fever 3 each, and other 
KViiioiic complaints 33. 

Comparison of the deaths for each city shows. — 





AllcklADiI 


Wvlli lift ton 


Chrislchuroli 


nunwlla 


Kyiuoik'. Ac. DUiM-tML. 


diid ttuburlji. 


and Sabtirbii. 


and Suliurbi. 


and Mul.>urb«. 




iwi inn. 


IHll. IWO, 


ivn. 


IWD. 


IIIOI. 


IIW), 


I>iikrrh<nftl dUenae* 


31 S7 


10 11 


1(1 


11 


6 


14 


liiQuaiitK 


14 10 


14 fi 


28 


9 


21 


14 


Tvplioid f»VM 


11 a 


6 8 





8 


3 


9 


M«Be)«B 


• 1 ■ a 


I 


, , 


, , 


2 


, , 


8o&rlec Iev«r . . 


1 .. 


• I - - 


I 


1 


, . 


, , 


Biil>ooic P1»RUB 


1 


. . 










DIphinoria 


2 S 


7 « 


3 


': 


•2 


3 


WtioopioK cough 


1 .. 


1 •. 


1 


6 


1 


8 


Chicken pnx ,, 


» - > • 


. . * ' 


I 


, , 


, _ 


, , 


Obbar xjiiuotlc diaoMW* 


10 IS 


9 Q 


6 


6 


5 


8 



Parasitic Diaeasea (at Four Chief Centres). 
Hydatids were fatal at WelliugtoD (3 deaths), ChriBtchurch 
(1 death), and Dunedin (2 deaths). 

fHeUtic Diteans (at Four Chi*/ Cenlrti). 
These numbered 28, of which 15 were attributed to intemperance , 
IS being due to want of breast-milk, or malnutrition, and 1 to exposure. 




S52 



NKW KUALADTD OPl^ICiAI, YBAR-BOOK. 



ConatiuUiottal Dlseatos (at Four Chief C*Htrss}. 

From those, tleatlit* at the (our lowtia numbered 471 in 1901. 

The first in iiiiporLnnce oi Liivse lUKeoseH. &uii ol all causes of death, 19 

tubei-clo. The ri<,'iires fnr 1900 and 1001 show 266 and 263 deatba 

(or oach jear respectively. 



PhiliUli 



l>l)tl)l>i(. 
Auekland «nd suburbs . . 41 
Waltlngton . . . ».1 
Ohrinonurcb . ..43 
DuD«dm . ..63 



nd other TuborciilBT UIi)«k««i lat Four Chlct CvniroBt- 
1901. 

Otbvr Tab«r«u]u' 
Dlsnuwa. 

y 
as 

11 
11 



1«X1. 



3S 



807 5« ao< 63 

The mortality from tubercular dineasRa for 1901 was 11-56 per 

CBtu. of the total deaths at the four boroughs from all causes. 

Deaths from cancer at the chief towns rose in number from 

14S in 1900 to 154 in 1901. The latter Dumber is 6-77 per cent, of 

deeXhs for ihe year from all causes. 

BiabeiCB showed 24 deaths in 1901, against 15 io 1900. 

Dtveiopvisntal Diseaiea (at Four Chief Centte%). 
Tbetfi were 227 deaths in this class ; 9:1 o! which were fnMa_ 
premature birth, 116 from old age, and 19 from other causes. 

Local Distaste (at Four Chief Centres). 

Deaths in this class were 107 more than in 1900, the figures 
being 1.1^5 against l.OlH. Diseases of the rc^spiratory system 
showed 30a deaths for 1901, or more than one-fourth of the whole 
mortft[ity in the class, against 182 in the former year Bronchitis, 
pneumonia, cou^estion of lungs, pleurisy, and allied diseases form 
this group. The large increatie in deaths from these complaints 
accounts (or more thau the total increase in the class as a whole. 

Coder the head of " tliseases of the digestive syftt«ni" there were 
192dBath8at the four centres, including 59 from enteritis; peritonitis, 
19; gastritis, 25; cirrhosis of liver, 9; jaundice,?; and dentition, 10. 

Diseases of the urinary system caused 73 doaUis. The remainios 
denibs were : 244 from nervous diseases, I disease of orgajis of 
special sense, 2fiO of oryaua of the circulatory system, 10 of the 
l^-mphatic, 24 of the reproiluctivo system, 7 of the orgaus of locotoo- 
tlOD, and 6 of the integuments. 

VioUnt Deaths (at Four Chuf Cenlret). 

There wore 119 violent deaths at the cities and suburbs, 91 oC 
which were clsBsed as accidental. Four of tbitse latter were caused 
by fractures, and 9 by falls. In 10 cases dcatJi rcsuh«d from the 
deceased being run over by cab, cart, wagon, or train. Tiiirteen 
deaths were from burns or scalds, 24 by drowning, 6 by suffocation, 
1 by poisoning, 6 by misadventure with morphia or. chlorofonn, 
besides 8 from accidout at birtb, and 14 others. 

Two deaths were returned as homicidal, murder, manslaughter. Ae. 




IJZATH8 AT VAHIQUB AOB-PRBIODB. 



8^3 



Of 23 suicides. 5 were by shootinj;, 6 by nutting ihro&t, 2 by 
poison, i by hanging, 2 by drowning, 1 by placing hiniBelf on the 
railway-iine, 1 by strangling, 1 by throwing iiimself from a bridge, 
ami 1 from a window. 

Vital frPATISTrCfl op AtfRTllAliASIAN CAPtT.*LS, 1900. 

Tho vital statistics of tho cluuf cities, with their suburbs, of Aub- 
trftlasia, show that the doath-rato in Wellington (N.Z.) for 1900 was 
lower than that of any other of the principal lowdb for the Kama year. 



CIUm iLooludluf 
Hubavbcl. 



Sttlmatfd! 

Mewi 

PouiUft- 

tfon. 



BMAB. 



Total 
HuQitwr, 



iUto p«r 

jjom 



OcftllK. 



ToCftl 



tlon. 



lUt* DM 

tian. 



SsesM 

of Bictlia 

DeMilia. 



Melboumo 

A<l«1aJd« 

Brisbaoo * 
P«rth . , 
UotMrb 
W«IHngK>a 



•190,100 

486.067 

139.807 

190,585 

95,4U5 

94,619 

49,067 



1S,0&7 

ia,l27 

4.093 

8,433 

1.1140 

SSO 

i.ua 



S4 9A 
25 69 
28-47 
35-02 
34-04 
95-39 



7.021 


u-as 


6,&02 


11 S8 


a, OSS 


12-76 


l,dU 


10-90 


&2I 


14-72 


49& 


14 S4 


437 


8-91 



a, 046 

6,6S5 

3,0«O 

S.119 

719 

33B 

80« 



* T*u-inll«ruuui. 

Dkaths in the wbolb Colony at vauious AaE-PBiiioDft. 
The average age at death of persons of either 80X, in each of the 
seven years. lH9i>-l901, was as follows: — 





U«I«*. 


PlMIIiblct, 




UolM 


Fvmiilnii. 


1805 .. 


8R 21 jKB-n 


»0k7 r«Ars. 


1890 .. 


3773 itocH 


93 51 )U»r«. 


1896 .. 


8080 . 


32'41 . 


1900 ., 


lo-ai . 


3614 , 


1807 ., 


88-80 . 


84-77 , 


1901 .. 


1104 , 


87-68 , 


1898 .. 


89-29 . 


35-69 . 









From a mortality tabic, conMructcd by thu Aeeiatant Actuary of 
the CJovt-ruiiiutit Lifu lusuraiiCG Duparinioni fur }iis own purposes, 
it ap^^uars that ont of every 1,000 uiaUte bom Bf>2 reac)! the a£;e of 
fiO years, 614 tlx; age ni 66, 62U ihu a^e of (>0, and 471 the age of 66. 
For (eruales, fiflS out of ev«ry 1,000 born hve to 50 years. 618 to 55, 
596 10 60, and 530 to tiii. Thesn results must not be regarded as 
put forward by authorii.y of tlie rtepartmeni. 

Subjoined is a classiSod statement of tho deaths of infants under 
one year during 1901, with the ratio of the deaths in each clam to 
the 1,000 births during the year : — 



T»r. 



8«1. 






fluid Bftn<l TS& 

ttDdwO unilwiS ^ut 



1901 .. 



1001 .. 



Male 

Female 

Mkle 

FumaU 



NrVBER OP Deaihb. 

.. I a.';4 I ti2 I 167 

.. I 256 I IHO I 12C 
Dbathb to the I,000 Births. 

.. I 33-80 I 13-56 I 15-95 
2&-a5 12-^7 12 48 



160 
129 



1528 
12-87 



828 
G40 

78-59 
68 87 



801 



HSW ZBALAND OrPIOIAL TBAK-BOOK. 



Serettty-niDo out of every thousand of male children bora. 

and sixty-four of every thousand females, are found to have 
died before altaining the a4i;e of oue year. Tho mortality is thus 
one in thiriocn of male children and one in sixieen of fHtnales, even 
in New Zealand, where conditions are far more favourable to luftuit 
life than in Australia, at least an far as relaten to the cities. 

tt will also be sefiii from the figures that the chances of living 
during the first year of age are far greater for female than for male 
infants. Thus, during the year I'JOl there were — 

100 dealkie of tnalaa to 76 deaths of lemKloii under 1 month nl <ig« ; 
100 . 96 . from 1 to 3 nionllu of ftg« ; 

100 • 78 , from 3 to G months o( age : 

100 « 04 , from 6 to 12 muutlis o! ago ; 

100 .81. undt^r 1:1 months of ikf;a. 

Tho rates of infantile mortality — that is, tlie proportion the 
doaUis of children undc-r one year of a^i* bear to the liirths — are 
higher in the AusiraJian States than in New Zealand. 



Causks op Death (the wbole Colokt). 

The deaths registered in the colony during the last &ve 
when dibtributed among the several classes according to 
; asatgned oauBee, give the rates shown hereaoder : — 



years, 

their 







B&t« p«r 10.000 UvlBg. 


i 


Cuiae* of D««ib. 










^ 


twr. 


tsoe. 


1 


1000. 


IMI. 


Zymatio dlacMea . . . . 


8-44 


10-99 


19-41 ' 


9-83 


7-W 


Psrasitic diMUQfl . . 


0-18 


087 


0-sa 


0-80 


0-S4 


^^ictetio diUMM .. .. 


064 


0-87 


1-03 


0-oa 


0-88 


OpaaUiutionftt diMMM 


17-90 


ISBl 


18-75 


17-76 


1BS3 


]9imlopmeDlal diwu«a 
LomI diaaaeeB 


7-46 


8-BO 


964 


915 


1045 


40-ao 


4«-86 


48-60 


46-63 


48-96 


Tio)sn«e . . 


7-55 


7-<» 


T-aa 


7-53 


7 48 


ni-dafinod and not->p«oifittd causes , . 


3^ 


4-96 


4-17 


3-76 


387 


All cauaaa 


0139 


96-80 


102-40 


01-29 


9813 



The next table ahowa that fifty in every one hundred deatbs 
in 1901 were from local diseases, of which diseases of the re- 
spiratory nygteni formed 1.3 per cent., diseases of the circulatory 
8V8t«ni J2 per cent., and of the nervous system 11 per cent., while 
d'iseases of the digestive system contributed 8 per cent. Constitu- 
tional diseases, including, with others, phthisis and cancer, com- 
prised 19 per cent, of tho total mortality. Eight per cout. of deaths 
were from xymotic causes, including 5-13 per cent. Irom miasmatic 
diseases, and 1-82 per cent, from diarrhcoal. Deathi: from develop- 
mental difieaaes come next in proportion, being 10-24 [>er cent, of the 
whole, followed by violent deaths, with 7'63 per cent. 




■an -. ;ri,& 



It ■: ^11 






i53 _ .22 



I?? ! r?a 












4DC3e 






I2!g 













I 



S"is3^3i s°»= 



JX^- 



^"m-S 5^32 



Se ; -.Si 



riia^S -"" 



l«g. 



: : : 1 1 ! i 



: 1 : 1 i I i : I 









A 3 B'r* era Q .^ ^ 




* — e4 H » B a 
33 S! 







I ! i II i I !!li 






= = i: *- >| 
3 S I 3 5° 

5 u V C 




HEW £BAL&N1> OFFICIAL VKAJi-HOOK. 



The next table showB. for either gex, the nuDiber of deaths from 
eaah cause registered during the year 1901 ; — 

Cauhhs or Dkatm. 





CKUiw Qt DBfttb. 



Ordora Kiid Oii 



Tbiiwh ... 

titb>e> aiwMM tmta *•»- 

UvJKllddlHoUO 
VVonu* .. 

Qt'Lii-r diteuHiB Iroiu uii- 
liial |'arK>Jtuii .. 

TiilBlClnnlL „. 

flU.r<rHtloD 

WMtB at breut-mlUf .. 
Scurvy ... 
tDteuparuioft— 

ClironlL' BltialiolinDi ... 
D«llriuRi tr«iii(>iiK 
OtliurdlotodoftiaoKMoi ... 

TaUlCtMain. „. 

Rlicumatla favor 
nbaumibUam „. 

Hlokeu ... 
C«nc*r ... 
Tabes niaaonlariok. tv 

bflrcutBrporitoujiis ... 

TuImtcuIm' iriDDiuBitiM. 

acnt* bydn>c«}i|>iiln( ... 

Pliihini*.,. 

Oliver furui* ol tuliorcu- 

losti, KrrofuU ... 

Purpurik, luriuorrbaglii 
<U>tb»d> 

Aniemik. -ohloToMR. Idiiod- 
cylliH.-t(iiii 

Otbcr oocisUlnUon*! di»- 
MU«B ... ... 

ToisIClAHlV. „. 

i^rmniiirn birth 
Atoln-'twln 
CyADMla 
8]>iaa bifida 
iDiparfarau aou 
Clofl pBlatv, bnre-llp 
Utiivr consunltftl daliHU 
OldBif — 

ToUl Clu* V. ^. 



Oiuntn I.— Dt»Mi*# of A'*r- 

I iillKni tnai Ion al tba 
III kin tit li-^ iiK'iiitintn^ 

t.'rrt l>io Hiniisl iiKrnlngtU* 

A|iii|ilfnv 

Hortriiliie of hraln 

HvuUpleulft, bnin iwaly 
•to «. „ 



U 



sa 

"15 

8 

1 
9 

at 
sot 

fl 

vr 
ar 

s 

no 



US 

9 
T 
4 
I 
t 
7 
SS3l 



tSl 



fitt 

9 

IX 

It 



ta 
I 

""a 

MO 

aa 

w 
wi 



cw 



c 



1 



'i 



u 

11 



1 
ft 

8U 



aift 

H 

i 



1.4 



111 SM 

« IS 

a u 

a w 

1 * 

S 4 

!■-• 1» 



an 



Mr 



4M 



lie 



49< IM 

1T[ 4t 





i 

5 


0*.DiM of DMib. 




1 
1 






Okuaaa of Daatli. 




S 








1 

o 


3 




i 

1 


'3 
§ 


I 


Orden uid DlaeUM, 


OtdATs and DiaeaRM. 


3 

? 




If.n'nMu Sjyitpm— e>oiitd. 










OlU»ll S.— OttfiMM of 


















DtffMttVf S If item. 








^^_ 


fitr*lv*l* {iiniliwREtbodt... 


sa 


as 


ae 




8tAtn*tlUs. cADcrutu arit 


4 


8 


B 


^K 


Parftlnls utlutui 






■ ■■ 




Dantitlon 


l« 


M 


96 


^H 


IniibiiUv. ftHn«r»l p^rftly- 










Hore tlirnnt. qulnty 


T 


1 


B 


^^^ 


ai* of Invaue ... 


BO 


10 


10 




Dj'apvpaia 


s 


( 


10 


^^B 


ChorOA ,.. 


1 


1 


a 




H»n)at«inMU .,. 


1 


1 


a 


^^p 


E|ilU|iBy 


3a 


13 


u 




VTalnna ... 




8 


B 


^" 


Ooaviilatona 


to. 


IS 


III 




DiMMDi ol lUiinKcli. gaa- 










I.&r>'tiiitNUU* rtrldolDi ... 


... 


-.- 


... 




»)lJa ... 


H 


4« 


BB 




MIopKthio taUuna 


H 


,„ 


a 




RnMrllla 


a 


TS 


108 




Pkntplind^ dliBMW oi 










Ulu« ration, parforatloD, 










•|iln»T Rord 


11 


B 


(S 




n! iiitratinii 


D 


T 


11 




LiO«"tiiotoi- fttAXia 


7 


1 


» 




Ileua, obitnicUon of lo- 










OUisr dlaaaaaaof nerrona 










CoaUiia 


u 


U 


IS 




•ftUBl 


10 


AS 


K 




S(r totu re or ■ CrMi«uI atlon 
olinleatloo 


1 


. 


• 




ToUl Order 1 


tw 


33!l 


aao 




latQMuaoeutloa ol Incva- 

Uno 


D 





IS 




















Barnln ... 


* 


• 


IS 




Oiumi fi.— DltoiMM of 










Pktula ... 


I 




I 




Orvoat of 9p*ctal 8«—t. 










Variionllla 


» 


'ill 


w 




Otltla. OEorrhcBk. . . 


a 


..4 


a 




Aaaitoi ... 


1 


s 


s 




Rplatasla.kiid dlawaw of 










Oall^cioiiea 


S 


G 


19 




nnaw ... 


.- 


1 


1 


* 


Cirrhotic at llvnr 


as 


IE 


17 


"i 


OjiliUiftliiilft. and dltwusB 








s 


Otiier dlsMjee of liver. 








f 


oleyo ... 


... 


... 


.1. 


s 


tiflpaMtla.lauiidlM 


91 


IB 


19 


c 










£ 


Oilier dlaoMM of di|ea- 
















Total OrfLarfl 


s 


1 


a 


1 


tlvaay*t*ii] ... 

Total Older B .„ 


sat 


U 


to 








WD 


at 


• 


OuDsn ^.—Dittiuet of 








B 
















T 


Cltx-ittaiorj/ Bv»tem, 
BtulDOMidiUSi Talvular 








2' 


On^Kii i.—Ditfutt bf 








6 


(II'IMM* 


aae 


2&1 


«ST 


s 


I'ufUen QlaniU. 








§ 


P«nc&rAlG<fl 


s 


1 


e 


a 










[Iy)iEriiot>hy of hsait ... 


s 


1 


s 


J 


Dltoaao* of lymphatic 








Kaity (tvgcDeniiloB o[ 








3 


fljRleiD 


e 


t 


T 


liMirt 


3B 


93 


SI 


S 


Dl»«.>oi of aploon 


1 




1 


AiiSlQap4MOiM.., 


U 


IB 


le 


^ 


BroBcbooele 


« 


"n 


IB 


7 


Hyncope ... 

Aii«ijriHii 
HfiiiIb DiuiKnin s . . . 
SmbolUni.throisljaati... 
PJilebitia 


SB 


40 


laa 


1 


AddlaoQ** dUa*M> 


» 


* 


9 




IT 


1 
S 




^ 










P 


ToUl Order fi 


IG 


17 


99 




IS 


!3 


» 


























VancoH raiD*. iMlaa 


•-* 


■<• 


.-• 




OnPKA l.— DUMun of 










Olhar dlBaaa«ii uFoiroul»> 










friiirirv Sf/tirm, 










torrir*t«iS ... 


B 


... 


a 




ACUM DDptirltU ... 
BrlHhl'H dIaeHHt 


se 


19 


» 








* 






so 


N 


IM. 




ToialOrdarS .., 


S70 


sat 


1»3 




Urn^tuta 
Calculu* 


1 

a; 


11 

'"i 


1» 
I 
• 








OM>iin 4 —Dittam of 










Htprtinturl* 


a 




9 




Utai/irat»n/ Htftttm. 










Di&Daso* o[ bladdar and 










liarynicltJa 


U 


6 


9^ 




]irtinlat« 


» 


1 


eft 




Croup ... 


IS 


u 


ia 




Oibsr dixoana* of urlnikry 










OttiTT. illiiviuiM of laryna 










■jttviu Ikldnay dlaeaoea 










and tmclic* .., 


... 


1 


i 




node«CTlb»d) .., 


17 


U 


wt 




%attiiiik, «<iMiibyMm» ... 
BrunuLltlK 


1S» 


11 
ise 


9B 
MS 
















TotiJ Order T ... 


IM 


n 


9H 




PiiauiuooU 

riAunir ... 

OitiHr (fiMaa«a of T«aplra- 


sw 

89 




US 
























^^ 










ORnRR S.— r^M'lMa 1)/ 








^^L 


toryayiMoi .,. 


w 


Bl 


M 




Btprofltutiif. 8ti*Um, 

(a.> DUniutu ml or||«ria 

of sener&tlon,— 


























■ 


Toul Ordar « ... 


BU 


«lfl 


~M 










L 












Ovarian dlaeaaa 


... 


B 


» 







^ 



U— year-book 



i 



NEW ZRAXAHD OPnOUI. TBAH-BOOE. 



Gaukss of DwiTB — fontinuAi. 



GMiMa or DmUi. 



Ortm ttfl PlMMBi. 



OftMM of DM4b. 



Orden uid DiieuM. 



(«.) IHmmm of omua of 

(•DsrMloii — eld. 
OImmm of Dtenii Utd 

OUMdon of meaKrak- 

Uon ... ... „ 

Pel via «ViM«U _ » 

Porlnwil abacMS 
DiM*Mi a( MaiM. ponis, 

•omtDii], Ac, ... . . 

<t.) DiMHM al pArtori- 

tlon.— 
Abortion. luldeurriAKO « 
Pnnrpwral nianLK 
fuerper^ mointli .„ 
PnarpoTKl cooralalona ... 
PlMoou pnerl* Iflood- 

Ing) 

t^loRnualB d o] 0DS ... 
Otb«r •coldantc at obUd- 

Unh 

ToMi Ordar S 

Obdkii v.-JJmmmi 0/ 
Oniitnj u/ LooonofMn. 

CirioA, n««i««i*... 

irttirt<i>, 'ntlUii 

Otb«f (lliMio* ot orgKBi 
of loooniottOD ... .,. 

ToKlOrdorD 

OlinitR 10. — f>i««UKi of 

PtaleitBtoa. eollnUMa 

Lupoa - . 

Ulcer. l>od-»OT« ... ». 

Rcaamit ... „. 

Pomphtcu* ... ... 

Oihor dUooaoa d iiil«(n> 
BiHituy ByiMm 

Tom) Ordor 10 ... 

Toul UlMi VI, .„ 



aa 



Iff 



vt 



M 



10 



IT 



s,i0ai,a»».Kn 



^1 



Ontmn \.—AMtdffU or 

Pnctnra*, MtitiulMM ... 
Qanaliot wound* 
Oat. lUb 
Bum, aiMld 

aiiD*mko _ 
poison .. 
DrowaioR 

HoifoooUoD 
OtbervlM 

Total Otita I 

Ou>n ft.— HoMMUtf. 
Uurdar, mknalftogbMr — 
WoandB In battle 

Tot*l Order fl 

OkDBB 3.—SitkitU. 
Oaoabot woaoda 
Cat, n*b 
Potson ... „ 

OtowbIbi 

OitaonriM 

TotAl Order a .- 

Onsxn I.— SMonUoM. 

Total Clwm VU. „ 

Dro|]a]r .„ ... .„ 

Mu-Aamaa, Ao. ... ... i 

UortlAcatlon.iptaipviM... i 

Tunionr 

Abioaaa ... 

BviuorrbaA* ... ... . 

SwHdon Icaoa* aaaaeor- 1 

UlD«dl ... ,.. I 

OLhtir ilMefloeil and tuii- 1 

•pMlfiM e«,UM« ... . 



n 



3M, 



lot 



« 



TotAlOlAMVlIl.... ITS. int 
Ueoorftl lot*]s ... 4,418 9.81517 



U 



lag 



lu 



u 



MOHTALITY PBOU ZvMOTIO AKD FeBRILS DibBASBS. 

The deaths in 1901 from specific febrilo or zymotic diseasee 
amounted to 609, a pro[)orlion ot 7-83 in every 10,000 porsons 
living, and n. dpcrfiaae of £>6 on the number of deaths in 1900. whea 
thfl proportion wan 9-33. A naduced mortality from ineasles, 
diphtherJA, whooping-cough, and diarrhojal diseases woro the main 
cauaei of the decrea.sed death-rate in this class. 

The following are the diHeosoa in thia claee that have caused th«, 
greatest mortality during the past ten years : — 



ttUBOMIC PLAOOS PREVENTION. 



359 



DiBe&aea 


1S9£. 


IKB. 


I8IH. 


was. 


18H, 


leoT. 


ims- 


IHN, 


inxi 


1901. 


UaMlw ., 




SS6 


14 


__ 


1 


1 


M 


m 


s 


(t 


8carl«t faver &nd 


"i 


1 


5 


, , 


i 


s 


3 


, , 


10 


17 


scftrl&tina 






















Dipbthoria 
WtioopiBg-Miigh .. 


195 


138 


92 


76 


74 


49 


45 


68 


68 


44 


U5 


55 


190 


150 


34 


S 6 


133 


90 


9 


Infloenzk 


14« 


106 


283 


135 


»9 


lao 


219 


ISO 


181 


319 


niiirrhce&l djaeadea 


339 


193 


SOT 


282 


as4 


267 


376 


ma 


199 


139 


Kntarie or typhoid 


131 


97 


116 


94 


124 


106 


120 


93 


68 


96 


tevvc 






















Puerperal (dver . . 


39 


&4 


88 


98 


10 


la 


1» 


IS 


U 


30 



Meanlus, whic}i was epidemic in 1808, caused only 16 deaths In 
the four succeeding years ; but in 1398 the mortality rose to 66 
and in 1899 to 1S7 deaths, falling again to 9 deathg in 1900, and to 
6 deaths in 1001. From scarlatina there were 17 deatlis last yaar. 
The mortality from diphtheria rose from 45 deaths in 1898 to 58 in 

1899, and 63 in 1900, and fell to 44 deaths in 1901. 

Whooping-coush in 1894 destroyed 190 lives, and 150 in 1895, 
hut was in 1896, 1897, and 1898 much lew fatal. In 1899 the 
mortality sprang up again to a total of VIZ deatlis, against 90 in 

1900, aiid 9 in 1901. In 1891 there were 249 deaths from this 
cause. 

Influenza, the deaths from which were 89 in 1896, 120 in 1897, 
and 219 in 1898, caused 136 deaths in 1899, 181 in 1900, and 219 in 
1901. 

From diarrhoeal complaints the deaths in 1901 were 139, against 
199 in 1900, or 159 Imb than in 1899; while in 1896 the mortality 
reached the heij^bt of 334 deaths, and in 1889 wim even higher 
(856), with a much smaller population than in 1901. lufluenxa 
i« the most fatal of the order " zymotic and febrile " (219 deaths), 
tliarrboeal diseases coming second for the year 1901, eatenc ferer 
third, and diphtheria fourth. 

Enteric or typhoid fever was more fatal in 1901 than in 1900, 
the figures being 9.'^ deaths, against 08 for the foruier year. The 
highest mortality during the deconnium was in 1892, when tha 
deaths numbered 184 for the colouy. 




BuBONto P1.AOUE Pbevbntion. 

The year 1900 saw the outbreak of the discaae known aa the 
bubonio plague ia Sydney and other parts of Austraha. In that 
year there was one death from plague in New Zealand, which 
occurred at Auckland, but none happened in the year 1901. 
The Public Hoaltb Uepartm>BDC ia Caking every possible precau- 

liOD. 



360 



»RW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YRAK-BOOK. 



Vaccisatiok. 

From smallpox there were no deaths in 1901. The v&ecinA- 
tioQB registered for the last ten y«ars arc as under : — 



Total Nuoibor 

VftMiBkOMM or Blrtba 
t«(lM«Md. ragtoMnd. 



90.491 
19.646 
19.835 
18. IJ^ 
18.733 
18.613 
1S.S46 
IS.fiSB 
18,187 
17,876 



Proportion o( 

SucceMtal VacoiaktioiM of 



CbUdrwi uMtar 

I Ymt of Am to 

TotAlHlHha. 

I'orCiMit. 



Ciilliimit BDdi 
1 1 Ymm of An I 
to ToUl BirtSa. 
Pat Coat. 



The number of successful vaccinauons reeistered to 1901 was" 
only 3.76». against 4.o3d iu 1900. 0.133 m 1S99 and 10.349 in 1898. 
The lail IS cDoaequeni on the alteration of the law relattTft to 
Taocination in England, and subseqaently in this colony. 

OiM child in every ten bom in 1901 is ahonn to have been snc- 

onsfally raccinated in that year. The procedure nnner the new law 

as RfEarda raceiuation is siuiilar to that prvrionsly in force. The 

[B<g»»f»r tssoea a notice «heu a birth is registered, with forms for 

' SB lA the result of Taecinattoa aiucbed . Vaccination is 
•liU eompohorr. it exemption is not aecnred in fom: moGths from 
date ol birth. But everything is now subject to the provisions of 
the "exemplioD elanae." «hieh is the main feature, aad governs 
iIm rest. Any parent or etisiodian who has oockseientiOQs ohjec- 
tioo* — betieTtng that Tacanauoo woitld he injanoo* to the child's 
bcelth— can a^y for a c«ru6c*te oi execnptsoo to a Magiatmte or 

oCBmhs. 

Two thowaad Gv« hntkdred and fifteen stewption certificates 
iwMd biMi the ISth Ocfoher, 190(X wImb the Aat oame into 
w Uw and of tlw jrear 1901. 

WInb no ewiyioB etififie is obuiaed. the law now allows 

rwitsed ofssr ImB dale of binh in which tovaeeiDaie 

I ^ fMtM. and a ■mwlsr penod fton dne of tskiBe charge ol 

Ettnld in ease of a cw<odia». Tlisn are paasllieB Cor not vaceioattng 

One «on«irtMi lor n<^c>Mig to vaccinate a child re- 

linMil; ttDtU tb« ohiM m lonr y«ars of a$e. 

ti lbs new Ba^hih law iadnds a system oi 
fay ^nbbe TsecnMan, in sntnliiiliiiii lor IfaM 





COSSTITUTIOSAIi DISBASBS. 



361 



requiring; children to be taken Co vaccination stations, and exemp- 
tion of paT'jnls and others from any DsiiiiLty for not raceinaciag 
chitdren on production to the proper otacor of ft magistrate's certi- 
ficQCO to the effect that he 18 satistietl a» to the conaoientioos objoc- 
tion« raised. Vst^cinaiion with glycerinnticd calf lymph, or other 
lymph iasuod by Local Ciovernineni Boards is o0fered by the Govern- 
□leat. The Act continues id forue until the begiuoing of the year 
1904. 

Parahitio DisRARnfl. 

There woro 19 deaths from parasitic diseasos, tho proportion 
per 10,000 living being O'l^i. Dcallis froiii hydatids nuuibured 16 in 
1901. 

Dietetic DisEASEfi. 

Under the class " Dietetic Diseases" are included 43 deaths 
from intemperancH. But these cannot he said to repreaent the full 
extent of the mortality really cautied by thn abtiise of alcoholic 
liquors. Many dMatba of iiiteiiiperate pt;r»ons are attributed to 
disease of the liver, kidneyH, &c., in the niedicaL certiQcates. 



CoxsTiTUTtONAD Diseases: Phthisis, Canckr, bto. 

The deaths from constitutional diseast^s iu 1901 numbered 1.466, 
or 18 33 p«r 10.000 of population, and 19 out of every lOO dcatba 
from all causes. This class of disease is more fatal Chaii any other 
oxcepL that defined as "Local diseases," oa account of tho groat 
uuiuhure of deathii from cancer and phchists. with ottmr tuburcular 
complamtt*. which are classed as " Cousiitulioaal." 

From phthisis there are more deaths than from any other cauae. 
The nuinhyr of deaths was 596 in 1001. The deaths in 1901 woro 
in the proportion of 7'66 in every 10,000 persons living, against 
7"56 in the previous year. 

Figures for ten yfiars are quoted, showing that the total nuruber 
of deaths from this disease for 1898 was the highest recorded during 
the deceimiuui. though the rate hod been sUghtly higher in uome of 
the previous years. 



YMf. 



IB^-i 




less 




189i 




1805 




lew 




IH97 




1898 




lfi<)9 




1900 




1801 





Daktu* iroin 
I'hlliiaia. 

. SU 

S16 

. 576 

653 

. 528 

. S96 
. 897 

5oa 

877 
. 096 



IteM par iQ.aco. 

8-16 

818 

7-99 
7-40 
8i6 
811 
7-91 
7-» 
7-fl8 



363 



H8W KRACAMD OnriCUL YBAR-ROOR. 



In Australasia the rate is materially increased by tl>« deaUliw 
of persons who have come out either alreafly suffering from phthisis 
or predisposed thereto. Tliere is uo reason for belieriog that (his 
circumataDce has more eETect on the iloath-rate in Australia than 
in New Zealaiiil ; eu that the lower rate referred to in previous 
issues of thiH work as ohtainin^ in this colony may be taken as 
proof of the euperiority of its climate for withstandinR consumptive 
tendencies. 

The death-rate of Knfrland and Wales from phthisis, thoi^h 
declining, is far higher than that of New Zealand. In 1699 it stood 
at 13-36 per 10.000, 

Phthisis is now known to bo and is Created as an infectious 
prevontihlo disease caused by the bacillus tuberculosis, which is 
communicable in nmny ways. Certain constitutions are far more 
predisposed than others to receive this bacillus, especially under 
conditions of life uDfavourable to robust health, when a nidus is 
fornierl for the development of the bacillus. 

From other foriiig ot tuberculosis the deaths in 1901 were 179. 
or 230 per 10,000 of population. Thus a large addition has to be 
made to the deaths from pLtliisis to appreciate the full mischief 
done by tubercular dibuase. 

Deaths from all Tubercular DisroKt. 
The mortality from all forms of tubercular disease, tAken to- 

f [ether, has been at the average rate of about 10^ persons per 10,000 
ivtng for the last ten years. This rate ia far loner than that which 
obtained in England dtiring the year 1897, when the proportion was 
19-30 per iO.CKK) living, 

A table is supplii-d showing the results for each of ten years in 
New /(jealand. Besides the death-rate from tubercular diseases, it 
aUo shows the percentage of deaths by tubercle to those from all 
eaiisvH. which was from lO to 11^ per cent, for the deceuuial period 
1892-1901. 



DBCB!nn*r. Tahlr, 1692-1901, sirowrao the Dbatb Ratr niou ToBEBcfA raa 

10,000 LiVIKO kXU PBBCKirTAOB OF TOTAT. DbaTBS, 



TMur, 


Vtwi 
rDpalatiOB. 


of Damtbi trtita 
Tuber cnlkT 


Ba(« par 10.000. 


fromkUCuiMS 


>HMI 


.. £4:1.245 


TIKI 


10-90 


10S4 


J|BM 


.. 661,340 


729 


11 -OS 


10-77 


lN4 


.. 679.196 


759 


11-07 


10-87 


ie95 


692,417 


701 


10-99 


11-09 


ia9s 


70fl.iM6 


(U)0 


9-62 


10-57 


leoT 


.. 731.009 


763 


10 5" 


1157 


tsos 


736.900 


769 


10-44 


lo-ea 


1899 


.. 74y.9a4 


795 


10-60 


lO-Sfi 


1900 


7li3.594 


7&fl 


9-Bfi 


lU-44 


iWl 


.. 777,968 


77ft 


9-96 * 


10-16 




l>WnHnUL Tahle. 189^1901. — DaittliH from vftnoni Tubrroutthc DlKOftMS 
mgtohred la New Ze&lftnd, speolfying tha Mumbot under and over Five 
Yeftis ol Age. 



TMT. 



Tubvraulu 
Poritanilia. 



Tiibprculur 

McniuEitia. 

AmiM 

Brdrooephklui 



M 

sl 






IBSS 

teoa 

LS9i 
ISOfi 
18M 
1807 
1B98 
1899 
1900 
1901 





47 


IS 


.. 


3S 


u 




S6 


IS 


.. 


47 


16 




86 


11 




86 


9 




87 


IS 


.. 43 


19 


.. 30 


20 




80 


SS 



as 

as 

38 

ss 

80 
88 
37 
83 
24 
30 



SH 



PbLfaidt. 






32 
91 

ao 

37 

aa 
3a 

98 
40 
05 
91 






OCbtr Form I 

TabeecolOBti. 
ftaiofula. 









Toul D»ttifl 
from 

Tiibprcnimia 



II 



ir 

'3 



S16 16 
587] 81 
5m 16 



548 SS 

a , S18 19 

T I fi89 18 

087 11 

088 19 

56i 



9 



586 U 



SO 
49 
48 
S8 
83 
«S 
37 
96 
47 
5S 



104 
97 
92 

108 
W) 
88 
95 
97 
66 
84 



696 
S32 
GGO 
6&6 
590 
675 
674 

686 
691 



700 
719 
7S2 
761 
680 
768 
769 
7flfi 
7S8 
775 



It will be seen that the term "tubercular dieeast^ri" includeit 
" phthisis, " " tftbes nieseiiterica," " tubercular peritouiiis," "tuber- 
cular tneningitis, " " ac a te liydroeephal ua , " with other forms of 
tuberc'jlosis {scrofula, io.). Of these the mortality from phthisis, 
forms by fai* the greatest part of the whole. Thus, iu 1901, there 
were 596 deaths from phthisis out of a. total of 775 deaths from all 
tubercular complaints. Of a9G deaths by phthisis, only 10 were of 
pereouB under hvu yeara of age. 

Exacnination of the next table, giving the full series of ages 
of persons who died from tubercular disease during the year lOOl, 
show* that of 62 deaths from tabes meseitterica, with tubercular 
peritouttis, 30 were of ciiildreu under 5 yeara. Also, that of Gl 
denthti front tubercular metiihgiiis, with acnte hydrocephalus, 30 
were of poreoiie under 5 years, and 21 from 6 to 20 years. Under 
"other forms of tuberculosis" (excepting pbthieis) th« greater 
numbers of deaths are at the earlier ages. 

The tnortiility from phthiaia ia hieavioat at 130-90 years, being 196 
deaths out of 506 of all agf^a ; but lari^e numhf ra are found in the 
colutnos as far as that for the ad^-anced term of 66 to 70 years, at 
which bhe> deaths for lUUl were IB. 



I 



864 



KBW ZBA£.A}ID OFFICUI. TEAB-BOOE. 



Table Bhowing the Nambrr of Dcitths from Tabcnmlar DIwwms rogU'ureil 
New Zealand during the Year 1901, arruigsd io Oroup* of Ag««. 

Persotu. 









J 


























ta 




i — 


i 

X 


►• 
































1 


3 

1 




1 




ID 

i 


d 


ID 


^ 


Si 


8 


si 


3 


9 


i 


i 


^ 


^ 


g 


^ 


^ 


D 

•n 


n , 


5 


1 


^ 


T 


2 


s 


2 


a 


s 


2 


2 


o 


s 


o 


S 


a 


S 


2 3-11 


r 


Q 


Q 


•n 


2 


2 


S 


a 


s 


^ 


S 


:d 


s 


a 


e 


a 


£ 


4 


TftbvB UoccntprloB. 


00 


30 


9 


3 


7 


4 


s 


I 




» 




J 














H4 


Tulj«rcul<u Poiri- 




















1 
















J 


tODltl* 








































Tubrruular Mealn- 


s 


90 


19 


G 


1 


a 


! 


s 


■•■ 


>.. 


•_ 


*>■ 


... 


„ 


1 


~. 


>'« 


M* 


■ m 


Bltli, AcaM Hydro- 








































oi>i>liklua 






































1 H 


plilhiAl* 


1 


ID 


a 


ti 


u 


110 


Kt 


en 


&H 


87 


ae 


N] 


»i 


as 


w 


< 


6 


s 


i^^l 


OUifr forms ol Tu- 


s 


)<< 


I 


E 


T 


17 


11 


s 


^ 


,. 


! 


J 


u 


1 


1 


—, 


... 




H^l 


berouloalii, Sero I ula 


18 


M 


30 


)« 




"i 










so 


as 


83 


» 


1 


e 






1 


TptalB 


IT 


tM 


7S 


04 


^ 


» 


a 


m 


vfl 



To show the mortality from tuberculoBi's iu various parts of the 
colony, a tikblu giving tho deaths in the various provincial (listricis Is 
added, vrliich, liowever, only shows thai, thu itiortality is cliscribated 
very much according to popultttioii. The deatlis in the North Island 
are, however, found to be "29 fewer than those for the South Island 
or 373 deaths and 40i3 deaths for iho&e divisions respectively : — 

TiDi-ic ahoirlDg (he Number ot Dtath* Crnm Tubsraulkr Djbbmm r0)t>*ter«d ll 
«Mh Proviooiat DiBlriet of N«w Z«»ie>ni da.?iiiK the Year 1901. 



Provlnolkl 


TabvB 
UaaontBrloa, 


Tubaraular 
Mod lug 111*, 


PhttilKln 


Otticr 

form* of 


Tola) DMIlM 

fro in 
Tabcnsolarfa 


Diitrlot. 


Tubxrcular 


Acuto 




Tnbarooloali, 




Parltonttji, 


HjidrocapliiUua. 




Hcrotula 


Auckland 


IS 


11 


12S 


10 


isa 1 


Taranab I 


1 


6 


21 


1 


a ' 


Hftkukc's Bay 


5 


8 


SO 


7 


41 


WcJIin^toQ ,. 


10 


la 


100 


Ifi 


146 


Marllioroiigli 


1 


, . 


4 


. , 


5 


KcUon 


3 


a 


37 


1 


34 


WesUaod . . 




, , 


U 


, , 


n 


Osntarburjr .. 


6 





118 


14 


lU-^ 


Utago 


14 


IS 


160 


18 


SIO^ 


ToMda .. 


03 


til 


GOG 


66 


775 



Eight deaths from "lupus" hava not been included in tbs 
comparative table for ten years. All these were deaths of adult 
persoua. 

The report of the Koyal Coiuiuissiou, presented to the Imparial 
Parliauiont aud dated •lili April, 1898, states that inquiry was mad* 
OS to what admiuistrative procedures are available) and desirable (or 
Goubrolitng the daugor to cnau through usiug as food the meat aod 





milk of tuberculous aniina.)R. Nothing was adduced to ruse ftay 
doubt as to the accurftcy of the opinion expressed at & previous 
ComnuDHion in iB9fi, that tubercular dioease in bovine And other 
aiiitiiala is identical with that in the bumao eabject, and couioiupic- 
able Iroiii oae to the other, uor doubt that any person who takes 
luburculoua nutltur iuLo the body aa food incurs risk of acquiring 
tuberculous diguuee. Buc the conclusioii aiiivcd at was that there 
has hviiii a tx-iidency to exa^(jcjratu the uxluuc of the risk arising 
from nieal, Deahng with the question of inilk-suppiy, the Commis- 
sioners say ;— 

Whatever clfgree of d&iij(*r may be Incurred by Hifl cciiBumptlon of tho n««fa 
ol tuberriilou* ftnimiilii, thrre oikti be liule doiiht tlint the carrerponding dnn({er 
in rpdi Oct of milk-supplj' h n fur grp&Ler oao. On this point ilio opinion o( the 
prrvloiin Knyftl ComnilaAion on lui eroiilo'-tH vriui Mtiphatii:: *' No doubt thelargOHb 
]i&rt of Iha LulwrLiuL'Kia whicli iiim) ubi>iiiii tbruuKb. fam {•hmI in by tiiaHtiH at aiilkc 
coiitftM>ir>8 tuberoulou* rnaicti." Id Ore&t BdMia atid Irelkiid o\»ml, »* a ni1«, 
is cookod bpfori il is entsn to an extent whiob ^oon larifoljr to ccBtroy Inlnotiv* 
IDihltcr. MiLIf, on Ibe ottirr band, i> Inrf^-oly oon«>iiTlMl Sn & in* «tnte, eopociklllf 
by cbiidrei), »iid il>er« Bxluta ft f(«n«rnl (lotAnto (or uooked milk am a, bevernge. 
Amongot moti roritinenial nationii tliv practice L' to MDme extent the opposite of 
tbi', Kiid Uree qu&niities of tno'ii, a-^ptoiaKy in the varioiiH (ormR ol a&uanciMV, 
am noiiHiimcd ntiRnhitoly law, wbile thr grraior pruportion <■( the milk in cookrd 
be'iiro GODHUtii|itiic]ri. It ban be«ii firuKtd uvfT ntiu uvtr Ui^ain Lhnb riiilk Irum 
tiib'TLuiouB U'id»ni, mil) ev^ii milk wbiob hae b'ou ("urpoeely ootitBtni'-atoi with 
tuborculcuti ninltrr, can h« rodvHd perfectly harriilo-i by beinK boikd lor oiia 
mliiutr^ — & method of «ii<rili-iiiirtn mhloh wa n«r<'e wiHh thi^ FdririF-r Cominisition 
in prrfrrnng ti^c (femr*) ap|ihi'at o<< to any ul tbe oibtr (jlan* (vhioh have betrn 
tropio)fi>t. Wg have air ady explained how untatmliictury lb the tiyiit«m of 
moat inapeotion in this coutitr;^ ; but ax refiarda milk, in rclutloii to tubcn-uloBiR, 
in*n*c(io>i I* siill morx »a; indeed, it may b* naid not to ^xiat. Elven local 
aulticrltieB, whu cii^rL thDiuKplvo lo (ireviiit tt>u sulv of tub- rculoue meat, are 
wittiDul BuCfioiarit powtn lo prevent the sole within chtir diBiriDtit of milk drawn 
from diMa^cd aovra. 

Legislative action has been recommended to safeguard the life 
and health of the people from tubercle ; and the complete isolation 
of consumptive patients, with the liisinfeclinK of their sputa, and of 
everythin;^ that iias be*.<ii iti contact with them, is suggested from 
time to time as a iieceseary measure. 

Cancer. 

The deaths from cancer during tho year 1901 were 515. There 
were more deaths of males than of fuuial^s, the nijiiilierH being, 
males 2t)6, fbinales, 260. The rate of mortality per 10,000 living 
was 662. The apparent increase in deaths from this disease is 
shown further on and compared with that of England. But the 
increase is not believed by all authorities to be a fact to the extent 
repregeo ted , but partly the result o( more careful certihcatiou of 
the causes of death, and of iiuprovud dia^uosis in casus of what is 
tunned inaceeiimble cancer. 

It is certain, however, that out of a total of 7.634 deaths from 
ail causes in New Zealand during 1901, 515, or 6-75 par cent., were 
caused by cancur. 




966 



KBW £BAl.A}iD OPFIOUL TBJUt-BOOE. 



The deaUi'r»t« froni c&Doer is not to great as that from tnbeivslw 
dweases, but is D0T«itb«le86 a most alarming matter, not onJj oo 
aeeouot of the nntnber of deaths, but becaose of its progrenn 
increase. 

A decennial table shows that the deaths per 10.000 pervoM tirim 
rose from A IS in 1892 to 6 62 in 1901 ; and thas wfaercss i'fl 
oat gf even- ICO deaths were attribatafaU to cancer tea ytmn 
the proponioD had grown to 675 last year. 

Tabls ■bowlac tor cwti ot tk* Tea Yun. 1893 to 1901. tha Kimtar if 
r erie as vpMtttd M bavtB^ I>»»a (ram GMcvr. lb* Pnfmctioa ol Dislh* 
bom OeaMC p« 10.000 Livug. and Um P«tccBt«fe of *1I pMtfes Mtil- 
bnMl to CaasH. 



Umm 



1MU 



>»]) 



TOUlOMthi 



'UM 



un 



1<06,M« 
TO .cot 

T49.K4 
TaS.SM 
Tn.BSi 



Me 

«n 

-SGS 
490 
S15 



e.u9 


4-Tr 


«.T«T 


b<'-i 


<.*ts 


6U1 


6.8M 


5SS 


a.isa 


5M 


•.9K 


S-4? 


T.»4 


e^o 


T.6B0 


c« 


T.SDO 


»4S 


T.CM 


»«S 





To exhibit how cancer affects the difierent pans oC the bamaa 
body in respect oi each sex. the experieaee of three yevB (1399, 
1900, and 1901) is shown id a sa(^ceeding table. Of any Bingle orKMi 
•ffaeted. the stomach is the ooe most liable to be the Mas of cancer 
atnocg males, although with this sex the diseaw is appareottjr to 
about the same extent located m the moDth, Hps, toa^e. and thniM, 
taking theae parts all toother. Next to the stomach, the lirer is 
with males mo part which is most often attacked, to JTidge by 
BHMTtalitT reconls, and next in order oo(d« tbe iatestinec aod rectum. 
Afierwmrds, bui at a ooDsiderable dtOano, ioUow the kidneys, 
Madder, aod orethia. 

Amonfu the females, the organs ol generatioo. ovkries, otenu, 
moA Ta^Ba. as a gToup, show by far tuoai cases of mortabiy fron 
esneer; bat, a* with the males, the stomach is. el any anf^ 
organ, the one most afiected. the ti\-vc couun|{ next, then the breast, 
•ad then the intestiaee and rectom. Females do not contract 
cauoer in the luouth (judgioK by tbe teiuros of d e a ths ), tonifae. lips, 
and throat, to neariy the same extent as prenuls aniou|{ inalsa. 
Whatever may be the caase, tbe ftgntcs mrv retuarkafate. being only 5 
out of every 100 deaths from cancer amoDg fagislf . n^sinst S8 am 
of evwT 100 of males dyinfi &om tbe saoM came. or. sspraaed in 
nmbeis, 99 deaths of feonues ojuun e d aeuasi 193 of malea. fmn 
«anoer in riw mooifa, Ao.. in a three y«an' experienes of tnortabty. 




OANOBK. 



S67 



Dk*tbs I'ROM CxxtKB, VriV9, IIKIO, »sji 1901. 

T&BL£ ebonin:g chs Number of Deaths at Males &nd PMn&Iea Irotn Cancer 
during the Yekra I89D, 1900, and 1901, clMuGcd Mcotding to the Put 
of ihe Body aflBcted. 



Pirt ABHti^, 



un. 



DCB,U». 



Pn>i I'll rt Ion 

of 
SpeiHfied. 



leop. 



IfiOI. 



Suriilicr Froiportinn iNnnibet 

of I of : or 

Uoalba. BpocUloe. Dekthe. 



Proportion 

of 
Specified. 



Val«f. 







Par C«Dt. 




PnCmt. 




Pot C«iit. 


Moutb, lip, tongna. 














IhroBt, neck, Ac. .. 


09 


27 J 8 


68 


Sl-78 


60 


24 09 


Stnmnoh . . . . 


9T 


86-71 


HO 


87 89 


97 


8992 


Inlenlinan, r«otum .. 


20 


6-44 


se 


12-lfi 


SS 


1317 


Liver 


« 


lS-68 


sc 


ii'ce 


87 


IS S3 


Kidnayi. bladder. 














urottarft. As. 


IT 


717 


g 


43) 


la 


5-S& 


Leg, toot, Ac. 


6 


a-58 


4 


I&7 






Dug 


2 


0-81 

inooo 


a 


093 


4 


1-64 




SS7 


S14 


100-00 


UB 


lOOOO 


Not speoified 


34 


■■ 


32 


-- 


33 


■■ 


To(ftJ« 


371 


.. 


846 


.. 


965 


.. 



Females. 



Moath, tooagne. 














throKt. &o. 


17 


9-71 


6 


8'7S 


6 


a -77 


Br^iwit 


30 


U-4S 


17 


loss 


SB 


17 51 


SlomBob 


40 


32'8fl 


2S 


lT-39 


61 


38 11 


Inioninrr. reotata .. 


M 


600 


ttl 


13 04 


19 


8 7C 


Kidney*, bluddtr .. 


4 


S-29 


6 


3!1 


Si 


0-92 


Ovary, oterua, vngiua 


50 


28 57 


54 


83-54 


55 


S5-3S 


Livtir 


25 


14 30 


'ii 


14-58 


39 


18*a6 


Gall-blBddor, aplcAii. 














pancroaa 


» 


1-71 


i 


1-S4 


i 


0-92 


Lung, spine, tbigh, 














ahouldsr 


-2 


M4 


3 


1-86 


6 


fl-30 




175 


lOOOO 


lai 


100-00 


21 T 


100 00 


Not Bpeoifled 


32 


■■ 


33 


•• 


dt 


■■ 


Toiiblii 


197 


■ - 


184 


.. 


am 


■ 



Coiiftidering the iiuinberH of peraotiH dying at the diRntoti age- 
periods, the following table of ten years' results showi- tha age ot 
f)0 VBant to be the time of life at whjcli deaths from cancer be^ia 
to lie numerous (ii, is really 35 for iiiale* and 30 for fetiiales). The 
maximum of deaths is reucbed at ibti period (30 to C5 fur ttmltis. and. 
55 to 60 for fcitialcs. These leaitu-ks are givcu without rofereiice to 
the Qutiibers oi pursous living at tht; various agus. 

Deaths fi'uiii cantfur. it will lii; observed, are very rare aiiioDg 
childreu under o yBu.rs, and not frequent in thoso above that age. 



Tlio increase since 1B81 ia well exhibited in respect of each sex, 
and in regard to the higher e.gea, which are the periods at which the 
most cancer deaths occur, by a proportional statement: — 

PaoroBTtOKS or Dkatrs frou Cancrr pkb 10,000 Mjii^Bfi akd Fskalxs 

LlVIttO AT THfiKB AgE-PBBIOIM. 

40 to so. tn to 60, m to 10. 

1H8I ,. ,. 658 990 .. IJIO 2257 .. 82 86 43 7S 

IWa.. .. 907 X659 .. 3164 26 09 .. B5 21 47 44 

The death-rates for cancer in respect of each sex are given for 
each of sereo years, selected to show the poutioa as from 1836 to 
1901:— 

Dkaths fbok Casckb is kvehv 10,000 Pbbsoxs op back Sbx uviho 
in New ZKAI.AND. 
V «*r. lUJi>. Femkl M. Yoftr. 

1866 .. .. S-60 3-67 Id^ 

1890 .. .. 4-72 4-79 lUOO 

1994 .. .. 666 5-27 1901 

1698 .. .. 6-77 5-98 

Up till 1901 the ntortality vtas higher among the uialea than among 
the f*Diale«. which in the revfirae of Enghgh expsrieuce, whore the rate 
was 6-73 per lO.OOO of males and y-77 nf femalus, tor the year 1899. 
In the United Knisdoin, howeyer. the rate of inorcaje is bo iimch 
higher amoujt: uiule^ than with femalfs that the liegistrar Geiitiral 
calculates equihbriuin will be reached in about the year 193'2, and 
thereafter the rale auioug malus would exceed the rate among 
females. The English rate for 1^99 is the highest recorded there 
(or each of the two sexeR. 

The increase in the numbers for the sexes together for England 
and New Zealand is represented in the proportions below : — 



Ualoa. 


PemaJiM. 


fi-as 


S W 


0X9 


5^39 


6-48 


a7T 



Deaths fhoh Cahusu m svcax lO.OOO Pkiisoks uvmo. 
YMtr, Kelt ZoalKud, KostMid. 

a 6& 
8-68 



IHSl 
1886 
1891 
1896 
1999 



4-66 
S&O 
6-34 



520 
S-90 
Ii92 
764 

e-s9 



The actual Qtimber of deaths of persons of either sex and all 
ages registered in New Zealand during the last eleren years was: 



1B91 
1802 
18^9 

181^4 

iBVJn 

189C 
1897 
1806 

u&g 

IBOO 

IWl 



Total 



154 
173 

188 
240 
2GB 
2(]5 
210 
aG3 
371 
246 
265 

2,433 




1 



1,970 



i.8S3 



I 



370 



KBW ZKAUiKD OrriVlAl. XKUt-UOOK. 



MOKTAIitTy PUOH DBVitLOfHtiXTAL DlSKUBS. 

The total of deaths froiu dovelopmeotal diseastis was 783, or 
10-05 per 10.000 pentODS Uviiig. The mortality from prematim biitfa 
vompnsvd 2G4 deaths, aud thai from atetectosis, oyaDosis, and iHbar 
cODgeQiUd defects 63 deatlis. The proportion of deaths froin pre- 
mature birth varies from 11 to 14 out of every 1. 000 births, and 
ibat from congenital defects from 3 to 3 per 1.000 births. Parti- 
euUn for six years exhibit the annual rates : — 



Tau. 



NlTMBIB Atn> EllOPODTIOHS fEB l.OOO BlBmS. 

DMkba frotn Prainaiutv HirUi. D«utaa (fvm 



uom 

1996 
IIS 
13 « 

18 (K 
II 13 
13-88 



«6 
SS 

» 
55 

63 



Roportloa 
2-47 
880 

sso 

2 91 

9-m 



StatJDg the result in another way, ther« was one death from 
premaUir« birth to ev«T>' IH births in 1901, and one death from oon- 
geniUi defect to everj' did births. In Bngiaud lh« proponioa <tf 
deaths from premature birth to every 1.000 births was as high as 
19-97 io the year ltJ99. 

Old Age. 

Deaths from old age in 1901 numbered 455, against 966 in 1900. 

MOBTALITT THOU LoOjLL DtSEASBS. 

DuatUs by diseases of the Derroos syeteta wsra 830, or 10-74 out 
of ttTery 100 deaiiis from all oaosa ii , and 10*54 out of erery 10,000 
peraoDS linug. Of ihe 630 deaths, U2 wer« creditod to apoplexy, 
111 to eonvulsioos, and 104 to inflammatioo of the brain and its 
membranes. Paralysis, including hemiplegiB and pvmlTsts of the 
insane, caused 169 deaths, sod locomotor ataxia 8 deathe. Para- 
plegia, wHh diseases of the spinal cord, caused 39. Deaths from 
nenrous diseases (exetadlng oonTulsionB of ehildten) numbend 709, 
or 911 per 10.000 personsliring. 

Diseases of the circulatory system resulted in 933 deaths, being 
19*33 out of every 100 from all causes, and 13-00 per 10.000 persons 
Uring. Of the total number in this order, eadocarditis and rafvolar 
d isea s e of the heart contributed 637 deaths. From angina pectoris 
there were 35 deaths, from syncope l*i9, from anaonam, 18; aod 
from other forms of heart d ia ea ae (hypertrophy, fatty degWMratioo, 
and pericarditis) 70- 

P icea seaof the respirmtoc^ system show 961 deaths, of which 781 
««« attdbutable to broochUas and poeumocMu Taken tcfgether. 
ifaese two oomplaiaks were the caass of more daaths than was 
p^^l>i>ic, and adding 48 from pleurisy, 38 bom eroap, 38 from laryn- 
gitis, and 96 from other rvsptratory diseases, the mortality m the 
order is fband to be 1385 per cent, of the total deaths, and 13-61 
per 10.000 of the population. 






HOfti-XTALB, ETC, 

Peatha from disoasss of the digestive syBbem also formed a, large 
proportioD of the wiiole <S 0^ per cent.), the number being 614. 
£ateritis was most fatal, sliowiiig 163 deaths, gastritis and liver 
diseases comiu'' nest with 96 deaths caoh. 

Of 284 deaths from diaeaaeB ot the urinary systora in 1901, the 
deaths from Briglit's disoaao of the kidiieyB (albuminuria) numbored 

Hi. 

Violent Deaths. 

Deaths by violeuue form a large item in the total mortality. In 
1901 the pro[x>rti[>n per lO.OOO of perHotiB living was 7*48, the total 
number of deatho liaviiif^ he.nu .W2. 

Of 462 males who died violent deaths, 66 were auicides. The 
deaths of females by violence were far fewer than those of males, 
amounting to J20, and out of thcac only 13 coniinitt&d auicido. A 
table givon previously states tho full list of deaths from oxtenial or 
violent causes for the yeoc 19Cll. 

Accidental deaths numbered 494. males 39'J and foraaica 102. Of 
the total male deaths, 188 resulted from fractures or contusions, and 
1'21 frotn drowning. Of the female deaths, 21 wore due to drowning. 

Hospitals, Lunatic .Asylums, Bknkvolknt AsviiUUh, and 

ChaUITABLK iNSTITt'TIONS. 

Hospitaii. 

Prior to tho abolition of provinces the hospitals of the colony 
were supported mainly out of provincial revenues. After that 
eveni the expenditure for hospitals was for the moat part charged 
against the. revenue of countiea and niunicipal corporations, until 
October, 1883. when "The Hospitals and Charitable Institutions 
Act, 1685," came into force. 

The portion of tho colony included within the three principal 
islands — the North, Middle, and Stewart Islands — is by the above 
Act divided into thirty hospital districts, each consisting of one or 
more counties with the interior boroughs, to be presided over by 
elective Boards, designatftd "Hospital and Charitable Xid Boards," 
The revenues of tiiese Boards accrue from the following 
sources : — 

(1.) Bents itnd profits of land and endowinenle ve«ted in the Board, 

or set apart for tlit.^ beiietil. of particular iustitutious ; 
(2.) Voluntary contributions ; 

(3.) Grants from contributory local uulhoritimj ; and 
(1.) SubsidieB from the Consolidated Fund (these being at the 
rate of lOs. for every £1 of bequests, but in no case ex- 
ceeding £500 in respect of any one beauest ; £1 4b, (or 
every Sil of voluntary contributions ; ana £1 for every £1 
reoeis'od from any local authority). 
The contributory local authorities (being the County and Borough 
Cooncils, and Boarda of road and town districta where tho Counties 




879 



VHVf SEA LAND OmOtAI. YEAR- BOOK. 



I 



I 



Aot in not in hrv.*-) ara «inpower«d by the Act to roiso by b 
rrbtfa tliti aniuunls ussc-Kse'l by the Hospital District Boartts as 
their proportionate contributions to tlie Hospital and GharitaUa 
Aul VuxiA. 

Tbfl District Boards andertake the ^nerat management and 
oonlrol of those hospitals that are not incorporatod in terms of 
tho Act. and an) rcquirod to conlributo to the support of the incor^ 
poriktei) hospitals. To be incorporaltid a hospital must have as many 
a« 100 ■ubaoribers, ountribiitiug not less than £100 annually by 
amounts of not less than Sh.. and must have been declared by the 
(lOVtirtior in Council, after receipt by him of a duly sij^ed petition, to 
Ihi a Ikxly [xiliiic ikttd corporate, under the government of trustees. 

Tht<n> ai-e 48 hotipilals in the colony, of which 22 are incor- 
poratetl institutions, wluU« '21 aru directly managed and controlled by 
Uisinct Lk>an1a. In 11K>1 these hospitals afforded accommodatioD 
(or 1,13^ male and 648 female patients, a total of 1,787. The number 
ol cubic feet of space included within the vralis of all the sleeping- 
wanis was d,629,6U*J, which g%VQ an average of 1.416 cubic feet to 
aack bed. 8,596 wales and 4,309 females were admitted as patients 
daring th* yaar 1901. and 764 male and S37 fuinale patients wete 
inniatw at iho end of the voar. Th« total number of indoor patients 
daring iha ymr was 13.H}9— via.. 9.301 males and 4.50d females. 

Outdoor relief was also given to a ver\' large QuttiL>L-r of perwtos ; 
but. as in aome of ibe faos|l>tftls no records are kept of the ontdoor 
(wiient*. It is irapoasible to Slate the number of distinct persons who 
t«(«ivt«d Mich relief, 

Ttte total revenufls of the various hospitals as at five diOiereiit 
Annual periods were : — 



— 


m^ 


wm^ 


m^\m^m^mm^ 


TslMtlaiy eMMtSbotieM aa4 W 






M 

u.an 


M 


t.V> 


f^WiMa If |MdMa« 


■AsaaAleaal 






u.«es 
mjtu 


16,308 

as .008 


tT.OIt 


lkM..^.SbKMi 


■ a 4 a 

Ma 


s^jn 


»,«t 


Km^ 


ft.fllT 


111. Ill 


T«te 


n.tm 


««.«■» >a».«» 


loo.eoe 





LUNATJO ASVbUHB. 373 

Btiturua were received (roiii uiaotoen beaevoleut asylums (not 
inciudiiig orphanages) , estabtUhcd For the suppDrt of indigeat 
persons. The iminbtir of inmiitus iu thami iuiiUtutione at the end 
o( 190i was 1.167, of whom. 698 were males and 469 females. Out- 
door relief was given by three of these iitstitulions to 1.861 poraoiiB 
(including 1,096 children). 

Ajtekland Sailors' Home. 

There is a. Sailors' Home at Auckland for tho uao of seafaring 
men resident in or visitinfj tho town. Tho lato Edmund Gostley 
having left a large sum for cliaritable purpoHcs, it was reaolved to 
employ the bequest in bmldiriK and endowiuft »n institution where 
sailors might be received without distinction of race or religious 
belief, and board, lodging, and refreahmentn provided for them, 
lo);;ether with such tuatruction and amusements as might t^nd to 
promote their aucial conifort and ffenerat welfare. 

The Home, built iu lBfj7, has room for 35 iutnates, who are 
ctiar^jed Ids, a week for boanl and lodging. It is managed by a 
council of eight members elecl&d by the Bubscribers to the iuHtitu- 
Cion. Tlie late Primate of New Zealand, who first originated the 
Bchcme, has been Life President. 

Orphan Asi^lums. 

There were id 1901 four orplian asylums in the colony, one uiain- 
tainmi by a District Hosuitol Board, one by the Church of England 
authorities, and two by clergy of the Roman Catlioliu Church ; three 
of them receiviuj^, at the charge ol the State, orphan, destitute, and 
ether children cotnmitt^ed to them by a Stipendiary Magistrate. 

Exclusive of the children so committed, 12, mate and 25 female 
orphaQK were received during the year 1901, and 49 male and 84 
female orphans remained as inmates a^the end of the year. 

Orphauagea receiving committed children are. for that purpose, 
constituted " industrial schools." 

Lttnalic Asyltinu. 

There are neven public lunatic asylums in the colony, inaintaiaed 
wholly or in part out of the public rovenac. There is also one 
privacu asylum, licensed by the Governor for the receptioa of 
lunatics. 

The amount of sleeping-accommodatiou provided in each of tho 
public BBylums ia shown in tabular form, giving separately the 
number and cubic contents of the sleeping-rooms intended for one 
pernon only, and of the dormitories occupied by several inmates 
conjointly, together with the number of patients actually in the 
Asylums on the Slat December, 1901 : — 

25— Year-book 



J 



S74 



XBW KKALAKD OPriCIXL TKaK-ROOK. 





aiMpliig-iooautor Ob« Ptnoti mlr- 


Pa»oii> 








tiicmkiM 






InitMMa 




i 


NiunW 


(I'^Uetila) 
on 


hnmbM 








of Cubic Past. 


niM D*cMabBr. 


ofCaUerMt, 


HatI>w^nMlMi 






IWI. 


X 




'ST^ 


Anvklftnd 


18S 


119.1180 


138 


25 


9S9,«7S 


881 1 


\V<>l]ii)|iU>u .. 


77 


?2,A00 


77 


16 


100,178 


173 1 


puriruft 


ce 


GS.aiT 


68 


14 


807.612 


439 


HatBoti 


9S 


39.398 


88 


14 


60. na 


101 


U^ltilr* 


81 


S3. 923 


81 


6 


e0.8i» 


«1 


MjliWhnrt*' 


«) 


69.G51 


60 


84 


S97,01O 


166 


^eiur 


176 


137,734 


ITfi 


46 


98S,S8S 


46B 


ToUlB ., 


«« 


617. B43 


eos 


\Si 


1,808.883 


8.100 



I 



Al Afthburn Hall, Waikari, there are 66 rooms, each for oae 
p«raoD odIv. wiih an A^ynrgaie cubic conutni of 64.913 ft. Tbe 
Biimb«r of iMtiicDis on the 31st December. 1901. was 11. 

At tb« ena of 1901. 1,634 male and 1.098 female padent* (id- 
eluiltng 90 out on trials vrere uD<ier the care of the Mylsm officer* 
of tbe e<^oy. Of tbese, 1.536 males and 1,001 feiiMle* were re- 
gu4«d M incarable, 11 males and 9 females were oot oa trtal, and 
S? Dkalea au>i K^ (etuales were supposed to be curable. 188 male 
and 117 female paueiiu were diaeluLrged dtiring the }Tar. 

Tlw following shows the proporuon of iosane — or. xmtb«, «i 
JBiiw^nn ol hmatie as^'lmue and ihoee out on trial — u> tlie popoia.- 
tioa <««dBisiTe in each cAse of Maoris) at tbe end of the 



18M, 1 xmrnam Hnoo lo 




uae. 


>M 


ISSA. 


ae 




ISSC^ 


M8 




MSI. 


ns 




IMS. . - 


SIS 




use. 


8BB 




UM. 


aw 




IMBk 


asB 




nut. 


m 





u 



th» 



bM be orerioofced tkMtlw 
tM tbe asvlaBie of 
MOI |veftny be tnen. 
fall— atkia as lo haai t. exuacted 
««Mt. «iB be kvd e« p^L IK and 366. 

Os-sr, Dumb, axb Buitik 
PutsMUn wlii^ so <be Asei, kmm\^ — d 
al last casMB. an icteved «» OB 1^ 9St%o96ft 



ittouh aadotben, wbo 



tbe 



* 

-4 






i 






I 



SECTION XIX,— AGRICDLTUBE. 

Uktil 1895 the a^jrienltural statiBticH were collected and coinpiled 
by the KegislrartJcneral, uiuiei- amlmrity at "Tlio Census Aot, 
1877,*' aiinuully in the inoinli of Fnbniary, except in census years, 
when the collection was made with the enumeration of the people. 
Under thin Act BtatiMticH of the acreiif;R in ^rasA an<l in all kinds 
of cultivation were taken ; and. at the same time, the estimated 
yields of all the principal crops were obtained from the farmera 
themselves. 

By the Agricultural and Pastoral Statistics Act, passed in 1896, 
the duty of collectui^j the rcLurue devolved upon the Departn^ent 
of Asriculturo. The pku tiuw adoplfd under the Act of 1895 i» 
sixiiilar ta that used in the United Kingdom, the account of land 
l&id down in crop beini^ made up uiuch earlier than formerly, 
while estiiiiateH of produce are made after the results of threshing 
are known. 

Statistics of the land in cultivation wore accordingly collected in 
October. 1901, and an interim return of the compiled results was 
published tn detail in the Neio Zealand Gaietle of the 19th December, 
1901, while the correrted acreages under each deBCription of crop 
were made public on the Gth March following. A Kuinmary of the 
particulars then yiveii is shown in the acconipunyinR tablsB. with 
the finally corrected siatvuienle oE yield of the prmcipa) n.rops ; 
but, in coijiparing these Dj^ures with the rettults obtained in former 
years, it must be reniembered that, under tti« u«w Act, stutivtics of 
ibe acreage and crops of land held and cultivated by Maoris are 
included; whereas previously information about the farnliu^ carried 
on by Maoris was obtained only when a census of the Native race 
was taken. 

Full roniarlcs on the progress of agriculture in New Zealand, in 
resp&ct of all its features in detail, are supplied by Mr. Murphy, of 
ChrJatchureh, in the special article devoted to the subject, which, 
appears as the first of Section II., in Part HI. 



g 



376 



XKw ZBALUID orncuL tmui-hooK. 



I 



i^x" 



m-May 









i 



f 



3 I 



r t i 



8 9 
« 3 



8 3 

8 M 



!l 



■•J»V 
PHtJl 



■Mil 



IBIS 



:■ & 



si b ft i s s ^ I i 



*'t 



a s A 



55S?5I SE 



•• •O M 



D| -U9V 

»dp(«ii 



ai>«i9v 
ndptoix 



3 I 



MM 

S I R Z 



M 



« § 9 

e ft K 



<a « « 



S E S I 
a - • 



§ 3 



3 9 S 



I S S 9 






^n 



S I £ £ i 6 " 



A 1^ -• 






E i t I i 



I I I I 



•a — 

3 1 

-« H K 



f 



J fr ■ 



" B Z ° 



niiiH 



378 



NEW ZBALAKD omCIAL YKAH-HOOE. 



AOfWAOK DSDSS 8oWV OhASSBK, AMD CdLTIV'aTIOX OEMB&AU.T, rO% MAOE 

Conrrv, a« ox tiu ISrn Octobbb, 1901. 



OcMUItUk. 



In Bom 

QrMMM, 



In Sown 

not 
prvvlmnly 
ploothad. 



tABd 

brakMi 
but Dot- 
Crop. 



TMftl 



'T. 




Mongonti) .. 

httj of i«iftDds 

HokiaiigK .. .. 

Rodnoy 
WlinjigAMi 
Oumaivft . . 

&ob»on 

Edea 

Maaakau .. 

Or>romiind«l 

Thunaa 

OhineuiucI ,. 

WAikatc .. 

lUglfeD 
WupK 

Pikko 

K«wliiA aud WmI 

T»ujw 
Eaot Taupo Mid 

llotoruK 
TAvirangA .. 
WliftkAians 
■Opotikt 

WAIKpU 

Cook 
Vfairtn 
Eawkc'B B«7 
P&t*ng*iA . . 

WMipAWR .. 

Clitloa 

Tuviftki . . 
Stratford . . 
Hawsnb 
Pmok 

WAJtoUn . . 
WMigAnni .. 

lUDgltllMi 

Otonb 
Ki«>it«a 

PolnkngiriA 
UannwRtu 
BorowUeouK 
Htiti 

Wnimrftpti South 
MA-t« tt>ii .. 



AorH. 

8.970 

708 

6.441 

936 

ia.67a 

21 ,01 6 

7.1W 

1,067 

19,SS8 

15,51^ 

106, 4&3 

a. 117 

4,G0J 

5.718 

180,143 

l«,8d9l 

61.4^<) 

131 .(M9 

Id. HSU 

4. SSI 

27.009 
B.OW 
11. M7 
1S,6.'>3 
88.417 
24,ir.8 
30e.7'.'S 
81,278 

11.973 
68.069 

i.eoo 

47.111 
4&.8Cd 
88, (HI 
17.140 
61.271 
17.3<W 

8.3AI 

S70 

46.6l.t 

4,4»5 

T.imi 

64.944 

ay,f.<7 

8,880 



Aeni. 1 Acmi. 

iO.VJS 861 

4,UG2 2 

iS.m 184 

19,496 .. 

87.666 868 

88,660i 196 

61,08£ ao7 

67.684 TM 

39.426' 1,890 

4,3541 64 

89.1311 6,806 

13.336; 27 

8,4861 &t 

8.108: 36fi 

16.0-20 1.U82 

76.41)1 T'J 

8.866 223 

A6.99T 2.0.Ma 

64,676 461 

0,031 301 



7.5fi3 

10, i.->o 

156. 07U 
462,203 
271.G75 
SS3.14ft. 
Wi0.tl76 
S7i.9'l5! 

16,038; 
144,076 
150.808' 
146.792 
114.170 

77.0«» 
lG9,fV4:» 

160,700 

141..¥J'J| 

7'J.688l 

01.4Sij 

9H.0I9 

lfl7.744l 

37!>.7'W| 

aw, 1071 

89,«4U 



412 
21W 



Aorw. 

1,968 

488 

744 

850 

1,868 

9.956 

540 

1.018 

i.9C8 

9.650 

18,386 

172 

6->4 

1,737 

10,180 

8.074 

19,9113 

:29,SSiV 

3,611 

644 

8.067, 
3,1961 
3,l»98l 
t.8l9 
6.6W 
9. 678 
16.U8T 
a.44>& 
8,678 
1.U61 
6,981 
1.988 
7.1771 

4.e7a 

a.iiil 

a,7&a 

14.751: 

19.719! 

9.3H1 

491 1 

19.018J 

a.OfiS! 

l.RJI'l- 

18,447, 

1I.6»7| 

859i 



46 



596 
906 
604 
979 
194 



68 146 



I.( 



AaKt CULTURE. 



379 



AorRaoe umdeb Sows Gbahskb, stc, — e*?ntiHv4(i. 



P 



i 



Count !«. 


In Sown 

Oruui. 

■ftar 

b«en 

plOOSlMd. 


Id Sown 

uot 
provloilsly 
plough «d. 


liKaH 
bT«k«a 

up 
bUIBOl 
aadmr 
Crop. 


Tol»l 

mid or 
Crop, 


s 
o 

a 


4 


4-1 . 

S3 

s » 

it 

* a 




Aorofl. 


AoriM. 


Aores. 


A arm. 


Aer*8. 


AoToa 


AoreH. 


Afeitio 


528 


107,193 




122 


74 


se 


80 


Pahiatna .. 


730 


135. 7S1 


go 


1,111 


130 


249 


68 


Eli«l»hai)ft 


m 


S1,bii 


7 


3TC 


48 


73 


7 


KiLnriooville 


15 


3&.144 


4 


181 


17 


89 


6 


Mu.riboroiixh 


5B,74J 


131,666 


574 


26,55H 


163 


28S 


i,r«8 


Souodi 


2.981 


96.207 


S2 


1,191 


68 


121 


24 


Eftikoiira . . 


3y,fiJ7 


3v.«7a 


96 


3,944 


27 


32 


48 


Unllingnood 


9, MS 


3n.C47 


14 


1,160 


te 


270 


7 


WkimoM . . , 


39.830 


MI4.290 


186 


21 .-288 


-272 


2. 2021 238 


BulUc 


791 


7,047 




134 


58 


146: .. 


InangAhuA ,, 


i,cm 


27.734 




8HH 


8 


75 a 


Amuri 


5S,a63 


8a,4IG 


46 


8,607 


SO 


3? 1,072 


OliDvioc 


24.i>79 


2.111 


1 


7. 54 'J 


78 


65 302 

67 4 


WentJiiiid .. 


4,759 


28,818 


52 


rt04 


87 


Grey 


3.5m 


20.1,12 


23 


»ri2 


24 


&o! 6 


Asbloy 


257,527 


13().H50 


1,325 


81.»61 


6KS 


4731 2,327 


Salwyn 


3L0.42T 


22,1S2 


1,779 


133,581 


1,346 


1,260 ^.316 


Akurcw 


86,736 


1S5.22U 


, , 


3,U02 


UU 


1176 37ft 


AflHburton 


431,480 


19.787 


l.Ml 


161 ,444 


6.13 


30*. 9,776 


Oeraldliia . . 


120,458 


11.803 


089 


67.944 


24ft 


239 1.840 


LovoU 


86.319 


2,HU4 


456 


41,1»>2 


389 


253 l.OOT 


WaimAta , . 


205, »H0 


i7,aJ7 


3.376 


80.409 


670 


143 662 


MaokatiKta 


A5,601 


3,972 


244 


115,749 


61 


3?f 624 


Waitaki .. 


199.890 


28,848 


2,872 


61.878 


404 


27&I 1,149 


Waihemo .. 


84.526 


4,383 


400 


9,586 


87 


68 


144 


Walkouaid 


ai,air> 


fil,282 


92 


«,7'J3 


118 


119 


102 


Peninniil* ., 


3.:iT9 


11.901 


6 


1 ,5.'j4 


253 


42 


00 


TVieri 


7U.967 


15.439 


1.968 


26.010 


667 


881 


621 


Bruoe 


103,273 


7.075 


888 


38,824 


165 


72 


sao 


Clutha 


' 177,323 


30,361 


998 


51,9^15 


347 


173 


497 


Timpokit . , ., 


102,503 


22.600 


1,SS6 


SS,S«2 


137 


S40 


133 


Maaioiuto . , 


44,4f53 


lO.GtiB 


882 


18.214 


206 


16 


330 


Vinodzit 


21,384 


1,820 


3,140 


12,350 


124 


304 


76 


Lako 


10,777 


5,375 


3,685 


11,000 


133 


94 


157 


Southland . . 


Ma, 358 


50,784 


10,350 


180.737 


900 


954 


904 


Wiillft4j« andPJotd .. 


153,108 


aa.SiK 


1,367 


64,857 


264 


96 


266 


Btowart laUnd 


81 


344 


■• 


9 


10 


5 


3 


Total .. 


4.6Q&,200 


6,024,978 


55,047 


1,497,846 


17,684 


26,896 


43.770 



^ yow 



The extQDt of Unfi in ouUivatiori (inoLudiag sown gi-nssos a.ad 
land broken up but not under crop) aniouoted to 13.12H,'191 acrag, 
Of this area, land uudor aitifieiii,! grosses comprised 88'51 per cent. ; 
land under graio-crops, i-H^ per cent. ; land under root and groon 
crops, 5-89 per cent. : land in f,'arden and orchard. 0'34 per cent. ; 
mod land in fallow, 0-43 per ceut. Full details for th<! iatit fifteen 
years ore tabulated. 



] 







III "^ 

kn 



s s s 

■* I- d 



3 r- t- •-< n a S 



09 CO BO OS ^ ^ ^ ^ 



•e (O » «o « 



01 m v} n « r4 
e 2 t^ S « S 



e4««eco(9n««Qv 



2 g 




a)QM9i(nw>Q*ot*' 



i s s s s 



I 



Wheat. 

The wheAt harvest of 1902 showed &n avcrago yield of 24*76 
bushels per acre, the crop realised beiiig 4,046,539 bushels, a^aiosG 
6,527.154 bushels iu 1901. 8,581.b9e bushels in 1900, 13,073.416 
basbuls iu 1B99. 5,670.017 bushels in 189B. 5.926,523 bushels in 
1B97, 6.843,768 bushcU in 189G. 3,613,037 bushels in 1895, 4.891.695 
bushels in 1894, 8,378,217 buBbtils iu 1893, and 10.'257,738 bushels 
in 1892. 

The quantity of wheat of last season's harvest held by faruK^rs 
in October, 190i, as shown by the gazetted figures, was 3,182,007 
bushels, an ftinotiut which excludes stocks of gram and flour held 
by merchants aud millers. The total amount of wheat exported 
during iho year 1901 was 2,301,092 buahols, while the imports 
were only 1.662 bushels, most probably for seeding purposes. 

The imports of flour during 1901 were 615 centals (30} tons), 
and the exports 1,305 tons. 

The area vniJer wheat for tbrc'shin^ decreased from 206,465 acres 
in 1901 to 163, -162 acres m 1902 ; and this decrease of 43,003 acres 
wftfe shared by all the jjroviijcial districts. Iu addition to the area 
cut (or threshiijR, -154 acres were cut for chaff, and 14 acres for 
ensitai'e. while 3,514 acres were fed down with stock, so that the 
total area sown in wheat was 167,474 acres. 

Of the 163,462 acres in wheat (for thrushiug) this year, no 
lees than 119,531 acres were in Canterbury, aiid 31.931 acres in 
Otu^o. 

The area under wheat for grain, the estimated gross produce 
in bushels, and the average yield per acre for each of the last twelve 
years wcro : — - 



^P 'tm7. 


Lsijil under 

WtlMt. 




Atw«« 

TWd 

per Acroh 


1 


Aor«», 


14uiili(^1i. 


BuibvU 


^tSM 


aOl.460 


A, 733, 6m 


18*90 


^ IBM 


*Oa,i73 


10.257,738 


9fi» 


laM 


381, 2i6 


fl„37a,ai7 


ai-06 


UM 


342,787 


4,891,695 


2015 


l»S 


148,675 


8,613.037 


Q4'Sa 


1886 


•24&,*il 


6,8*3,768 


27 88 


1897 


2dd,608 


&,0S6,fi9» 


3S93 


U"" 


3i5,801 


6,670,017 


17 '96 


■4flM 


800,034 


18.073,416 


33-76 


^i«on 


369. TdQ 


8. Ml, (198 


8) -81 


ItOl 


S06.-165 


6,fi27,lM 


31*61 


K atns 


163,463 


4,046.089 


M-78 



363 



HBW Klt&LAHU OITPIUUL VKAU-BUOK. 



The following gives the area in wheat and the estiinated produce, 
ior [ha Austi-ailan Slates, for the season of 1901 :— 



Btato. 


Wbtatrerop. 


QueeuBlatid 
NewEJouch Wa)«b 
Viotoriii 
South Aiutmlis 
Wettcm AiulrsJia.. 
TMirnADiA 


Acre*. 
79.8IM 

i.iia«j.ooi> 

a. 017, 831 
1.813,347 

74,iau 
si.sa& 


1,194,088 

1G.17.H.7T1 

17.647.881 

II.3.S8.I4H 

774,176 

1,110,421 


Bufllwla 
per Aora. 

16 OS 

XOfl? , 
6-66 4 
6-88 ' 

Il>44 

2143 



Consumption of WJteat. 

The yearly ooDsuiiiptioii of wheat per head of population in Nov 
Zealand, as prfviously slated, has been eatimaled at 6 butihels. 

The didiculty of correctly computing the con'iuiiipcion ol 
4>read-Btufrs is shown by the great <liffereiices in the eaiiniaiea 
arrived at. 

The arernge quantity required per head of the population (exola* 
aive of that used for seed} has been caUndnted at (i'4 buahels for 
New South Wale», and 4^ to o bushels for Victoria, by statiatici&as 
in those States. 

The average consumption of wheaten bread-stuffs in New Zea- 
land thus appears to be somewhat higher than in Victoria. 

The following is the average annual cousuuiptioii of who&t per 
lohabitant iu some of the principal countries of the world : — 

UniMd Kliigdom .. .. .. .. tO bu«boli. 

Canada .. .. .. .. ..6-0 

Frnnro .. .. ,. 8"1 

Rormany , , . . SK) 

Kunftia .. .. .. .. .. S'l 

Italy 54 

Utiitad SUles .. .. .. 4'S 

The Eughbh cunBuiuption during the last twenty-five years appears 
to have ranged from 6^ to 6 bushels per huad oE population. 

Oats. 
The extent of land in oats grown for grain in 1902 was 405,924 
acres, againat 449,5.14 acres in the preceding year, a decrease^ of 
43.610 acres. The Pravincial District* of Otago (199,38^ acres) 
and Caulerburv fl(>4,y69 acres) account for 364,251 acres of the 
total area, Wellington taking third place with 21,786 acres. The 
breadth of land iu oats for cuaHinK- ensilage, or feeding down with 
stock was 1^9,60H acruB, an mcrease of ill, 001 acres od the figures 
for 1901. 



AOBICULTUKB. 



3B8 



Tho average yield per acre wm, in 190"2, 37-06. and in 1901, 
43'45 bushels, the quantity oi produce docroasing from 19,085,837 
iiushelti to 15,(H5,233 bushels. 

Th« oat-crop for 1901 in the Australian StaUs was as follows : — 



QoooDsland .. 
New Soutb Wnim 


Avrvi. 


BuhIihI* 
7.HS5 




Viotoha 
South Aivitr»liA 


.. 97,988 


LI,383,3B!2 


18 09 


WaBtero Aualraiin 


6.881 


dG.OTI 


U-79 


TcMinatiia 


.. 4&.073 


1.40B,91b 


ai-st 



»Maiie. 
This is a very important crop. In 1902 there wure 12.503 acree 
■JfB^TD for grain, the escimatod yield being 671.884 bushels of corn, an 
Average of nearly 46 buftheU per acre. Maize ia grown only in 
the North Island, with the exception of a few acres in Nelson 

t-aiid Otaj^o. Th^ Provincial District of Auckland had I1,46H acres; 
(Hawke's Bay, 66G acres; Taranaki, 177 acres; and WelUnf^ton, 
IB'i oeres, in 1902- As consiu^rable interest is taken in this crop, 
the group of couutujs whec« it Is chiefly grown is otftteii, viz.: 
Hobsoii, Maaukiui, Ohiuenuiri, Kodnwy, Whnntj;arei, Mougonui, 
HokiHtiga. Tauruii^u, Whukaliiitt!, Oputiki, Waiapu, (yuok, Wuiroa. 
and Hawke's Bay. Hiiiall acreii>^e» are found in all ihe couiiciij<i oi 
the Auckland, and in inotit of the couiilieH in the Taranaki, llawlie'b 
-Bay, and Welhnjjton districta. 

BofrJey. 
tTnder hariey, '2Ct,t}li acres were returned in 1903, the estitnaied 
■crop being 855,993 bushels, an averajje yield per acre of 32 98 
bushels. In 1901 the area under barley was 30.S31 acres, and the 
yield 1,027,651 bushels, or 33 33 bushels per acre. 

There were 1,090 aurea in rye, yielding 27,2.10 bushels, or at the 
iratB of *35 bushels per acre, in 1902, rvgainst 1,368 acres and 
31,169 bushels, tiie rate being 29-45 bushels per acre, in 1901. 

^P Peas and Beans. 

The Area under peas (or threshing iti Llm season 1902 was 7,242 
iftcreSi yielding L<34,T12 bushels, or au avurage of 22S^ bushels per 
acre, against 5.UHB acres and 214,211 bushels, or 36'38 bushels per 
.acre, in the previous year. 

Under beans there were 3,504 acres, giving a return of 88,905 
fbushuls, the average being 25-65 buahela per acre, against 1^,927 
acres and 99,964 bushela (3420 bushels per acre) in 1901. 



I 



k 



•J 



8M 



NRW ZKAEjIMD OrVICIAL TKAA-fiOOK. 



I 




Potatoe*. 
The area under pocatoe» was 31.259 acres in 1903, yielding tbo 
..return of 206, 81d tons, or a. rate of 6-61 tons per acre, against 
J,5S4 acres in 1901, and 169.042 tons (or 09 tons per acre), an 
increase of 9,735 acres and 37,773 tons. 

A cornparison of ttie ^ros» yiekl of potatoes with the amount 
exported in eitch of the twelve years. 1883-94, showed that for each 
period an average of 597 lb. per heat! of popalation was retained io 
the colony. Allowing for waste, pi^-feed, and seed, the average 
amouat retaiDed for human consumption was iouud to be 449 lb. a 
bead. 

Turnips. 

Tamips and rape fonn a most iinpon-ant crop iu a sheep-breeding 
country such lis New Zealand, and in 1892 the htpr. of Lemd under 
this crop arnountftd to 422,359 acres. The returns (or 1895 gave 
only 385,788 acres, but for the present year 521,842 acres {398,fi0ft 
acres in turnips and 1'23.334 in rape) were set down as under these 
crops ; and there were 10,448 acres in addition : in mangolds (8,349 
acres), hcet (-016 acre^i), and earrois {1,684 acres). 

The cost of growing turnips sown broadcast and in drills may 
be: Broadcftflt — Ploughing, 5s. 6d. per acre ; han-owing, Ss. per acre ; 
rolling, Is, per acre ; seed and sowing, is. 6d. per acre : total, lit. 
per acre. Dnll— Ploughing, 6s. fid ; (^rubhing, 33. ; harrowing, Ss. ; 
rolling, Is. ; drilling, 3b. 6d. ; haud-ha.-ing, 10s. : horse-hoeiug, ds. : 
•eed and sowing, 2s. 6d. ; manure. 10a. to Ids. : total, £2 3s. 6d. tO' 
£S 8ti. 6d. per acre. 

Mopa. 
I'here wore 841 acres undt;r hops in 1902, as against 1,050 acrea 
last year. No account of the produce for the last suveii years was 
taken, but in 1895 the yield wan 7,506 cwt. In l!KX)'the total 

Quantity uaed by the breweries in the colony amounted to 5,020 cwt. 
if the land under hops in 1902, 740 acres were in the Waimea 
County, and 84 in Collingwood, both in the Provincial District of 
Nelson. The import of hops in 1901 aniountod to 9*27 cwt., and 
the exports to 4,946 cwt., of which 4,29y cwt. were the produce of 
the colony. 

Tobacco. 
The growing of tobacco does not progress in New Zealand. 
In 1889. 34 acres were being cultivated ; in 1890, 25 acres ; in 1891, 
16 acres ; in 1892, 6 acres ; in ISSS, 4 acres ; in 1894, 4 acres ; and 
ID 1895, 5 acres, producing 1.599 lb. of dried leaf. Statistics of thia 
crop have not been taken since 1895. 

Gardefu anri Orchards. 
The extent of land in garden was 17.G84 acres, of which 13,787 
Mtras were private gardens, and 3.897 acres market gardens. la 
tatioos of forest-treea there were 48,770 acres- 



^ 



AQKICULTUBK. 



386 



Thore were 26,294 acres in orchard in 1902, an incruase of 
1,039 acpos on the area so rolucned m the praviouB year, and 543 
acres were romriiBd a& "vineyard." The fruit-crop of the colony 
is suppJemunted by a oonsiderable import from the Australian 
States and Fiji. 

Sown Qrastts and Seeds. 

New Zealand in eusentially sullud for grazing purposes. 
Wherever there is light and moisture, Enghsh grasses thrive when 
the natural bush and fern are ckared off. In fact, the white clover 
gradually overcomes the fern ; and, from the niildneHS of the winter 
soaBon, there are few places where there is not »oine growth, even 
in thti coldest months of the year. In all parts of the colony slock 
live, although in varying condition, without other food than euch ae 
tliey can pick up. Sown grass land, as might be expected, hoade 
the Hat of cultivations. 
^L At the bef^inning of the year 1902 there were 11,620,178 actea 
^^nder artificial graanea. OF tfiBSC, 4,69S,200 acres had been pre- 
vioasly ploughed, presumably under grain or otiier orope, while 
6,924,978 acres had not lieeo ploughed. Much of tlie latter area 
was bush or forest land, sown down in grass after the timber had 

•been wholly or partially burnt off. 
The area under rvegra&s for seed in the Reason of 1002 was 
16,244 BcrcB, yielding '366,765 bushels of 20 lbs., or a rato of 21-97 
bushels p«T acre, against 23.270 acres and 476,418 bushels, aa 

rverage of 2044 bushels per acre, in 1901. 
In cocksfoot there were 27,876acre8, which yielded 4,481,3401b., 
or an average of 161 lb. per acre, against 36,758 acres and 6,401,764 lb. 
(a rate of 161 lb. per acre) ld the previous year. 
^L Seeds (or sowing pasture lauds are used much as in Groat 
^P-B^taio, the following being a common mixtui'o : Perennial ryegrass, 
33 lb. to 30 lb. per acre ; cocksfoot, 2 lb. ; alsike, 2 lb. ; timothy, 
3 lb. ; cowgrass, 2 lb. ; red clover, 2 lb. : white clover, 2 lb. , rape, 
1 lb. : total, 'A\) lb. to 44 lb. por acre. Pastures are renewed at 
.intervals of from four to ejght years, accoriliiig to the nature of the 
iiancl. 

The following ahows the acreage in sown grasses in .\ustralaaia 
1900-1901 :— 



Queensland .. 
Naw SDutb Wttlos 
Victoria 

SoDLt AuiitnlU 
Wostern Australia (19O0) 

Now ^nftlnnd .. 



Act**. 

24.898 
442,741 
307,896 

22,166 

2.590 

&U6.IH0 

ii.oai.yisi 



It will be observed that the acreage of land under sown grasses 
WM eleven tnues as groat in Now Zealand as in the whole of 



88fi NBW ZEALAND OVFIOUL TBAB-BOOS. 

Australia and Tasmania. When compared in ei^ with the States 
of Australia, New Zealand is not large — ahout one-thirtieth of 
their total area — but in respect of grazing capabilities the relative 
importance of this conntry is much greater. Australia is generally 
nnsnitable, owing to conditions of climate, for the growth of English 
grasses, and the amount of feed produced by the natural grasses 
throughout the year is very much less per acre than is obtained from 
the sown grass lands in New Zealand; indeed, it may be said that 
the average productiveness of grass-land is about nine times as 
great here as in Australia, or, in other words, that land in this 
colony covered with English grasses may be considered equal, for 
grazing purposes, to an area of Australian land about nine times as 
great. 

In addition to the artificially- sown pastures, the returns for 1902 
show that 22,830,627 acres of unimproved land, including that in 
tussock or native grass, belonged to the occupied holdings, and were 
available for stock-feeding by the sheep-farmers and cattle-farmers 
of the colony. 



SECrrON XX.— MINING. 

The niiturftl mineral resourcea of New Zealand are vyry yreat, 
anil havu exerciseid in the pitsi a iiiot^b important intlu^iKe on bhe- 
development ftml proijre&s of the colony Oold to tlie value of 
£59.109.683 was obtainBri prior to the 3lM December, 3901 ; ihe 
value of the produce for tiio veur 19t)l Kaving been Jei.7o3.i83. la 
the earliest years the goltl watt obbaiued from alluvial diggings, but 
at the present lime mucli is taken from goKI-bearing quartz, wUit^h 
is diatribiiced witlely through sevEirai parts of the colony, and ihuH- 
lliero iBaiiuiL;}! better prospect of tiie permanency of this iiuluHtry 
than ailuvial diggings alone could give. 

The yioltl of silver to the end of 1901 amounted to £380,8(16 in 
valiiH. thu quantity mined iu 1901 having been 571,134 oz.. valued at 
£66,2,78. 

Of otiier niim^rals, the value of the product to the Hatne date 
amounts to £l!>.5d0.275, of which kauri-guui yielded £10,77fi,9l6, 
and coal, with wke, £8.45B.3H0. 

The quiintitif^ii and valuon of precious metals and mioflraU- 
obtained dunng the year 1901, and the total value of all mining; 
produce sittce 1853. are: — 

IWI. ToMl V&luo ilnctt 1863. 

0&. E t 

Gold .. .. 4&5.501 1,7:>3.783 60.1SQ.4S3 

Silver , .. .. 671.131 65,258 880.806 



^ 
^ 


1.020.6113 


1, 


,919,041 


fi9.&4O,680 


K 


Twu. 








wn«-«r« 


8 




105 


18,086 


Obniav-or* 


. . 




■ * 


37,477 


Afltlmuny-uce 


SO 




IflO 


52,598 


Miiii|[iiTiiiiio-u«J . . 


-ioe 




6ti 


60,846 


Umuai Ui'dia .. 


• • 




.. 


396 


Uixed minerals .. 


.. 




7,r75 


110, b91 


Ooal . . 


1.227,638 




676,171 


8,4S9,&;6 


Sl<a e . . 


12.(){6 




6,U!i4 


0.021 


Cok« (oxpDrtfid) .. 


.. 




• t 


M,804 


KKuri-guin . > 


7,541 




446.114 


I0,77fi,!M5 




Zi 


.U55.98a 


£79.OIS0,964 



Of the gold enlered for exjiortation during the year Qudedl 
[^e 3l6l March, I<)02 — viz.. 439,005 0/.., representing a value oi 




388 



HKW ZBALAKD orPIClAL TBAR-BOOK. 



i 



£1,680,382 — about 60 per cent, came oat of quartz-mines; bat, 
if the total yield of gold obtained in the cclonv b^ taken, the 
value of wbieh to Sist Marcb, 1902. is £59.o3ti,562. about 35 per 
cent, caino from quartz - mines, and 76 per cent, from alluvial 
workings. 

MnntRAL Peoiwction (Valcb) of Adbthalabia to bsd or 1900. 
The votal value of uiiaerftl production for Australasia to tbe end 
of the year 1900 is shown iu the followiog table. The figures, 
except those for New Zealand, are uken from Mr. Coghlan'i 
" StatiHiice of tbo Six Slates of Australia and New ZeaLand," 
1900-1901 :— 



flfatoovOolotty. 






K«* B-th WalM 

Vl«tOtlB 

QuHualand ... 
E4i>nlli Aiumlto 
\^'«t'ii AinrUrmUa 

Tk^IIK[ll^.- ... 
S'a» Kvaland . .. 



S I 



Ts.mi 



4.SBB.U« 
BT.Wt.H» 



Od>]. 



I QUm* 

Htasnd*. 



TtotaL 



B.Mi.m 

a.0U.M9 



us.so as.ati.Mi 



B.SM 

atn.Ms 



s.an.TW 

IT.M) 



Aoattmluia lM3.UB.3ia M.vn.OBT si.aD9.on lS.a9Q.lUu.OI0.0U IS.au.TM 'jost.tm.x^ 



s.ifls.m9r.ais. 
ni.ur M.1' 
i.aco.iA s.ot, 

T.wr. 



T,om. 




* tnolwira of luATi^ttttn toth**«liMaf mUBMSL 

GOLO-HirilNQ. 

The history of the finding of gold in this colony was bnedy 
eketched in the Year-books for 189.1 and 1894. and need not, tber«- 
fore, be repeated here, bnt a word mar be said on recent develop- 
ments in mining. Great changes have taken place since the early 
days, when a man wanted but a pick and shovel, tin dish and 
cradle, to enable him to earn a livelihood on the diggings. The rich 
shallow gravels have been to all appearances worked out. the ground 
is getting deeper, the mroads of water more troublesome, and 
greatly-improved appliances are needed in order to pump tbo wowr 
or wash away the massee of drift that overlie the gold-bearing layers 
on the bottom. 

The difficulty for many year« experienced in working the beds of 
the larger rivers has been at last overcome by the use of dred^ng 
CDftcbinery. Dredgiufc has not only been adopted for working river- 
beds, but has also been applied with advantage to aliuvitu flate, 
which cannot be otherwise profitubly worked. The total nnmber 
of dredges at the end of the year 1^1 was: Working. 183: being 
built, 59; not working, 33; undergoing removal, 19; total, ih)4 

So Duxnerotis are rapid titreama and rivers m New ZvaJand 
that water is generally available for supplying direct motivo-power 
for all kind* m mining machinery, as well as for the generation and 
transmission of electric energ)* where the water-supply i» distant 



OOLD-UUitMQ. 



399 






trom the scene o( operations. It has beeu used at Skipper's tor 
years to generate eieclrioity by lueaas of dyoamoH, the curreut being 
transmitted a iJistance of several miles over a high range for the 

Eurpose of driving a crushiiig battery. Great iniproveinents have 
c>L'n made in the appliances since the method was first adopted. 
The total number of gold-miners oniployod in 1901 was 12,533 
as against 13,502 for iho previous year. In some places, more 
cspceiflJly in Otago. Nelson, and the West Coast, many of the 
miners do not depend entirely on mining, but employ a part of their 
cime in farming and other pursuits. 

tiajit year (1901) aii Act vma pasaad reducing the fee payable for 
a miner's right from lOs, to fis. 

The toEftl quantity of gold entered for export during the years 
ending Slst March. 1901, and Slat March, 1902, for the several 
districts, and the total quantity and vilue of the gold exported from 
the colony from the let January, 1857. to the Slst March, 1902. 
shouu hervundcr; bat this does uot uece6»arily include tliG 
bole of the gold produced, as no doubt much has beeu taken 
out of the oolooy from time to lime by people who have evaded 
the duty, and a good deal has been used for making jewellery and 
Tnaments : — 



Pablb aaowiMo the Quaktitv amu Valuk ov Gold khtriird roa Bxpobta- 
TIOK riWH Nkw Zkalaxd mn this Ykabm kmukij tkk 31st March, 1901 
ARD 1002, /Jlo TBB Total Qoabtitx aso Valds FaOM Jamdaby, 18fi7, TO 
31HT Mahch, 1902. 



DUMot. 



Teu* ending 

mn auxato. iwi. 



Qu&Q- 
U%f. 



Vkla*. 



T»»r tDdlna 

am Mu«ii, la 



Qnao- 



Vkloft. 



loorMMa 

(or 

Year •ndipg 

aiU MkNb, 



Totkl Quantltr tDd 
V«ltte Aoiii Juiukry, 
IWT. to aist UbTcli, 

180S, 



rAiickl*nd . . 
Wgllingtan.. 
Mn.rl borough 
Nolaou 

WMbOOMt.. 

C&oMrbury.. 
Ougo 



I 



ToMds 



On. 
10O,O4<J 

SIT 

6.126 

85.779 

3S 



"070 

I9.aa8 

843,T3d 
S4 



l35.7-'>a' 548,4 U 

I 

9M.97(! 1,516.482 



Oe 
a01,BAl 

377 

4.907 

104,441 

19 

12S/2UQ 

439,005 



7'2e,4'J8 

i'.109 

17,118 

41B,3^ 

71 

1,680,382 



Ox. 

"so 

- 919" 

i8,ce3 

3* 
-7.563* 



Os 

a.S&2,804 

188 

87,099 

267,802 

6,103,471 

123 



1C),BTS,46S 

706 

aS9,S96 

l,0&5.4Ba 

24.-2CS.lie 

468 



6,85a,G4:J 23.199,(180 



4&,Q2Q 1&,16»,1B9 



69,SS6.58S 



It will be seen from the above table that there was last year 
an increase in the yield of gold of -lG,0'29oz. on the figures for the 
preceding twelve months. 

Of the total quantity of gold entered for exportation last year 
Auckland contrilntted do-OS per cent. ; Marlborough, 0-07 per cent. ; 
Nelson, 0'9G per cent.; "West Coast, 23-79 per cent.; and Otago, 
29-20 per cent. 

S6-Y*iir.bo(.k 




HKW KBALAHD OmCIAt< YBAK-BOOR. 



Prod-action of Auatralasia. 

The gold yield of Australasia for 1897, 1898, 1899, and 1900. 
was as QDder : — 





uw. 


tan. 


IHW. 


IBOB. 




Ob. 


Ok. 


Ok. 


Os. 


QuMBslutd 


.. 796. &85 


920, CHS 


946,894 


963,189 


New South WftlM 


.. 2»2,21T 


810, 4»3 


496.196 


345,660 


Victoria 


.. 813,706 


887,367 


SH.SOO 


807,407 


Soutb AuaLrklin 


10,»22 


81,901 


B8,1SS 


24, raw. 


W«attni AattraUft 


.. dis.OdS 


1.060,184 


1.648,877 


1.580.950 


Tftunuitft .. 


60,786 


74.233 


88,9D9 


81, l» 


New Z^alaud 


.. Kil.US 


aso,i7s 


889.558 


878.616 




3,699,661 


8.aai,351 


■I, 438, 189 


4.176.098 



The increase for the period is l,276,872oz. The mint value of 
Australasian ^old averages £^ 166. per ounce, and a comparison of 
ralue 18 therefore OS follows: IHOT, £11.018.674 ; 1898. £13,430,d8S; 
1899. £16,864.9-27; 1900. £15,868.887: increane, 1897 to 1900, 
£1,850,213. 

The Cyanide Procesi 

On the Uauraki Ouldficlds ^old is often found either in so 
Gnoly diviiled a form timl the ordium y uiuLhods of amalganiatiou 
fail to recovBr a payablu purcuiitouu, or it io aesoeiated with, or 
entangled m. ba&e metallic uiinerGils which aecessilate the adop- 
tion of scientific, and often costly, nieihoils of treatment. In thew 
goldfinids the successful use of the cyanide process is Bteadflf 
extending, with ihe result that many ores tlial foniiE^rly were workc-d 
at a loHS by amalgamation processes now yield regular returns on 
the capita] invesiBd. 

Indeed, the cyanide process is the most noteworthy improve* 
ment as yet introiinced in the treatment of gold- and silver- hearing 
ores. It is particularly suitahle where the gold is found in the 
oro in tine partirlps; wherpas, if the gold be at alt coarse, cvanide 
►will do no more than cleanse and hrighten its surface and render it 
[fitter for amalgamation. In a paper on " Cyaniding in New Zea- 
land," Mr. James Park, F.G.6., comments nn the treatment of these 
ores: — 

Dry Cruitiittg. 

Prior lo the inbraduction ot iha cjanid* proces* (ho crci were treated b^ drv 
«ruahtng »nd hot pftit a.mftlgMDauoD with ctaemicala, fay vrhiob a reeovAry of a& 
per cent, v/iu ■(Tacled. 

Wben ofBDJd* i.r«»lni»nt ««• ^op^ted. dr^r OFtKhisg mAa naturally oontimitd 
ftt the dilStrsnt millE, tbo dry pu)v*ri>rd mairrial bdir^ chftrgrd into >bMllow m« 
and treated directly with cy^Dide. Prom 66 per <»T<t. by pan umaigKntAtion ibt 
naovTy rosa kt & boand to 66, nod in fmo Chutt to 00 pr cent., ani] the rMuIt» 
Wfl» so MtUafftotorj thai no larthrr im pro veto ant wm eoD>idcr«d possibie. 



J 



aOLD-UININQ. 

Id X lew y«ikn, lionever. it beoejoe kppftrenc that dr; oruBbinj; poRBesNcl 
m&ny diFadvnni&gca &e compitrod with vet crushiTiK, the principal onen being 
the COM at the pri>liininAr}- drying o( the oro. the low rluty of tiic stmiirii, and 
th« tarpe nunibar of vabu requtrra tor laaciiinK. In 1H9T mine-owiisi« began to 
turn itieir Aticntinn to w«t crunhing, aiid onfl by ono, ftinoe the besinnlng of 
1696, the diOerect mills have been adtipling wet ariialiing, uutil at the preaent 
Uin« dry oruahing it ibe exc«ption, and not, ae it vra^fimr ysars ago, the rul«. 



ITff Cruihing, 

I. For oral oantftlning ft large propcrrtion of free, euHy unalRftmabla gold, 
with a ci-rtatn proportion of fJns or "tloafgald, and eilv«r-Hiilphid», ibe mill 
praotioo is :— 

(a) Cninhintr with water. 

(6.) Platf uu)a.lga[cjatjun. 

|c ) SpiUluli* tipparalioD ol ssnds and ultmes. 

(cI.) Cyauidv IroBluicut of luida uvU Blimoi by ordinary parool ttion. 

A t}pioat piamplc a( an Are at thin cIkha i:> tnat of the Kauri Grild Riitate*, 
at Opilonuj, where e f(^rLv■•tamp niill in ei:eL-L»d. Tiie aands and heavy tlimoa 
are BDbjvcted to thp "double" oyanide treatnuoat; but it Is doubtfiiJ if tbe 
additional eaving will pay for tbo tstra labour iovolvad. 80 lar 00 provision 
has bern made for thft LrAntmnnt of thr fino iilinieB. It they are worta it, they 
will probably be treated by agitation and deu&uling~ 

n. For a olean ore, aluiu*t identical with that doooribed aboT«, but doq- 
taining a small proportion of free arnalg&mable gold and a large proportion of 
fine oynuiding gold, witb iictlo or no slimes, tbe metbod of treaiinaut at tha 
Crown Mines is : — 

(a.) Cruchingwjib oyanide solution. 

t(6.) Direct cyanide ireatni«rit of mixftd a&nda and ellmes by perealatlon. 
{C.j Plate aiimlKiMuaLioti of lr»« gold. 
With an ore exoepuoualiy frae from sLimea, it sBema that the order of 
aatment ooold be reversMl with advantage as rogardi both (tamp duty and 
fioienoy of amalgaitiabion en the plute*. 
III. For 0M8 ooTitainiiig somo easily amnljiatiiAble guld, and fine gold aaso* 
at«d with pyrites and idlver-Rii Iphideii, th« treatment ue«d ib: — 
{a.\ Crunhing with winter. 
i(.i Plate amalgADiation. 
ic.) Spitiivtu separation of fJnv sliinot, U aaceisary. 
Id.) Vannnr ooncontratlnn ot siilphurets. 
ts.) Cjantde treabmenl of sauds by pt-r£olation. 
[/.) Oyaoide treatment ol ssTids by ai[itation and deoantiog. 
(a.) Cyiknide traatmpDt of oonucntratoe by «KitatioD. 

The prantloe at the Woodstock niill is a typfoal example tyf this Kystom, th« 
datatU being a« rollnwN : The ore in ohaloedonio and fln«ly crymCallins quarts, 
eoaiaining a eaiAll proportion of olayey matter and a little pyrites. It in utained 
a greyirb- and blaokiHh-brown colour through the prosenoe of iron ajid man- 
ganeee 01 idea. 

IV. For verv slimy ores, oontaining very little easily nmolgamablo aoM and 
a large proportion of oxtremely floe gold, besideii the usual silvor aulphides. tha 
trc«tm«ni i* oa follfiwa : — 

in. I CruHbing witli cyanide solution. 
6.) Sjnt'tutU separation of aands and slimts, 
(e.) Treatment of Hands by percolation. 
U.) TroatRinnt nt sllmbH by agitation and decanting. 

This nivlhod of Iret^tinent is >ubJeot to various raodlfloaiions as regard* 
nwobanloal sppUanoes and methods of appUoation, but the general prinoiplcs 
are the same everywhere. 

By a stacuie passed in December, 1897. and termed " The 
ruide Pi-ocess Gold-extraction Act, 1837," an agroemeDt wok 




approred by Parliameat iiniler which the Government arrangad to 
^urebaso the patent rights tn New Zealaod of (he C&ssdl Gold- 
■QXtraciing Company, thus rendering the said patonc rights avulAble 
ior mining purposes at reasonable rat«8 of royalty. The proodM 
used under the patent is what is commonly known as the cyanide 
process, and the operation of the Act should prove highly important 
in the development of low-grade ores, and otherwise promote ;be 
mining indastry. The royalties received by the Governmoui up to 
theSIst March, 1902, amounted to £4.d77'lLs. Id. The payment 
of royalties will cease when the total amouul disbursed for the 
purchase of tbe patent rights bos been repaid to the Consolidated 
JPund. 

Quarts and Alluvial Working*. 

Tbe working of quartz mines and deep alluvial drifts necessitates 
a large outlay of money before returns can be expected, and can only 
be andertaken when capital is available. In the case of quartz 
mines, they must bo sumciently opened op to ascertain the valao 
and extent of the reefs preparatory to toe erection of redttccioD 
machinery, which must be constructed on the most modern prin- 
ciples to insure efliciuncy and economy iu the handling and treat- 
ment of large hodicis of ore. 

The introduction of capital has thci effect of cnabhng the 
claims not only to b« opened up at greater depths than heretofore. 
but they will also be worked in a more systematic and economical 
manner. Modem machinery and appliances are introduced aad 
erected for the reduction and treatment of the ores, and a Ear larger 
percentage of the gold is being recovered than has been the case 
iu tbe past. 

The improved appliances introduced in dredging and hydraoUe 
elevating and sluicing machinery have mofle it possible to work with 
profit alluvial ground and drifts thai a few yean a^ oould not be 
handled remuneratively. 

Ill the successful development of alluvial drifts containing only a 
few grams of gold to the ton or cubic yard, a large and constant 
supply of water is of primary importance, and to secure this the 
construction of expensive races must be undectaken as the initial 
step towards systematic working. 

In the colony there are large areas covered with auriferous drifts 
■which will prove remunerative if a sufficient quantity of water oao 
be obtained to work them on an extensive aoate; and the number 
of men who can be profitably employed in alluvial workings will 
oeoessarily be in proportion to the quantity of water available. 



Cau<-Muci>a. 
The extent of the coal • measures in New Zealand will make 
eoal-mining one of the large industries in the colony, especially 



^ 



COAL-lflNINO. 



393 



on the west coast of the MiJdle island, where bituniiaous coal exiftta 
equal, if itot superior, in quality to coal of the Bame cIass iu auy 
part of the world. 

The progressive increaee in the ontput of coaI from 1678 to the 
end of 1901 is ahown below : — 







5 i. 




= 35 '^ 




B«lMd Id tba Colon]'. 






Bxportwd 

(MClUdillB 

OMklloT 

Fti«l by 


a ©5 


ta^ii. 


Tw. 






tinportod. 


m^ 


^!lg 






Total. 


YMTlT 

InerMM. 






Oeea.a 


jm 






TOBI. 


Tou. 


Tom, Tom. 


Taut. 


Ton«. 


Ton*. 


1878 .. 


18a,9Lfi 


. , 


174,148 886,866 


8.921 


382,445 




vsn .. 


881,318 69.000 


158,076 969.394 


7,195 


882, 009 


49,65* 


laeo .. 


999.9*i8 08.705 


123,298 


423.221 


7,031 


416,200 


34.101 


van .. 


887,262! 37.389^ 


129,96*3 


467,224 


6,626 


460,596 


44,3{>8 


19tt .. 


878,2T!il 41,010 


120,582 


507,854 


4,S«5 


508,609 


4.^.011 


IHHK .. 


431,704; 48,403 


12;i,A40 


545. S04 


7,172 


688.132 


34.633 


ieS4 .. 


480,631 59,007 


UK, 444 629,275 


6,854 


622,921 


84.759 


leas .. 


511,0681 30,S8S 


130,202 G41,266 


9,871 


686,894 


15.978 


1886 .. 


594, !J5!) 2.1,390 


119,879 664,226 


2,863 


651,364 


12,470 


188T .. 


668, &:^ S4.!i67 


107.290 665.850 


19.961 


652,809 


I,5&5 


1888 .. 


613.6951 85.275 


101,341 


715,236 


27.678 


687,558 


34,669 


1869 .. 


586. 445 -27.450" 


128.063 


714.508 


39.290 


676,218 


12.340 


1890 .. 


637, a«7 m.m^ 


110,93'.) 


74fi,.'ia6 


38,404 


714,982 


30.714 


1891 .. 


669,794 91,397 


125. S13 


794,112 


29.093 


764.019 


49.087 


18fiS .. 


673.315; 4.523 


125.453 


798. 7G8 


28.169 


770,599 


8,.'>60 


IBM .. 


601, MBi 18,238 


117.441 


806.992 


24.236 


784,704 


14,105 


18H .. 


7!9,546l 27,938 


112,961 


832,507 


25,44y 


807,058 


22,354 


1895 .. 


726,654 


7,108 


108. 19S 


634,852 


26,151 


908.701 


1,648 


1808 .. 


7tKt,851 


66.197 


101.766 


8&4.607 


27,974 


866.63,1 


67,932 


1897 .. 


840,713 


47,8C9 


110.907 


951.630 


20,689 


924,981 


58,348 


1898 .. 


«07.O33 


66.320 


116.437 


1,022.460 


ia,.'Mfl 


1,004,112 


79.181 


1899 .. 


076.484 


68.201 


99. CSS 


1,074,889 


14,146 


1,060.748 


56.681 


1900 .. 


1.093,990 


118.756 


124,033 


1 218,023 


36,699 


1,181,324 


120.. 581 


1901 


1,SS7,638 


133.648 


149,764 


1.377.403 


77.668 


1.299.639 


118.515 




* DeoruAe. 

Il will be seen from the above that, with the exception of 
(there hits been a steady increase in the output of coal from 
miriee iu the colony, year after year, siitce records have been 
iept by the Miue« Department. The yearly increase in output is 
principally due to tho growmg demand for consumption within the 
colony. During a period of tweuty'lour years the auuaal consumption 
of coal in New Zealand ha^ incrunsed to the extent of 967,394 tons, 
gfaowiog that new industries are quickly springing up, requiring fuel 
for geQerating motive -power. 

The total output from the mine e laet year was 1,227.638 Cons, 

against 1,093.990 tons for 1900. an increase of 133,648 tona. 

e coal imported from other countnes was 149.764 tons, againBt 
124,033 tons in 1900. an increoBe in the importation lost year of 
35,731 tons. The importa wore 149,004 tons from New South Wales, 





KEW EBaIaAHD oppiciai. yb&b-book. 



758 toua frotu Queeasland, and 2 tons from the United Kiagdom. 
Tlie torni export of coal was 168,-148 tous. of which 159,6:13 tons 
wore coloniai produce, and 8.S05 tons iniiwrted cooi from other 
coaiitrieft. Of ibe coal exported. 90,835 tout) were for coaling direct 
steamers trading between the colony and the United Kingdom, ami 
bos been treated as cool consumed within the colony, these stoainais 
trading wholly between New Zealand and Great Britain. Talcing, 
therefore, the output from the mines and tho coal importod, there 
is a total of 1.377,402 tons, of which 7V,5fJ3 tons were exported. 
leaving the consumption witliin the colony last year 1,299,839 tons. 
as against 1,181,324 tona for 1900, an increased consumption of 
118.616 tons. 

The lar^^est increase in the output last year was iu the Weet- 
port district — namely, 74,911 tons, There wtts also an inureasod 
production from the mines m llie Otayo District of 23.109 tons, 
m the Southland district of 18,470 tons, m the Whangarei, Kamo. 
Ngunguru, and Wbauwhau district of 7.418 tons, in the Waikato 
district of 6,895 tons, in the West Wanganui district of 469 tons. 
in the Reofton district of 1.723 tons, itj the Malvern district of 1.936 
tons, in the Micanda district o( 430 tous, in the Moka.u district of 80 
Ions; but thera was a decline in the Groymouth district of 1.761 
tons, and in the Kawakawa and Kikurangi district of 4'2 tons. 

The quantitieB of coal protlucud in each district are aa 
under : — 



NuDo at Dlatrlot, 


OokpotpICoal, 


[noTMw or 
Dwrvan. 


AllllTOKlCDftM 

total Uucput of 

COttl up to tb« 

nut UecemlMr, 

IWI. 


UOl. 


HOD. 




T«nf. 


Tana. 


Tool. 


Tons. 


KftWAkaKft «ad Ilikumngi 


68,298 


68,340 


43 


1,189.8LS 


WhiuiHiirQi. KcLmo. Ngunguru, 








1 


and WliAUwIiftu 


88,757 


36,389 


+ T.418 


467, ai» 


Waikn.to 


81.066 


77,iai 


+ 6,805 


1,351,354 


Moltau 


3,S13 


9,438 


+ 80 


39.584 


Miranda 


430 


, . 


+ 4ao 


480 


Ptlomt . . .. .* 


. . 


. ■ 




TU 


WoBt WnngriBui 


3, SOS 


1.73a 


+ "400 


55,188 


WoAtport 


-156.057 


380,146 


+74,9il 


4,161,6B« 


Heeftan 


6,IO!i 


4.379 


+ 1,728 


90.S48 


Orejmoutb .. 


306,168 


207, H19 


- 1,701 


8,088.«8 


Malrern 


10.098 


14,102 


+ 1,980 


30».4S4 


TioMru 








10,667 


Otaea 


3K9.satl 


966 /iia 


+23, IM 


4,862,659 


Sondiland 


77,599 


69,189 


+ 18,470 


608,075 


Touli 


i,aa7,6a8 


l,O9a,9<J0 


+ 188,648 


15.780, soe 



Tbe following table, constructed from " liaboratory Reports of 
the Geological Survey" (Sir J. Hector) gives the cornpositiou of 
samples of New Zealand coals fresblv taken from the principal 
minea t — 






AaChnuito 
Bitumiiioiu 



Altered brown ooid 
Bitumiaoutt 
Ol&acfl coal 
Bituminous 

Pitcii codi 
Bituminaua 
Pitoh ooM 
Bitumiaoaf . ■ 



1 

3 
S 

4 

5 

6 

1 

S 

9 
lOj 
111 

13 

HI 
16 
16 
17 
18 
10 
20 
31 
32 

•i* 

35 Piujh ooal 
ae! Qlftnc« coal 

37 Pitch coikl 

38 BrowD ooal 



34| Pitch ooal 
S-V Brown ooftl 



Pitch coal 

BiovD ooal 



Aoheroii. Ounteibury . . 84-13 



Alt«r»d brown ooal 
Bltuminoufl 






Pitoh coal 



Hewo«Ml4.N.8.W. 



Coalbroakdalo 

Banbury 
MalvRrn HUlt 

R&katA Gorge 
Wall-end .. 
Grey Hitbc ,. 
Kawakawa , . 
ProMrvation Inlet 
Blackball, Gr«y Hirer 
MokihiQui .. 
Coalpit l{«&tti 
Mnkihiniii 
Bruitnur Min* ., 

Weatport 
Mokihinui .. 
Bcumiur .. . . 

Malvern Hilla 
WalU«nd .. 
OtaiuaLaara Cr«ek 
N«ai Oapo Farewell .. 
Kawakawa . , 
Wtiang&rel ., 
Kamo 

Malvnrn HilU 
Pcrnhilt 
Allandale .. 
Kaitangata . . 
Shag Point .. 
Homenunh ., 
Hikaran^i, Whangarai 
Uokouai 
Saiiangnta .. 
Nightcaps 
3ha« Point .. 
Spiittgil«ld . . 
Orepuki 
Kaitangata . , 
Shag Paint , . , , 

AUandaifl 
Orey Rivec . . 



7*-83 
70-00 



69-97 aS-TI 
68-54 l'>fl'J 

6401 21 27 



1% 

30 M 



62 87 

63 87 
61-16 
60-83 
60-20 
39-75 
88-81 



BI-64 
^'U 
26 00 

28 'DO 
29 97 
3214 

S8'9S 



5(1 f.j :i". t.w 
S(J-ji;i7 T-'i 
a6-Ol!:i717 
55-5d!3H-J«1 
54 16!S5Hfl 



SS-39 



53'l08ft-47 
92-B9 S6 Ofl 



51-87 
50- IS 
5011 
50 01 
49-99 
49-06 
4781 
4649 
4621 
44-92 



44 36 
4411 
4362 
49-10 
42 68 



92 04 



$8 72 
42'6S 
S8'0S 
87Cft 
»5'43 
86W 
84 26 
33- 4S 
82 6& 



44'fiO 47-0(1 



38 '33 
38-32 
33 CB 
30 OS 
33-66 



1-80 
1-lfl 
352 

O'OO 

4 ir. 

O'8-i 
0161 
1-66 
1 !Jy 
2'Jl 
4-33 
801 
897 
102 
;( '.US 
1 r.:i 

1 .'.0 
360 
3 l« 
250 

13 0.1 
I '41 

2 IS 
438 
4-18 
B-OI 
961 

11-79 
12-00 
1241 
14M 
16 03 



36 00 15-83 



61W 



4 1^-61 30 if, 
8e'S9!3^ iS. 

aS'Tfl 30 86 
|U-7341'4S 
l84-72ifi6-4S 



15 44 

18'33 
1562 
l6-6£ 
14-44 

17 50 
1322 



12-12 
S-51 

&'33 

3 33 
7 42 

4 41 
746 
8S3 
620 
834 
6-19 
1-82 
4 14 
1-19 
a- 18 
6-11 
4-.W 
4-22 
2'3!) 
7-4fl 
3-03 

10-02 
H'ii!) 
5'53 
S-OI 
3-30 

a-ea 

3-BO 
110 
6 02 
5-38 



10-98,18-60 
9-7(^16 46 
U' 10,15-40 
0Qm&-38 
a 27 i2-M 
8-5a 13-55 
8 3013 20 
8-l71S'82 

5 01 lB-32 
7 95 13 55 
7-9i:i2'Ba 
7a2'13 80 
7-76 n-80 
7 64' 13-96 
7-5012 75 
7 36112 46 
7'3C»12'36 
7-28 12' 30 
72(H2 2a 
7 04 11 91 
6-921150 
6-9011 68 
6-90, 11 -70 
6-31 11-60 
6-5011-80 

, 6'50| 11-75 

6 5011117 
6-491 10-90 
6 49110-99 

, C-l&10 9e 
C 04 10 32 



6-12 6'00|l0l6 



325 1 
S-Rl 



16-50 l-OO! 



2-13 

4-87 

10-M 

5-01 

6-66 

U-78 

20-16 

4-66 



Foa OoupABison. 
Beat .. .. 158-33|84-17 

Worxt .. .. |53-;i4 2ti-fl6 



G-2C 2-60 



1-83 5 671 
8-89 16 67; 



5-8» 
6-78 

S'75 
5-74. 
5,67 
5 Oil 
5 55 
5-54 

4'e7 

4-61 
4-51 

4'5V 



9' 67 
9-79 
9-77 

996 
969 
952 
938 
•938 
832 
7 85 
7-68 
7-63 



7-90 12-88 
6 9011 73 



■Tba •«non(l ooliirno h«ad»d "Evaporative Powar" U obtalnad b]> tbv ua* of a 
walllpl* eonipiiin.) (mm tho rMulli o( Piofowor LIvAniodgv-auparttniiDiiitiiMatliiteoali 
of Haw South W*1m. Tb* maltliil* tii»d tor lbt> t)r«t column in tti« oam whirli ti>a lotif 
bacD e<>nnTalJr tu«d lor eompatiiu tlia »Tai>ar*tlTO povor of coal*: but. to pravont any 
• uifa.fr Mini (irvjuillolal oomparlaoa <i( our ooali witti iLoipof Maw 8iiii(.)i Walt*, lb* •iwood 
'InmoutftiTan, 



^^MlMOD 



NBW KKALAHD OFFICIAL TBAK^BOOE. 



As regB.rdft the qaality of the coal, it cannot be surp&wed. The 

late Sir John Coode, in his presidential address to the Institute of 

Civil Kngineera. London, stated : " The bituinioouB coal found on the 

lurest coast of the Middle Island is declared by engioeers to be fultv 

[equal, if act superior, to ilic best description from any part of tlra 

tvotld." 

Tbo quantity of each class of coal produced In 1900 and 1901 
was:— 



1 PIa^ /if f^^T 


Od^qI or CoaL 


IluirauNL 


lalaJOMMtfll 
Ca*l ut> w lb* 
SIM DMAnbar, 




IMOl 


taoL 


HtBoUnout and Hint bltuminou' 

wwT 

Blown .. 

Ligaile 


t 
Toom, ToBi. 
673,863 754.958 . 
37,801 U.fiM i 

ti.sas as,949 , 


Tooa 
81,l>Jl 
33 230' 
6S.366 
10,411 


Took. 
8.70J,77T 
1.819.7n 
4.TM,(wa 


Totkl* 


l,0&3.9yO 1,237,63» ', 

'. 1 


13S,M8 


is.Tso.itm 



1 



* Dacnww. 



It hoB been computed that t« deliver coal at the pit-mouth costs 
in labour &». a ton. The number of persons employed in all the coal- 
tiuiK* last year was 2,7M. and the output of coal, 1,2127,638 tons : 
the average earning for each person would thus be £133 lis. 7d. per 
anDQin, or about £2 lis. oA. per week. 

StATB COAL-UIMBe. 

In 1901 an Act was passed by the General Assembly authoritiiig 
the acquisition and working of coal-mines for the benefit of the State. 
It is intended to u»e the coal so obtained for State requirements in 
the firnt place, but. should the supply exceed what is needed for this 
purpose, it will be lawful for the State to sell and deliver coal and 
other products in the same manner as a private mine-owner. 

InTCStigationa have been made in various parts of the West 
Coast coal-fielda to determine suitable sites. Two have been 
selected ; one in the Westport district, and the other in the locality 
of Gre\*motith. 

At the former, some prospecting has recently beer. carriMl out 
nndcr the dires^ion of the Inspectinn; Enj^neer (or Mines, and a 
seam of valuable coal, averaging over 14 ft. in thickness, Ims been 
proved over a considerable area. To win tliit^ coal no siakiuo of 
shafts wUl be required, but a large adit tunnel has been 8i!irieu in 
the side of a range of hills. The coat will be conveyeil fmm the 
inni^r end of this tunnel to the bins adjoining the SedrtoDville 
Rail way 'Hlation by an endless rope tramway capable of dealing with 
500 tontu in eight hours wli>i!i] working ut its nonnal spee^l. 





Be>'OQd some preliminary surveys aixi prospecting, no active 
work bae yet been done at the latter place : but it ia expected thai 
operatioDs will shortly be comuieDced. to develop the properly on a 
couipretiensive scale. 

Ouj Shalb. 
The mine and works of the New Zealand Coal and Oil Com- 
pany (Limited), at Orepuki, have reached a productive stage. During 
1901 the mine produced 10,662 tons of coal and 12.048 tons of aliale. 
The works are tilted up with retorts, stills, purifiers, extractors, kc, 
for the wiADufaclure of various grades oi burmng aod lubricatinR 
oils, paraflJQ wax. sulphate of auimouia, ^■ 

OtHEB MbTALB or MtKBlULS. 

Very little has been done in lh« colony to prospect and develop 
mines other than for noId and Bilvor, The only exports last year of 
tnet&llifuroug products, excluding gold and silver, were 208 tons 
of manganii&e-ore, 143 tons of Bulpbur, and sinati parcels of 
other uiiuerals, representing &a aggregate vaJue of £8,G30. 

Kauri-oum. 

The quautity of kauri-guiu exported last year was T.ii^l tmm, 
as against 10,159 tons for 1900. Last year's produce (£440.111) 
gave an avera^^ value of about £59 Sb. Sd. per ton, while for 1900 
the average was £61 59. 2d. per ton. 



W XXI.— ACCUMULATION: PRICES AND WAQW. 

Bakks of Issdb. 

In DooBinWr, 1901. five banks of iasue were Aoing business is 
Now ZmUiuuI, tho Bank of New ZeaUntl and the ColoDiaJ Bank 
hvill£iuntil);iuniun() in 1896. Two of the five hanks, the Biuikof 
tw SMlttixi ftixl l)ie NationiU Bank of N«v« Zealand (Limited), 
wholly New Seaiaad infititulioas. with a paid-up capital ol 
).000. besidM which the Bank of New Zealaud has £2.000.000 
of 4 pcir cent, stock guaranteed bv the Goremment of the coloay. 
"" total vnn^ liatulities of alt Bre banks for the year 1901 in 
2l of New Zealand transaetiona were £17.190.035, and the 
tmmtt £18.4^3.374. Tbe ararage amount on deposit daring 
' w«0 £16,034,^48. of which sum £813.730 belonged u> the 
OoTOmmenl. Bxoloding tboae belonging to Owrerament. 
to lh« valtte ct £8>fl97,79S wem beanng intenu. and 
1^333 M eall. The valae of Iha Botes in eimriatioa ol tbeee 
was Cl.a$l,3&&. 
TtM d«t«lapBMBK of bwakinc m New Zealand ainee (be rear 1BS7 
s bvMi TMTT gnU- Takioft kit each vear the avcn^ ol the four 
Tvium* tnvle hv ti>« hanks d tasoe, the figms for 1S57. 
1$S0, liiW. 190O. and 1901 are — 



VM» 



l«t 






MH-a 




itel«Hft) 



»». 




BANKS OF IBSUC. 



The (oUowing figuroa, which are taken from tho pubUshed 
returoa for the Daoember quarter of each year, sliow that the value 
of the coin and biiUion heU by &11 the baaks ol issue doing 
business in New Zealand ro»e steadily from 1891 to 1895. in which 
year the value stood at £3.333.273. Since th&t dale the value 
gradually decreased year by year to £2,63tj,177 in December 
quarter, 1899, but rose anain to £2,80:^,233 ia December. 1900, aad 
further to £3.003,813 in beccmber, 1901 :— 



* 



P 



Qnutw 




Gold and Kill ar 


Taul Coin 


endnt 


Oola. 


In 


Mad 


31HD«oaiDbar. 




Bullton or liArn. 


liuUlftD. 




£ 


£ 


£ 


1890 


9;<SI.»80 


10',t.059 


9.591.189 


len 


9. 931. MS 


lW.S4fl 


3.367,SSS 


laas 


2, am. 919 


141, «0G 


2.ftliJ.7a5 


1893 


s,iao,4s^ 


121,496 


2.001.949 


18H 


S,I03,SS3 


118.131 


3.221.476 


189& 


3,190,989 


las.saa 


3.833.37S 


1S9G .. 


8,171,702 


1^3,901 


3,994.608 


1897 


2, ma, I S3 


107,CS5 


2,!)fiG.BI8 


1899 


3,62S.8d6 


126,34'^ 


3, 703. 343 


1S99 


S.All.lUj 


1S6.07S 


9.6$6.177 


laoo 


a,668,:207 


144.095 


2.803.2!12 


1901 .. 


3,931.268 


U9,fi75 


3,068,649 



The figures shown "for each quarter of the year 1901 are : — 



M&rch quarter, 1901 

&ept«mbei: 
December 



Coin, 
I 
S.7ft3.90B 
3,66S,44S 
8,887.680 
3.931, 9«8 



HiiUion. 

a 

183. 1C9 
ldO,700 

149, B36 
142,075 



In 188& the nverage amount of advances made by the banks was 
£16,8^3,420, equal tu £27*23 pur head >^f the meau pupulatiou. 
The adv(i.UL'>;s t^rudually ducliiiud iu uniouiil aud proportiuu :u popu- 
latioa until 1891, when thuy were in value £11,5^9.146. ur £1831 
per head. l>uniig the vears 1802 and 1893, Imwever. there was 
a rise, but m 1S9-I a fall to £12,031,537 (£17-71 per head), and 
in 1897 to £10.892.111. or £1509 per head, whi=h is the lowest 
average since tlie year 1M72. In 1898 an increase bolh m the 
average amount of advances and nt the rate per head of population 
(£11.387.321 and £15-47 reapeetivoly) was obaorved ; in 1899 thoro 
was a furtht-r iiiereaae to £U.80G.839, or £15-71 per head ; in 1900 
to £12.084.74'!, or £15-83 per h^ad : and in 1901 to £i;ilO6,909. 
or £1685 per head. The discounts in 1901 amounted to £1.89(i,869, 
or £9-44 per head of mftan population. The largest amount of 
discounts in any year was £6.0f»l,969 in 1879. a rate of £13'53 per 
head. From 1879 there was a fall year by year until 1896, wheu 





400 



HBW ZBALAlfO OmUlAb TKAR-BOOE. 



ibe Bom was £1.756.791, or £2 49 p«r head. In 1897 they totetM 
£1.766.845, but. with a comparativelv larger popalaUon. the rate 
per head was only £2-45. In 1898 the anioont fell to £1,719.715, 
■and the rate per head to £234. In 1899 there was • farther 
nfleoline in the amount to £l,()d2,'20t, and in th« rate per head to 
£3*36; bat in 1900 a rise to £1,730,809. or £2 27 p»r head, kod is 
1901 to £1,896,869, the rat« being £2 44 per head. 

The deposit*, as stated in the retarns (or the March qoKiten 
ol the yeapt 1903 and 1901, were :— 



D«poAiU not bvftring !□(«»«(. Muvb qnsner, 190fi 
• . . Uatoli qoartcr. 1901 



S 
T.WT.tei 
6.SSB,Sn> 



An inemwe of .. .. nST.TVt 

the amount held at call. The fixed deposits ahow a similar mov** 



It, but of leaser magnitude :- 

Dsporita btarJQg intereu, Uarob quarter, t8(M 
• , March quaner. 1901 



C 
6,StS.«8» 
S.I9G.S51 



Ao incrMM of £133.086 

Besides the above, the Gorerumeiit had with the Bank of New 

id £1,255.294 ou deposit in March. 1903, as against £770.504 
In March. 1901. 

^fwcwl Scniuty Ltfitiation. 

An Act WM paaMd in 1898 mtitnled ** Tb» Bftnks umI Baikacs Act Aumb^ 

It Act." ooMi which, DotwitibsUndiiia uiftbing in p wnoo » IcffialatMO. 

fib* ■banbeUtats or pcmiivton ol aay bani ta^y. fiom tim» to tims, of extra- 

nsolotlaQ. aotaoriM its «apial to b* tocruMd to soob an ameoat and 

I BMh tsma M are deencd hv Ihem to be «xp«di«Bt. Th* bolden el shares 

tm ek ioeraaMd onfitnl may m gmntw) vpaeial ptiTJ l iyt nolwithslaDdi^ 

■iasd in lbs ahatsv o( tbo banh. 
Aaj iaonaad eafital asf bs taissJ hf ths issaa el &«« shans of sncb 
MBl ss b iitwsalaei oa by aatraorffiaaTT ressMiM «< tbe ibanboJiters or 
pniton. 

Tbe Baafc-«o«e Imam Act ol tba mids yew fiewUH Ibat aoMa Eseoo4 ot 
shsalatad ia ibe solaar by any Uak shall, te lbs iMnnnlal tbe aethorissd iwae. 
bs a ta« cba»« en sfl dM anots and HOMrty ffacbrtiag Ibo jmid-np e»ptUl. 
■sisMii eapital.aBd iiihm load— " Bwdlasc A««. UM**) ol mob bank, and 
ItlMl «bs asiss aban ba n^rabte ia foU ealy at lbs OSes ol tbs bant ai lbs plaeo 
al iisas el tba aaU aoMs. 

Ybs asMis sad mv^tj of > buil ua deiasd ■• a««ta lor tbs p^OMnt 
«l 4«bti « other oeHgat'''ai coninctfd or sa t wsd apon or dao and payable 
Satbeeofaay. 

Tbs sAbor ilsain (I^ot II.) oi ih* mubo Acs ««e on^aaUr |MMsd lor twetTe 
■seahsflaty, battbii>ofM»tk«i«aa«iloMkMlm ia»S loe sttotbet Bw tl w roontb* 
[~iia,tiUSif4MAer. tW. Ais»aidsd ^ wbi n aia t saact — ts, theymn w 
iMIsws: Ths Ooosraor aay dscbus by riiiiiliBillini tiM aesss ol any bank 
•o be a legal tmift c4 Miasi la the aaaaai tbcesia axMctsed to 
|beMaU«. TW fsrtrf el tk^ im »a bo faslStd by lbs PierisMttnn. aad no 
I wwib ri nehaii l Mis ii in hi aiidi s e k w lbs fl n r i sa n r Ja fl i sa rii is wlaflsil Our. 
■ as > nana tbshysk sni its erodliors. hi ssssw m lbs ssls^y wKitti im MahUittM 
f ki tbe «elc«y. Tbe beak ma«laitbtea» all sacbaoSMtaaBHea seesMrtalkn, 
(•MMMylvettbellaM Mwllsa. at lbs e«w ol the baak at lb> pfae* af fame 



SPECIAL BANKING LBQISLAT[ON. 



» 



JlCMiy lime wlthia biz monthe nfter tba p«rl«d Limited by th« ProalamBtioo, 
ttie Colonl&l Treoaiiror, on b^ing SAtiBflod thu a bivok-noca covorcd by the 
ProclftmatioD bos boan presented &nd not paid, ih&li p\y Iha Mina m gold 
to ftny 6ona /U* huld«T. 

On th« 39(li JuQ«, 1394. the GolaninL TcAMurer lntroduo»d in the Hoiua of 
BeprMoatatives tliree Bills cslfttiiibi to b^Dking, wbiob were tboroupoti paaaod 
cbcough all stogci nn(] bccAmn Invr torthwitb. 

ThA mo*t imporiiLDt □( bboBo, latitulod " A.n Aet to KuarADteo out o( tha 
Ooiuutldnled Fuiia & Spooi&I lasuo oi 6hAr<ui by thn HAnk of Now KcAloDd to the 
Amooat ul Two Milhon I'oundii Sterling," pruvide-ij (ur Ihe miroAwof lb« capital 
by tlw inuo ol HhiueM' ta Ku ftinouiit noi exceeJiug two million p<iiiii<I» tturling. 
In goMttateeci sbftrea of tea pounds each, wiLhoui furbbar liability. Tbess aliaraB 
are praferautial in Tospoct of both oapiUvl and dividend, and the lability of the 
botdera of ordinnrv xharoB ia bo »euuri! paymunt ul thn f|<iar«nbeBd nbaieK and 
the dividonds thoraou. The direutom aao refa«e to regislur the transfer ol 
ordinary tharcB. Tha naartuitced sho-ras ara to be called in at tlio end of 
tea year*, and canceliod on payment of tho Drinoipiil sum with accrued 
dirideud. The rnts of dividend on prdfarantial Kharoit in not to eioaed 4 per 
oont. per annutiL, and is to be paid by the bank. The guaranieod or pn- 
foreatial Jibata* and dividenda thereon are to bo a charge upon and. In caw 
of detauJc by tb« bank, payable out of the Gon«olidivtod Fund of the colony; 
but if at anv itme any tnonoy xball be payable under tha gaiirun too, tha oseetB 
and property of the bank are to be Mecurity lor the repayment of inoDey so 
advanoocl; if the money be not tu paid, the Colonial Troaaiirei moiy appoint a 
Receiver. 

Ono>half of the nam of twu million poundji authonned by the Act to be 
misid in to bo at Iho diapoftal u( the bauk for uie in it* ordinary busineMS, and 
(bo remainder iu to be iavesled ae tha Colonial TroMurer may approve, or m 
may be apocially providod by law. Until the guarantood Bliarea are oalled is 
and oancelled, do divii-l-und in to be nnid to ordinary xharoholrlara without the 
CoDWal of the Coluuiat Tioaiurut. wfio in eiiipuw«r«d tu autisfy liiui><alf that ftoy 
propoMid dividend will not unduly aJlIect the aeauiity of the colony in ronpootof tbo 
guarantee. 

By sODtion 5 of the .^ot, the Ooldnial Treasurer might require tho directon 
to 0^1 up £500,000, belug oue-third o( the reserre oapital, within twelve mootlu, 
aud thie has aouordiugly beeu done. 

As provideii by the Act, tba head oRBee of tha bank wae retDovud to 
WoUinKlun, and a uew Board of direotoni elected. The Oo'.'onior ta OounoU 
o-ppointed a I^reaident [o,l}icB tince ab<tlKhed untUr Act of 1898, set post), 
and an Auditor of the busincis outnide the L'nitod Klogdom. An Aiidiloi 
of the buBtneM within the United Kingiom woa Appointed by the A|]vat- 
Qsneral. 

The ihares bold ia the Dank of New Zealand Esiatee Company (Lindted) bj 
the bank are, pending Uia oampletioQ of liquidation, to be treat&d in valuing as 
ftt par. 

" The Bank SliareliolderB Act, 181)1," provided that the dirootoie of any bank 
may dncliae to lagisler any transfer of shares upon which tliere i« any liabilitv 
made bv a shamholder to any porwan of whoco rnKpoiim lit lily tbey niiy not be 
aatlifloJ. "The Bank Diroctors and Sliarea Transfer Act, 1S04," gave authority 
to direotora to refnie approval, without aaaigning reuonii, to any iransfar of 
share* on which theio is liability. It limited the number of diteotore to not 
|a» than l^ve or mure than Bovon. (.Soe subiiaquant legitlatiou In IH'JS a« to 
dlseotory.) C* 

* Br further Atneadnieut AOI tbecs ibares were to be tsaoed Ln the Innu nX uiHCOtiable 
•took enrtillcataaor w>.rTatitii U- boaini. r>t auch amount* hs clis ilirHutur* iiiay Jdtarmine. 
The eertinoalM wiCL warrants or oouvodb are triiiiefi<r«ble hy dellrorv. rh« holdurs at 
•took cartlAcaiaa or wanaitta [iiB.y axch&iigD tticura tor r«)jl8tt<iw1 Ntoitk, trbioh la mulo 
transferable In bul-1i ampunu ae directors may sunoLlon. SliAres or Mock may bn lieli] 
by any parson witbont limit a* to anuibar. ftoiMmA thai th* toMl vnliio does uo\ eiceed 
two wtlllone BMiUna. 




XXW ZKAL^KD OPFlCtAI. nUB-MX»K. 



' Tms Bjunt or Nsw Zbalavs un> Bixixao Aer, ISK.* Asm m 



T T^ Ad 



Aitnnaairr Aci. 
IWi jUt »M p— tJ oath* llhot S^umbWt, 189& It atoriacd Cor «ritia( 

I litMirtea Ml £«ao.«)0| 9( tike fint oaU of S 6& fid. on Um iiiwii 
t7 W BO par akmn. 
X Hns flf jMflOjPOO (Mv cspUl wu raiatd bjr pt tli wi ftawM, >m1 wrm^ 
^Ad Ifaa Mbvr » «>abM>fv for Oo««aiiB«M ■■ wauli» . "Ikm pffctirf ikani 
1 u 1) per amt. TIm bkok vm flaai lk« rifht to ifW l ^J* at ptr 
wUMiB id! Trail fmxt* l*k»a Ad'UiMce (4). Pnitker sImtc capilal oaa ii— iti 
ly » ■■■o»a — U «< a— .tbiid ot tJw n»tm% IwOwbly (£3 (k. 8d. pw •iMral ia lw> 
. tbi CmJ thifd lo bt sftltod vp at aor tiam aim tb* ll«t Dib— hf. 
MB at «•• ntlUMi poandt, nqati«d bjr tfc« Skan GaaantM Am 
UM ta ha laitaiaJ a* tb« (Jol<wtoI TroaMucr mi^ af f aia. aaa lakaaad 
r Wiplnyiat b^ tlM bank in iu ofdiaaty boifaaw li «aa pwiidai MM 
I al a^ dincHB ol tba iMnk au w ba appoistad by iIm Oovanor. aod oea 
[ lk» iMa difacMca lo urMgn to maka way for Uw OoawomMU appdtolaa. pi* 
I lUitlatooa ki 1608 aa to dinetocr.) 
Aa Awata RaaBairtoa Board m MtaUtobad to porefaut all tlw aaavta of !)>• 
alai C o f aa y , asd «( tb« Aocfclaix) Acrieoltiiml Cooipaay, tor tba >ao 
Am.tOi. baJBC lh» aMrtnaMd value of the propeniM on ihe 31st of 
IMC ^*>i e t, iMwavar. to aa adjoatmeol of ttatioB aoeouota, tlw par- 
la ba paid in dibMitiaw tanwd by tbe A<wt« Board, having a nlaa 
I* c arr aoey aoa baatiiif taivrcat al 3) par e«Dt. per annam (rem tba SlM 
' , UBS, aay daAsteney to be goaraBleed by the Oovcmaicat aa a ohaigB 
■ tha Coaaolrfalod Fond of tha colony. 

Pfo»i ai oD ia Btada for Mcuring tba OoTamineat agataM loaa on aoeouni of 

I Aia fttaraotaa. aad tha Colooial TreaMuar may, in th« aTeot of any daBeieooy, 

[appomt a Beeutcr in reapeat ol tba seeantiM «itb tba pawns of a liqaidalor 

' i hf tba Sapran* Coart. Tba AoaU Baali«atioti Board U a body 

w, ec qMUiin ot ifaiaa Dombar*, two appoinMd by (ba Qovamoc aoj oim 

I fey tha diraeion of tfaa bank. 

gtaHen 8 at "Tha Baakiag Act. 189t."ii w paalad. and powgr h gi-nn to tba 

''Bask of Nav Zealand to pordMM tb* boiinaw and aaaatt of aoy ethor back 

dotal liiwimai in tba eoloay. exoaptacg Ba«b aaaali aa are found to be bad. doabl- 

M, or valnalaM. Any uieb porehaaa » eao^ltional tm latifloacion by tba abaia- 

I ol the •tiHag Wak aM tb« apptoval ol Parttamant. [TV bunnm of 

■ Cohmict Bmtk mT l«na Jtaaland bof tiae* Sara f t u tk am d mdar tJu amharitif 

Ifiaaa, fAa ooa fr o cf ba^ ^ymaJ aadirr lAa Amf»dmfnt Acl of ISSa, Mofwa J, 

^mmd latWfOWlp nutffad % tJu ilmnhaUUn of (W utbmg bmnk ] 

8o hng ai tbe oolooy ramaiaa ia aay tDMrarc liabta under tfaa Aet. or tba 
I Oaarantoe Act of 1894. the Bmenacon al ibe bank may sot take aoy nepa 
■ada wtediog ap oa dtaaolving ika sank. 

Ha Ajacu Board are lodmw ap a halaaea ibaet erery etx moaihe. and Uy 
■IMII bafota Pkrllamenl. 



" Tbb B«xx or Nxir Zbauuid uit> Baxkom Act, ISSft." 

Ooaaeqaaat on tba report of a Committee ol tfaa Uooaa ol RapraMntativee 
UBotetad to make iDqairie* reepeotiac tfa* aflaiia e( ib« Bank of New Zealaad, 
l*Mkata wM pMMed tn 1S96 baanay te abova tMa. 

It provide* for a Board of DireoMra oaadrthif ol atx paraone, instead ot Ave. 
' ahoai lour are appoioted fay the Ooveraoe in CoonotI and two alectod by tbe 
' Amiabeldere of tbe bank. 

,' Tbe office ol Praaident M aboliiheJ. with tie power ol velo : wblle the old 
MNietitatton el tha Hoaid, oadar whteb tbe Praetdeat and one director only ewre 
appoinud by ibt Ooveraor in Ooonell, and three bj tba Anrabeldata givee way 
to tba new one. 




Ot